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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hazards Associated with the Use of Bone Ash in Contact with Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bone ash itself is non-toxic and environmentally benign. However recent evidence indicates that bone ash can be reduced upon contact with aluminum alloys to ...

2

FGF-23 in bone biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 REVIEW FGF-23 in bone biology Katherine Wesseling-Perryin impairments in bone biology. Although the defectiveof the protein on bone biology, a growing compendium of data

Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Biodegradable synthetic bone composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Osteoporotic-like effects of cadmium on bone mineral density and content in aged ovariectomized beagles  

SciTech Connect

Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of ovariectomy in conjunction with cadmium (Cd) exposure on bone. Aged female beagles with {sup 45}Ca-labeled skeletons ovariectomized and exposed to Cd. Successive vertebral scans by dual photon absorptiometry monitored changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in each dog with time. Results showed that ovariectomy or Cd exposure alone caused significant decreases in BMD; ovariectomy with Cd exposure caused the greatest decrease. Ovariectomy alone did not decrease BMD in the distal end or mid-shaft of the tibia while BMD of the distal tibia decreased significantly due to Cd exposure alone. Combination treatment resulted in significant decreases in BMD of both tibial regions. At necropsy, tibiae, humeri, lumbar vertebrae and ribs were obtained for biochemical analysis. No group-to-group differences in bone weights (wet, dry, ash), in ash/dry ratios, or in long bone and vertebral Ca/dry or Ca/ash ratios were observed. Significantly higher total {sup 45}Ca content and {sup 45}Ca/dry and {sup 45}Ca/ash ratios were observed in long bones and vertebrae of OV- and OV+ groups. In contrast, intact ribs showed significantly decreased Ca/dry and Ca/ash ratios compared to the SO-group. Quartered ribs demonstrated regional responses to specific treatment; decreases in total Ca content were greatest in the mid-rib region ({minus}36 to {minus}46%). Results suggest that in the aged female beagle, bone mineral loss associated with estrogen depletion is not only related to bone type (trabecular versus cortical) but also to bone Ca pools. Our results also suggest that a regional heterogeneity of bone plays a role in responsiveness to ovariectomy and Cd exposure. These aspects suggest that Cd is an exogenous factor affecting bone mineral loss independently of estrogen depletion. However, estrogen depletion primes bone for responsiveness to Cd-induced bone mineral loss.

Sacco-Gibson, N.; Abrams, J.; Chaudhry, S.; Hurst, D.; Peterson, D.; Bhattacharyya, M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic...

8

Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

6Bone Backbone Routing Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 6Bone is an Ipv6 testbed to assist in the evolution and deployment of IPv6. Because of this, it is important that the core backbone of the IPv6 network maintain stability, and that all operators have a common set of rules and guidelines by which ...

R. Rockell; R. Fink

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Effects of Obesity on Murine Cortical Bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34, 376 (2004). S. S. Ionova-Martin, et al. , Bone 46, 217 (Cortical Bone by Sophi Martin A dissertation submitted inMurine Cortical Bone by Sophi Martin ABSTRACT The Effects of

Martin, Sophi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

13

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

14

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

15

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

16

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

17

Microdamage accumulation in bovine trabecular bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When bone is loaded beyond its failure point, it develops damage in the form of microcracks. Normally, microcracks are repaired by the remodeling process, limiting the number of in vivo microcracks. However, if the rate ...

Moore, Tara L. Arthur (Tara Lee Arthur), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Effects of glucocorticoid treatment on bone strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

gene results in the autosomal dominant high-bone-mass trait. Am. J Hum Genet 70:11–19. 33. Dubrow SA, Hruby PM, Akhter MP (2007) Gender specific LRP5.

19

Fracture, aging and disease in bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. O. Ritchie: Effect of aging on the toughness of humanof microstructure in the aging-related deterioration of thestudy of the effect of aging on human cortical bone J.

Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cellular and molecular immunotherapeutics derived from the bone marrow stroma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bone marrow contains a multipotent stromal cell, commonly referred to as a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). There has been recent interest in the clinical use of MSCs for cell-based therapy because: (1) bone marrow aspiration ...

Parekkadan, Biju

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal ... Keywords: Bone, biodegradable polymers, biomaterials, cell therapy, fracture repair, orthopaedics, tissue engineering

Glenn Dickson; Fraser Buchanan; David Marsh; Eileen Harkin-Jones; Uel Little; Mervyn McCaigue

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Celebrating Black History Month with DOE's Sheri Bone | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with DOE's Sheri Bone with DOE's Sheri Bone Celebrating Black History Month with DOE's Sheri Bone February 9, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis Sheri Bone. | File photo. Sheri Bone. | File photo. Ebony Meeks Former Assistant Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs Throughout the month of February, we're introducing some remarkable African Americans who are working to advance the President's clean energy agenda and help the Department of Energy achieve its mission. This week we're profiling Sheri Bone who is Senior Project Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Integration, National Nuclear Security Administration. Sheri Bone Question: What is your key responsibility? SB: I'm responsible for developing the Department of Energy's strategic plan for nuclear materials. This means directing and leading a team of

23

Bone scanning in the detection of occult fractures  

SciTech Connect

The potential role of bone scanning in the early detection of occult fractures following acute trauma was investigated. Technetium 99m pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained in patients with major clinical findings and negative or equivocal roentgenograms following trauma. Bone scanning facilitated the prompt diagnosis of occult fractures in the hip, knee, wrist, ribs and costochondral junctions, sternum, vertebrae, sacrum, and coccyx. Several illustrative cases are presented. Roentgenographic confirmation occurred following a delay of days to weeks and, in some instances, the roentgenographic findings were subtle and could be easily overlooked. This study demonstrates bone scanning to be invaluable and definitive in the prompt detection of occult fractures.

Batillas, J.; Vasilas, A.; Pizzi, W.F.; Gokcebay, T.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

On nano size structures for enhanced bone formation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Purpose The general aim of the present thesis was to investigate early bone response to titanium implants modified with nano size structures. Therefore, 1. a… (more)

Meirelles, Luiz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Directed Bone Regeneration to Prevent Fatigue Failure of  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... given for OC-Implants used as artifical bone grafts. Results include macro radiographs, CAT scans, and microscpic and SEM evaluation of recovered sections.

26

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

above a micron, toughening mechanisms can be markedly changed. Cortical bones' resistance to fracture in the transverse (breaking) orientation can be associated with...

27

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

28

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

29

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

30

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

31

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

32

Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy  

SciTech Connect

Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

Porter, Daniel S. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Pienkowski, David [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Faugere, Marie-Claude [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center; Malluche, Hartmut H. [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Relation between hydrogen isotopic ratios of bone collagen and rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen isotopic value ([delta]D) of deer bone collagen is related to both [delta]D of rain during the growing season and growing season relative humidity (RH). With correction for the effects of RH, bone [delta]D is related to growing season rain [delta]D in a simple manner with a slope of 1.0. This indicates that, with RH correction, there are no additional sources of bias in the [delta]D of bone due to unaccounted for biologic or climatic effects. Due to a low sensitivity of bone [delta]D to RH effects, both yearly and growing season rain [delta]D can be estimated with considerable accuracy (R = 0.97 and R = 0.96) from bone collagen [delta]D and [delta][sup 15]N. Here, [delta][sup 15]N is used to correct bone [delta]D for the effects of RH. From these estimates of rain [delta]D, it may then be possible to evaluate temperature since the [delta]D of rain primarily reflects local temperature. Therefore, the measurement of bone collagen [delta]D has good potential for evaluating paleoclimates.

Cormie, A.B.; Schwarcz, H.P. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)); Gray, J. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

On the mechanistic origins of toughness in bone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most intriguing protein materials found in Nature is bone, a material composed out of assemblies of tropocollagen molecules and tiny hydroxyapatite mineral crystals, forming an extremely tough, yet lightweight, adaptive and multi-functional material. Bone has evolved to provide structural support to organisms, and therefore, its mechanical properties are of great physiological relevance. In this article, we review the structure and properties of bone, focusing on mechanical deformation and fracture behavior from the perspective of the multi-dimensional hierarchical nature of its structure. In fact, bone derives its resistance to fracture with a multitude of deformation and toughening mechanisms at many of these size-scales, ranging from the nanoscale structure of its protein molecules to its macroscopic physiological scale.

Launey, Maximilien E.; Buehler, Markus J.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Resection followed by vascularized bone autograft in patients with possible recurrence of malignant bone tumors after conservative treatment  

SciTech Connect

In conservative treatment of malignant bone tumors, assessment of the local condition is difficult. The radiological changes seen in the irradiated tumor and the frequent occurrence of pathological fractures at this site may give rise to the fear that the tumor has relapsed. Resection of the whole of the involved bone is the best way to assure adequate local control but the extent of the bone defect and the bad local conditions secondary to irradiation make reconstruction hazardous. In two patients (one with Ewing's sarcoma of the femur and one with osteogenic sarcoma of the humerus) the authors used a free, vascularized fibular graft for the reconstruction having obtained consolidation of the limb after resection of the irradiated tumor, with preservation of its function. The encouraging results obtained have suggested a conservative attitude as primary treatment of specific malignant bone tumors.

Metaizeau, J.P.; Olive, D.; Bey, P.; Bordigoni, P.; Plenat, F.; Prevot, J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. (Hahnemann Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Modelling and simulation of acrylic bone cement injection and curing within the framework of vertebroplasty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimal invasive procedure of vertebroplasty is a surgical technique to treat compression fractures of vertebral bodies. During the treatment liquid bone cement gets injected into the affected vertebral body and therein cures to a solid. In order to investigate the treatment and the impact of injected bone cement on the vertebra, an integrated modelling and simulation framework has been developed. The framework includes (i) the generation of computer models based on microCT images of human cancellous bone, (ii) CFD simulations of bone cement injection into the trabecular structure of a vertebral body as well as (iii) non-linear FEM simulations of the bone cement curing. Thereby, microstructural models of trabecular bone structures are employed. Furthermore, a detailed description of the material behaviour of acrylic bone cements is provided. More precisely, a non-linear fluid flow model is chosen for the representation of the bone cement behaviour during injection and a non-linear viscoelastic material mo...

Landgraf, Ralf; Kolmeder, Sebastian; Lion, Alexander; Lebsack, Helena; Kober, Cornelia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Apatite-polymer composites for the controlled delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current treatment of bone defects due to trauma, cancer, or degenerative spine diseases involves the implantation of a bone graft. Autografts, which are harvested from the patient's own body, are associated with problems ...

Yong, Tseh-Hwan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

BoneMaster™ HA Coating – An In Vivo Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... group (668 N) demonstrated significantly higher pull out strength than control PPS group (348 N). After 32 weeks, the pull out strength for BoneMaster HA and PPS groups ... Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on ...

40

Alpha-tricalcium phosphate-calcium sulfate hybrid bone cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Alpha-tricalcium phosphate-calcium sulfate hybrid bone ... electron scanning microscopy on the characterization of polymer coating ... Improving the Resistance to Contact and Flexural Damage of Ceramics Using Elastic Gradients ... using phosphoric acid activation by ultrasound and microwave radiation ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bone Canonical WNT/B-Catenin Signaling in Models of Reduced Microgravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human exposure to reduced weightbearing results in bone loss. The rate of bone loss during microgravity exposure is similar to that of a post-menopausal women. In fact, the maintenance of bone mass is intimately dependent on exercise. Therefore, exercise associated mechanical loads to bone tissue are an important countermeasure to prevent disuse-induced bone loss. However, the types of exercise modalities required to prevent such bone loss are unclear. Moreover, how mechanical loading to bone translates into molecular osteogenic signals in bone cells is unknown. Radiation exposure is another potent inducer of bone loss, namely observed on Earth in the clinical setting following radiotherapy procedures. It is expected that long duration space missions outside the protection of Earth’s magnetosphere will result in significant galactic cosmic radiation exposure. However, the magnitude of bone loss resulting from this galactic cosmic radiation exposure is unclear. Moreover, it is unknown if radiation exposure will exacerbate disuse-induced bone loss. Therefore, a series of experiments were designed to determine: 1) Will simulated galactic cosmic radiation exacerbate reduced weightbearing-induced bone loss? 2) Will pharmacological activation of the putative mechanosensing Wnt pathway enhance exercise-induced bone mass gain? To address these questions the experimental study series employed two animal models of reduced weightbearing, hindlimb unloading and partial weightbearing. These model test-beds enabled the evaluation of two novel countermeasures (simulated resistance exercise and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) therapeutic) and simulated exposure to space radiation environments. To test the impact of simulated space radiation (28Si) one study of the series was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. To quantify the impact of the abovementioned countermeasures and space radiation on bone, mechanical testing, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry, and immunohistochemistry served as primary outcome measures. The primary findings are: 1) Low-dose high-LET radiation negativity impacts maintenance of bone mass by lowering bone formation and increasing bone resorption. This impaired bone formation response is in part due to sclerostin induced suppression of Wnt signaling. 2) Combining GSK-3 inhibition with high intensity exercise mitigates cancellous bone loss and restores cortical periosteal growth during disuse.

Macias, Brandon 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Archaeopteryx specimens are important but extremely rare fossils. Due to their possession of both reptilian (jaws with teeth, long bony tail) and avian (feathered wings) characters, Archaeopteryx has been crucial in the development of Darwinian evolution. Despite their importance, no Archaeopteryx specimen has ever been chemically analyzed. This in large part may be explained by the analytical obstacles which preclude applying standard methods to such valuable specimens; destructive sampling is not an option and most non-destructive methods cannot handle large specimens. Furthermore, mapping using conventional methods is far too slow to enable chemical zonation to be reasonably determined. Mapping of trace element chemistry is of tremendous interest, however, because it opens a window into understanding several critical questions about Archaeopteryx in particular, and about fossil specimens in general. Preserved trace chemistry in bones and soft tissue may be remnants of the living organism, and therefore may give insight into life processes of extinct organisms. When mapping includes the embedding rock matrix, mass transfer between the fossil and the matrix can be constrained, hence giving information about mode of preservation. Chemical analysis can also resolve artefacts of the curation process. Finally, accurate chemical maps can also be useful for directing future work by highlighting regions that may be promising for other types of analysis including structural methods (CT, diffraction) or techniques that use other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (infra-red).

44

Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin  

SciTech Connect

Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the Nanoscale Scientists studying osteoporosis and other skeletal diseases are interested in the 3D structure of bone and its responses to conditions such as weightlessness, radiation (of particular interest to astronauts) and vitamin D deficiency. The current gold standard, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), provides 3D images of trabeculae, the small interior struts of bone tissue, and electron microscopy can provide nanometer resolution of thin tissue slices. Hard X-ray transmission microscopy has provided the first 3D view of bone structure within individual trabeculae on the nanoscale. figure 1 Figure 1 Micro-CT (left) shows trabecular structure inside of bone. Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM; center and right) can reveal localized details of osteocyte lacunae and their processes.

46

E13: An Experimentally-based Flow Stress Model for Cortical Bone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developed here is a micro-scale-based flow stress model of cortical bone. In order to ... Catalysts by Using the Metal Ion-reducing Bacterium Shewanella Algae.

47

MICROSCOPIC METABOLISM OF CALCIUM IN BONE. III. MICRORADIOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OF MINERAL DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

The range of microscopic calcium densities in man and in dog does not change wiih the age of the individual. The ranges, however. are not the same in the two species. New bone mineral in the dog is formed at higher density than similar mineral in man, and highly mineralized bone in the dog is more dense than the most dense bone in man. Thus species differcnces in calcium metabolism of bone do exist and should not be overlooked in the intercomparison of the uptake and retention of the alkaline earths in mammalian skeletons. (auth)

Rowland, R.E.; Jowsey, J.; Marshall, J.H.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Proton Range Uncertainty Due to Bone Cement Injected Into the Vertebra in Radiation Therapy Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We wanted to evaluate the influence of bone cement on the proton range and to derive a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting distorted computed tomography (CT) data as a reference to determine whether the correction is needed. Two CT datasets were obtained with and without a bone cement disk placed in a water phantom. Treatment planning was performed on a set of uncorrected CT images with the bone cement disk, and the verification plan was applied to the same set of CT images with an effective CT number for the bone cement disk. The effective CT number was determined by measuring the actual proton range with the bone cement disk. The effects of CT number, thicknesses, and position of bone cement on the proton range were evaluated in the treatment planning system (TPS) to draw a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting the CT number of bone cement. The effective CT number of bone cement was 260 Hounsfield units (HU). The calculated proton range for native CT data was significantly shorter than the measured proton range. However, the calculated range for the corrected CT data with the effective CT number coincided exactly with the measured range. The conversion factor was 209.6 [HU . cm/mm] for bone cement and predicted the range shift by approximately correcting the CT number. We found that the heterogeneity of bone cement could cause incorrect proton ranges in treatment plans using CT images. With an effective CT number of bone cement derived from the proton range and relative stopping power, a more actual proton range could be calculated in the TPS. The conversion factor could predict the necessity for CT data correction with sufficient accuracy.

Lim, Young Kyung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ui-Jung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongho, E-mail: dongho@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Doo Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Lee, Sang-Yeob [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryeol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

6BONE pTLA and pNLA Formats (pTLA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo defines how the 6bone uses the 3FFE::/16 IPv6 address prefix, allocated in RFC 2471, "IPv6 Testing Address Allocation", [6BONE-TLA], to create pseudo Top-Level Aggregation Identifiers (pTLA's) and pseudo Next-Level Aggregation Identifiers ...

B. Fink

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Multiple verification in complex biological systems: the bone remodelling case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a set of formal techniques and a methodology for a composite formal analysis at the tissue and organ level, focusing on the verification of quantitative properties in the process of bone remodelling. Starting from a differential equation model, ... Keywords: bone remodelling, formal analysis, model checking, piecewise multi-affine abstraction, sensitivity

Ezio Bartocci; Pietro Liò; Emanuela Merelli; Nicola Paoletti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley-known increase with age in fracture risk of human bone is essential. This also represents a challenge from accompanying the process of aging using appropriate multiscale experimental methods and relating them

Ritchie, Robert

52

Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone: evaluation by R-curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone: evaluation by R-curves R.K. Nallaa,b , J online 27 October 2004 Abstract Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study

Ritchie, Robert

53

Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope  

SciTech Connect

New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Geek-Up[6.10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in Bone's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in 10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in Bone's Nanostructure Geek-Up[6.10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in Bone's Nanostructure June 10, 2011 - 5:07pm Addthis Data image on lead telluride thermal conductivity | Photo Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Data image on lead telluride thermal conductivity | Photo Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Identifying a key ingredient in bone's nanostructure may help treat and prevent bone diseases such as osteoporosis and develop new light-weight, high-strength materials for innovative technologies. Advanced thermoelectric materials could be used to develop vehicle

55

Bone dielectric property variation as a function of mineralization at microwave frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical need exists for new imaging tools to more accurately characterize bone quality beyond the conventional modalities of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), ultrasound speed of sound, and broadband attenuation measurements. In this paper we ...

Paul M. Meaney; Tian Zhou; Douglas Goodwin; Amir Golnabi; Elia A. Attardo; Keith D. Paulsen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Non-invasive shock wave stimulated periosteum for bone tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cambium cells of the periosteum, which are known osteoprogenitor cells, have limited suitability for clinical applications of bone tissue engineering due to their low cell number (2-5 cells thick). Extracorporeal shock ...

Kearney, Cathal (Cathal John)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Investigation of bone response to implant materials by electron microscopy and computer simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) implementation of this scintigraphic method for quantitative studies of osteoblast-mediated mineralization in vitro. A 2-D truss finite element model is used to study the remodeling of trabecular bone. Using strain ...

Wang, Hao, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

On the multiscale origins of fracture resistance in human bone and its biological degradation  

SciTech Connect

Akin to other mineralized tissues, human cortical bone can resist deformation and fracture due to the nature of its hierarchical structure, which spans the molecular to macroscopic length-scales. Deformation at the smallest scales, mainly through the composite action of the mineral and collagen, contributes to bone?s strength or intrinsic fracture resistance, while crack-tip shielding mechanisms active on the microstructural scale contribute to the extrinsic fracture resistance once cracking begins. The efficiency with which these structural features can resist fracture at both small and large length-scales becomes severely degraded with such factors as aging, irradiation and disease. Indeed aging and irradiation can cause changes to the cross-link profile at fibrillar length-scales as well as changes at the three orders of magnitude larger scale of the osteonal structures, both of which combine to inhibit the bone's overall resistance to the initiation and growth of cracks.

Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Barth, Holly D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 13 CLA and Bone Modeling in Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 13 CLA and Bone Modeling in Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 13 C

60

Revised estimates of electron absorbed fractions and radionuclide S-values in trabecular bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The field of nuclear medicine has reached advanced stages in the use of radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment and diagnosis of innumerable maladies. However, along with the use of nuclear medicine come responsibilities inherently associated with the use of radioactive material. It is necessary to be able to calculate doses in the trabecular bone region accurately and consistently. The accurate assessment of patient dose will allow physicians to better predict the amounts of radioactivity needed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Additionally, improved calculational techniques for bone dosimetry will decrease the likelihood of overadministrations and will allow for reliable predictions of side-effects to patients. The dosimetry of this region is therefore a very important, and unfortunately complicated, area associated with the field of nuclear medicine. A new dosimetric trabecular bone model has been developed and incorporated into a Monte Carlo radiation transport code to determine electron absorbed fractions in red bone marrow and the endosteal tissue which is contained in trabecular bone. The model is based on measured omnidirectional chord length distributions through trabeculae and marrow cavities in nine skeletal locations. Absorbed fractions were calculated for the two target regions, and then estimated from these results for all other skeletal regions thought to contain red marrow. These absorbed fractions were then used to calculate S-values for a variety of beta-emitting radionuclides at each of 15 skeletal locations thought to contain red bone marrow. Absorbed fractions and S-values were calculated for sources in the marrow, on the bone surface, and in the bone volume. Comparisons were made between the new absorbed fractions and those published in ICRP Publication 30, as well as between the new S-values and those determined from the MIRDOSE2 software.

Parry, Robert Alan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks  

SciTech Connect

Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effects of High Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on Oxidative Stress and Bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronauts in space flight missions are exposed to increased iron (Fe) stores and galactic cosmic radiation, both of which independently induce oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. Recent evidence has linked oxidative stress to bone loss with aging and estrogen deficiency. Whether the increased iron stores and radiation that astronauts face are exacerbating their extreme bone loss while in space is unclear. We hypothesized that elevated iron levels (induced by feeding a high iron diet) and gamma radiation exposure would independently increase markers of oxidative stress and markers of oxidative damage and result in loss of bone mass, with the combined treatment having additive or synergistic effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (15-weeks old, n=32) were randomized to receive an adequate (45 mg Fe/kg diet) or high (650 mg Fe/kg diet) Fe diet for 4 weeks and either 3 Gy (8 fractions, 0.375 Gy each) of 137Cs radiation (?RAD) or sham exposure every other day over 16 days starting on day 14. Serum Fe and catalase and liver Fe and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were assessed by standard techniques. Immunostaining for 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, marker of DNA adducts) quantified the number of cells with oxidative damage in cortical bone. Bone histomorphometry assessed bone cell activity and cancellous bone microarchitecture in the metaphyseal region. Ex vivo pQCT quantified volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD); bone mechanical strength was assessed by 3-pt bending at the midshaft tibia and compression of the femoral neck. High Fe diet increased liver Fe and decreased volume per total volume (BV/TV). ?RAD decreased osteoid surface per bone surface (OS/BS) and osteocyte density. The combined treatment increased serum catalase, liver GPX, and serum iron and decreased cancellous vBMD and trabecular number (Tb.N). High Fe diet and ?RAD independently increased number of osteocytes stained positive for 8-OHdG, with the combined treatment exhibiting twice as many osteocytes positively stained compared to the control. Higher serum Fe levels were associated with higher oxidative damage (r =0.38) and lower proximal tibial cancellous vBMD (r =–0.38). Higher serum catalase levels were associated with higher oxidative damage (r =0.48), lower BV/TV (r =–0.40) and lower cancellous vBMD (r =–0.39). High dietary iron and fractionated 137Cs ?RAD leads to a moderate elevation in iron stores and results in oxidative damage in bone and are associated with decreased cancellous bone density. Moderate elevations in iron stores are not only found in astronauts, but also naturally occur in healthy human populations. This healthy population with elevated iron stores may also have increased levels of oxidative stress in the body. Elevated levels of oxidative stress not only increase one’s risk for accelerated bone loss, but also the risk of developing other chronic diseases such as insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome.

Yuen, Evelyn P

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Aortoesophageal Fistula and Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Induced by Swallowed Fish Bone: A Report of Two Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Esophageal perforation caused by accidental swallowing of fish bones can lead to rare complications, such as aortoesophageal fistula accompanied by aortic pseudoaneurysm, which can be fatal if not properly handled. We report two rare cases of aortoesophageal fistula and aortic pseudoaneurysm caused by esophagus perforation after accidental swallow of fish bone; the patients also had purulent mediastinitis and esophagitis. The treatment of aortic pseudoaneurysm was successful in both cases, with one patient undergoing surgical resection and aortic neoplasty and the other patient undergoing endovascular stent graft placement. Long-term antibiotic treatment was administered to both patients after surgery. There were no postsurgical complications, and the patients recovered without incident.

Chen Aiping, E-mail: chenaiping-123@163.com; Yu Hong, E-mail: yuhongphd@163.com [Second Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital (China); Li Huimin [Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Xinhua Hospital (China); Xiao Xiangsheng, E-mail: cjr.xxsh@vip163.com; Liu Shiyuan [Second Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Calcium balance and bone density in immature horses fed a high protein diet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies in other species indicate high protein diets increase urinary calcium (Ca) excretion and may lead to negative calcium balance and reduced bone density. As overfeeding of protein is commonplace in the horse industry, this study was undertaken to determine the effects of excess dietary protein on growth, physiologic response, mineral balance, bone density, and bone geometry in immature horses. Sixteen 10-month-old American Quarter Horses were blocked by age and sex into two dietary treatments. The control diet was formulated to provide the NRC (1989) recommended concentration of crude protein, while the high protein diet provided 130% of NRC (1989) recommendations. All other nutrients were formulated at or slightly above NRC (1989) recommendations. Blood samples, feces, and urine were collected during the 116-day study to determine any diet effect on pH and mineral balance. Radiographs were made of the left third metacarpal (MCIII) to determine bone density via radiographic bone aluminum equivalence (RBAE), and bone geometry was determined metrically from the radiographs. Urine pH decreased over time (p < 0.001), but there were no diet effects on blood pH or urine pH. Conversely, when normalized to day 0 values, fecal pH was reduced by feeding the high protein treatment (p < 0.02). Density of dorsal and palmar cortices increased over time (p < 0.001), but no differences were observed between diets. But, normalized total medial-lateral (ML) width of the MCIII was higher in the control diet (p < 0.05). Fecal Ca loss was greater in horses fed the high protein diet (p < 0.005), while Ca absorption and retention were lower for horses on the high protein treatment (p < 0.02). Phosphorus (P) balance was not different between diets, although feeding the high protein diet resulted in higher P intake overall (p < 0.001). While excess dietary protein may decrease fecal pH, increase fecal Ca excretion, and decrease Ca absorption and retention, there was no consistent effect of the high protein diet on bone density over the course of this study. Further research is necessary to determine if feeding high-protein diets is detrimental to bone quality in the growing horse.

Spooner, Holly Sue

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Instrument for bone mineral measurement using a microprocessor as the control and arithmetic element  

SciTech Connect

A self-contained instrument for the determination of bone mineral content by photon absorptometry is described. A high-resolution detection system allows measurements to be made at up to 16 photon energies. Control and arithmetic functions are performed by a microprocessor. Analysis capability and limitations are discussed. (auth)

Alberi, J.L.; Hardy, W.H. II

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Refinement of the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ fish-bone potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ fish-bone potential by simultaneously fitting to the experimental phase shifts. We found that with a double Gaussian parametrization of the local potential can describe the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ phase shifts for all partial waves.

Smith, E; Papp, Z

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Effects of Vibrator Types and Their Placement on Bone?Conduction Threshold Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monaural bone?conduction threshold measurements in the quiet were obtained for 10 normally hearing young adults at both forehead and mastoid positions using two hearing?aid?type vibrators of different manufacture. Physical calibration data for the vibrators were obtained by other laboratories

Peter B. Weston; Roy W. Gengel; Ira J. Hirsh

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Effectiveness of Reirradiation for Painful Bone Metastases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases in nonresponders or patients with recurrent pain after initial response is performed in up to 42% of patients initially treated with radiotherapy. Literature on the effect of reirradiation for pain control in those patients is scarce. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we quantify the effectiveness of reirradiation for achieving pain control in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A free text search was performed to identify eligible studies using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration library electronic databases. After study selection and quality assessment, a pooled estimate was calculated for overall pain response for reirradiation of metastatic bone pain. Results: Our literature search identified 707 titles, of which 10 articles were selected for systematic review and seven entered the meta-analysis. Overall study quality was mediocre. Of the 2,694 patients initially treated for metastatic bone pain, 527 (20%) patients underwent reirradiation. Overall, a pain response after reirradiation was achieved in 58% of patients (pooled overall response rate 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.49-0.67). There was a substantial between-study heterogeneity (I{sup 2} = 63.3%, p = 0.01) because of clinical and methodological differences between studies. Conclusions: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective in terms of pain relief for a small majority of patients; approximately 40% of patients do not benefit from reirradiation. Although the validity of results is limited, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview and the most quantitative estimate of reirradiation effectiveness to date.

Huisman, Merel, E-mail: m.huisman-7@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Wijlemans, Joost W. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Linden, Yvette M. van der [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Verkooijen, Helena M. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 17 Effect of Flaxseed on Bone Metabolism and Menopauseolism and Menopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 17 Effect of Flaxseed on Bone Metabolism and Menopause olism and Menopause Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

72

Aluminum silicate nanotube coating of siloxane-poly(lactic acid)-vaterite composite fibermats for bone regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our earlier work, a flexible fibermat consisting of a biodegradable composite with soluble silicate species, which has been reported to enhance bone formation, was prepared successfully using poly(L-lactic acid) and siloxane-containing calcium carbonate ...

Shuji Yamazaki, Hirotaka Maeda, Akiko Obata, Keiichi Inukai, Katsuya Kato, Toshihiro Kasuga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Potential commercial application of a bi-layer bone-ligament regeneration scaffold to anterior cruciate ligament replacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A business model was created in order to explore the commercial application of a bi-layer bone-ligament scaffold to the treatment of torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) requiring replacement. The two main keys in producing ...

Li, Jessica C. (Jessica Ching-Yi)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Three dimensional modeling and analysis of Haversian systems in compact bone tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study provides a qualitative as well as quantitative characterization of the geometry and architecture of the Haversian systems at a microscopic level. A procedure was developed and employed to generate a three dimensional computer model from serial sections of equine bone. From the reconstruction, quantitative calculations were made. including porosity. surface areas. cross sectional areas, anci cross sectional shapes. Also the porosity due to Volkmann canals was estimated. Other more qualitative calculations included the nature of branching. termination. taper'n-and-general osteon movement. Any chance in the specimen size or shape during, the entire processing-was carefully documented and corrected for where possible. One of the goals of the research was to assess and evaluate the procedures developed and identify ways to further improve accuracy. With a computerized three dimensional imag-e of the bone microstructure. detailed calculations can be made and insig-ht cained more accurately than with two dimensional models or past three dimensional models.

Deisseroth, Kate

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Imaging the Material Properties of Bone Specimens Using Reflection-Based Infrared Microspectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) is a widely used method for mapping the material properties of bone and other mineralized tissues, including mineralization, crystallinity, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking. This technique is traditionally performed in a transmission-based geometry, which requires the preparation of plastic-embedded thin sections, limiting its functionality. Here, we theoretically and empirically demonstrate the development of reflection-based FTIRM as an alternative to the widely adopted transmission-based FTIRM, which reduces specimen preparation time and broadens the range of specimens that can be imaged. In this study, mature mouse femurs were plastic-embedded and longitudinal sections were cut at a thickness of 4 {micro}m for transmission-based FTIRM measurements. The remaining bone blocks were polished for specular reflectance-based FTIRM measurements on regions immediately adjacent to the transmission sections. Kramers-Kronig analysis of the reflectance data yielded the dielectric response from which the absorption coefficients were directly determined. The reflectance-derived absorbance was validated empirically using the transmission spectra from the thin sections. The spectral assignments for mineralization, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking were indistinguishable in transmission and reflection geometries, while the stoichiometric/nonstoichiometric apatite crystallinity parameter shifted from 1032/1021 cm{sup -1} in transmission-based to 1035/1025 cm{sup -1} in reflection-based data. This theoretical demonstration and empirical validation of reflection-based FTIRM eliminates the need for thin sections of bone and more readily facilitates direct correlations with other methods such as nanoindentation and quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBSE) from the same specimen. It provides a unique framework for correlating bone's material and mechanical properties.

Acerbo A. S.; Carr, G.L.; Judex, S.; Miller, L.M.

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

76

Genomic deletion of a long-range bone enhancer misregulatessclerostin in Van Buchem disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutations in distant regulatory elements can negatively impact human development and health, yet due to the difficulty of detecting these critical sequences we predominantly focus on coding sequences for diagnostic purposes. We have undertaken a comparative sequence-based approach to characterize a large noncoding region deleted in patients affected by Van Buchem disease (VB), a severe sclerosing bone dysplasia. Using BAC recombination and transgenesis we characterized the expression of human sclerostin (sost) from normal (hSOSTwt) or Van Buchem(hSOSTvb D) alleles. Only the hSOSTwt allele faithfully expressed high levels of human sost in the adult bone and impacted bone metabolism, consistent with the model that the VB noncoding deletion removes a sost specific regulatory element. By exploiting cross-species sequence comparisons with in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays we were able to identify a candidate enhancer element that drives human sost expression in osteoblast-like cell lines in vitro and in the skeletal anlage of the E14.5 mouse embryo, and discovered a novel function for sclerostin during limb development. Our approach represents a framework for characterizing distant regulatory elements associated with abnormal human phenotypes.

Loots, Gabriela G.; Kneissel, Michaela; Keller, Hansjoerg; Baptist, Myma; Chang, Jessie; Collette, Nicole M.; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Rubin, Edward M.

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Adapting the polycarbonate dosimeter and electrochemical etching to the microdosimetry of /sup 239/Pu in bone  

SciTech Connect

The problem of setting the maximum permissible body burden, MPBB, for /sup 239/Pu is a complex one. Recent papers have been published which favor lowering the MPBB by varying factors depending on the assumptions used. /sup 239/Pu has been shown quite clearly, on detailed autoradiograph, to concentrate on the trabecular surfaces of the endosteal face of osseous tissue. This realization led the ICRP to propose the alteration of the MPBB for /sup 239/Pu in a manner based upon microdosimetry of /sup 239/Pu in bone, i.e., determine the dose out to 10..mu..m from the bone surfaces. Unfortunately, microdosimetry fulfilling this requirement has not been available. We are working toward this objective utilizing the Lexan polycarbonate detector and our optimized electrochemical etching procedure to amplify plutonium alpha tracks. As a prerequisite to this work, we are studying three problems inherently present in the Lexan detector. They involve achieving a very low background of tracks on the foils and a high degree of reproducibility between etching batches at this background level. Thirdly, we are determining the factor by which to multiply the number of induced tracks/cm/sup 2/ (..cap alpha.. and recoil) to obtain dose equivalent (rem). In this calibration we are using a standard /sup 239/Pu source and a surface barrier detection system. The plutonium bearing bones used in the microdosimetry phase of this research are rat, dog, and human.

Stillwagon, G.B.; Su, S.J.; Morgan, K.Z.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length-scales  

SciTech Connect

The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length-scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at nearmillimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone’s toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural-scales typically below a micron and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural-scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple lengthscales. Using in situ small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction to characterize sub-micron structural changes and synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micron-scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size-scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions and to an increased osteonal density which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micron-scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by “plastic” deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking.

Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D.; Tang, Simon Y.; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

X-band EPR imaging as a tool for gradient dose reconstruction in irradiated bones  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Various tools are currently available for dose reconstruction in individuals after accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. Among the available biological analyses, Monte Carlo simulations, and biophysical methods, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), the latter has proved its usefulness for retrospective dosimetry. Although EPR spectroscopy is probably the most sensitive technique, it does not provide spatial dosimetric data. This information is, however, highly desirable when steep dose gradient irradiations are involved. The purpose of this work was to explore the possibilities of EPR imaging (EPRI) for spatial dose reconstruction in irradiated biological material. Methods: X-band EPRI was used to reconstruct ex vivo the relative dose distribution in human bone samples and hydroxyapatite phantoms after irradiation with brachytherapy seeds or x rays. Three situations were investigated: Homogeneous, stepwise gradient, and continuous gradient irradiation. Results: EPRI gave a faithful relative spin density distribution in bone samples and in hydroxyapatite phantoms. Measured dose ratios were in close agreement with the actual delivered dose ratios. EPRI was able to distinguish the dose gradients induced by two different sources ({sup 125}I and {sup 192}Ir). However, the measured spatial resolution of the system was 1.9 mm and this appeared to be a limiting factor. The method could be improved by using new signal postprocessing strategies. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that EPRI can be used to assess the regional relative dose distribution in irradiated bone samples. The method is currently applicable to ex vivo measurements of small size samples with low variation in tissue density but is likely to be adapted for in vivo application using L-band EPRI.

Leveque, Philippe; Godechal, Quentin; Bol, Anne; Trompier, Francois; Gallez, Bernard [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Institut de Surete Nucleaire et de Radioprotection, F-92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Level of osteopenia and bone recovery in alcohol-fed adolescent rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adolescence is a period in human growth and development that is a time of rapid and drastic change. It is also known to be an age of widespread alcohol abuse. Studies addressing the reversibility of the deleterious effects of chronic alcohol consumption on young, actively growing adolescent bones have not been done. The objective of this study was to determine the level of bone recovery, if any, once an adolescent ceases alcohol consumption. Fifty, 4-week old, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were individually housed and maintained in an American Association for the Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care-accredited facility at Texas A&M. The rats (n = 6 or 7 per group) were fed either alcohol (35% ethanol-derived calories), isocaloric liquid diet, or chow for 2 or 4 weeks, depending on the experimental group. The weekly blood alcohol concentrations averaged 309 [] 9 mg/dl. The rats were sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after the experimental feeding began. The BioQuant Morphometric System was used to perform the histomorphometric analyses of the proximal tibia. Tibia bone volume per trabecular volume (BV/TV) in both age groups of alcohol and pair-fed animals was significantly less when compared to the chow 4 week animals. BV/TV was increased in the alcohol recovery group when compared to the alcohol 2 and 4 week groups, but the level of growth never reached the chow-fed 4 week group. Femur length, diameter and volume measurements increased in the alcohol recovery group when compared to both the alcohol 2 and 4 week groups. However, the length and volume parameters did not fully recover to equal those of the control chow 4 week animals, or even the some-age pair-fed animals. Femur diameter of the alcohol recovery animals was comparable to the alcohol 4 week animals, but less than the chow-fed. Alcohol also suppressed IGF-I levels. Full bone recovery did not occur within two weeks after removal of alcohol from the diet, suggesting the detrimental effects due to alcohol were not completely reversible during this time frame.

Spears, Heather Lynae

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Regional geologic characterization of the Second Bone Spring Sandstone, Delaware basin, Lea and Eddy Counties, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bone Spring Formation is a series of interbedded siliciclastics and carbonates that were deposited in the Delaware basin during the Leonardian (Early Permian). It consists of the First, Second and Third Carbonate and the First, Second and Third Sandstone, as well as the informally named Avalon Sandstone. The Second Bone Spring Sandstone, the focus of the study, can be subdivided into 4 distinct sand bodies separated by pelagic zones. These sands are designated the A-D Sands. The depositional patterns of the Bone Spring Formation are reflective of the underlying structure that resulted from compression during the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian. The Second Bone Spring Sandstone (specifically the C Sand) is essentially a dolomitic, coarse siltstone that is composed of facies reflective of deposition by turbidity currents in a slope fan environment. The midfan, levee/overbank and hemipelagic environments of deposition identified in the Second Bone Spring Sandstone are consistent with those of the typical slope fan of Walker (1978). The slope fans of the C Sand were confined by north-to-south trending reverse faults, which inhibited lateral migration of both the fans and the channels within them. The A-D Sands are correlatable throughout the study area but thicken in the underlying structural lows. These thicker sands are lobate in plan view and are located adjacent to, rather than directly on top of, underlying thick sands. This is likely a result of differential compaction of underlying sediment which served to further confine the fans. The sediment comprising the Second Bone Spring Sandstone was likely transported through basinward migration of sand dunes in an arid environment during relative sea level lowstands. Periodically, brief rises in sea level choked off sediment supply allowing hemipelagic material to be draped over underlying sands. With sea level fall, sands were again deposited in the tectonic sub-basins.

Downing, Amanda Beth

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Bone lead content assessed by L-line x-ray fluorescence in lead-exposed and non-lead-exposed suburban populations in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of lead (Pb) in bone reflect cumulative Pb exposure, whereas blood Pb levels are indices of absorption during the previous 21-30 days. This study was undertaken to estimate bone Pb concentrations by L-line x-ray fluorescence (LXRF) in a United States suburban population which was exposed to unusually high levels of Pb in emissions from an adjacent factory during 1963-1981, compared with concentrations similarly estimated in a matched suburban community without unusual Pb exposure. The mean bone Pb value in 269 residents of the highly exposed suburb (15 ppm) was 3-fold greater than that of the reference suburb (5 ppm). LXRF estimates of bone Pb identified those individuals at risk for adverse effects of Pb, whereas blood Pb levels were uninformative. Average LXRF-estimated bone Pb concentrations in residents of the unusually exposed suburb approximated estimated values in workers at Pb-processing factories. 44 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Rosen, J.F.; Balbi, K.; Balbi, J.; Bailey, C.; Clemente, I.; Redkey, N.; Grainger, S. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)); Crocetti, A.F. (New York Medical College, Valhalla (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Validation of mutual information-based registration of CT and bone SPECT images in dual-isotope studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The registration of computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) images can substantially enhance patient diagnosis as it allows for the fusion of anatomical and functional information, as well as the attenuation correction of NM images. However, ... Keywords: Accuracy, Bone SPECT, Dual-isotope studies, Multi-modality registration, Multi-resolution, Mutual information, Precision, Qualitative evaluation, Quantitative validation, Reproducibility, Robustness, Sensitivity

Lisa Tang; Ghassan Hamarneh; Anna Celler

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Alkali-free bioactive glasses for bone tissue engineering: A preliminary investigation  

SciTech Connect

An alkali-free series of bioactive glasses has been designed and developed in the glass system CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 along diopside (CaMgSi2O6) – fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F] – tricalcium phosphate (3CaO•P2O5) join. The silicate network in all the investigated glasses is predominantly coordinated in Q2 (Si) units while phosphorus tends to remain in orthophosphate (Q0) environment. The in vitro bioactivity analysis of glasses has been made by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) while chemical degradation has been studied in Tris-HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Some of the investigated glasses exhibit hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on their surface with in 1-12 h of their immersion in SBF solution. The sintering and crystallization kinetics of glasses has been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and hot-stage microscopy (HSM), respectively while the crystalline phase evolution in resultant glass-ceramics (GCs) has been studied in the temperature range of 800-900 oC using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The cell growth and osteogenic differentiation for glasses has been studied in vitro on sintered glass powder compacts using rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The as designed glasses are ideal candidates for their potential applications in bone tissue engineering in the form of bioactive glasses as well as glass/GC scaffolds.

Goel, Ashutosh; Kapoor, Saurabh; Rajagopal, Raghu R.; Pascual, Maria J.; Kim, Hae-Won; Ferreira, Jose M.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dosimetric verification of the anisotropic analytical algorithm in lung equivalent heterogeneities with and without bone equivalent heterogeneities  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In this study, the authors evaluated the accuracy of dose calculations performed by the convolution/superposition based anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) in lung equivalent heterogeneities with and without bone equivalent heterogeneities. Methods: Calculations of PDDs using the AAA and Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4C) were compared to ionization chamber measurements with a heterogeneous phantom consisting of lung equivalent and bone equivalent materials. Both 6 and 10 MV photon beams of 4x4 and 10x10 cm{sup 2} field sizes were used for the simulations. Furthermore, changes of energy spectrum with depth for the heterogeneous phantom using MCNP were calculated. Results: The ionization chamber measurements and MCNP calculations in a lung equivalent phantom were in good agreement, having an average deviation of only 0.64{+-}0.45%. For both 6 and 10 MV beams, the average deviation was less than 2% for the 4x4 and 10x10 cm{sup 2} fields in the water-lung equivalent phantom and the 4x4 cm{sup 2} field in the water-lung-bone equivalent phantom. Maximum deviations for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field in the lung equivalent phantom before and after the bone slab were 5.0% and 4.1%, respectively. The Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated an increase of the low-energy photon component in these regions, more for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field compared to the 4x4 cm{sup 2} field. Conclusions: The low-energy photon by Monte Carlo simulation component increases sharply in larger fields when there is a significant presence of bone equivalent heterogeneities. This leads to great changes in the build-up and build-down at the interfaces of different density materials. The AAA calculation modeling of the effect is not deemed to be sufficiently accurate.

Ono, Kaoru; Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hirokawa, Yutaka [Department of Radiation Physics, Hiroshima Heiwa Clinic, 1-31 Kawaramachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0856 (Japan); Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 730-8527 (Japan); Center of Medical Education, Sapporo Medical University, 17 Minami 1 Jo, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Heiwa Clinic, 1-31 Kawaramachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0856 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty and Bone Cement Leakage: Clinical Experience with a New High-Viscosity Bone Cement and Delivery System for Vertebral Augmentation in Benign and Malignant Compression Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 {+-} 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA was injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.i [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Zoarski, Gregg [University of Maryland, Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Manca, Antonio [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Masala, Salvatore [University 'Tor Vergata', Radiology Unit and Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Nanomechanics and ultrastructural studies of cortical bone : fundamental insights regarding structure-function, mineral-organic force mechanics interactions, and heterogeneity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the mechanics of bone has been studied extensively at the micro- and macro-scale, the nano-scopic level is perhaps the most illuminating as this is the length scale at which the individual constituents interact. ...

Tai, Kuangshin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Chip-Based Comparison of the Osteogenesis of Human Bone Marrow- and Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Mechanical Stimulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are considered as an attractive stem cell source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We compared human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and hASCs ...

Park, Sang-Hyug

89

A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Innovative Composites Through Reinforcement Morphology Design - a Bone-Shaped-Short-Fiber Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project is to improve the strength and toughness of conventional short-fiber composites by using innovative bone-shaped-short (BSS) fibers as reinforcement. We fabricated a model polyethylene BSS fiber-reinforced polyester-matrix composite to prove that fiber morphology, instead of interfacial strength, solves the problem. Experimental tensile and fracture toughness test results show that BSS fibers can bridge matrix cracks more effectively, and consume many times more energy when pulled out, than conventional-straight-short (CSS) fibers. This leads to both higher strength and fracture toughness for the BSS-fiber composites. A computational model was developed to simulate crack propagation in both BSS- and CSS-fiber composites, accounting for stress concentrations, interface debonding, and fiber pullout. Model predictions were validated by experimental results and will be useful in optimizing BSS-fiber morphology and other material system parameters.

Zhu, Y.T.; Valdez, J.A.; Beyerlain, I.J.; Stout, M.G.; Zhou, S.; Shi, N.; Lowe, T.C.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

91

Characterization of the Bone Loss and Recovery Response at the Distal Femur Metaphysis of the Adult Male Hindlimb Unloaded Rat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended periods of mechanical unloading are known to be detrimental to bone health. Astronauts who spend months in microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are at particular risk. It is anticipated that NASA will not drastically increase the size of the astronaut corps, and this will mean increased likelihood of repeat missions for more astronauts. Thus, it is important to better understand the effects that prolonged, multiple bouts of unloading have on bone. This study utilized the hindlimb unloaded (HU) rat model to examine bone loss and recovery for single and double unloading bouts. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 months old) were randomized into the following groups: baseline (sacrificed at 6 months), 1HU7 (unloaded for 1 month, weight-bearing recovery for 3 months), 2HU10 (unloaded for 1 month, recovered for 2 months, unloaded for another month, and then recovered 2 months), 1HU10 (normal cage activity until 1 month HU ending at month 10, 2 month recovery followed), and aging controls (remained ambulatory throughout experiment). Every month (28 days), animals were terminated and the left femurs were excised, resulting in n=15 per group for each time point. Mineral and geometric properties were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at the distal femur metaphysis, and quasi-static reduced platen compression (RPC) was used to estimate the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. Strength indices based on pQCT parameters were calculated as predictors of mechanical properties. Bone mass properties decreased due to HU and recovered within 2-3 months post-HU. A combination of increased periosteal apposition and endocortical resorption also occurred during HU. The initial HU bout suppressed normal age-related increases in mechanical properties and recovered within 1-2 months. Cancellous compressive strength index (CSI) most closely matched changes in mechanical properties. A second HU bout after two months recovery had a less detrimental effect on pQCT parameters but a greater negative impact on mechanical properties, when compared to pre-HU values. The opposite is true for mechanical properties if loss is characterized relative to aging controls. Recovery after the second HU period did not appear to be significantly affected by a previous bout of HU.

Davis, Joshua Morgan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Deborah Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deborah Rebecca Ash Deborah Ash Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Energy Efficiency Standards Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS...

93

Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Wada, Hitoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Miyagi Cancer Center, Natori (Japan); Harada, Hideyuki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, Mishima (Japan); Nozaki, Miwako [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan); Nagakura, Hisayasu [Department of Radiology, KKR Sapporo Medical Center, Sapporo (Japan); Tago, Masao [Department of Radiology, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kawasaki (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane University Hospital, Izumo (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A tribological and biomimetic study of potential bone joint repair materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates materials for bone-joint failure repair using tribological and biomimicking approaches. The materials investigated represent three different repairing strategies. Refractory metals with and without treatment are candidates for total joint replacements due to their mechanical strength, high corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. A composite of biodegradable polytrimethylene carbonate, hydroxyl apatite, and nanotubes was investigated for application as a tissue engineering scaffold. Non-biodegradable polymer polyimide combined with various concentrations of nanotubes was investigated as a cartilage replacement material. A series of experimental approaches were used in this research. These include analysis of material surfaces and debris using high-resolution techniques and tribological experiments, as well as evaluation of nanomechanical properties. Specifically, the surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and an atomic force microscope. Debris morphology and structure was investigated using a transmission electron microscope. The debris composition was analyzed using an X-ray diffractometer. Nanoindentation was incorporated to investigate the surface nanomechanical properties. Polytrimythelene carbonate combined with hydroxyapatite and nanotubes exhibited a friction coefficient lower than UHMWPE. The nanoindentation response mimicked cartilage more closely than UHMWPE. A composite formed with PI and nanotubes showed a varying friction coefficient and varying nanoindentation response with variation in nanotube concentration. Low friction coefficients corresponded with low modulus values. A theory was proposed to explain this behavior based on surface interactions between nanotubes and between nanotubes and PI. A model was developed to simulate the modulus as a function of nanotube concentration. The boronized refractory metals exhibited brittleness and cracking. Higher friction coefficients were associated with the formation of amorphous debris. The friction coefficient for boronized Cr (~0.06) under simulated body fluid conditions was in the range found in natural joints.

Ribeiro, Rahul

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au [Premion and Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia); Dear, Keith [Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, New South Wales (Australia); Le, Thai [BHB, Premion, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes and Research (CCORE) and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wirth, Andrew [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Porter, David [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Roos, Daniel [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Comparison of the Distributions of Bromine, Lead and Zinc in Tooth and Bone from an Ancient Peruvian Burial site by X-ray Fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence was used to study the distribution of selected trace elements (Zn, Pb, and Br) in tooth and bone samples obtained from an individual from a pre-Columbian archaeological site (Cabur) located on the north coast of Peru. The results show that Zn, Pb, and Br are present in both the teeth and bone samples and that the Zn and Pb seem to be confined to similar regions (cementum and periostium), while Br shows a novel distribution with enrichment close to the Haversian canals and (or) in regions that appear to be Ca deficient.

Martin,R.; Naftel, S.; Nelson, A.; Sapp, W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

PROLONGED STUDIES OF CHANGES OF THE COMPOSITION OF THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND BONE MARROW IN ANIMALS FOLLOWING WHOLE-BODY SINGLE X IRRADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The changes in the composition of the peripheral blood and the bone marrow in cats following a single whole-body dose of 300 r x radiation were studied over a period of 715 days. The data are tabulated. (J.S.R.)

Tkacheva, T.V.

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Quality of Life After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Results of an International Study Validating the EORTC QLQ-BM22  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is an effective method of palliating painful bone metastases and can improve function and reduce analgesic requirements. In advanced cancer patients, quality of life (QOL) is the primary outcome of interest over traditional endpoints such as survival. The purpose of our study was to compare bone metastasis-specific QOL scores among patients who responded differently to palliative RT. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving RT for bone metastases across 6 countries were prospectively enrolled from March 2010-January 2011 in a trial validating the QLQ-BM22 and completed the QLQ-BM22 and the core measure (QLQ-C30) at baseline and after 1 month. Pain scores and analgesic intake were recorded, and response to RT was determined according to the latest published guidelines. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric and Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes in QOL among response groups. A Bonferroni-adjusted P<.003 indicated statistical significance. Results: Of 79 patients who received palliative RT, 59 were assessable. Partial response, pain progression, and indeterminate response were observed in 22, 8, and 29 patients, respectively; there were no patients with a complete response. Patients across all groups had similar baseline QOL scores apart from physical functioning (patients who progressed had better initial functioning). One month after RT, patients who responded had significant improvements in 3 of 4 QLQ-BM22 domains (painful site, P<.0001; painful characteristic, P<.0001; and functional interference, P<.0001) and 3 QLQ-C30 domains (physical functioning, P=.0006; role functioning, P=.0026; and pain, P<.0001). Patients with progression in pain had significantly worse functional interference (P=.0007) and pain (P=.0019). Conclusions: Patients who report pain relief after palliative RT also have better QOL with respect to bone metastasis-specific issues. The QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C30 are able to discriminate among patients with varying responses and are recommended for use in future bone metastasis clinical trials.

Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt); Jesus-Garcia, Reynaldo [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kumar, Aswin [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India)] [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India); Forges, Fabien [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France) [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Unit of Clinical Research, Innovation, and Pharmacology, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Tseng, Ling-Ming [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hou, Ming-Feng [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chie, Wei-Chu [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bottomley, Andrew [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)] [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The relationship between the bone mineral density and urinary cadmium concentration of residents in an industrial complex  

SciTech Connect

Background: An association between cadmium exposure and bone mineral density (BMD) has been demonstrated in elderly women, but has not been well studied in youths and men. Some studies report either no or a weak association between cadmium exposure and bone damage. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the urinary cadmium (U-Cd) levels and BMD of females and males of all ages. Methods: A total of 804 residents near an industrial complex were surveyed in 2007. U-Cd and BMD on the heel (non-dominant calcaneus) were analyzed with AAS-GTA and Dual-Energy X-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Demographic characteristics were collected by structured questionnaires. Osteoporosis and osteopenia were defined by BMD cut-off values and T-scores set by the WHO; T score>-1, normal; -2.5=}1.0 {mu}g/g creatinine) in females (OR=2.92; 95% CI, 1.51-5.64) and in males (OR=3.37; 95% CI, 1.09-10.38). With the multiple linear regression model, the BMD of the adult group was negatively associated with U-Cd (<0.05), gender (female, p<0.001) and age (p<0.001). The BMD of participants who were {<=}19 years of age was negatively associated with gender (female, p<0.01), whereas it was positively associated with age and BMI (p<0.001). BMD was not associated with exercise, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, job or parental education. Conclusion: Results suggested that U-Cd might be associated with osteopenia as well as osteoporosis in both male and female adults. Age and female gender were negatively associated with BMD in the adult group, whereas age was positively associated with BMD in the youth group. Cadmium exposure may be a potential risk factor for lower-BMD and osteopenia symptoms as well as for osteoporosis symptoms. - Research Highlights: {yields} The relationship between the urinary cadmium levels and BMD was investigated. {yields} U-Cd was associated with osteopenia and osteoporosis in adults. {yields} Cadmium exposure may be a potential risk factor for lower-BMD and osteopenia.

Shin, Minah; Paek, Domyung [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chungsik, E-mail: csyoon@snu.ac.kr [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lead effects on development and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells promote Th2 immune responses  

SciTech Connect

Although lead (Pb) has significant effects on the development and function of macrophages, B cells, and T cells and has been suggested to promote allergic asthma in mice and humans, Pb modulation of bone marrow (BM)-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and the resultant DC effects on Th1 and Th2 development have not been examined. Accordingly, we cultured BM cells with murine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) {+-} PbCl{sub 2}. At day 10, culture supernatant (SN) and non-adherent cells were harvested for analysis. Additionally, day 10 non-adherent BM-DCs were harvested and recultured with mGM-CSF + LPS {+-} Pb for 2 days. The day 10 Pb exposure significantly inhibited BM-DC generation, based on CD11c expression. Although fewer DCs were generated with Pb, the existing Pb-exposed DCs had significantly greater MHC-II expression than did the non-Pb-exposed DCs. However, these differences diminished upon LPS stimulation. After LPS stimulation, CD80, CD86, CD40, CD54, and MHC-II were all up-regulated on both Pb-DCs and DCs, but Pb-DCs expressed significantly less CD80 than did DCs. The CD86:CD80 ratio suggests a Pb-DC potential for Th2 cell development. After LPS stimulation, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), and TNF-{alpha} levels significantly increased with both Pb-DCs and DCs, but Pb-DCs produced significantly less cytokines than did DCs, except for IL-10, which further supports Pb-DC preferential skewing toward type-2 immunity. In vitro studies confirm that Pb-DCs have the ability to polarize antigen-specific T cells to Th2 cells. Pb-DCs also enhanced allogeneic and autologous T cell proliferation in vitro, and in vivo studies suggested that Pb-DCs inhibited Th1 effects on humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The Pb effect was mainly on DCs, rather than on T cells, and Pb's modification of DC function appears to be the main cause of Pb's promotion of type-2-related immunity, which may relate to Pb's enhanced activation of the Erk/MAP kinase pathway.

Gao Donghong [Biggs Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Mondal, Tapan K. [Biggs Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Lawrence, David A. [Biggs Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)]. E-mail: lawrencd@wadsworth.org

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

White Ash Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Ash Biology Name: blondi Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: 1. Is the white ash tree endangered or is it a protected variety? 2. How does the white ash tree...

102

No evidence for in vivo induction of genomic instability in bone marrow cells collected from mice exposed to low-dose 137Cs γ rays:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rithidech et al, 2006 1 Rithidech et al, 2006 1 No evidence for in vivo induction of genomic instability in bone marrow cells collected from mice exposed to low-dose 137 Cs γ rays: Kanokporn Noy Rithidech 1 , Chatchanok Loetchutinat 1 , Louise Honikel 1 , and Elbert B. Whorton 2 1 Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 2 Molecular Epidemiology Research Program, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77555-1153 Assessment of potential health risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still a challenging public health issue. It is therefore important to improve our understanding of potential induction of genomic instability in vivo by this low-dose range because it has been widely suggested that elevation of genomic instability also elevates cancer

103

Modified total body irradiation as a planned second high-dose therapy with stem cell infusion for patients with bone-based malignancies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate the maximum tolerated dose of hyperfractionated total marrow irradiation (TMI) as a second consolidation after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous or syngeneic blood stem cell transfusion for patients with bone/bone marrow-based malignant disease. Patients and Methods: Fifty-seven patients aged 3-65 years (median, 45 years), including 21 with multiple myeloma, 24 with breast cancer, 10 with sarcoma, and 2 with lymphoma, were treated with 1.5 Gy administered twice daily to a total dose of 12 Gy (n = 27), 13.5 Gy (n = 12), and 15 Gy (n = 18). Median time between the 2 transplants was 105 days (range, 63-162 days). Results: All patients engrafted neutrophils (median, Day 11; range, Day 9-23) and became platelet independent (median, Day 9; range, Day 7-36). There were 5 cases of Grade 3-4 regimen-related pulmonary toxicity, 1 at 12 Gy, and 4 at 15 Gy. Complete responses, partial responses, and stabilizations were achieved in 33%, 26%, and 41% of patients, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimates of 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival for 56 evaluable patients are 24% and 36%, respectively. Median time of follow-up among survivors was 96 months (range, 77-136 months). Conclusion: Total marrow irradiation as a second myeloablative therapy is feasible. The estimated maximum tolerated dose for TMI in a tandem transplant setting was 13.5 Gy. Because 20% of patients are surviving at 8 years free of disease, further studies of TMI are warranted.

Zaucha, Renata E. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Buckner, Dean C. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Barnett, Todd [The Swedish Hospital Medical Center, Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Holmberg, Leona A. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Gooley, Ted [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Hooper, Heather A. P.A.-C. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Maloney, David G. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Appelbaum, Frederick [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Bensinger, William I. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: wbensing@fhcrc.org

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ash Static Liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This laboratory study was focused on assessing fundamental geotechnical engineering properties of fly ash.  It involved the testing of fly ash recovered from the existing ash ponds and from dry fly ash silos operated by 5 participating utilities.  Materials from 22 different sites were involved in the testing program.  To provide comprehensive fundamental understanding of the similarities and differences between the samples, a series of basic geotechnical engineering characterization ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Deep-Sea Natural Products, Biogenic Polyphosphate (Bio-PolyP) and Biogenic Silica (Bio-Silica), as Biomimetic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of a Morphogenetically-Active Polymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Bone defects in human, caused by fractures/nonunions or trauma, gain increasing impact and have become a medical challenge in the present-day aging population. Frequently, those fractures require surgical intervention which ideally relies on autografts or suboptimally on allografts. Therefore, it is pressing and likewise challenging to develop bone substitution materials to heal bone defects. During the differentiation of osteoblasts from their mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells and of osteoclasts from their hemopoietic precursor cells, a lineage-specific release of growth factors and a trans-lineage homeostatic cross-talk via signaling molecules take place. Hence, the major hurdle is to fabricate a template that is functioning in a way mimicking the morphogenetic, inductive role(s) of the native extracellular matrix. In the last few years, two naturally occurring polymers that are produced by deep-sea sponges, the biogenic polyphosphate (bio-polyP) and biogenic silica (bio-silica) have also been identified as promoting morphogenetic on both osteoblasts andMar. Drugs 2013, 11 719

Xiaohong Wang; Heinz C. Schröder; Qingling Feng; Florian Draenert; Werner E. G. Müller

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Diopside (CaO-MgO-2SiO2)-fluorapatite (9CaO-3P2O5-CaF2) glass-ceramics: Potential materials for bone tissue engineering  

SciTech Connect

Glass-ceramics in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) - fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F] system are potential candidates for restorative dental and bone implant materials. In the present study, a series of glasses along diopside - fluorapatite binary system have been prepared with varying diopside/fluorapatite ratios for their potential applications in bone tissue engineering. The glasses were obtained from compositions with fluorapatite contents varying between 0-40 wt.%. The sintering ability and crystallization kinetics of as obtained amorphous glasses have been studied through hot-stage microscopy (HSM) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), respectively while crystalline phase evolution in sintered GCs has been followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) adjoined with Rietveld-R.I.R. technique and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, biodegradation and apatite forming ability of glass-ceramics were investigated by immersion of glass-ceramic discs in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution while chemical degradation and weight loss of glass-ceramics were studied by immersion in Tris-HCl in accordance with standard ISO 10993-14. The addition of fluorapatite (10-25 wt.%) in diopside glass system significantly enhanced the sintering ability of glass-ceramics and improved their apatite forming ability along with their biodegradation behaviour. Moreover, the in vitro cellular responses to glass-ceramics showed good cell viability and significant stimulation of osteoblastic differentiation, suggesting the possible use of the glass-ceramics for bone regeneration.

Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Pascual, Maria J.; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Hae-Won; Ferreira, Jose M.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

109

Enhancement of mechanical strength of TiO{sub 2}/high-density polyethylene composites for bone repair with silane-coupling treatment  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical properties of composites made up of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and silanated TiO{sub 2} particles for use as a bone-repairing material were investigated in comparison with those of the composites of HDPE with unsilanized TiO{sub 2} particles. The interfacial morphology and interaction between silanated TiO{sub 2} and HDPE were analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The absorption in spectral bands related to the carboxyl bond in the silane-coupling agent, the vinyl group in the HDPE, and the formation of the ether bond was studied in order to assess the influence of the silane-coupling agent. The SEM micrograph showed that the 'bridging effect' between HDPE and TiO{sub 2} was brought about by the silane-coupling agent. The use of the silane-coupling agent and the increase of the hot-pressing pressure for shaping the composites facilitated the penetration of polymer into cavities between individual TiO{sub 2} particles, which increased the density of the composite. Therefore, mechanical properties such as bending yield strength and Young's modulus increased from 49 MPa and 7.5 GPa to 65 MPa and 10 GPa, respectively, after the silane-coupling treatment and increase in the hot-pressing pressure.

Hashimoto, Masami [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan)]. E-mail: masami@jfcc.or.jp; Takadama, Hiroaki [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan)]. E-mail: takadama@jfcc.or.jp; Mizuno, Mineo [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan)]. E-mail: mizuno@jfcc.or.jp; Kokubo, Tadashi [Research Institute for Science and Technology, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai 487-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: kokubo@isc.chubu.ac.jp

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Detection of occult infection following total joint arthroplasty using sequential technetium-99m HDP bone scintigraphy and indium-111 WBC imaging  

SciTech Connect

Preoperative exclusion or confirmation of periprosthetic infection is essential for correct surgical management of patients with suspected infected joint prostheses. The sensitivity and specificity of (/sup 111/In)WBC imaging in the diagnosis of infected total joint prostheses was examined in 28 patients and compared with sequential (/sup 99m/Tc)HDP/(/sup 111/In)WBC scintigraphy and aspiration arthrography. The sensitivity of preoperative aspiration cultures was 12%, with a specificity of 81% and an accuracy of 58%. The sensitivity of (/sup 111/In)WBC imaging alone was 100%, with a specificity of 50% and an accuracy of 65%. When correlated with the bone scintigraphy and read as sequential (/sup 99m/Tc)HDP/(/sup 111/In)WBC imaging, the sensitivity was 88%, specificity 95%, and accuracy 93%. This study demonstrates that (/sup 111/In)WBC imaging is an extremely sensitive imaging modality for the detection of occult infection of joint prostheses. It also demonstrates the necessity of correlating (/sup 111/In)WBC images with (/sup 99m/Tc)HDP skeletal scintigraphy in the detection of occult periprosthetic infection.

Johnson, J.A.; Christie, M.J.; Sandler, M.P.; Parks, P.F. Jr.; Homra, L.; Kaye, J.J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ethos and answerability in the novelized epic: passional readings of Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh, David Jones's In Parenthesis, and Chenjerai Hove's Bones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposes an approach to a solution for the problem of the perceived ‚separatedness? of language from reality which employs the rhetorical concept of ethos, the doctrinal concept of the Chalcedonian definition of the nature of the incarnated Christ, and Mikhail Bakhtin’s notion of ‚answerability.? As an alternative to theories of reading and interpretation based on the arbitrariness of linguistic meaning, radical skepticism, and the death of the author, the approach defined in this study emphasizes affirmation of the centrality of the human person and the necessity of close, loving attention as the grounds of both aesthetic vision and ethical action. Developing three exemplary readings of novelized epics including Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Aurora Leigh, David Jones’s In Parenthesis, and Chenjerai Hove’s Bones, the study demonstrates how loving, careful attention to ethos—the definition of which is expanded to include relationships between language and character in literary works, genres, characters, authors, and teachers—is the prerequisite for answerability in literary relationships. Whether one is primarily interested in authors, characters, genres, canon, readers, or critical reception, attention to ethos illuminates the ways in which responses to literary works are conditioned by and analogous to responses to persons. The complex and irreducible relationships between the ‚word? and the ‚person? require an individual answerability for which there is no alibi. Ultimately, the ‚word? and the ‚world? are united in the answerable person, whether that person is an author, a character, a reader, a critic or a teacher.

Sibley, Pamela Jean

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Optimizing Ash Handling - SmartAshTM System Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High ash levels in electrostatic precipitator (ESP) hoppers are notorious for increasing particulate matter (PM) emissions and plume opacity. Conventional means of monitoring hopper ash levels and fly ash handling system performance have been time-consuming and problematic. Neundorfer, Inc., has developed a fly ash conveying system-monitoring package (SmartAshSystem) that provides improved monitoring of fly ash removal process parameters and provides graphical depictions of ash system performance. Additi...

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fly Ash Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

..., ASM International, 2006, p 499â??500ASM Handbook, Vol 13C, Corrosion: Environments and IndustriesCorrosion and Erosion of Ash-Handling

114

Wet Bottom Ash Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

..., ASM International, 2006, p 499â??500ASM Handbook, Vol 13C, Corrosion: Environments and IndustriesCorrosion and Erosion of Ash-Handling

115

Dancing in the ashes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following novel is the third draft of my creative thesis entitled Dancing in the Ashes . It is an exploration of the Detroit rave… (more)

Malesh, Vytautas Adolph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ash cloud aviation advisories  

SciTech Connect

During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ash Handling System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Ash Handling System Maintenance Guide provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for the ash handling system.

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

118

Continuing disposal of coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large volume of power-plant coal ash produced and stricter Federal water pollution controls are making ash disposal increasingly difficult for utilities. The protection of surface and ground water quality required in the Resource conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act's Clean Water Act (CWA) amendments of 1977 have raised the cost of disposal to a level where an acceptable method must be found. The Electric Power Research Institute's Coal Ash Disposal Manual (EPRI-FM--1257) describes-ash chemistry, disposal site selection, site monitoring and reclamation, and other information of interest to utilities that are making cost estimates and procedure evaluations. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Comparison between MSW Ash and RDF Ash from Incineration Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the unwashed incineration ash were tested and analyzed for TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure of auxiliary air. The flue gases are PEER-REVIEW 963 #12;eventually led through air pollution control system to prevent visible flue gas emissions due to higher moisture content. TCLP ANALYSIS Samples of fly ash

Columbia University

120

Operational Implications of Airborne Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic ash clouds pose a real threat to aircraft safety. The ash is abrasive and capable of causing serious damage to aircraft engines, control surfaces, windshields, and landing lights. In addition, ash can clog the pitot—static systems, which ...

Gary L. Hufford; Leonard J. Salinas; James J. Simpson; Elliott G. Barske; David C. Pieri

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Incineration and incinerator ash processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel small-scale studies on the dissolution and anion exchange recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and at the Rocky Flats Plant. Results from these two studies are discussed in context with incinerator design considerations that might help to mitigate ash processing related problems. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Blum, T.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Coal Ash Carbon Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market resistance to the use of ash containing elevated levels of carbon and/or ammonia has become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years as a result of increased use of nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction environmental control technologies. EPRI initiated this state of practice assessment to help power producers evaluate alternatives for ash beneficiation.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Nature Bulletin No. 649-A October 1, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRICKLY ASH AND PRICKLY PEAR In the plant kingdom, as among people, there are so-me that we avoid. They have few virtues, if any, and our experiences with them are painful or have unpleasant after effects. Poison ivy is a notorious example. Prickly Ash, a shrub, is another. Although not poisonous it is thickly armed with wicked thorns and has no ornamental, economic or wildlife value. In 1821 when the first section lines were established in Cook County, the surveyor recorded -- for the benefit of land buyers -- the principal kinds of trees and other vegetation observed along each mile. He frequently encountered prickly ash in thickets near the Little Calumet River and also the north and south branches of the Chicago River.

124

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on identifying ash deposit materials and mounting them to a heat transfer surface for further study. A group of synthetic slag of various compositions was also produced using a sodium silicate binder, Powder River Basin (PRB) bottom ash, and ash cenospheres for porosity to test the effects of pulse detonation techniques on the removal of ash deposits.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

125

Insurance coverage for coal ash liabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses how liability insurance can be a valuable tool for limiting coal ash liabilities.

Elkind, D.L. [Dickstein Shapiro LLP (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Integrated Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is directed toward solving new challenges to meeting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge limits for ammonia and selected metals from coal-fired power plants. Based on the field and laboratory study of fly ash ponds at five operating coal-fired power plants, the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in fly ash sluicing systems are discussed and recommendations are made as to how to best manage the pond...

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Genetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bats, tool handles, furniture, and firewood. However, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) develop an efficient regeneration and genetic transformation system for green ash, (2) regenerateGenetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance

129

Fly ash chemical classification based on lime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Fox, J. [BASF Construction Chemicals, LLC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Bone Demineralization and Deproteination Studies: A Biochemical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activation energy for demineralization increased with increasing HCl ... Bactericidal Effect of Silver Reinforced Hydroxyapatite and Carbon Nanotubes ... Microstructural and Mechanical Investigation of Macadamia Nutshells on Different ...

131

Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As seen in the fluorescence microscopy images, cells align with the gradient at the high end of the taper (left), and orient randomly on the low end ...

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mechanics of Hierarchical Structures in Bone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the role of nonbonded interactions between mineral and collagen on collagen mechanics. We have also investigated molecular level ...

133

Engineering Fibrous Scaffold for Bone Regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural Characteristics of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions · Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Nano Hydroxyapatite ...

134

Composite bone substitutes prepared by two methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Sabanay, B. Geiger, “Rotated plywood structure of primaryWoven fiber structure. c) Plywood-like structure present inarrays, woven fibers, plywood-like lamellar structures, and

Lee, Hoe Yun; Lee, Hoe Yun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Bioactive Ceramic Foams for Bone Tissue Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Brittnee Mound, Jordan Ball, Fatmata Barrie, Michele Manuel, Jossephine Allen, Juan Claudio Nino. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Juan Claudio Nino.

136

Doctor blading artificial nacre and bone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial synthesis and fabrication of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by using the metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae · Micromechanical ...

137

Bird Bones in Bending and Torsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial synthesis and fabrication of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by using the metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae · Micromechanical ...

138

Silver nanoparticles in alveolar bone surgery devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silver (Ag) ions have well-known antimicrobial properties and have been applied as nanostrategies in many medical and surgical fields, including dentistry. The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) may be an option for reducing bacterial adhesion to dental ...

Stefano Sivolella, Edoardo Stellini, Giulia Brunello, Chiara Gardin, Letizia Ferroni, Eriberto Bressan, Barbara Zavan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water Management in Ash-Handling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1980, EPA proposed revisions to the effluent standards and guidelines for fly ash and bottom ash transport systems. This review of utility practices provides a comprehensive account of the operation of and problems experienced in wet handling of bottom and fly ash and suggests areas for further research.

1987-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Bottom Ash System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to personnel involved in the bottom ash system and its components, including good maintenance practices, condition monitoring, predictive and preventive maintenance techniques, probable failure modes, and troubleshooting guidance. The guide was developed primarily to provide detailed maintenance and troubleshooting information but also includes basic system information.

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

142

Compositional Analysis of Beneficiated Fly Ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fly ash is a byproduct of combustion of coal in coal-fired powerplants through ... to be disposed of at a significant cost to power plant companies, and ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Use of Class C Fly Ash in High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of fly ash in concrete is a well-established practice, the volume of high-calcium Class C ash used lags behind that of low-calcium Class F ash. Because Class C may be the only type of ash produced in some western states, this disparity can significantly limit its use potential. The literature results presented in this report represent the first phase of a longer term research effort to provide technical information supporting the increased use of Class C ash in concrete applications.

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre...

146

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a...

147

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Rocky Flats ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. This test will also gain information on the effects of the glovebox atmosphere (moisture) on the stabilized material. This document provides instructions for testing Rocky Flats Ash in the HC-21C muffle furnace process.

Winstead, M.L.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R{sub B/A} of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R{sub B/A} is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

Ots, A. A., E-mail: aots@sti.ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Investigation of Ammonia Adsorption on Fly Ash and Potential Impacts of Ammoniated Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems associated with ammoniated fly ash have become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years due to the increased use of ammonia-based environmental control technologies. Of particular note is more frequent use of ammonia-based NOx control systems and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) conditioning with ammonia. To help power producers evaluate and mitigate the impacts of ammoniated ash, this project provides crucial information in the areas of fly ash characterization, adsorption test...

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

EML: Environmental Measurements Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the archive included: human bone, animal tissue and bone, vegetation, milk and food ash, soil, lake water and sediment, seawater and aerosol filters. Over 70,000 samples,...

153

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 2: Ash Use R&D and Clean Coal By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Coal Ash Contaminants in Wetlands | SREL Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracey Tuberville, and Bill Hopkins The ash plume wetland (APW). The APW received coal combustion wastes from a breach in a receiving basin in the 1970s. Several trace metals...

155

Airborne Volcanic Ash Forecast Area Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of aircraft flight safety operations, daily comparisons between modeled, hypothetical, volcanic ash plumes calculated with meteorological forecasts and analyses were made over a 1.5-yr period. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian ...

Barbara J. B. Stunder; Jerome L. Heffter; Roland R. Draxler

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The 1983 Ash Wednesday Fires in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Australia experienced the most disastrous bushfires in over 40 years on Ash Wednesday, 16 February 1983. This article describes the meteorological conditions prior to, during and after these fires, and includes photographs from GMS-2. It also ...

M. E. Voice; F. J. Gauntlett

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Winter'04Ash4-5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process, fly ash is used as a raw material to substitute for part of the clay and shale, which are the two main raw materials of a conventional brick. Test bricks produced...

158

Ashe County- Wind Energy System Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a...

159

NETL: Events - World of Coal Ash 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(WOCA) 2007 conference, jointly sponsored by the American Coal Ash Association and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, will be held May 7-10, 2007 at...

160

Carbon-in-Ash Monitor Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the lack of publicly available performance and operational data for the current carbon-in-ash monitor (CIAM) commercial offerings, EPRI and Southern Company initiated a demonstration of several commercial technologies on Southern Company's coal-fired units.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Case Studies in Ash Pond Management, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Toward Developing Integrated Strategies for Managing Multiple Constituents in Ash Pond Discharges," EPRI's second workshop on Ash Pond Management, was hosted by TVA on May 16, 2006, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The presentations in this workshop reflected specific research challenges identified by participants in the first Ash Pond Management workshop, held in 2004. Among the presentations given in this second workshop were the following: Ash Pond Limnology Optimizing Ash Pond Treatment of Ammonia Predic...

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management, and Environmental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants in the United States produce more than 92 million tons of coal ash per year. About 40% is beneficially used in a variety of applications, and about 60% is managed in storage and disposal sites. This technical update summarizes information and data on the physical and chemical characteristics of coal ash, beneficial use applications, disposal practices, and management practices to mitigate environmental concerns.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of several boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but also lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of a number of boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Densification of pond ash by blasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash from thermal power plants is disposed, in huge quantities in ash ponds, which occupy large land areas otherwise useful for agriculture, housing, or other development. For effective rehabilitation of ash ponds, densification of the slurry deposit is essential to increase the bearing capacity and to improve its resistance to liquefaction. Extensive field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of deep blasting for densification of deposited fly ash. Ninety explosions comprising 15 single blasts, with varying depths and quantities of charges, and 3 group blasts, each having 25 charges placed at various spacings, were carried out. The compaction achieved in terms of an increase in relative density was evaluated from surface settlement measurements. Extensive field monitoring was undertaken through pore-water pressure measurements, vibration measurements, penetration tests, and block vibration tests. For the average charge of 2--4 g of explosive per cubic meter of untreated deposit, the average relative density was found to improve from 50% to 56--58%. Analysis of the test results indicates that deep blasting may be an effective technique for modest compaction of loose fly ash deposits. The field testing program presented in this paper provides valuable information that can be used for planning blast densification of fly ash deposits.

Gandhi, S.R.; Dey, A.K.; Selvam, S. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

SciTech Connect

Investigates the selling of by-products of coal-fired power generation--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber sludge--by utilities for use in highways, parking lots, cement, roofing, bricks, and blocks. Points out that the EPA has drafted tough new regulations for solid-waste storage, transportation, and disposal that may soon cost power plants $25-$40 a ton to dispose of wastes. Reports that the EPRI is studying high-volume by-product applications that have low technology requirements (e.g. fly ash for use in highways, parking lots, and utility construction) and medium-volume, medium-technology applications (e.g. by-products used for cement manufacture, asphalt, blocks, bricks, roofing granules, and wallboards). Reveals that EPRI plans to eventually identify a representative set of perhaps half a dozen basic fly ashes, characterize them, do proportion studies of existing concrete mixes (including those with fly ash in them), and then develop guidelines for fly ash proportions in concrete.

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of Reference Methods and Reference Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SRM 972 Vitamin D in Human Serum - Vitamin D metabolites, four levels SRM 998 Angiotensin I - Purity SRM 1400 Bone Ash - Elements SRM ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

171

Exhibitor: MURLIN CHEMICAL INC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Murlin Chemical, Inc. manufactures Bone Ash at its plant located in West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, USA. Established in 1978, Murlin Chemical supplies ...

172

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 1998 - Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sediments, human tissues, and ocean sediment, and is working on additional unique matrices: ashed bone, ocean shellfish, and Rocky Flats Soil-II. ...

173

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase in coal-fired power plants and tighter environmental problems have put utilities in the position of marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge by turning waste products into a resource. Many utilities are looking beyond road and structural fill uses in their marketing efforts. Slag can be made into sandblasting grit, aggregate, and roofing granules, or used for soil stabilization or the chemical fixation of municipal wastes. Composition and collection variations discourage many utilities from marketing their by-products, while availability can be a problem for customers if the power plant should shut down. Other problems include storage and transportation, competition, and institutional barriers. Documentation of the fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber waste markets by the Electric Power Research Institute considers these factors and develops a marketing method to help utilities evaluate and promote their product. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2011 ... Upon cooling, the molten ash forms a brittle glass that flakes off, taking the coating with it. Like sand, ash is made mostly of silica and poses a ...

177

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3000-ft-length fly ash base under a highway shoulder will help demonstrate the impact of reused ash on structural integrity and groundwater. This report provides valuable design details for utilities seeking to increase ash reuse and for state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

ASH VITRIFICATION -A TECHNOLOGY READY FOR TRANSFER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methods for treating ash in the near future [1]. The lack of specific rules by RCRA has led to confusion the Toxic Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extraction tests conducted on slag samples which were(ml!!l) in TCLP Extract Arsenic BQL · Barium 0.8 Cadmium 0.010 Chromium BOL Lead 0.43 Mercury 0.0007 Selenium BOL

Columbia University

180

Plutonium dissolution from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash  

SciTech Connect

Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) soon will commence recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash. In preparation for this processing, Rockwell undertook literature and laboratory studies to identify, select and optimize plutonium dissolution methods for treating the ash. Ash reburning, followed by dissolution in nitric acid containing calcium fluoride, was selected as the processing method for the ash. Recommended values of process parameters were identified. Using the selected process, 99.5% plutonium recovery was achieved, leaving about 12.7 wt % heel residue for an equal weight composite of the three ashes tested. 15 refs., 26 figs.

Delegard, C.H.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete  

SciTech Connect

Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol ubility_Paper.doc Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 and Karl Schroeder 2 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Research Group Leader, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, activated carbon, pH ABSTRACT It is expected that increased controls on Hg emissions will shift the environmental burden from the flue gas to the solid coal utilization by-products (CUB), such as fly ash and flue-gas

186

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The Effect of Ammonia on Mercury Partitioning in Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management options and environmental assessments for fly ash are driven primarily by their physical and chemical characteristics. This report describes the results of a laboratory study on the leaching of mercury from several paired fly ash samples from facilities employing powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for mercury control. While previous EPRI research has shown that mercury leaching from ash with PAC is negligible, it has also been found that ammonia complexes can increase the mobility of so...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

In-Plant Ash-Handling Reference Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite problems with ash-handling systems that have led to failures in electrostatic precipitators, there has been no extensive reference manual for specifying, operating, and maintaining such systems. The comprehensive manual compiled in this study serves as a reference for every phase of boiler bottom ash- and fly ash-handling systems design and operation as well as a primer for those unfamiliar with these systems.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Identification of Arsenic Species in Coal Ash Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of the chemical species and compounds of arsenic in individual coal fly ash particles will help provide a scientifically sound basis for assessing health risks from inhalation of these particles. This report presents the results of an analytical chemistry study of coal-combustion ash, with some work also completed on oil-combustion ash and copper smelter dust collected from several sources in the United States and Europe. Results showed that most arsenic is present on the surface of coal a...

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

NETL: Utilization Projects - Managing High-Carbon Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing High-Carbon Ash Managing High-Carbon Ash Task 1: Effect of Coal Quality The objective of this task is to assess if fuel selection is an important factor determining ash quality. Work on this task will involve each of the three participating organizations. Ash samples from three coals will be generated under identical firing conditions in the pilot furnace at the University of Utah, and the matching ash and coal samples sent to Brown. Additional matching sets of coal and ash will be obtained from commercial-scale firing at Southern Company. The ashes will be characterized for LOI and surfactant adsorption activity under standard conditions and trends with fuel type identified. At the same time, chars will be prepared from the matching coal set under standard conditions in a laboratory furnace and also characterized for surfactant adsorptivity. A variety of standard conditions may need to be explored. The combined data set will be analyzed to determine cross correlations between ash behavior, standard laboratory char behavior, and parent coal properties. Our goal is to be able to anticipate ash behavior either (a) from coal properties directly, or (b) from the properties of chars made by a simple laboratory procedure. Either could be the basis for a coal quality index -- one based on fuel properties and the other based on a simple screening test.

192

Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity by Yong Wang, Guang- chun Yao, and Bing Li. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: PDF.

193

Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS. Author(s), Udayashankar B C, Raghavendra T. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Udayashankar  ...

194

NETL: News Release - Novel Treatment of Fly Ash Yields Safer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully tested at near full-scale levels. Easily integrated with existing ash handling equipment, the simple-to-operate, cost-efficient technology can be retrofitted to...

195

Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Mechanical Activation of Deposited Fly Ash by Grinding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... According to laboratory experience the breaking of fly ash particles is required to increase its hydraulic potential (Opoczky, 2001). Aim of the ...

197

Rebound characteristics for ash particles impacting a planar surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of ash deposition on the heat transfer tubes in a boiler reduces the heat transfer coefficient by about 25%. Because of these fouling layers

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Embankment Loading on Saturated Coal Ash: Centrifuge Demonstration Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an embankment of coal combustion residuals or soil is built over a coal ash pond, pore water pressures can accumulate in the underlying saturated ash deposits and trigger a rapid slope failure. This report documents a scale model test completed to obtain data on the conditions that may lead to a slope failure. A 6.5-inch tall sand embankment was built on top of a 6-inch thick deposit of saturated fly ash. The strength of the fly ash was characterized using consolidated undrained triaxial ...

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

Sulloway, H. M.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Coal Fly Ash as Alternative Source of Smelter Grade Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, COM 2011 (held with the World Gold Conference), POSTER SESSION. Presentation Title, Coal Fly Ash as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

HIGH STRENGTH PHOSPHATE CEMENT USING INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT ASHES ...  

industries that use fossil fuels. Approximately one third of this ash is recycled in the cement based products as an additive. Typically, ...

202

Long-Range Forecast Trajectories of Volcanic Ash from Redoubt Ash from Redoubt Volcano Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Redoubt Volcano in Alaska began a series of eruptions on 14 December 1989. Volcanic ash was often reported to reach heights where, as it moved with the upper-level flow, it could affect aircraft operations thousands of km from the eruption. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder; Glenn D. Rolph

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Environmental Performance Assessment of Coal Ash Use Sites: Waukegan Ash Embankment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive database on the environmental effects of reusing coal combustion residues is essential to increased application of these products. This report discusses changes in soils, vegetation, and groundwater quality around an embankment containing coal fly ash and develops an approach for building a statistically sound environmental performance database.

1991-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Environmental Performance Assessment of Coal Ash Use Sites: Little Canada Structural Ash Fill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An insufficient database on the environmental effects of reusing coal combustion residues hampers increased utilization of these products. This report discusses the changes in soils, vegetation, and groundwater quality around a structural fill containing coal fly ash and develops an approach for building a statistically sound environmental performance database.

1990-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

Strain Rate Dependent Response of Rabbit Femur Bones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overview of Microstructural Models Applied to Hot Rolling Mill for Long ... Study of Composite Materials Application for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Blades.

206

Fabrication of Bone Substitutes by Sponge Replica Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous BCP scaffold was fabricated by the sponge replica method using PU sponge. After 3 times of dip coating and the subsequent oven drying, burning out

207

Fracture, bone mineral density, and the effects of calcitonin receptor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

minus CTR isoform is expressed in essentially all human tissues known to .... duplicate error, and (3) Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium test p>0.001. Statistics.

208

Mechanical Behavior of Biological Materials I: Bone and Teeth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... These cells participate in the regenerative process through ... rise to overall loading-unloading hysteresis and cyclic dissipation of energy.

209

Nanostructured Bio-scaffold for Bone Implants, Stents: A Biomedical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mechanical toughness and proliferation and perform controlled on-site drug ... Engineering Non-Stick, Pro-Stick/Adhesion and Anti-Corrosion Surfaces with ...

210

Selective Laser Sintering Fabrication of Bioglass Bone Scaffolds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-Site Speaker (Planned), Mariano Velez. Abstract Scope, Bioactive glasses implanted in vivo convert to hydroxyapatite and form a strong bond with ...

211

On the mechanistic origins of toughness in bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MM.   1988.   Twisted  plywood  architecture  of  collagen the existence of a “plywood” type structure, where the 

Launey, Maximilien E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Organosilicate nanoparticles as gene delivery vehicles for bone cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) proliferation. The metabolic response of these cells after particle ingestion was also characterized in order to ensure that the osteoblasts retained their phenotype. The expression of various proteins involved in ...

Moudgil, Suniti, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Molecular and ultrastructural changes in human bone with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial synthesis and fabrication of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by using the metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae · Micromechanical ...

214

Diagnostics for Bone Disease Taking the High Road or the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hip fracture incidence alone will increase 2-3 fold by 2040 according to predictions from the Surgeon General's office. Dual-energy x-ray ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

CASE REPORT Open Access The extravascular compartment of the bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under suboptimal anti-malarial prophylaxis with doxycycline. Microbiological explorations, including

216

Nature-Inspired Hybrid Structural Materials for Bone Repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fabrication of a Cellulosic Nanocomposite Scaffold with Improved Supermolecular Structure as a Potential Cardiovascular Tissue-Engineered Graft .

217

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

crack bridging by collagen fibrils. At the largest length-scales (10's to 100's m), the primary sources of toughening are extrinsic and result from extensive crack deflection and...

218

The Development of Bone Engineering Materials Based on Calcium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional Short-Term Glow Discharge Nitriding of 316l Austenitic Steel · Using Accumulative Roll Bonding to Process Ultrafine Grained ...

219

Fracture and Fatigue of Biological Materials: Bone and Teeth - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 9, 2007 ... This presentation is a selection from the TMS 2007 Annual Meeting Short Course "Biology for Materials Scientists and Engineers." It discusses ...

220

Good bones: anthropological scientific collaboration around computed tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report preliminary results from a socio-technical analysis of scientific collaboration, specifically a loosely connected group of physical anthropology researchers. Working from a combination of interview data and artifact analysis, we identify current ... Keywords: scientific collaboratories, virtual organizations

Andrea H. Tapia; Rosalie Ocker; Mary Beth Rosson; Bridget Blodgett

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Colloquium: Failure of molecules, bones, and the Earth itself  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials fail by recurring rupture and shearing of interatomic bonds at microscopic, molecular scales, leading to disintegration of matter at macroscale and a loss of function. In this Colloquium, the state-of-the-art of ...

Buehler, Markus J.

222

Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , The effect of aging on crack-growth resistance andR.K. Reprogel, Effects of aging on the mechanical behaviorNalla et al. , Effect of aging on the toughness of human

Ager III, Joel W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

224

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Manganese Occurrence Near Three Coal Ash Impoundments in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research performed to better understand the cause of elevated manganese concentrations sometimes found in groundwater near coal ash management facilities. Three impoundments in Illinois were selected for detailed field and laboratory studies of conditions conducive to manganese release from coal ash as well as natural soils.

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

Murtha, M.J.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

Short, Daniel

228

Characterization of Ammonia Leaching from Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents the results of a preliminary laboratory assessment of the leaching of ammonia from coal ashes that have been ammoniated by pollution control devices installed on power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. This laboratory assessment project was designed to measure the leaching rates of ammonia from ashes in a disposal environment.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Infiltration Processing of Metal Matrix-Fly Ash Particle Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal Matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings while saving production energy and raw material costs. Ash-derived metal matrix composites, in particular, can provide high value-added use to coal fly ash. This report describes research on use of pressure infiltration techniques to produce composites for automotive component applications.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the construction and performance testing of a 3000-ft length of fly ash base under a highway shoulder. Following three years of service, the road shoulder shows no signs of premature deterioration. This report should aid utilities seeking to increase ash-use rates in highway-related projects, as well as state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Evaluation of Leachate Chemistry from Coal Refuse Blended and Layered with Fly Ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alkaline fly ash has been studied as a liming agent within coal refuse fills to reclaim acid-forming refuse. Previous studies focused on bulk blending ash… (more)

Hunt, Joseph Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be obtained. This policy was adopted in the context of an ongoing debate over

234

Purple traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer The question of whether or not DOE's forests are infested with Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been answered. On May 10, a trap on Highway 95 at the Highway 58 interchange produced the first instance of the destructive non-native insect in Roane County. Five days later, a second trap on Bethel Valley Road near the East Portal turned up the first capture in Anderson County. "Unfortunately, these finds signal the beginning of a decline of ash species throughout the reservation" according to Greg Byrd, forester with the ORNL Natural Resources Program. "Dieback will become more prominent as the insect populations expand. Native ash trees have little defense against this pest, which was

235

Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The incineration of MSW in fluidized beds is a commonly applied waste management practice. The composition of the ashes produced in a fluidized bed boiler has important environmental implications as potentially toxic trace elements may be associated with ash particles and it is therefore essential to determine the mechanisms controlling the association of trace elements to ash particles, including the role of major element composition. The research presented here uses micro-analytical techniques to study the distribution of major and trace elements and determine the importance of affinity-based binding mechanisms in separate cyclone ash particles from MSW combustion. Particle size and the occurrence of Ca and Fe were found to be important factors for the binding of trace elements to ash particles, but the binding largely depends on random associations based on the presence of a particle when trace elements condensate in the flue gas.

Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Rauch, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Division of Water Environment Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Sven Hultins Gata 8, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Cho, P.; Steenari, B.-M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Behavior of Ammoniated Fly Ash: Effects of Ammonia on Fly Ash Handling, Disposal, and End-Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implementation of ammonia-based nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technologies has had the undesired side effect of creating potential problems for operating units due to ammonia-contaminated fly ash. The work described in this report is a continuation of long-term EPRI efforts to address various industry concerns associated with ammoniated fly ash.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Scale-up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is the first large pilot scale test of a new process to passivate the carbon in ash so that it can be used in concrete without physically removing the carbon from the ash. The tests were conducted at PPL's Montour SES, sponsored by DOE and supported by EPRI. Near full-scale industrial equipment was used to expose fly ash, carbon mixtures to ozone to see if ozone would passivate the surface of carbon so that it would not react with air entraining agents that are used by concrete manufacturers...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Arsenic and Selenium Speciation in Fly Ash and Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work is to predict As and Se behavior in pond wastewater based on coal and power plant characteristics so that utilities will have tools for selection of coals (and blends) that will allow them to meet applicable water quality regulations in the ash pond discharge. Arsenic and selenium were chosen as the focus of this work because the behavior of arsenic and selenium is not well correlated with pH in ash pond water, but with speciation of these oxyanions in the fly ash. Furthermore, ...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Coal- and Ash-Handling Systems Reliability Conference and Workshop Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents papers, discussion summaries, and conclusions from an EPRI workshop on reliability problems with coal- and ash-handling systems in power plants. Held in October 1980 in St. Louis, the workshop covered yard and in-plant coal handling, frozen coal, fugitive dust, fly ash handling, bottom ash handling, and ash disposal.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power color from pulp mill effluent using coal ash. Prevent coal ash adsorbent from leaching arsenic, chromium, lead, and zinc. Define a treatment procedure using coal ash that will result in the maximum

Hutcheon, James M.

248

Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

Hopkins, William A.

249

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 1: High-Volume Uses/Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

250

Guideline for Control and Prevention of Fly Ash Erosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler tube failures (BTFs) represent the largest portion of availability loss in the fossil boiler industry at about 4%. Approximately 25% of all tube failures are due to fly ash erosion (FAE).

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion ...

257

Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

Self, S.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Recoverable immobilization of transuranic elements in sulfate ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash at least about 20% of which is sulfates of transuranic elements. The ash is mixed with a metal which can be aluminum, cerium, samarium, europium, or a mixture thereof, in amounts sufficient to form an alloy with the transuranic elements, plus an additional amount to reduce the transuranic element sulfates to elemental form. Also added to the ash is a fluxing agent in an amount sufficient to lower the percentage of the transuranic element sulfates to about 1% to about 10%. The mixture of the ash, metal, and fluxing agent is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the fluxing agent and the metal. The mixture is then cooled and the alloy is separated from the remainder of the mixture.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Adsorption of Trace Elements on Fresh and Weathered Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of trace elements are associated with fly ash produced by coal combustion. These trace elements are potentially of concern for human health if they are released to the environment, and thus it is important to understand their mobility in coal fly ash management settings. In the fly ash management environment, the ash may react with meteoric fluid to release trace elements into groundwater or surface water. However, fly ash particles also have a relatively high surface area and have the ability ...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT  

SciTech Connect

Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Triboelectric Fly Ash Beneficiation: Summary Report, Phase IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky has devised new approaches for extracting marketable fly ash from high carbon combustion ashes. Dry beneficiation technology based on pneumatic transport, triboelectric principles has emerged with the potential for high efficiency removal of carbon at low cost and with no secondary waste products. (EPRI Interim Report TR-109016, November, 1997; EPRI Interim Report TR-111647, November 1998; EPRI Report TE-113673, September 1999; E...

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Porat, Iris [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Amonette, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash 2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash October 28, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Participants List [PDF-31KB] Papers and Presentations Control Measures Predictive Performance Tools (Including Instrumentation) Processing and Utilization of High-LOI Fly Ash Beneficiation of High-LOI Fly Ash Characterization of High-LOI Fly Ash Poster Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

267

LOW-TEMPERATURE ASH SINTERING AND STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop fundamental sintering-viscosity relationships for coal-type ash at relatively low temperatures, with the end result being a simplified soot-blowing index for power systems. This involves correlating several important factors which control the ease of deposit removal, including deposit strength, deposit porosity, chemical composition, and temperature. Testing was performed on ashes derived from three coals and two biomass materials along with a standard soda-lime glass. The coals were selected because detailed analyses as well as ash samples were already available. Sintering characteristics of the ashes were to be determined by observation using an HSM and video recording system, with a stainless steel microscope stage chamber constructed to allow the use of corrosive gas atmospheres. The measurements would allow calculation of the viscosity of liquid phases as the sintering progressed, using the Frenkel and other sintering models. The sintering behavior and viscosity would be correlated with ash mineralogy and chemistry and information on bench-scale deposit strength and porosity to develop an initial relationship to predict deposit removability.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION FOR UTILIZATION OF ASH IN SOIL STABILIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) approved the use of coal ash in soil stabilization, indicating that environmental data needed to be generated. The overall project goal is to evaluate the potential for release of constituents into the environment from ash used in soil stabilization projects. Supporting objectives are: (1) To ensure sample integrity through implementation of a sample collection, preservation, and storage protocol to avoid analyte concentration or loss. (2) To evaluate the potential of each component (ash, soil, water) of the stabilized soil to contribute to environmental release of analytes of interest. (3) To use laboratory leaching methods to evaluate the potential for release of constituents to the environment. (4) To facilitate collection of and to evaluate samples from a field runoff demonstration effort. The results of this study indicated limited mobility of the coal combustion fly ash constituents in laboratory tests and the field runoff samples. The results presented support previous work showing little to negligible impact on water quality. This and past work indicates that soil stabilization is an environmentally beneficial CCB utilization application as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This project addressed the regulatory-driven environmental aspect of fly ash use for soil stabilization, but the demonstrated engineering performance and economic advantages also indicate that the use of CCBs in soil stabilization can and should become an accepted engineering option.

David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fly ash as a liming material for corn production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D. [University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE (US)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Rotunda, John R. (Fairmont, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cementitious binder from fly ash and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, investigations were undertaken to formulate cementitious binder by judicious blending of fly ash with Portland cement as well as by admixing fly ash with calcined phosphogypsum, fluorogypsum, lime sludge, and chemical activators of different finenesses. The effect of addition of calcined clay in these types of binders was studied. Data showed that cementitious binders of high compressive strength and water retentivity can be produced. The strength of masonry mortars increased with the addition of chemical activators. The strength development of binders takes place through formation of ettringite. C-S-H, and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. The binders are eminently suitable for partial replacement (up to 25%) of the cement in concrete without any detrimental affect on the strength. The results showed that fly ash can be used in the range from 45% to 70% in formulating these binders along with other industrial wastes to help in mitigating environmental pollution.

Singh, M.; Garg, M. [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)] [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ash reduction system using electrically heated particulate matter filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for reducing ash comprises a temperature estimator module that estimates a temperature of an electrically heated particulate matter (PM) filter. A temperature and position estimator module estimates a position and temperature of an oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter. An ash reduction control module adjusts at least one of exhaust flow, fuel and oxygen levels in the electrically heated PM filter to adjust a position of the oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter based on the oxidation wave temperature and position.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; He, Yongsheng [Sterling Heights, MI

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid Sintering-Leaching ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid ... Coal fly- ash from coal-fired power plants is rich in Al2O3 content with potential use as a ...

278

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions and increased the international consensus to improve volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low volcanic ash ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

279

Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

280

Activation Of Fly Ash-Lime Reactions By Curing At Elevated Temperature And By Addition Of Phosphogypsum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pozzolanic reactions play a key role in improving the compressive strengths of compacted fly ash-lime specimens. Based on studies performed with cement amended fly ash… (more)

Asha, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Testing the ecological stability of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: effects of heat, ash and mycorrhizal colonization on Pinus muricata seedling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal pan and heating it in a soil drying oven. During thesoil heating and ash addition, using a drying oven and ash

Peay, Kabir G.; Bruns, Thomas D.; Garbelotto, Matteo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Evaluation of an Ecolotree TM CAP for Closure of Coal Ash Disposal Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once they are filled or become inactive, coal ash disposal ponds at power plant sites must meet state and federal regulations for permanent closure. In-place closure of ash ponds typically requires an impermeable cover to protect groundwater from leachate generated by stormwater infiltration through the ash. This report documents the construction, maintenance, and performance of the EcolotreeTM Cap (Tree Cap) -- an ash pond closure alternative consisting of poplar trees, grasses, and surface soil amendme...

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sodium-based sorbent such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

284

Using Zeolites Synthesized from Fly Ash to Reduce Ammonia Loss to the Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes studies using zeolites synthesized from fly ash to reduce ammonia loss to the environment.

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mercury Leachability From Concretes That Contain Fly Ashes and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the leaching of mercury from concrete that contains fly ash and powdered activated carbon (PAC) sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied during this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing PAC. Only very low levels of mercuryless than 5 parts per trillionwere leached from the fly ash concretes in both 18-hour and 7-day laboratory leach tests.

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fly Ash Construction Manual for Road and Site Applications, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume construction manual details the use of fly ash in high-volume road construction and site development, covering all project elements from ash procurement to finishing. It addresses the use of fly ash in fills, embankments, backfills, subgrade stabilization, pavement base course, and slurried backfills, as well as its application as a soil amendment.

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

291

Swirling Melting Characteristics of Fly Ashes from Co-Firing of MSWI in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting treatment is an efficient for heavy metal stabilization in MSW fly ash. The fly ashes from co-firing of municipal solid waste and coal incinerator were melted in the swirling melting furnace system under various temperatures. The melting characteristics ... Keywords: fly ash, co-firing, melting, melting temperature, heavy metals, fixation rate

Wang Xue-tao; Jiao You-zhou; Xu Bin; Jin Bao-sheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Aluminum - Fly Ash Metal Matrix Composites as Advanced Automobile Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites such as silicon carbide-aluminum, alumina-aluminum, and graphite-aluminum represent a class of emerging materials with significant potential for commercial use in the auto and aerospace industries. In industrial foundry trials, a joint industry and Department of Energy project demonstrated a promising new process for producing a low cost aluminum metal matrix composite containing fly ash particles.

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thermal analysis and characterization of Elephant grass ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Here, ashes from incineration of elephant grass are characterized and its incorporation into clay to produce ... Moreover, thermal analysis was performed including gas emission ... Differential characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron sandstone deposit.

294

Novel Ash Beneficiation Processes for Managing Unburned Carbon and Ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes new fly ash beneficiation concepts for managing deleterious effects of unburned carbon and ammonia contamination associated with low nitrogen oxides (low-NOx) combustion systems. The report contains technical data, scientific discussion, and a description of ongoing development and scale-up activities.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces - with similar geometry and combusting similar coal. The method is potentially applicable to completely different boiler furnaces combusting different coal, and the authors recommend running the tests with new deposit samples. The data will then be applicable to the thermal design of a whole new class of furnaces, having similar geometry and combusting similar coal. This is expected to greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of thermal calculation as well as the efficiency of thermal design of steam boilers. (author)

Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan [Department of Thermomechanics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS); Vucicevic, Biljana [Laboratory for Thermal Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (RS); Goricanec, Darko [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, Maribor 2000 (Slovenia); Stevanovic, Zoran [Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Dusina 7, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Limnological Approach to the Management of Fly Ash Disposal Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash disposal ponds are found at half of the U.S. coal burning power plants and receive a mixture of fly ash and water used to sluice the ash from the power plant to the pond. Leaching of metals, notably Cu, As, and Se, from fly ash can be decreased by control of inflow pH, but their release through the discharge to surface waters remains a problem, particularly for Se. Comanagement of low volume wastes of varying chemical composition and volume with fly ash make the management of water quality at the...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

297

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, A.H.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in which more C was released as dissolved C than was oxidized to CO2 by the oxygen in water. We confirmed that both fly ash and two types of biochar (oak char [OKEB], and hardwood [HW] char) exhibited minimal leaching of heavy metals including Cr, Ni, Zn, Ga, and Ag, and no detectable leaching of Pb or Cd (data not shown) under the conditions tested. The Biochar HW had a slightly higher C/N ratio (334) and pH (7.7) than did the Biochar OKEB (284 and 6.5). There was no toxicity exhibited by the fly ash (not shown) or biochar leachates as measured by the Microtox© assay under the conditions tested. In previous results no toxicity was reported in testing the fly ash samples except for one high-pH sample. The most notable leachate component from both types of biochar, but not the fly ash, was organic carbon with the HW biochar leaching less organic carbon than the OKEB biochar (5.71 ppm vs. 59.3 ppm). Alone (in batch sorption experiments), or in mixtures of 90% soil and 10% biochar (column studies), we noted significant loss of carbon from the biochar into soluble components. However, when we added fly ash to the column experiments (80% soil, 10% fly ash, and 10% biochar) we observed significant decreases in the amounts of C leached (20% for HW, and 47% for OKEB). The results indicate that applying a combination of fly ash and biochar may result in maximizing the amount of carbon sequestration in soil while also increasing beneficial soil properties and fertility. The lower amount of carbon leached from the HW biochar compared to the OKEB biochar is likely due to the more recalcitrant form of the carbon in the HW char, due to its preparation at a higher temperature (600 ºC) than the OKEB biochar (450 ºC). High heat treatment temperatures during biochar preparation increase both the total carbon content of the biochar and the proportion of the carbon that is present in fused aromatic rings resistant to chemical and physical degradation.

Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

To be published in Waste Management (2010) Bodnan et al. MINERALOGY AND PORE WATER CHEMISTRY OF A BOILER ASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF A BOILER ASH FROM A MSW FLUIDIZED-BED INCINERATOR F. Bodénan* , D. Guyonnet, P. Piantone, P. Blanc BRGM presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from to as "boiler ash", is analogous to what Abbas et al. (2003) refer to as "hopper ash" (see Fig. 1 of Abbas et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Evaluation of Concrete Containing Fly Ash With High Carbon Content and/or Small Amounts of Wood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive database of information on the impacts of the use of high carbon coal ashes and concretes with small amounts of wood ash on the performance of concretes. It is expected these data will support easing the restrictions on the use of high carbon ashes and any wood ash products in concrete in the ASTM standards.

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Physical and Chemical Properties of Fly Ash from Coal Gasification and Study on Its Recycling Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the difficulties in utilization of fly ash from coal gasification, the physical and chemical properties of fly ash were investigated. This research studied recycling utilization on using fly ash as one of cement raw materials for cement clinker. ... Keywords: fly ash, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), recycling utilization

Guohua Qiu; Weiqiang Zeng; Zhenglun Shi; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Exhibit Show Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2003 ... Flux/Gas Injectors (RFI/RGI); Degassers including the Alcan Com- pact inline Degasser (ACD); ... and Natural bone ash products will be described. Application methods and .... worldwide including Russia. Equipment includes ...

306

2003 TMS Annual Meeting: Supplier Presentation Sessions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthony Osborn, Sales Manager – Worldwide Education Sales, ... including the Rotary Flux/Gas Injectors (RFI/RGI); Degassers including the Alcan Compact in ... Differences between Synthetic and Natural bone ash products will be described.

307

Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400 C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount of carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. {alpha}-Iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but ?-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2320029°, -84.3782734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2320029,"lon":-84.3782734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

309

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration Y. Roh (rohy@ornl.gov; 865-576-9931) T. J. Phelps (phelpstj1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7290) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6036 A. D. McMillan (mcmillanad@ornl.gov; 865-241-4554) R. J. Lauf (laufrj@ornl.gov; 865-574-5176) Metal and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6085 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration estimates atmospheric greenhouse gas releases may exceed 8 billion metric tons by the year 2010 heightening its international environmental concern. Carbon dioxide will dominate the

310

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a cost of $8.9 million, $2.9 million under budget. The manmade earthen basin received ash from the former R Area Pow- erhouse operations, which ended in 1964. The first of five reactors con- structed at SRS, the R Reactor produced nuclear materials for national defense. Recovery Act funding allowed SRS to accelerate cleanup of the basin and complete the project five years earlier than the target set in a regu- latory schedule. In late 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control determined the closure met all regulatory requirements after inspection

311

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part of the System to Inject Limestone Sorbent for SO, Control. Nucla, CO Nucla...continued Before being repowered, the plant consisted of three 12 MWe coal stoker- fired units built in 1959, which were taken out of service in 1984 due to low efficiency and high fuel cost. Antici- pating a need for additional power in the early 1990s. and after review of many power generation alternatives, CUEA started constmction of the re- powered Nucla CFB plant in Novem- ber 1984 and completed the project in May 1987. The original boilers were replaced with a new Fympower Corp. CFB bailer, a new high pressure 74 MWe steam turbine generator was installed, the three original 12 MWe steam turbines were

312

Microsoft Word - CX-Ashe-CGSFiberInstallation_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Debbie Ruckwardt Electrical Engineer - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Installing fiber optic cables between Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's Columbia Generating Station (CGS). Budget Information: Work Order # 00261540 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1864 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The project takes place between BPA's Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's

313

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

Chatterjee, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand [Southern Research Institute and Southern Company Services, Wilsonville, AL (USA). Power Systems Development Facility

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2250114°, -112.4840675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2250114,"lon":-112.4840675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

A Laboratory Method for Ash Particle Size Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing stringent particulate emissions limits are putting more pressure on power producers to improve electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance. In an effort to select the most cost effective upgrade option, many power plant engineers are using ESP computer models to estimate the impact of the available options. These models are sensitive to the fly ash particle size distribution used in the calculations, but the actual distribution is rarely known. Furthermore, measuring this distribution has, in...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ash Properties Analysis from Co-Firing Biomass and Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant interest in renewable energy has been increasing, especially in response to legislative requirements to include renewables in the generation mix. One promising renewable strategy is co-firing biomass with coal, in pulverized coal- (PC-) fired units. The objective of this research is to provide quantitative data on full-scale test burn samples to demonstrate changes in ash characteristics and to identify anomalies affecting particulate material (PM) collection efficiency that result from co-fi...

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

A new way to stabilize fly ash from municipal incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy metals and toxic chlorinated organics, added to very low grain-size distributions, make fly ashes from municipal incinerators a very hazardous waste. For their disposal, the present general trend is, not only to stabilize chemically the ashes, i.e., to reduce the leachability of the toxic substances, but also to stabilize them mechanically, i.e., to convert them into massive, resistant, and unleachable solids. This paper describes various stabilization methods used on representative European fly ash samples, which led to the development of a new stabilization technique taking place in four stages: elimination of the alkali chlorides by dissolution; addition of a moderate quantity of phosphoric acid; calcination; and solidification with Portland clinker or cement. The principal advantages of the process are as follows: the polychlorodibenzodioxins-polychlorodibenzofurans are destroyed, the reactivity of the heavy metals is reduced drastically, the final solids have satisfactory mechanical properties, and the increase in weight of the waste to be disposed of does not exceed one fourth. Comparative results of TCLP extraction tests are presented.

Derie, R. [Free Univ. of Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Ore Dressing

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Superheater Tube Corrosion in Wood Gasifier Ash Deposits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The upper operating temperature of tubes in heat exchangers/steam generators is strongly influenced by the degradation that can occur because of the reaction of the exchanger/generator tubing with the deposits that accumulate on the surface of the tubes. In fact, severe corrosion has been observed in some biomass fired systems, particularly with elevated potassium and chlorine concentrations in the deposits. Wood gasifiers have recently been and are currently being constructed at several sites in North America. In these systems, the syngas is burned to produce steam and the performance of the heat exchanger tubes under ash deposits is of great concern. As temperatures of the heat exchangers are increased in an effort to increase their operating efficiency, the performance of the tubes is of greater interest. The corrosion behavior of alloy steel tubes as a function of temperature has been investigated by exposing samples of selected alloys to ash collected from the steam generator fired by syngas produced in wood gasifiers. This study compares corrosion rates from laboratory exposures of synthesis gas and ash at 500 C and 600 C. This study investigated the material performance of four ferritic steels and one austenitic steel exposed to conditions expected on the fireside of a wood gasifier. The purpose of this study was to identify an effective method for determining material performance for samples exposed to both the process gas and the fly ash that is typically observed within the steam generator for times up to 1000 hours. Mass changes were measured for all of the samples, but this information can be misleading concerning material performance due to the difficulty in sufficiently cleaning the samples after exposure in the ash. Therefore, small cross sections of the samples were collected and imaged using optical microscopy. Oxide thicknesses were measured along with metal losses. The metal loss information provides a clear indication of material performance. The metal loss rates for the ferritic steels at 500 C were almost half of those observed at 600 C and the rates decreased with increasing exposure time. It was also reported that the metal loss rates generally decrease with increasing chromium concentration.

Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electrostatic Precipitator Performance Modeling of High Carbon Ash Using EPRI's ESPM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet reduced nitrogen oxide (NOX) emission limits, many power producers installed low-NOX combustion systems that raised the level of carbon in the ash. However, carbon can be difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipitator and, consequently, the particulate emissions from many affected units increased. EPRI initiated this study to better understand carbon capture in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), improve collection of high carbon ashes, and predict the collection of such ashes with its ESP...

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fly Ash Carbon Burn-Out at TVA's Colbert and Shawnee Stations: Site Specific Application Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash beneficiation using Carbon Burn-Out (CBO) technology offers the opportunity to market fly ash that was previously landfilled. This site application study of beneficiating pulverized coal boiler fly ash at Tennessee Valley Authority's Colbert and Shawnee Stations indicates this process is a cost effective solution for decreasing solid waste disposal, increasing landfill life, improving boiler heat rate, and generating a positive revenue stream.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Mercury Emissions from Curing Concretes that Contain Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the release of mercury from concrete containing fly ash and powdered activated carbon sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied in this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing powdered activated carbon (PAC). Minute quantities of mercury were emitted from five concretes during the standard 28-day curing process and throughout an additional 28 days of curing for two of these concretes. Ge...

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly-Ash Cenospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings, while saving production energy and raw material costs in the process. In particular, ash-derived metal matrix composites can provide utilities a high value-added market for their coal fly ash. This report describes research on a promising manufacturing process for one such application -- pressure infiltration techniques to produce lead-ash composites for automotive battery applications.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geochemical Investigation of Pyrite Codisposal with Sluiced Fly Ash and Implications for Selecting Remedial Actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of pyrite results in acid generation as well as the release of sulfate, iron, and other metals to solution. When pyritic coal mill rejects are codisposed with coal ash, pyrite oxidation and the subsequent interaction of oxidation products with the ash primarily control leachate quality. The geochemistry of the pyrite/ash system has implications for management and remediation actions at codisposal facilities. Utilities can use the results of this research to make decisions regarding such facilit...

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Assessment of Impacts of NOx Reduction Technologies on Coal Ash Use: Volume 1: North American Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume report provides documentation about physical and chemical effects combustion and post-combustion low-NOx technologies have on coal fly ash. U.S., European, and, to a lesser degree, Japanese experience is discussed. The report assesses the effect of low-NOx technologies on fly ash markets in a general manner. Options for beneficiating fly ash for specific markets also appear.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

Use of High Carbon Fly Ash as a Component of Raw Mix for Cement Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the production of concrete, fly ash often serves as a supplementary cementing material, but some fly ashes may not be suitable for this use due to excess unburned carbon. This report presents the results of a literature investigation, bench-scale laboratory study, and pilot-scale tests of the feasibility of using such high carbon fly ashes in the manufacture of portland cement.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Optimum Condition of Vanadium Recovery from Power Plant Fly-ash ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, recovery of vanadium from power plant fly-ash was developed using a hydro metallurgical process consisted of acidic leaching ...

329

The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash by Carbonation Reaction with Diffeent Water Content by Nam-Il Um, Kwang-Suk ...

330

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

331

INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in Integrated Gas Combined Cycle Turbine Engines. Author(s), Andrew D.

333

Removal of Thiosalts using Biomass Ash from Pulp and Paper Mill ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass ash used in this study is collected from Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Mill, NL and Zellstoff Celgar Mill, BC and is characterized to understand the ...

334

and Se(VI) Ions onto Biomass Ash - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass ash used in this study is collected from Zellstoff Celgar Mill, British Columbia, Canada and is characterized to determine the physico-chemical ...

335

Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

Harbour, J

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Use of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the results of efforts to integrate municipal solid waste combustion ash into a high strength portland cement concrete matrix comprised of multiple waste materials. The material developed by this research was to be used to construct a large underground storage vault to house the Friendly Mobile Barrier, a safety barrier system for use at highway crossings for the high speed rail system. The subcontractor, Environmental Solutions, Inc., of Richmond, Virginia, worked with researchers at Pennsylvania State University and the State University of New York--Stony Brook to develop and test the material. The result of this work is a portland cement concrete matrix which utilizes 80.01% recycled materials, and a field-applicable method for incorporating MSW ash as a component at volumes up to 9.78%. Twenty-eight day strengths of over 4000 psi were achieved, with 315 day strengths of 6500 psi. All structural, chemical and environmental testing showed the material to be competitive with conventional concrete.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Resuspension of Relic Volcanic Ash and Dust from Katmai: Still an Aviation Hazard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest winds were strong enough to continuously resuspend relic volcanic ash from the Katmai volcano cluster and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes on 20–21 September 2003. The ash cloud reached over 1600 m and extended over 230 km into the ...

David Hadley; Gary L. Hufford; James J. Simpson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in blended cements with minimum (less than 10%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete impact assessments. INTRODUCTION #12;3 Coal is the most widely used source of energy for power production, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

343

Quantifying the availability and the stability of trace cationic elements in fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Associated with Coal Mining Interactive Forum: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL in this paper to deter- mine these parameters for model elements Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) in fly ash 50 mM EDTA extraction. Ã? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coal fly ash has

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

344

Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa [Abo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Abo (Finland)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Release of Mercury During Curing of Concrete Containing Fly Ash and Mercury Sorbent Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides laboratory data on mercury release during the initial curing stage of concrete made with fly ash or mixtures of fly ash and activated carbon containing mercury. These experiments suggest that mercury is not released from these concretes during initial curing.

2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Herzegovina; UBAL University of Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina; FAZ University of Zagreb, Croatia; BTUC risks of farmed and barren alkaline coal ash landfills in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Environmental its research on the thermo-electric plant (TEP) and associated coal ash sites at Tuzla, Bosnia

347

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

350

Rapid response to the Chaiten eruption, Chile, May 2008: ash fallout and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid response to the Chaiten eruption, Chile, May 2008: ash fallout and impact David Pyle AGU, 90 (24), 205-7, 16 June 2009. #12;Satellite imagery records widespread ash fallout across central eruption of rhyolite since Katmai (1912). #12;Thick fallout deposits near Chaiten volcano (January 2009

351

Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower, composites, tensile properties 1. INTRODUCTION Fly ash, a waste by-product generated abundantly in electric processibility of the filled materials5 . Furthermore, as a waste by-product, its usage decreases the overall

Nemat-Nasser, Sia

352

Use of Ash from the Incineration of Urban Garbage into Clayey ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The waste is a type of fly-ash resulting from the incineration of a selected part of urban ... Analysis of Carbon Fiber Recovered from Optimized Processes of ... Clayey Ceramic Incorporated with Powder from the Sintering Plant of a ... Influence of Fly Ash and Fluorgypsum on Hydration Heat and Mortar Strength of Cement.

353

High-Volume Fly Ash Utilization Projects in the United States and Canada: Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash--an increasing disposal problem for utilities operating coal-fired power plants--has considerable unrealized potential as a construction material. In a wide-ranging survey, this study documented more than 250 U.S. and Canadian construction projects employing fly ash in high volume for backfill, landfill, hydraulic fill, embankments, pavement base courses, soil amendment, subgrade stabilization, and grout.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

pH-dependent leaching of dump coal ash - retrospective environmental analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace and major elements in coal ash particles from dump of 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant in Obrenovac near Belgrade (Serbia) can cause pollution, due to leaching by atmospheric and surface waters. In order to assess this leaching potential, dump ash samples were subjected to extraction with solutions of decreasing pH values (8.50, 7.00, 5.50, and 4.00), imitating the reactions of the alkaline ash particles with the possible alkaline, neutral, and acidic (e.g., acid rain) waters. The most recently deposited ash represents the greatest environmental threat, while 'aged' ash, because of permanent leaching on the dump, was shown to have already lost this pollution potential. On the basis of the determined leachability, it was possible to perform an estimation of the acidity of the regional rainfalls in the last decades.

Popovic, A.; Djordjevic, D. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Mercury retention by fly ashes from coal combustion: Influence of the unburned carbon content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of unburned carbon particles present in fly ashes produced by coal combustion on mercury retention. To achieve this objective, the work was divided into two parts. The aim of the first part of the study was to estimate the amount of mercury captured by the fly ashes during combustion in power stations and the relationship of this retention to the unburned carbon content. The second part was a laboratory-scale study aimed at evaluating the retention of mercury concentrations greater than those produced in power stations by fly ashes of different characteristics and by unburned carbon particles. From the results obtained it can be inferred that the unburned carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture in fly ashes. The textural characteristics of these unburned particles and of other components of fly ashes also influence retention.

Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Diaz-Somoano, M.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Argonne CNM HighlightL Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Calcium Map Calcium map of an activated fly ash geopolymer displays regions of high calcium concentration (circled). Their distribution suggests localization as a discrete calcium-rich phase within the lower-calcium aluminosilicate geopolymer gel. Use of the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) has provided the first access to the nature of heterogeneity in real fly ash-derived geopolymers at the nanoscale. Direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium nanometer-sized particles within a hydroxide-activated geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium fly ash has been obtained using HXN fluorescence characterization. Additionally, the team of CNM users from the University of Melbourne, the Universidad del Valle of Colombia, and the

357

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement

358

Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V., E-mail: siva@civil.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Baig, M. Arif Ali, E-mail: reach2arif@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

18 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF FRAXINUS SPP. FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handles, and for fiber in the manufacture of fine papers. White ash is the primary commercial hardwood protocol for green ash. We are also investigating an adventitious shoot regeneration system using leaf18 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 GENETIC TRANSFORMATION

360

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

Menon, M.P.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L. [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (Taiwan). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated. 7 figs.

Khan, M.R.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures  

SciTech Connect

A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly Ash Cenospheres "Lead-Lite" Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential high-value utilization method for power plant fly ash is to mix it with an alloy to make a metal matrix composite. In the case of this project, the fly ash is mixed with lead to make a composite with low density and improved hardness. This new material can be used in the auto industry to make lighter battery components. This report describes the results of corrosion tests of several lead samples and lead-fly ash composite samples at room temperature for more than 1500 days. This long-term d...

1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Devolatilization and ash comminution of two different sewage sludges under fluidized bed combustion conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different wet sewage sludges have been characterized under fluidized bed combustion conditions with reference to their devolatilization behavior and ash comminution with the aid of different and complementary experimental protocols. Analysis of the devolatilization process allowed to determine the size of fuel particle able to achieve effective lateral spreading of the volatile matter across the cross-section of medium-scale combustors. Primary fragmentation and primary ash particle characterization pointed out the formation of a significant amount of relatively large fragments. The mechanical properties of these fragments have been characterized by means of elutriation/abrasion tests using both quartz and sludge ash beds. (author)

Solimene, R.; Urciuolo, M.; Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (IRC) - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Salatino, P. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (IRC) - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Damonte, G.; Donati, C.; Puglisi, G. [ECODECO Gruppo A2A, Giussago (PV) (Italy)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Diverse latest Pliocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the north-central Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia are newly interpreted as components of a large caldera system that erupted a compositionally zoned rhyolite-dacite ash-flow sheet at 2.83 ± 0.02 Ma (sanidine and biotite 40Ar/39Ar). Despite its location within a cratonic collision zone, the Chegem system is structurally and petrologically similar to typical

372

Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hunt's Ash Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Hiko, Nevada Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

373

Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekmann, James M. (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Application of advanced technologies to ash-related problems in boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prediction of ash behavior in boilers has, for many years, been based on relatively simple relationships involving the composition of inorganic material in fuels. In recent years, advanced analyses for both fuels and deposits have seen increasing use in the solid fuel combustion community. The combination of the standard and advanced analyses, together with a knowledge of boiler design and operating conditions, allow better interpretation of ash behavior in boilers than has previously been possible. This paper discusses several case histories where advanced technologies have been applied to interpret ash behavior in boilers where standard techniques were insufficient. Included in the discussion are: (1) the behavior of blends of fuels; (2) explanations for markedly different behavior between fuels with similar ASTM characteristics; and (3) effects of boiler operating conditions on ash deposit formation.

Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility); Richards, G.; Harb, J. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

STATE-OF-THE-ART: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG UTILIZATION IN USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Backfill. 1.0 Introduction At the present time, coal fired electric power plants in the USA produce, ease of handling, and moisture insensitivity, etc. [2,11]. 2.1.2 Backfills Fly ash is used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

377

Smyrna's Ashes: Humanitarianism, Genocide, and the Birth of the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

burning of the city of Izmir, Smyrna’s Ashes is an importantof Smyrna came a new city, Izmir, and a new Turkish nation.Gardens (Kensington), 165 Izmir, 1 Index / 249 Jerusalem, 67

Tusan, Michelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

M-2: Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash with Ammonium Sulfate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The whole process of extracting alumina from coal fly ash ... Decrease of Heat Consumption at Nepheline Processing to Alumina and By- Products ... Flash -and CFB Calciners, History and Difficulties of Development of Two ...

379

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Withers, G. [Ultalite.com, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lubricant-derived ash : in-engine sources and opportunities for reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent emissions regulations that limit particulate matter. Over time, ash primarily derived from metallic additives in the engine oil ...

Watson, Simon A. G. (Simon Andrew Glean)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions about and increased the international consensus toward improving volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The potential for use of waste-to-energy facility ash: Executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This executive summary presents an overview of the investigations, findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the Long Island Regional Planning Board (LIRPB) study of the Potential for Beneficial Use of Waste-to-Energy Facility Ash. The full report consists of the following volumes: Executive Summary; Volume 1: Long Island Ash Management Status; Volume 2: Sampling and Testing Procedures; Volume 3: Environmental Properties; Volume 4: Engineering Properties; Volume 5: Environmental Assessment; Volume 6: Engineering and Economic Evaluation; and Volume 7: Legal and Institutional Issues. Volumes one through seven are briefly summarized in this executive summary with the exception of Volume 2 of the report, which serves as the documentation of the sampling conditions and testing methods used in measuring chemical and physical properties of the ash tested. The study investigated the feasibility of the use of incinerator ash as a substitute for natural aggregate in construction applications.

Koppelman, L.E.; Tanenbaum, E.G. [Long Island Regional Planning Board, Hauppauge, NY (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Recovery of Metal Oxides From Fly Ash, Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By processing fly ash to obtain metal oxides and other commercial products, utilities can realize both sales revenues and reduced disposal costs. A commercial-scale processing plant could be ready for demonstration by 1992.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Field Test of a Semi-Continuous Fly Ash Unburned Carbon Monitor: Cyclone Boiler Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unburned carbon (UBC) is the measure of the carbon level in the fly ash of a coal-fired boiler—with increased carbon indicating less-complete and less-efficient combustion. Boiler design is one important factor that affects UBC levels. Cyclone boilers burn coal at high combustion temperatures (ca. 1650°C) and exhibit relatively high, but quite variable, fly ash UBC levels. Recently, because of competitive fuel pricing and reduced SO2 and NOX emissions, cyclone boilers ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag generated annually in the United States less than 40 percent is used. The eastern half of Texas is served by 18 coal burning electric power generating plants which produce approximately 3.8 million tons of bottom ash each year. This is also the section of the state in which the sources of quality aggregates are either few. dwindling or nonexistent. While a small fraction of the bottom ash is utilized, the rest is delegated to landfills or on-site disposal areas. Increasing attention is being given to development of new, high-volume uses for this safe and readily available by-product. One such use is as an aggregate in road construction. The use of bottom ash as an aggregate for both roadway surfaces and base courses has been limited due to its absorbency and friability. The former tends to increase asphalt binder demand while the latter adversely affects its ability to withstand the crushing effects of traffic loads. On the other hand, bottom ash is lighter in weight and generally much cheaper than conventional quality aggregates such as limestone, sand and gavel. This research was designed to up-firade the load-bearing characteristics of bottom ash and maximize its use 'in asphaltic concrete roadway mixtures through the use of sulfur. The process essentially coats the ash with liquid sulfur which upon cooling fills the voids on the surface of the particles while increasing their crush resistance. The results of this investigation indicate that asphaltic concrete mix designs in which bottom ash represents from 5 0 to I 00 percent of the aggregate fraction can be achieved.

Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mitigation of SCR-Ammonia Related Aqueous Effects in a Fly Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated fly ash resulting from secondary injection of ammonia to mitigate SO3 produced by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system altered the water quality of a fly ash pond at a coal-fired power generation station. This project attempted to improve water quality by encouraging the growth of algae in the pond to remove ammonia, while keeping other important parameters (pH, total suspended solids, Biological Oxygen Demand, and metals) within allowable limits.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Program on Technology Innovation: Formation of Large Particle Ash in Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to obtain a better understanding of the process that underlies the formation of large particle ash (LPA) in coal-fired boilers. As an approach, sample sets of coal, fireside ash deposits, and LPA were collected from selected boilers identified by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis techniques. The coals were characterized to determine the abundance, size, and composition of t...

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of potential risks from ash disposal site leachate  

SciTech Connect

A risk-based approach is used to evaluate potential human health risks associated with a discharge from an ash disposal site into a small stream. The RIVRISK model was used to estimate downstream concentrations and corresponding risks. The modeling and risk analyses focus on boron, the constituent of greatest potential concern to public health at the site investigated, in Riddle Run, Pennsylvania. Prior to performing the risk assessment, the model is validated by comparing observed and predicted results. The comparison is good and an uncertainty analysis is provided to explain the comparison. The hazard quotient (HQ) for boron is predicted to be greater than 1 at presently regulated compliance points over a range of flow rates. The reference dose (RfD) currently recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) was used for the analyses. However, the toxicity of boron as expressed by the RfD is now under review by both the U.S. EPA and the World Health Organization. Alternative reference doses being examined would produce predicted boron hazard quotients of less than 1 at nearly all flow conditions.

Mills, W.B.; Loh, J.Y.; Bate, M.C.; Johnson, K.M. [Tetra Tech, Lafayette, CA (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Lafayette, CA (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper  

SciTech Connect

The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Structure of Trabecular Bone in DMP-1 Deficient Knock Out Mice ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Templates Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Improving the Resistance of Ceramic Surfaces to Biofilm Formation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on 316L ...

397

Increased Accumulation of Superficial Zone Protein (SZP) in Articular Cartilage in Response to Bone Morphogenetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:55­64. 56. Ripamonti U, Duneas N, Van Den Heever B, et al. 1997. Recombinant transforming growth factor

Neu, Corey P.

398

The Assessment of Structural and Material Bone Qualities in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The risk of fracture is higher in adults with type 2 diabetes compared to controls without type 2 diabetes, despite normal or higher than… (more)

Pritchard, Janet M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Is decreased bone mineral density associated with development of scoliosis? A bipedal osteopenic rat model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ankara, Turkey. 2 Izmir KentHospital, Cigli, Izmir, Turkey. 3 University of California

Dede, Ozgur; Akel, Ibrahim; Demirkiran, Gokhan; Yalcin, Nadir; Marcucio, Ralph; Acaroglu, Emre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Osteoinduction by combining bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 with a bioactive novel nanocomposite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential application as an osteoinductive agent in regenerative medicine. Keywords: Osteoinduction; BMP-2; Nanocomposite; Polymer; Ceramics 2 Article focus: ? Can BMP-2 be delivered from a bioresorbable nanocomposite? Key messages... -TCP/PLGA nanocomposite was then hot-pressed into 50 mm x 1 mm sheets using thermocompression. The nanocomposite was characterised using SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDX). Synthesis of BMP-2 An E. coli expression...

Sharma, A; Meyer, F; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth; Rushton, N

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Flexible Statistical Models for Growth Fragments: a Study of Bone Mineral Acquisition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mineral called dual energy x-ray absorptiom- 2 #12; etry (DXA). To date, most of these investigations have youth and to determine if there were gender and/or ethnic di#11;erences in the magnitude and tempo are more closely linked to pubertal development than to chronologic age (Bonjour 1996), gender, ethnicity

Hastie, Trevor

402

Two cases of metastases to the scalp bone mimicking epidermoid cyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dermatology Online Journal 17 (12): 13 Fukushima MedicalUniversity, Fukushima, Japan Abstract Metastatic skin tumors

Kato, Yasunobu; Kikuchi, Nobuyuki; Nishibu, Akiko; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Self-Assembled Collagen-Apatite Matrix with Bone-Like Hierarchy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our findings emphasize that physical and chemical interactions can lead to complex ... Controlled Photolytic Release of Biocides for High Efficiency Decontamination ... Yeast-derived Glycolipids as Greener Structure Directing Agents for ...

404

SmartCast: Instrumented Casts for Monitoring and Intervention during Bone Healing Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a diamond pattern of carbon fibers providing surfaceIt is 87% polyester with 13% carbon fibers woven into it.The carbon fibers are conducting [29]. The Velostat is a

Shahbazi, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Using Ice to Mimic Nacre: From Structural Materials to Artificial Bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Ice to Mimic Nacre: From Structural Materials tohere how the physics of ice formation can be used to developphenomenon, the freezing of sea ice, which occurs at the

Deville, Sylvain; Saiz, Eduardo; Nalla, Ravi K.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

High strain rate mechanical characterization of trabecular bone utilizing the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique has been in use in one form or another for more than fifty years and has recently gained a great deal of attention for its ability to characterize materials such as metals, ...

Johnson, Timothy Paul Mahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Multi-Scale Study of Deformation and Fracture in Diseased Bone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial synthesis and fabrication of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by using the metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae · Micromechanical ...

408

A9: Multiscale Modelling to Assess Elastic Properties of Cortical Bone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A8: Microstructural Investigation of Nano-Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride Ions .... D7: Surfactant Structure–property Relationship: Effect of Polypropylene ... E4: The Effect of Monobutyl Ether Ethylene Glycol on the Conductivity and ...

409

Effects of 810-nm Laser on Murine Bone-Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective: The purpose of this study was to Investigate the effect of 810-nm low level laser therapy (LLLT) on dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. Background data: LLLT can enhance wound healing and increase cell proliferation ...

Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao

410

The bone diagnostic instrument III: Testing mouse femora Connor Randall,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the maximum load is used in instrumented inden- tation analysis, as discussed by Oliver and Pharr,3 for obtain and distance are monitored by transducers, which are then analyzed through OSTEOPROBE IITM software. Each cycle and to minimize the effect of the remaining creep during the linear decrease in load. This type of hold

Hansma, Paul

411

Examining Wari influence in the Las Trancas Valley, Peru using oxygen isotopes from bone carbonate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results. Chemical Geology (Isotope Geosciences Section),isotopes in fossil teeth from Pakistan. Chemical Geology,Isotope Composition of Human Tooth Enamel from Medieval Greenland: Linking Climate with Society: Comment. Geology,

Henry, Erin-Marie Lelik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Towards an understanding of phosphate ?18O in the bones and scales of small pelagic fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a local scale. Chemical Geology: Isotope Geoscience sectionisotope analysis of phosphates: a comparison of techniques for analysis of Ag3PO4. Chemical Geology

Lambert, Timothy David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Flesh yours, bones mine : the making of the biomedical subject in Turkey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the emergence of biomedical technologies, human body parts from living or dead donors have become commodities in the international networks of trade. This dissertation tries to understand religious, political and ...

Sanal, Aslihan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The role of E2f4 in cell cycle exit and bone development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Members of the E2F family of transcription factors are critical downstream effectors of the pocket protein family and mediate the regulation of genes required for cellular proliferation. The repressive E2Fs act in association ...

Miller, Emily S. (Emily Sun Young)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closest to exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. 39 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Giere [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fly ash properties and mercury sorbent affect mercury release from curing concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of mercury from concrete containing fly ashes from various generator boilers and powdered activated carbon sorbent used to capture mercury was measured in laboratory experiments. Release of gaseous mercury from these concretes was less than 0.31% of the total quantity of mercury present. The observed gaseous emissions of mercury during the curing process demonstrated a dependency on the organic carbon content of the fly ash, with mercury release decreasing with increasing carbon content. Further, lower gaseous emissions of mercury were observed for concretes incorporating ash containing activated carbon sorbent than would be expected based on the observed association with organic carbon, suggesting that the powdered activated carbon more tightly binds the mercury as compared to unburned carbon in the ash. Following the initial 28-day curing interval, mercury release diminished with time. In separate leaching experiments, average mercury concentrations leached from fly ash concretes were less than 4.1 ng/L after 18 h and 7 days, demonstrating that less than 0.02% of the mercury was released during leaching. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; William E. Wolfe [State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of various organic pollutants from wastewater. The wastewater contains various types of phenolic compounds, such as chloro, nitro, amino, and other substituted compounds. Various types of pesticides, such as lindane, malathion, carbofuran, etc., and dyes, such as, methylene blue, crystal violet, malachite green, etc., are also present in the wastewater. These contaminants pollute the water stream. These organic pollutants, such as phenolic compounds, pesticides, and dyes, etc., can be removed very effectively using fly ash as adsorbent. This article presents a detailed review on the role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater. Adsorption of various pollutants using fly ash has been reviewed. The adsorption mechanism and other influencing factors, favorable conditions, and competitive ions, etc., on the adsorption process have also been discussed in this paper. It is evident from the review that fly ash has demonstrated good removal capabilities for various organic compounds. 171 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Ahmaruzzaman [National Institute of Technology, Silchar (India). Department of Chemistry

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tensile strength of ash cake beds at high-temperature conditions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The primary deliverable will be a graphics-driven computer model that can be used as an engineering tool to help predict ash-related hot-gas filter problems based on analyses of coal and sorbent, as well as system operating parameters. This paper presents preliminary testing data on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions. The range in temperatures for tensile testing is ambient to 900 C. The simulated gas atmosphere includes carbon dioxide, water vapor, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, sodium chloride, hydrochloric acid, and nitrogen. At present, all testing has been performed using ash from the Westinghouse advanced particle filter (APF) at the American Electric Power Service Corporation (AEP) Tidd pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) demonstration plant in Ohio. Other sources of filter ashes, including several from non-American PFBC systems, will also be evaluated.

Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Use of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse ash in concrete as sand replacement  

SciTech Connect

Sugarcane today plays a major role in the worldwide economy, and Brazil is the leading producer of sugar and alcohol, which are important international commodities. The production process generates bagasse as a waste, which is used as fuel to stoke boilers that produce steam for electricity cogeneration. The final product of this burning is residual sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), which is normally used as fertilizer in sugarcane plantations. Ash stands out among agroindustrial wastes because it results from energy generating processes. Many types of ash do not have hydraulic or pozzolanic reactivity, but can be used in civil construction as inert materials. The present study used ash collected from four sugar mills in the region of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, which is one of the world's largest producers of sugarcane. The ash samples were subjected to chemical characterization, sieve analysis, determination of specific gravity, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubilization and leaching tests. Mortars and concretes with SBA as sand replacement were produced and tests were carried out: compressive strength, tensile strength and elastic modulus. The results indicated that the SBA samples presented physical properties similar to those of natural sand. Several heavy metals were found in the SBA samples, indicating the need to restrict its use as a fertilizer. The mortars produced with SBA in place of sand showed better mechanical results than the reference samples. SBA can be used as a partial substitute of sand in concretes made with cement slag-modified Portland cement.

Sales, Almir, E-mail: almir@ufscar.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lima, Sofia Araujo, E-mail: sofiaalima@yahoo.com.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Leaching and toxicity behavior of coal-biomass waste cocombustion ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land disposal of ash residues, obtained from the cocombustion of Greek lignite with biomass wastes, is known to create problems due to the harmful constituents present. In this regard, the leachability of trace elements from lignite, biomass, and blends cocombustion ashes was investigated by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In this work, the toxicity of the aqueous leachates and the concentrations of the metals obtained from the leaching procedure were measured using the Microtox test (Vibrio fischen) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), respectively. The toxic effects of most leachates on Vibrio fischeri were found to be significantly low in both 45% and 82% screening test protocols. However, the liquid sample originating from olive kernels fly ash (FA4) caused the highest toxic effect in both protocols, which can be attributed to its relatively high concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn.

Skodras, G.; Prokopidou, M.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Effects of Trona Use in Flue Gas on Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, researchers analyzed the effect of the use of trona on the dynamics of a fly ash pond (FAP) at a plant in Ohio, using both field and laboratory measurements. They compared the chemical concentrations and biological dynamics in the FAP from four years before the onset of trona use with those from two years after trona use was implemented. They compared the chemical composition of fly ash from two generating units with trona injection systems with that from a generating unit without trona. T...

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Leaching Assessment of Fly Ash, Flue Gas Desulfurization Filter Cake, and Fixated Scrubber Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The by-products of coal combustion (for example, fly ash and flue gas desulfurization filter cake) are an important environmental concern due to potential leaching of trace constituents and the large volume of residues produced. About 40% of these by-products may be utilized as raw materials outside of the energy sector; the remaining 60% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) are disposed of as waste. At Plant 14090, the subject of this report, fly ash and scrubber sludge are blended with quicklime ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

(A small-scale study of Rocky Flats uncalcined incinerator ash dissolution and filtrate anion exchange)  

SciTech Connect

Small scale experimentation was conducted with incinerator ash in the nitric/hydrofluoric acid cascade dissolver and the anion exchange systems at Rocky Flats and Los Alamos National Laboratories for the purpose of determining the following: to determine the relationship between calcium fluoride dissolution feed levels and plutonium dissolution yields. To determine the relationship between calcium fluoride feed levels to dissolution, and the performance of anion exchange when processing dissolution filtrate. To determine the effect of carbonaceous materials on the dissolution and anion exchange when recovering plutonium from incinerator ash.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Radiolytic gas generation in concrete made with incinerator ash containing transuranium nuclides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of various factors on H/sub 2/ generation by alpha radiolysis of concrete containing TRU incinerator ash were studied. Methods for reducing H/sub 2/ generation were investigated. Samples of Portland and high-alumina cement containing up to 30% calcined ash (dry basis) were doped with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Gas pressures were measured as a function of radiation dose; gas compositions were determined. Gas yields were calculated in terms of G values (molecules produced per 100 eV of alpha energy absorbed). These yields were used to estimate pressures in containers of radioactive concrete waste during storage. 4 figures.

Bibler, N.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Virtual Globe visualization of ash-aviation encounters, with the special case of the 1989 Redoubt-KLM incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of natural hazards on the local environment causes major issues for those agencies responsible for warning and understanding of the risks. Analysis of past events can assist and improve future warning capabilities. Here, volcanic ash-aviation ... Keywords: Dispersion modeling and Virtual Globes, Puff, Volcanic ash

P. W. Webley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Volcanic Ash Transport from Mount Asama to the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Influenced by Large-Scale Local Wind Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eruption of the Mount Asama volcano on 16 September 2004 produced an ash cloud and led to ashfall in the Tokyo metropolitan area that lies on the Kanto Plain. Satellite images showed the ash cloud drifting toward the south in the morning but ...

Nobumitsu Tsunematsu; Tomohiro Nagai; Toshiyuki Murayama; Ahoro Adachi; Yasuhiro Murayama

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Proceedings, World Of Coal Ash, April 11-15, 2005, Lexington, KY, USA Pultrusion of Fabric Reinforced High Flyash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings, World Of Coal Ash, April 11-15, 2005, Lexington, KY, USA Pultrusion of Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement Composites Barzin Mobasher(1) , Alva Peled (2) , and Jitendra of elasticity. #12;Proceedings, World Of Coal Ash, April 11-15, 2005, Lexington, KY, USA In addition to ease

Mobasher, Barzin

433

The role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of fly ash disposal in mined areas. In: Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on CoalThe role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a , Harmanjit, 2005). CAIR permanently caps emissions of NOx and SOx from large stationary sources including coal

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

434

Direct seeding of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.): The effects of sowing date,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct seeding of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.): The effects September 2006 Abstract Direct seeding is an alternative method to conventional planting for woodland-emergent herbicides, and cultivation and protection on the emergence and survival of direct-sown ash (Fraxinus

435

Mechanical Properties and Durability of Concrete Made with High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cement Produced in a Cement Plant: Commercial -Scale Trial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the preliminary results of the commercial-scale production of a high-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement, using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

436

Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming (Michigan-Med); (HHMI)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

437

Prevention of trace and major element leaching from coal combustion products by hydrothermally-treated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important structural components of coal ash obtained by coal combustion in 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant located near Belgrade (Serbia) are amorphous alumosilicate, alpha-quartz, and mullite. The phase composition of coal ash can be altered to obtain zeolite type NaA that crystallizes in a narrow crystallization field (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}; H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios). Basic properties (crystallization degree, chemical composition, the energy of activation) of obtained zeolites were established. Coal ash extracts treated with obtained ion-exchange material showed that zeolites obtained from coal ash were able to reduce the amounts of iron, chromium, nickel, zinc, copper, lead, and manganese in ash extracts, thus proving its potential in preventing pollution from dump effluent waters.

Adnadjevic, B.; Popovic, A.; Mikasinovic, B. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries  

SciTech Connect

It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Characteristics of ashes from different locations at the MSW incinerator equipped with various air pollution control devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of ashes from different locations at a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) equipped with a water spray tower (WST) as a cooling system, and a spray dryer adsorber (SDA), a bag filter (BF) and a selective catalytic reactor (SCR) as air pollution control devices (APCD) was investigated to provide the basic data for further treatment of ashes. A commercial MSWI with a capacity of 100 tons per day was selected. Ash was sampled from different locations during the normal operation of the MSWI and was analyzed to obtain chemical composition, basicity, metal contents and leaching behavior of heavy metals. Basicity and pH of ash showed a broad range between 0.08-9.07 and 3.5-12.3, respectively. Some major inorganics in ash were identified and could affect the basicity. This could be one of the factors to determine further treatment means. Partitioning of hazardous heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Cr, Hg and Cd was investigated. Large portions of Hg and Cd were emitted from the furnace while over 90% of Pb, Cu and Cr remained in bottom ash. However 54% of Hg was captured by WST and 41% by SDA/BF and 3.6% was emitted through the stack, while 81.5% of Cd was captured by SDA/BF. From the analysis data of various metal contents in ash and leach analysis, such capturing of metal was confirmed and some heavy metals found to be easily released from ash. Based on the overall characteristics of ash in different locations at the MSWI during the investigation, some considerations and suggestions for determining the appropriate treatment methods of ash were made as conclusions.

Song, Geum-Ju; Kim, Ki-Heon; Seo, Yong-Chil; Kim, Sam-Cwan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil. Technical terminal report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Interpretation of Accurate UV Polarization Lidar Measurements: Application to Volcanic Ash Number Concentration Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, accurate UV polarization measurements are performed on a volcanic ash cloud after long-range transport at Lyon, France (45.76°N, 4.83°E). The volcanic particles are released from the mid-April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull ...

A. Miffre; G. David; B. Thomas; M. Abou Chacra; P. Rairoux

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

BENEFICIAL USE OF ASH AND CHAR FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION Naomi Klinghoffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 BENEFICIAL USE OF ASH AND CHAR FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION Naomi Klinghoffer Columbia University in the future. A common way to recover energy from biomass is through gasification where synthesis gas gasification conditions. Specifically, it is desired to produce a porous char which could be used as a catalyst

Columbia University

444

New Air-Entraining Admixtures for Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A promising new air-entraining admixture has been developed by the leading North American admixture producer. Independent, EPRI-sponsored testing indicated the admixture was suitable for use with concretes that contain fly ashes with levels of unburned carbon higher than the typical 3-4 percent allowed in the concrete industry.

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Investigation on the Parameters Affecting the De-Icing Salt Scaling Resistance of Fly Ash Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In scaling of concrete by de-icing salts, the mortar near the surface flakes or peels away. This report presents the results of an R&D laboratory study to examine the scaling of high ash content concrete from the use of salts used routinely in cold climates to melt ice and snow on roads and sidewalks.

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE WAVELENGTH Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Keywords: scanning electron microscopy, trace metals, coal analysis ABSTRACT Scanningelectron microscopy with wavelength-dispersive spectrometry has been used to measure trace metals in coal

Laughlin, Robert B.

447

Low-Cost Ash-Derived Construction Materials: State-of-the-Art Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing technologies have been successfully applied in the manufacturing of construction materials that incorporate coal combustion byproducts. This report describes an extensive literature review on coal ash use in low-cost building materials, including information on technical and economic feasibility.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

How carbon-based sorbents will impact fly ash utilization and disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of activated carbon flue gas to control mercury emissions will result in a fly ash and activated carbon mixture. The potential impact of this on coal combustion product disposal and utilization is discussed. The full paper (and references) are available at www.acaa-usa.org. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Hassett, D.J.; Buckley, T.D.; Heebink, L.V.; Pavlish, J.H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Surface tension measurements of coal ash slags under reducing conditions at atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global demand for reduced CO{sub 2} emission from power plants can be answered by coal gasification techniques. To develop integrated gasification combined cycles that incorporate hot syngas cleaning facilities, detailed knowledge of the thermophysical properties of coal ashes is imperative. Currently, the surface tension of liquid coal ash slags in a reducing environment was studied by means of the sessile drop method. Three different algorithms were employed to analyze the acquired drop images. The slags under consideration were obtained from black and brown coals as well as from an experimental gasification reactor. Typically, a sharp surface tension decrease with temperature was found in the melting interval of the ashes. This was followed by a temperature range of smooth drop contours during which a slight rise of the surface tension could mostly be observed. Bubbles at the circumference of the drops started to appear when approaching the measurement temperature limit of 1550{sup o}C. With regard to the temperature regime of uncorrugated drop profiles, coal ash slags exhibited surface tension values between 400 and 700 mN/m. 32 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Tobias Melchior; Gunther Putz; Michael Mueller [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany). Institute of Energy Research

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Comments on ``Failures in detecting volcanic ash from a satellite-based technique''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of active vol- canism (pp. 45­64). Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union. Davies, M. A., & Rose, W. I inter- national symposium on volcanic ash and aviation safety, Seattle, WA. Washington, DC: US GPO. US, causing severe restrictions to air traffic for many hours. This cloud was tracked without any split-window

Bluth, Gregg

451

Long-Term Leaching Tests With High Ash Fusion Maryland Coal Slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction-procedure toxicity tests showed that the solid residue materials resulting from the Texaco coal gasification process using fluxed high ash fusion Maryland coal were nonhazardous. Contaminant concentration in the leachate was below or only slightly above the primary maximum contaminant limits (PMCL) established for public drinking water supplies.

1991-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Factors Influencing Volcanic Ash Dispersal from the 1995 and 1996 Eruptions of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prediction of the dispersal of volcanic ash from events such as the Ruapehu eruptions of 1995 and 1996 is important, not only for civil-defense authorities who need to warn people in downwind areas, but for airline companies that have to ...

Richard Turner; Tony Hurst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effect of coal fly ash-amended organic compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired electric power plants generate large quantities of fly ash as a byproduct. In continuation of previous studies on the utilization of fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for use as a manure for agricultural crops, the authors have now determined the effects of this manure on the yield and uptake of selected elements by several plants including collard green, corn, mustard green, bell pepper, egg plant, and climbing beans. An amended compost containing 30-40% fly ash with a compost:soil ratio of 1:3 was found to be most effective to enhance the yield and nutrient uptake of most of the plants. At 20% fly ash level, no increase in yield of any of the above crops was observed. The uptake of K, Mg, Mn, and P was increased in most plants. Boron which is known to be detrimental to the growth of plants above certain level was also found to be increased in plants nourished with the manure.

Ghuman, G.S.; Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Chandra, K.; Sajwan, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Mercury Control Research: Effects of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Parameters on Mercury Speciation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of HgOin simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (Hel-combustion region are unknown, and the major reaction pathways for Hg oxidation in combustion flue gases remain in the oxidation ofHgo in flue gases containingHC!. Thus, an important parameter that influences the oxidation of

Columbia University

456

The Road to Reuse: York County's Ash Management Program David E. Vollero  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Center (York County RRC) commenced operations in 1989 and has since processed all County RRC is complemented by other components of York County's integrated solid waste management system-combustible wastes and York County RRC ash residue, and public education programs emphasizing waste minimization

Columbia University

457

9th Annual North American Waste to Energy Conference Ash Recycling: Partnering for Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Townships as the host municipalities, PennDOT as a potential major end-user, MYRES as the RRC opaator the RRC's ash. After exhaustive research, YCSWA selected AAR's technology and commWlicated those benefits Center (RRC) in Manchester Township, Pennsylvania; and owns and operates the Yard Waste Compot Site

Columbia University

458

Evaluation of leaching and ecotoxicological properties of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were the evaluation of sewage sludge stabilization by mixing with fly ash, the examination of the physicochemical properties of the produced materials and their leachates and the assessment of their environmental impact by the evaluation of the ecotoxic characteristics. Different ratios of fly ash and sewage sludge (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6, and 1:9) were mixed for 48 and 72 h. After mixing, the liquid phase of the produced materials was analyzed for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while the solid residue was dried and tested for the leaching characteristics by the application of TCLP and EN 12457-2 standard leaching methods. Furthermore, the produced leachates were analyzed for their content of specific metals, while their ecotoxicological characteristics were determined by the use of toxicity bioassays, using the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The phytotoxicity of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures was also determined by utilizing seeds of three higher plants (one monocotyl and two dicotyls). The mixtures exhibited low metal leaching in all cases, while the ecotoxic properties increased with the increase of fly ash/sewage sludge ratio. The phytotoxicity testing showed increased root length growth inhibition.

C.A. Papadimitriou; I. Haritou; P. Samaras; A.I. Zouboulis [Technological Educational Institute of West Macedonia, Kozani (Greece)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Paper No. P-30 A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF ASH RESIDUE CHARACTERISTICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment of ash to reduce the solubility of lead and cadmium was explored: this research led and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) , which also has not been found to simulate of data from weekly composite tests, These unsatisfactory results led to comprehensive research

Columbia University

460

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone ash bone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


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