Sample records for bond comm ga

  1. Lattice-Mismatched GaAs/InGaAs Two-Junction Solar Cells by Direct Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, K.; Aiken, D. J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Morral, A. F.; Atwater, H. A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct bonded interconnect between subcells of a lattice-mismatched III-V compound multijunction cell would enable dislocation-free active regions by confining the defect network needed for lattice mismatch accommodation to tunnel junction interfaces, while metamorphic growth inevitably results in less design flexibility and lower material quality than is desirable. The first direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs two-junction solar cell, is reported and demonstrates viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The tandem cell open-circuit voltage was approximately the sum of the subcell open-circuit voltages. This achievement shows direct bonding enables us to construct lattice-mismatched III-V multijunction solar cells and is extensible to an ultrahigh efficiency InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction cell by bonding a GaAs-based lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs subcell and an InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsP/InGaAs subcell. The interfacial resistance experimentally obtained for bonded GaAs/InP smaller than 0.10 Ohm-cm{sup 2} would result in a negligible decrease in overall cell efficiency of {approx}0.02%, under 1-sun illumination.

  2. COMM REF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A Lithologic andRECORD OF DECISION:L ,_4 COMM

  3. Direct-bonded GaAs/InGaAs tandem solar cell Katsuaki Tanabe,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    , Pasadena, California 91125 Daniel J. Aiken Emcore Photovoltaics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 Mark W. The direct-bonded interconnect between subcells of this two-junction cell enables monolithic interconnection- proach is to employ direct-bonded interconnects between subcells of a multijunction cell, which enables

  4. Wafer Bonding and Epitaxial Transfer of GaSb-based Epitaxy to GaAs for Monolithic Interconnection of Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; D.A. Shiau; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'brien; R.K. Huang; M.K. Connors; A.C. Anderson; D. Donetsky; S. Anikeev; G. Belenky; D.M. Depoy; G. Nichols

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb/InAsSb/GaSb epitaxial layers were bonded to semi-insulating GaAs handle wafers with SiO{sub x}/Ti/Au as the adhesion layer for monolithic interconnection of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices. Epitaxial transfer was completed by removal of the GaSb substrate, GaSb buffer, and InAsSb etch-stop layer by selective chemical etching. The SiO{sub x}/TiAu provides not only electrical isolation, but also high reflectivity and is used as an internal back-surface reflector. Characterization of wafer-bonded epitaxy by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and time-decay photoluminescence indicates minimal residual stress and enhancement in optical quality. 0.54-eV GaInAsSb cells were fabricated and monolithically interconnected in series. A 10-junction device exhibited linear voltage building with an open-circuit voltage of 1.8 V.

  5. GaInAsSb/A1GaAsSb/Sb Thermophotovoltaic Devices With an Internal Back-Surface Reflector Formed by Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; R.K. Huang; D.A. Shiau; M.K. Connors; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'brien; A.C. Anderson; D.M. DePoy; G. Nichols; M.N. Palmasiano

    2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel implementation for GAInAsSb/AlGaAsSb/GaSb TPV cells with an internal back-surface reflector (BSR) formed by wafer bonding to GaAs is demonstrated. The SiO{sub x}/Ti/Au internal BSR enhances optical absorption within the device, while the dielectric layer provides electrical isolation. This configuration has the potential to improve TPV device performance; is compatible with monolithic series-interconnection of TPV cells for building voltage; and can mitigate the requirements of filters used for front-surface spectral control. At a short-circuit density of 0.4 A/cm{sup 2}, the open-circuit voltage of a single TPV cell is 0.2 V, compared to 0.37 and 1.8 V for 2- and 10-junction series-interconnected TPV cells, respectively.

  6. The Effect of Offcut Angle on Electrical Conductivity of Direct Wafer-Bonded n-GaAs/n-GaAs Structures for Wafer-Bonded Tandem Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeung, King Wah Sunny

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency of p?n Junction Solar Cells, J. Appl. Phys. 32,Inverted Triple- Junction Solar Cell with Two Independentlyof Thin-Film GaAs Solar Cells on Si Substrates, J. Appl.

  7. Interfacial structure, bonding and composition of InAs and GaSb thin films determined using coherent Bragg rod analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cionca, C.; Walko, D. A.; Yacoby, Y.; Dorin, C.; Millunchick, J. M.; Clarke, R.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Michigan; Hebrew Univ.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used Bragg rod x-ray diffraction combined with a direct method of phase retrieval to extract atomic resolution electron-density maps of a complementary series of heteroepitaxial III-V semiconductor samples. From the three-dimensional electron-density maps we derive the monolayer spacings, the chemical compositions, and the characteristics of the bonding for all atomic planes in the film and across the film-substrate interface. InAs films grown on GaSb(001) under two different As conditions (using dimer or tetramer forms) both showed conformal roughness and mixed GaAs/InSb interfacial bonding character. The As tetramer conditions favored InSb bonding at the interface while, in the case of the dimer, the percentages corresponding to GaAs and InSb bonding were equal within the experimental error. The GaSb film grown on InAs(001) displayed significant In and As interdiffusion and had a relatively large fraction of GaAs-like bonds at the interface.

  8. InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well and LED growth on wafer-bonded sapphire-on-polycrystalline AlN substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Olson, S. M. (Aonex Technologies Inc., Pasadena, CA); Banas, M.; Park, Y. -B. (Aonex Technologies Inc., Pasadena, CA); Ladous, C. (Aonex Technologies Inc., Pasadena, CA); Russell, Michael J.; Thaler, Gerald; Zahler, J. M. (Aonex Technologies Inc., Pasadena, CA); Pinnington, T. (Aonex Technologies Inc., Pasadena, CA); Koleske, Daniel David; Atwater, Harry A. (Aonex Technologies Inc., Pasadena, CA)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report growth of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) and LED structures on a novel composite substrate designed to eliminate the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch problems which impact GaN growth on bulk sapphire. To form the composite substrate, a thin sapphire layer is wafer-bonded to a polycrystalline aluminum nitride (P-AlN) support substrate. The sapphire layer provides the epitaxial template for the growth; however, the thermo-mechanical properties of the composite substrate are determined by the P-AlN. Using these substrates, thermal stresses associated with temperature changes during growth should be reduced an order of magnitude compared to films grown on bulk sapphire, based on published CTE data. In order to test the suitability of the substrates for GaN LED growth, test structures were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using standard process conditions for GaN growth on sapphire. Bulk sapphire substrates were included as control samples in all growth runs. In situ reflectance monitoring was used to compare the growth dynamics for the different substrates. The material quality of the films as judged by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was similar for the composite substrate and the sapphire control samples. Electroluminescence was obtained from the LED structure grown on a P-AlN composite substrate, with a similar peak wavelength and peak width to the control samples. XRD and Raman spectroscopy results confirm that the residual strain in GaN films grown on the composite substrates is dramatically reduced compared to growth on bulk sapphire substrates.

  9. Fitzgerald Wtr Lgt & Bond Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park atFisia Babcock Environment GmbH

  10. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analyses of GaAs/Si interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    -bonded multi-junction solar cells Dietrich Häussler a , Lothar Houben b , Stephanie Essig c , Mert Kurttepeli online 20 July 2013 Keywords: Multi-junction solar cell Wafer bonding Interfaces Aberration corrected and composition fluctuations near interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells. Multi-junction solar

  11. COMMUNICATION www.comm.pdx.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMUNICATION www.comm.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Arts in Communication Bachelor of Science in Communication Minor in Communication e Department of Communication offers a variety degrees in two areas of academic concentration include mediated communication and interactive discourse

  12. Le disque comme document 1 Karim Hammou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    en France tome 2, L'Harmattan, 2012, pp.177-193. Le disque comme document : une analyse quantitative'action musicale, Paris, L'Harmattan, 2007, p.45 et suiv. 3 Beuscart, J.-S., « L'industrie du disque : bil

  13. Princeton Public Utils Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation toPowerPrinceton Public Utils Comm Jump to:

  14. Bagley Public Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: EnergyBagley Public Utilities Comm Jump to:

  15. Greenwood Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoods | Open EnergyGreenrockGreenwood Utilities Comm

  16. Hydrogen-Bond Networks: Strengths of Different Types of Hydrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energetic driving force for enzyme catalysis and conformational changes such as in protein folding due to multiple hydrogen bonds in a HBN. Citation: Shokri A, Y Wang, GA...

  17. Electronic structure and bonding in garnet crystals Gd{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12}, Gd{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}Al{sub 3}O{sub 12}, and Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} compared to Y{sub 3}Al{sub 3}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yong-Nian [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Ching, W. Y. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Brickeen, B. K. [Allied Signal FM and T, Kansas City, Missouri 64141 (United States)] [Allied Signal FM and T, Kansas City, Missouri 64141 (United States)

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure and bonding of Gd{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (GSGG), Gd{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}Al{sub 3}O{sub 12} (GSAG), and Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} (GGG) crystals with a garnet structure are studied by means of first-principles local-density calculations. The results are compared with a similar calculation on yttrium aluminum garnet [Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG)]. The calculated equilibrium volumes of the three crystals are close to the measured volumes with a slight overestimation for GGG. GGG also has a smaller bulk modulus than the other three crystals. The calculated density of states and their atomic and orbital decompositions are presented and contrasted. All four crystals show very similar band structures and interatomic bonding. However, it is found that in GSGG and GSAG crystals, the Sc atom at the octahedral site shows a higher covalent character and an increased bond order in comparison to Ga or Al at the same site. This result may provide some insight into the significant difference in the radiation hardness of Cr{sup 3+}:Nd{sup 3+}:GSGG as compared to Nd{sup 3+}:YAG. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. InAsGaPInGaP high-temperature power Schottky rectifier and J. M. Woodall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    °C. Further improvement of the thermal stability is expected to be achieved by reducing the diffusion is thought to be due to strong covalent bonding at the InAs/GaP interface. The InAs/GaP heterointerface effectively blocks impurity diffusion. Since InGaP is superior to GaP for high-power applica- tions, as shown

  19. CrystEngComm Cite this: CrystEngComm, 2014, 16,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Peter

    -counterbalancing Na+ cations rather than the more typical hydrogen bonding interactions as a result of fewer free ([5] Al) species are of topi- cal interest because they promise improved performance for lithium.9,11 Consequently, much less is known about their physicochemical properties, e.g., the chemical

  20. SECURITY AND COMMUNICATION NETWORKS Security Comm. Networks (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SECURITY AND COMMUNICATION NETWORKS Security Comm. Networks (2013) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI: 10.1002/sec.819 SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Integrating security mechanisms, must be protected against security threats. Due to the security and also resource constraint concerns

  1. Roadmap: Communication Studies -Applied Communication -Bachelor of Arts CI-BA-COMM-APCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Communication Studies - Applied Communication - Bachelor of Arts CI-BA-COMM-APCO College Semester Eight [14 Credits] COMM 46092 Practicum in Applied Communication 3 C ELR COMM Concentration 39 36 2.250 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Communication Studies - Applied Communication - Bachelor of Arts CI

  2. Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds. Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds. Abstract: Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model...

  3. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof is disclosed. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, Au and alloys thereof. 3 figures.

  4. Investing in Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason; Polk, Wade

    2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonds, which are issued by governments and corporations, can be an important part of one's investment portfolio. U.S. government bonds, municipal bonds, zero-coupon bonds and other types are described. Also learn strategies for coping with inflation...

  5. ORISE Resources: HealthCommWorks Communication Tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project *1980-1981 U.S. OR I GI N AHealthCommWorks

  6. Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomistic structures of high-energy ion irradiated GaN have been examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Single crystalline GaN substrates were irradiated at cryogenic temperature with 2 MeV Au2+ ions to a fluence of 7.35x1015 Au/cm2. Cross-sectional TEM observations revealed that damaged layers consisting of amorphous and nanocrystalline phases are formed at the surface and buried depth of the as-irradiated GaN substrate. Atomic radial distribution functions of the amorphous/poly-nanocrystalline regions showed that not only heteronuclear Ga-N bonds but also homonuclear Ga-Ga bonds exist within the first coordination shell. It was found that the ratio of heteronuclear-to-homonuclear bonds, i.e., the degree of chemical disorder is different between the surface and buried damaged layers. The alternation of chemical disorder was attributed to the difference in the defect formation processes between these layers.

  7. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution. Abstract: A power law regression...

  8. Roadmap: Communication Studies -Applied Communication -Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-APCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Communication Studies - Applied Communication - Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-APCO] College of Communication and Information School of Communication Studies Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] COMM 15000 Introduction to Human Communication

  9. Surety Bond Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Surety Bond Program, a program of the Maryland Small Business Development Financing Authority, assists eligible small businesses in obtaining bid, performance or payment bonds necessary to...

  10. Four-Junction Solar Cell with 40% Target Efficiency Fabricated by Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer: Final Technical Report, 1 January 2005 - 31 December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, H. A.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We realized high-quality InGaP/GaAs 2-junction top cells on Ge/Si, InGaAs/InP bottom cells, direct-bond series interconnection of tandem cells, and modeling of bonded 3- and 4-junction device performance.

  11. Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer Processes for High Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahler, J. M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Ahn, C. G.; Atwater, H. A.; Wanlass, M. W.; Chu, C.; Iles, P. A.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wafer-bonded four-junction cell design consisting of InGaAs, InGaAsP, GaAs, and Ga0.5In0.5P subcells that could reach one-sun AM0 efficiencies of 35.4% is described. The design relies on wafer-bonding and layer transfer for integration of non-lattice-matched subcells. Wafer bonding and layer transfer processes have shown promise in the fabrication of InP/Si epitaxial templates for growth of the bottom InGaAs and InGaAsP subcells on a Si support substrate. Subsequent wafer bonding and layer transfer of a thin Ge layer onto the lower subcell stack can serve as an epitaxial template for GaAs and Ga0.5In0.5P subcells. Additionally, wafer bonded Ge/Si substrates offer the possibility to improve the mechanical performance of existing triple-junction solar cell designs, while simultaneously reducing their cost. Present results indicate that optically active III/V compound semiconductors can be grown on both Ge/Si and InP/Si heterostructures. Current-voltage electrical characterization of the interfaces of these structures indicates that both InP/Si and Ge/Si interfaces have specific resistances lower than 0.1 W?cm2 for heavily doped wafer bonded interfaces, enabling back surface power extraction from the finished cell structure.

  12. Diffusion of a Ga adatom on the GaAs(001)c(44)heterodimer surface: A first principles study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    Diffusion of a Ga adatom on the GaAs(001)c(4×4)heterodimer surface: A first principles study J Diffusion barriers Reconstruction Density functional calculations The adsorption and diffusion behavior functional theory (DFT) computations in the local density approxima- tion. Structural and bonding features

  13. CONOMIE ET STATISTIQUE N 457-458, 201298 L'automobile est parfois perue comme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    #12;�CONOMIE ET STATISTIQUE N° 457-458, 201298 L'automobile est parfois perçue comme emblématique d'équipement et aux consommations matérielles (Gartman, 1991). Il est ainsi parfois avancé que l'automobile ne- nismes socio-économiques. L'automobile est de ce fait souvent prise comme exemple d'un bien dont les

  14. Wafer-Bonded Internal Back-Surface Reflectors for Enhanced TPV Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'Brien; D.A. Shiau; A.C. Anderson; Z.L. Liau; D.M. Depoy; G. Nichols

    2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses recent efforts to realize GaInAsSb/GaSb TPV cells with an internal back-surface reflector (BSR). The cells are fabricated by wafer bonding the GaInAsSb/GaSb device layers to GaAs substrates with a dielectric/Au reflector, and subsequently removing the GaSb substrate. The internal BSR enhances optical absorption within the device while the dielectric layer provides electrical isolation. This approach is compatible with monolithic integration of series-connected TPV cells and can mitigate the requirements of filters used for front-surface spectral control.

  15. Ab initio prediction of GaN ,,1010... and ,,110... anomalous surface relaxation John E. Jaffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Ab initio prediction of GaN ,,101Ż0... and ,,110... anomalous surface relaxation John E. Jaffe Received 22 September 1995 The results of a study of the surface relaxation of GaN in the framework is minimized the Ga-N surface bonds show a very small rotation angle of about 6° accompanied by a reduction

  16. Bond Financing (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bond financing is available to eligible businesses through the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, in the amount of $500,000 to $10 million. The bonds can be used to finance capital...

  17. Essays on corporate bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Jack (Jack C.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of three empirical essays on corporate bonds, examining the role of both credit risk and liquidity. In the first chapter, I test the ability of structural models of default to price corporate bonds in ...

  18. Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Limited obligation local government bonds ("special revenue bonds") may be issued for qualified electric energy generation facilities, including those powered by renewables. These bonds generally...

  19. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallow, Thomas I. (Fremont, CA); Hunter, Marion C. (Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen Lee (Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  20. Private Activity Revenue Bonds (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Private Activity Revenue Bonds are available in the form of both taxable bonds and tax-exempt bonds. Both types of bonds provide access to long-term capital markets for fixed asset financing....

  1. Improved InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with a p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN current-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Improved InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with a p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN current- spreading experimental and theoretical studies on the InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with optical output power and external quantum efficiency (EQE) levels substantially enhanced by incorporating p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN

  2. Bonded semiconductor substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atwater, Jr.; Harry A. (South Pasadena, CA), Zahler; James M. (Pasadena, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  3. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

  4. High temperature thermoelectric characterization of III-V semiconductor thin films by oxide bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    bonding Je-Hyeong Bahka) , Gehong Zenga) , Joshua M. O. Zide b) , Hong Luc) , Rajeev Singhd) , Di Lianga bonding technique is developed for high temperature thermoelectric characterization of the thin film III-W-N diffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin film ErAs:InGaAlAs metal/semiconductor nanocomposite

  5. Roadmap: Communication Studies Public Communication Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-PCMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Communication Studies ­ Public Communication ­ Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-PCMM] College: 23-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major 2 #12;Roadmap: Communication Studies ­ Public Communication ­ Bachelor of Arts [CI

  6. In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real-Time Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui

    In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real-Time Communication in a Packet study the feasibil- ity of bounding the delay jitter for real-time channels in a packet-switched store show that the scheme is capable of providing a significant reduction in delay jitter

  7. LA CERTIFICATION FORESTIERE COMME NORME DE GESTION DURABLE DES FORETS TROPICALES : UNE LABORIEUSE APPLICATION EN AFRIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LA CERTIFICATION FORESTIERE COMME NORME DE GESTION DURABLE DES FORETS TROPICALES : UNE LABORIEUSE sous l'effet de pressions du marché européen que par souci écologique de gestion durable des foręts nombreuses Organisations Non Gouvernementales Internationales (ONGI) basées dans les pays du Nord et militant

  8. In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for RealTime Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui

    In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real­Time Communication in a Packet study the feasibil­ ity of bounding the delay jitter for real­time channels in a packet­switched store show that the scheme is capable of providing a significant reduction in delay jitter

  9. Mixing Rocksalt and Wurtzite Structure Binary Nitrides to Form Novel Ternary Alloys: ScGaN and MnGaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mixing Rocksalt and Wurtzite Structure Binary Nitrides to Form Novel Ternary Alloys: ScGaN and Mn wurtzite structure and tetrahedral bonding, both MnN and ScN are face-centered tetragonal (fct [11]. Though challenging, growth of wurtzite MnGaN alloy by molecular beam epitaxy using radio

  10. Review of radiation damage in GaN-based materials and devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, Stephen J.; Deist, Richard [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32606 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32606 (United States); Ren, Fan; Liu, Lu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Polyakov, Alexander Y. [Institute of Rare Metals, Moscow, 119017, B. Tolmachevsky, 5 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Rare Metals, Moscow, 119017, B. Tolmachevsky, 5 (Russian Federation); Kim, Jihyun [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the effects of proton, neutron, ?-ray, and electron irradiation on GaN materials and devices is presented. Neutron irradiation tends to create disordered regions in the GaN, while the damage from the other forms of radiation is more typically point defects. In all cases, the damaged region contains carrier traps that reduce the mobility and conductivity of the GaN and at high enough doses, a significant degradation of device performance. GaN is several orders of magnitude more resistant to radiation damage than GaAs of similar doping concentrations. In terms of heterostructures, preliminary data suggests that the radiation hardness decreases in the order AlN/GaN > AlGaN/GaN > InAlN/GaN, consistent with the average bond strengths in the Al-based materials.

  11. Bond Financing Program (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BFA’s Bond Financing Program offers tax-exempt and taxable bonds for fixed-asset expansion projects. Industrial development revenue bonds can be used by manufacturers for the acquisition,...

  12. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  13. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  14. Bonding aerogels with polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, F.M.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerogels, porous silica glasses with ultra-fine cell size (30nm), are made by a solution gelation (sol-gel) process. The resulting gel is critical point dried to densities from 0.15--0.60 g/cc. This material is machinable, homogeneous, transparent, coatable and bondable. To bond aerogel an adhesive should have long cure time, no attack on the aerogel structure, and high strength. Several epoxies and urethanes were examined to determine if they satisfied these conditions. Bond strengths above 13 psi were found with double bubble and DP-110 epoxies and XI-208/ODA-1000 and Castall U-2630 urethanes. Hardman Kalex Tough Stuff'' A-85 hardness urethane gave 18 psi bond strength. Hardman A-85, Tuff-Stuff'' was selected for further evaluation because it produced bond strengths comparable to the adherend cohesive strength. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  15. The New Chemical Bond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    off when the first convincing experimental evidence of the phi bond showed up for the thorium sandwich complex, as revealed by its elaborate, never-before-seen symmetry. The...

  16. Characterization of anodic bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tudryn, Carissa Debra, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodic bonding is a common process used in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) device fabrication and packaging. Polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) is emerging as a new MEMS device and ...

  17. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Chaplin

    2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

  18. (a) p contact p-lnGaAs --p-lnP cladding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    of different dimensions and/or materials have to be aligned to sub- micron precision to enable efficient (PL:1545 nm) Spacer Super lattice Bonding layer 1 .7Q-AI0055Ga0292In0653As (8x) nP 1.1 Q-1n085Ga0 5As

  19. On the effect of N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN built-in junctions in the n-GaN layer for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    On the effect of N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N- GaN built-in junctions in the n-GaN layer for InGaN/GaN: N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN (NPNPN-GaN) junctions embedded between the n-GaN region and multiple the performance of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) in this work. In the proposed architecture, each thin P-GaN

  20. Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

  1. Thermal Conductivity and Large Isotope Effect in GaN from First Principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, L. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Broido, D. A. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Reinecke, T. L. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present atomistic first principles results for the lattice thermal conductivity of GaN and compare them to those for GaP, GaAs, and GaSb. In GaN we find a large increase to the thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment, ~65% at room temperature. We show that both the high thermal conductivity and its enhancement with isotopic enrichment in GaN arise from the weak coupling of heat-carrying acoustic phonons with optic phonons. This weak scattering results from stiff atomic bonds and the large Ga to N mass ratio, which give phonons high frequencies and also a pronounced energy gap between acoustic and optic phonons compared to other materials. Rigorous understanding of these features in GaN gives important insights into the interplay between intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering and isotopic scattering in a range of materials.

  2. LA DYNAMIQUE DES SYSTEMES COMME OUTIL D'AIDE A LA GESTION DU SOL URBAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LA DYNAMIQUE DES SYSTEMES COMME OUTIL D'AIDE A LA GESTION DU SOL URBAIN Monique DANTAS Doctorante qui le composent sont interreliées. Tel est le cas du sol urbain dont la complexité des interactions rend délicate la mise en place de politiques adaptées. La construction d'un modèle de gestion du sol

  3. Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through its Economic Development Bond Program, the Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) issues tax-exempt bonds on behalf of private entities or organizations for eligible purposes. The responsibility for...

  4. Private Activity Bond Allocation (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Private Activity Bond Allocation Program provides low-interest financing through tax-exempt bonds for certain types of projects, including electric and gas utility projects. Eligible applicants...

  5. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, , between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(?(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ?(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, ?, power law expression ? = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M-O bonded interactions for a relatively wide range of M atoms of the periodic table. The power law equation determined for the oxide crystals at ambient conditions is similar to the power law expression = r[1.46/]5.26 determined for the perovskites at pressures as high as 80 GPa, indicating that the intrinsic connection between R(M-O) and ?(rc) that holds at ambient conditions also holds, to a first approximation, at high pressures.

  6. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal

  7. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print

  8. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beavis, Leonard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Karnowsky, Maurice M. (Albuquerque, NM); Yost, Frederick G. (Ceder Crest, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about -40.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  9. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about [minus]40 C and 110 C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  10. Investigation of bonding strength and sealing behavior of aluminum/stainless steel bonded at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    ], spark welding [3], explosive bonding [4], and diffusion bonding [5,6]. However, the processing such as diffusion bonding [5,6], friction welding [7e11], vacuum roll bonding [12] and hot roll bonding [13Investigation of bonding strength and sealing behavior of aluminum/stainless steel bonded at room

  11. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) administers the Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECB) program in Ohio. QECBs have been used by local governments and public universities to...

  12. Advantages of the Blue InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes with an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN Quantum Well Structured Electron Blocking Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Advantages of the Blue InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes with an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN Quantum Well ABSTRACT: InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with p-(AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN) quantum well structured electron. The proposed QWEBL LED structure, in which a p-GaN QW layer is inserted in the p-AlGaN electron blocking layer

  13. Micromechanical resonators fabricated from lattice-matched and etch-selective GaAs/InGaP/GaAs heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micromechanical resonators fabricated from lattice-matched and etch-selective GaAs/InGaP September 2007 Utilizing lattice-matched GaAs/InGaP/GaAs heterostructures, clean micromechanical resonators are fabricated and characterized. The nearly perfect selectivity of GaAs/InGaP is demonstrated by realizing

  14. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Carlos da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the quantum confinement effect is proposed as the cause of the displacement of the vibrational spectrum of molecular groups that involve hydrogen bonds. In this approach the hydrogen bond imposes a space barrier to hydrogen and constrains its oscillatory motion. We studied the vibrational transitions through the Morse potential, for the NH and OH molecular groups inside macromolecules in situation of confinement (when hydrogen bonding is formed) and non-confinement (when there is no hydrogen bonding). The energies were obtained through the variational method with the trial wave functions obtained from Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SQM) formalism. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish the emission peaks related to the existence of the hydrogen bonds. These analytical results were satisfactorily compared with experimental results obtained from infrared spectroscopy.

  15. Ga nanoparticle-enhanced photoluminescence of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, M.; Al-Heji, A. A.; Jeon, S.; Wu, J. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Lee, J.-E.; Saucer, T. W.; Zhao, L.; Sih, V. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States); Katzenstein, A. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, Florida 33711-4744 (United States); Sofferman, D. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York 11530-0701 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the influence of surface Ga nanoparticles (NPs) on the enhancement of GaAs photoluminescence (PL) efficiency. We have utilized off-normal focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces to fabricate close-packed Ga NP arrays. The enhancement in PL efficiency is inversely proportional to the Ga NP diameter. The maximum PL enhancement occurs for the Ga NP diameter predicted to maximize the incident electromagnetic (EM) field enhancement. The PL enhancement is driven by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-induced enhancement of the incident EM field which overwhelms the SPR-induced suppression of the light emission.

  16. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  17. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  18. AlGaN/GaN-based power semiconductor switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaN/GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) have great potential for their use as high efficiency and high speed power semiconductor switches, thanks to their high breakdown electric field, mobility and ...

  19. GaAs/InGaP/AlGaAs quantum-well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keshagupta, P.; Radpour, F. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a new quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP) based on bound-to-miniband transitions in a GaAs/InGaP quantum well with GaAs/AlGaAs short superlattice barriers is presented and compared with the conventional GaAs/InGaP QWIPs. Results of the theoretical calculations of the detector parameters and the preliminary fabrication results of an embedded-well to miniband (EWTMB) GaAs/InGaP/AlGaAs quantum well/superlattice detector are presented. The advantages of the proposed design include improvement of the material quality, ability to adjust the peak wavelength in 8--12 {micro}m range, and in the lower dark current.

  20. Method of bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saller, deceased, Henry A. (late of Columbus, OH); Hodge, Edwin S. (Columbus, OH); Paprocki, Stanley J. (Columbus, OH); Dayton, Russell W. (Columbus, OH)

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. A method of making a fuel-containing structure for nuclear reactors, comprising providing an assembly comprising a plurality of fuel units; each fuel unit consisting of a core plate containing thermal-neutron-fissionable material, sheets of cladding metal on its bottom and top surfaces, said cladding sheets being of greater width and length than said core plates whereby recesses are formed at the ends and sides of said core plate, and end pieces and first side pieces of cladding metal of the same thickness as the core plate positioned in said recesses, the assembly further comprising a plurality of second side pieces of cladding metal engaging the cladding sheets so as to space the fuel units from one another, and a plurality of filler plates of an acid-dissolvable nonresilient material whose melting point is above 2000.degree. F., each filler plate being arranged between a pair of said second side pieces and the cladding plates of two adjacent fuel units, the filler plates having the same thickness as the second side pieces; the method further comprising enclosing the entire assembly in an envelope; evacuating the interior of the entire assembly through said envelope; applying inert gas under a pressure of about 10,000 psi to the outside of said envelope while at the same time heating the assembly to a temperature above the flow point of the cladding metal but below the melting point of any material of the assembly, whereby the envelope is pressed against the assembly and integral bonds are formed between plates, sheets, first side pieces, and end pieces and between the sheets and the second side pieces; slowly cooling the assembly to room temperature; removing the envelope; and dissolving the filler plates without attacking the cladding metal.

  1. Low Temperature Material Bonding Techniq Ue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  2. Local Option- Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Utah Industrial Facilities and Development Act, counties, municipalities, and state universities in Utah may issue Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRBs) or Industrial Development Bonds (IDBs)...

  3. Pooled Bond Program (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pooled Bond Program offered by the Economic Development Finance Authority is designed for capital intensive projects, providing small businesses access to larger capital markets for tax-exempt...

  4. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ''Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008'', enacted in October 2008, authorized the issuance of Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) that may be used by state, local and tribal...

  5. Carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asami, T.; Nosho, H.; Tackeuchi, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Li, L. H.; Harmand, J. C. [Laboratory for Photonics and Nanostructures-CNRS, Site Alcatel de Marcoussis, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Lu, S. L. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, CAS, Dushu, Lake Higher Education Town, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well (QW) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The sample consists of an 8-nm-thick GaIn{sub 0.36}N{sub 0.006}AsSb{sub 0.015} well, 5-nm-thick GaN{sub 0.01}AsSb{sub 0.11} intermediate barriers and 100-nm-thick GaAs barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a GaAs(100) substrate. The spin relaxation time and recombination lifetime at 10 K are measured to be 228 ps and 151 ps, respectively. As a reference, we have also obtained a spin relaxation time of 125 ps and a recombination lifetime of 63 ps for GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QW. This result shows that crystal quality is slightly improved by adding Sb, although these short carrier lifetimes mainly originate from a nonradiative recombination. These spin relaxation times are longer than the 36 ps spin relaxation time of InGaAs/InP QWs and shorter than the 2 ns spin relaxation time of GaInNAs/GaAs QW.

  6. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    2006-07 CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 GEOL 245 MATH 223 CE 328 CE 212 CE 225 CE 295GE 213# MATH 224 GEOL 224 GEOE 218 GEOL 258 Hum/SocSci Jr. GEOE 315 GEOE 475 Grp C Elec.# GE 348#CE 318 CE 319 ENG 11X# GEOL 463 or Grp B Elec.# GEOL 226 GE 300# CE 316

  7. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 CMPT 116CHEM 250# MATH 223 EE 201 GE 213 Grp. A elective*CHE 223 Hum/SocSci Jr. MATH 224 English 11x CHE 220CHE 210 CHECHE 413 Grp. B elective#* Grp. B elective*#CHE 424 CHE 421 CHE 422 GE 348# CHE 423 GE 449# CH E 470

  8. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    2005-2006 CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 GEOL 245 MATH 223 CE 328 CE 212 CE 225 CE 295GE 213# MATH 224 GEOL 224 GEOE 218 GEOL 258 BusSci/HSS# GEOE 315 GEOE 475 Grp C Elec.# GE 348#CE 318 CE 319 ENG 11X# GEOL 463 or Grp B Elec.# GEOL 226 GE 300# CE 316 Grp

  9. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 CMPT 116CHEM 250# MATH 223 EE 201 GE 213 Grp. A elective*CHE 223 HSS@# MATH 224 English 11x CHE 220CHE 210 CHE 323 CHE Grp. B elective#* Grp. B elective*#CHE 424 CHE 421 CHE 422 GE 348# CHE 423 GE 449# CH E 470^ Chemical

  10. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 GE 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 GE 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 ME 227 GE 213# MATH 223 EE 201ME 214 CMPT 116 ME 215 GE 226 MATH 224 Hum/SocSci@# ME 251 ME 229 ME 318 ME 335 ME 313 ME 316 ME 352ME 330 GE 348# ME 328 ME 327 ME 323 ME 321ME 324 RCM 300# ME 418 ME 417 ME 450 ME 431

  11. P-type InGaAsP Coolers for Integrated Optic Devices Daryoosh Vashaeea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation in the wire-bonds and metallic pads on top of the device predict accurately the optimum cooling resistance to 5x10-7 ohm-cm2 , and optimizing the metallic contacts on top of the devices), simulations showGaAsP, P-type. 1. INTRODUCTION Temperature stabilization of optoelectronic components lasers, filters

  12. Compositionally-graded InGaAsInGaP alloys and GaAsSb alloys for metamorphic InP on GaAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compositionally-graded InGaAs­InGaP alloys and GaAsSb alloys for metamorphic InP on GaAs Li Yang a of tandem graded layers of InGaAs and InGaP with compositional grading of the In concentration. This tandem

  13. CONVERTIBLE BONDS IN A DEFAULTABLE DIFFUSION MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanblanc, Monique

    CONVERTIBLE BONDS IN A DEFAULTABLE DIFFUSION MODEL Tomasz R. Bielecki Department of Applied Research Grant PS12918. #12;2 Convertible Bonds in a Defaultable Diffusion Model 1 Introduction In [4), such as Convertible Bonds (CB), and we provided a rigorous decomposition of a CB into a bond component and a (game

  14. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daix, N., E-mail: dai@zurich.ibm.com; Uccelli, E.; Czornomaz, L.; Caimi, D.; Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Siegwart, H.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J. [IBM Research - Zürich, Säumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Hartmann, J. M. [CEA, LETI 17, rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Shiu, K.-T.; Cheng, C.-W.; Krishnan, M.; Lofaro, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sadana, D. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Rd., Route 134 Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I) fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (InGaAs) active layer is equal to 3.5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup ?2}, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000–3000 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  15. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Andreas M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  16. Lattice distortion in single crystal rare-earth arsenide/GaAs nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, A. J. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Schultz, B. D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9560 (United States); Palmstrřm, C. J., E-mail: cpalmstrom@ece.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9560 (United States)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial single crystal nanocomposites comprised of rare-earth arsenide nanoparticles embedded in GaAs (001) layers produce a larger change in lattice parameter than expected from the lattice parameters of relaxed films. Despite similar cubic structures and lattice parameters, elongation of the interfacial bond length between the two materials induces additional strain causing an expansion in the nanocomposite lattice. The interface bond length is material dependent with an average atomic layer spacing at the ErAs:GaAs interface of 1.9?Ĺ while the spacing at the ScAs:GaAs interface is only 1.4?Ĺ. Implications for lattice matching various single crystal epitaxial nanostructures in semiconductors are discussed.

  17. Ideally Glassy Hydrogen Bonded Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Phillips

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The axiomatic theory of ideally glassy networks, which has proved effective in describing phase diagrams and properties of chalcogenide and oxide glasses and their foreign interfaces, is broadened here to include intermolecular interactions in hydrogen-bonded polyalcohols such as glycerol, monosaccharides (glucose), and the optimal bioprotective hydrogen-bonded disaccharide networks formed from trehalose. The methods of Lagrangian mechanics and Maxwellian scaffolds are useful at the molecular level when bonding hierarchies are characterized by constraint counting similar to the chemical methods used by Huckel and Pauling. Whereas Newtonian molecular dynamical methods are useful for simulating large-scale interactions for times of order 10 ps, constraint counting describes network properties on glassy (almost equilibrated) time scales, which may be of cosmological order for oxide glasses, or years for trehalose. The ideally glassy network of trehalose may consist of extensible tandem sandwich arrays.

  18. Low frequency noise in AlGaN/InGaN/GaN double heterostructure field effect transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Nezih

    Torr and consisted of a 1.4 lm undoped GaN buffer layer on i-SiC substrate, * Corresponding authorLow frequency noise in AlGaN/InGaN/GaN double heterostructure field effect transistors N. Pala a November 2002 Abstract Low-frequency noise in AlGaN/InGaN/GaN double heterostructure field effect

  19. Polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriram Krishnamoorthy; Digbijoy N. Nath; Fatih Akyol; Pil Sung Park; Michele Esposto; Siddharth Rajan

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and demonstration of polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel junction diodes with high current density and low tunneling turn-on voltage. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculations were used to model and design tunnel junctions with narrow bandgap InGaN-based barrier layers. N-polar p-GaN/In0.33Ga0.67N/n-GaN heterostructure tunnel diodes were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Efficient zero bias tunneling turn-on with a high current density of 118 A/cm2 at a reverse bias of 1V, reaching a maximum current density up to 9.2 kA/cm2 were obtained. These results represent the highest current density reported in III-nitride tunnel junctions, and demonstrate the potential of III-nitride tunnel devices for a broad range of optoelectronic and electronic applications.

  20. Bond Programs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBond County, Illinois:Bond

  1. Plasma chemistries for dry etching GaN, AlN, InGaN and InAlN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Vartuli, C.B.; Lee, J.W.; Donovan, S.M.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Abernathy, C.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shul, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McLane, G.F. [Army Research Lab., Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States); Ren, F. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Etch rates up to 7,000 {angstrom}/min. for GaN are obtained in Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/Ar or BCl{sub 3}/Ar ECR discharges at 1--3mTorr and moderate dc biases. Typical rates with HI/H{sub 2} are about a factor of three lower under the same conditions, while CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} produces maximum rates of only {approximately}2,000 {angstrom}/min. The role of additives such as SF{sub 6}, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2} or Ar to the basic chlorine, bromine, iodine or methane-hydrogen plasma chemistries are discussed. Their effect can be either chemical (in forming volatile products with N) or physical (in breaking bonds or enhancing desorption of the etch products). The nitrides differ from conventional III-V`s in that bond-breaking to allow formation of the etch products is a critical factor. Threshold ion energies for the onset of etching of GaN, InGaN and InAlN are {ge} 75 eV.

  2. Theoretical study of defect formation during the initial stages of native-oxide growth on GaSb (001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, V. M., E-mail: victor.bermudez@nrl.navy.mil [Electronics Science and Technology Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of defects during the initial stages of native-oxide growth on the GaSb (001)-?(4?×?3) surface has been studied computationally using spin-unrestricted density functional theory. It is found that insertion into a Ga-Sb adatom dimer to form a peroxo Ga-O-O-Sb bridge is the most energetically favorable process with insertion into Ga-Sb back-bonds being somewhat less so. A Ga-O-O-Ga bridge between dimers is also favorable, but Sb-O-O-Sb bridges show little if any stability. In the course of analyzing molecular adsorption, a particularly reactive site has been identified that leads to O{sub 2} dissociation with little or no barrier. This process is initiated in the vicinity of an Sb-Sb dimer in the terminating layer and leads to sub-surface Ga and Sb defect sites (i.e., coordinatively unsaturated atoms) and to strained Ga-Sb bonds that may be susceptible to further O{sub 2} attack. However, the defects formed in these reactions do not produce states in the gap.

  3. Violet to deep-ultraviolet InGaN/GaN and GaN/AlGaN quantum structures for UV electroabsorption modulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Violet to deep-ultraviolet InGaN/GaN and GaN/AlGaN quantum structures for UV electroabsorption In this paper, we present four GaN based polar quantum structures grown on c-plane embedded in p-i-n diode GaN/AlGaN quantum structures for operation in the deep-UV spectral region and the other three

  4. Bonded polyimide fuel cell package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  5. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  6. Luminescence Efficiency of InGaN/GaN Quantum Wells on Bulk GaN Substrate M. Dworzak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Luminescence Efficiency of InGaN/GaN Quantum Wells on Bulk GaN Substrate M. Dworzak1 , T. Stempel1/37, 01-142 Warsaw, Poland ABSTRACT Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on InGaN quantum wells grown by MOCVD on two different substrates (sapphire and GaN) show that the lumines- cence

  7. Analysis of InGaN light-emitting diodes with GaN-AlGaN and AlGaN-GaN composition-graded barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yujue; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin; Zeng, Yiping, E-mail: ypzeng@semi.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with Al composition increasing and decreasing GaN-AlGaN barriers along the growth direction are studied numerically. Simulation results suggest that the LEDs with GaN-AlGaN composition-decreased barriers show more significant enhancement of light-output power and internal quantum efficiency than LEDs with composition-increasing GaN-AlGaN barriers when compared with the conventional LED with GaN barriers, due to the improvement in hole injection efficiency and electron blocking capability. Moreover, the optical performance is further improved by replacing GaN-AlGaN barriers with AlGaN-GaN barriers of the same Al composition-decreasing range, which are mainly attributed to the modified band diagrams. In addition, the major causes of the different efficiency droop behaviors for all the designed structures are explained by the electron leakage current and the different increase rates of hole concentration with injection current.

  8. Design and fabrication of InGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistors for microwave power amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keogh, David Martin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. Henderson, “High- Speed InGaP/GaAs HBT’s Using a SimpleA typical AlGaAs/GaAs HBT or InGaP/GaAs HBT has the opposite

  9. Response of GaAs to fast intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, JS; Allen, Roland E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The Hamiltonian is H ~ r !5 S ?1 V~r ! V ~ r ! ?2 D , ~1.1! so the bonding and antibonding states have energies ? 6 5 1 2 ~?11?2!6 1 2 @~?12?2! 2 14V ~ r !2#1/2. ~1.2! PRB 580163-1829/98/58~20!/13627~7!/$15.00 t intense laser pulses R. E... to TABLE II. Repulsive potential parameters for GaAs and Si. These values are appropriate when distances are measured in ? and energies in eV. a b g GaAs 263.7 -1227.5 3653.1 Si 263.2 -1027.0 2631.8 PRB 58D R. E. ALLEN an intense laser pulse...

  10. Properties of radio-frequency-sputter-deposited GaN films in a nitrogen/hydrogen mixed gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyazaki, Takayuki; Takada, Kouhei; Adachi, Sadao; Ohtsuka, Kohji [Department of Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu-shi, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Research and Development Division, Sanken Electric Co., Ltd., Niiza-shi, Saitama 352-8666 (Japan)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN films have been deposited by reactive sputtering in nitrogen gas at pressures from 0.08 to 2.70 Pa with and without the addition of hydrogen gas. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), optical absorption, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy have been used to characterize the sputter-deposited GaN films. The XRD pattern reveals that the GaN films deposited in nitrogen gas at pressures lower than 0.53 Pa are polycrystals with the (0001) texture ({alpha}-GaN), while those deposited at or above 1.07 Pa display mixed crystalline orientations or an amorphous-like nature. The GaN:H films deposited in nitrogen/hydrogen mixed gas, on the other hand, show an amorphous or amorphous-like nature. The FTIR spectra indicate that the GaN:H films show peaks arising from hydrogen-related bonds at {approx}1000 and {approx}3200 cm{sup -1}, in addition to the GaN absorption band at {approx}555 cm{sup -1}. The optical absorption spectra at 300 K indicate the fundamental absorption edges at {approx}3.38 and {approx}3.7 eV for the highly oriented {alpha}-GaN and amorphous GaN:H films, respectively. PL emission has been observed from sputter-deposited {alpha}-GaN films at temperatures below 100 K. The GaN:H films also show strong band-edge and donor-acceptor pair emissions. The PL emission in the GaN:H film may arise from crystalline GaN particles embedded in the amorphous GaN matrix.

  11. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Möreke, Janina, E-mail: janina.moereke@bristol.ac.uk; Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Haigh, Sarah J. [Super STEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury Campus, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Bldg, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  12. Major Business Expansion Bond Program (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Major Business Expansion Bond Program provides long-term, credit-enhanced financing up to $25,000,000 at taxable bond rates for businesses creating or retaining at least 50 jobs; up to $10,000...

  13. Industrial Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRB) are tax-exempt bonds that can be used to stimulate capital investment and job creation by providing private borrowers with access to financing at interest rates that...

  14. Secondary Market Taxable Bond Program (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secondary Market Taxable Bond Program provides tax-exempt interest rate bond financing for real estate and machinery and equipment acquisitions. Up to 90% of the project debt may be financed,...

  15. The Market for Borrowing Corporate Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asquith, Paul

    This paper describes the market for borrowing corporate bonds using a comprehensive data set from a major lender. The cost of borrowing corporate bonds is comparable to the cost of borrowing stock, between 10 and 20 basis ...

  16. Bonded, walk-off compensated optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bonded, walk-off compensated crystal, for use with optical equipment, and methods of making optical components including same.

  17. Ga NMR spectra and relaxation in wurtzite GaN M. Corti and A. Gabetta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    69,71 Ga NMR spectra and relaxation in wurtzite GaN M. Corti and A. Gabetta Department of Physics properties of wurtzite GaN are studied by Ga nuclear magnetic resonance NMR in a GaN bulk crystal containing GaN is a wide band-gap semiconductor which crystallizes in the hexagonal wurtzite structure

  18. Cross-sectional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Cross-sectional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions Y Abstract Compositionally abrupt InGaP/GaAs heterojunctions grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy have the InGaP layer show non-uniform In and Ga distribution. About 1.5 nm of transition region

  19. Role of Electrochemical Reactions in the Degradation Mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    Role of Electrochemical Reactions in the Degradation Mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs Feng Gao1, USA tpalacios@mit.edu; (617) 324-2395 Keywords: AlGaN/GaN HEMTs, reliability, moisture, electro-chemical reactions Abstract The nature of structural degradation in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

  20. Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yat

    Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High Electron Mobility Transistors, 2006 ABSTRACT We report the rational synthesis of dopant-free GaN/AlN/AlGaN radial nanowire-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that the GaN/ AlN/AlGaN

  1. Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides information on Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative (CE+BFI). CE+BFI brings together public infrastructure finance agencies, clean energy public fund managers and institutional investors across the country to explore how to raise capital at scale for clean energy development through bond financing. Author: Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative

  2. Beta decay of Ga-62 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, BC; Iacob, VE; Azhari, A.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Hardy, John C.; Mayes, VE; Neilson, RG; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a study of the beta decay of Ga-62, whose dominant branch is a superallowed 0(+)-->0(+) transition to the ground state of Zn-62. We find the total half-life to be 115.84+/-0.25 ms. This is the first time that the Ga-62 half-life has been...

  3. Influence of GaAs surface termination on GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure and band offsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zech, E. S.; Chang, A. S.; Martin, A. J.; Canniff, J. C.; Millunchick, J. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Lin, Y. H. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the influence of GaAs surface termination on the nanoscale structure and band offsets of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals both coherent and semi-coherent clusters, as well as misfit dislocations, independent of surface termination. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy reveal clustered GaSb QDs with type I band offsets at the GaSb/GaAs interfaces. We discuss the relative influences of strain and QD clustering on the band offsets at GaSb/GaAs interfaces.

  4. Bonding, antibonding and tunable optical forces in asymmetric membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Pui-Chuen

    We demonstrate that tunable attractive (bonding) and repulsive (anti-bonding) forces can arise in highly asymmetric structures coupled to external radiation, a consequence of the bonding/anti-bonding level repulsion of ...

  5. Local structure of amorphous GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} semiconductor alloys across the composition range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levander, A. X.; Dubon, O. D.; Wu, J. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yu, K. M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Novikov, S. V.; Foxon, C. T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Typically only dilute (up to {approx}10%) highly mismatched alloys can be grown due to the large differences in atomic size and electronegativity of the host and the alloying elements. We have overcome the miscibility gap of the GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} system using low temperature molecular beam epitaxy. In the intermediate composition range (0.10 < x < 0.75), the resulting alloys are amorphous. To gain a better understanding of the amorphous structure, the local environment of the As and Ga atoms was investigated using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The EXAFS analysis shows a high concentration of dangling bonds compared to the crystalline binary endpoint compounds of the alloy system. The disorder parameter was larger for amorphous films compared to crystalline references, but comparable with other amorphous semiconductors. By examining the Ga local environment, the dangling bond density and disorder associated with As-related and N-related bonds could be decoupled. The N-related bonds had a lower dangling bond density and lower disorder.

  6. Bond Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBond County, Illinois:

  7. Interfacial chemistry and valence band offset between GaN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, T. L.; Ang, D. S. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Pan, J. S. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)] [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface region between Ga-face n-type GaN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric (achieved via atomic-layer deposition or ALD) is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An increase in the Ga-O to Ga-N bond intensity ratio following Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition implies that the growth of an interfacial gallium sub-oxide (GaO{sub x}) layer occurred during the ALD process. This finding may be ascribed to GaN oxidation, which may still happen following the reduction of a thin native GaO{sub x} by trimethylaluminum (TMA) in the initial TMA-only cycles. The valence band offset between GaN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, obtained using both core-level and valence band spectra, is found to vary with the thickness of the deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This observation may be explained by an upward energy band bending at the GaN surface (due to the spontaneous polarization induced negative bound charge on the Ga-face GaN) and the intrinsic limitation of the XPS method for band offset determination.

  8. Multiple-band-edge quantum-well intermixing in the InGaAs/InGaAsP/InGaP material system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coldren, Larry A.

    Multiple-band-edge quantum-well intermixing in the InGaAs/InGaAsP/InGaP material system Erik J InGaAs/InGaAsP/InGaP material system. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10 of achieving QWI in such active regions.3,4 However, InGaAs/InGaAsP/InGaP-based de- vices offer numerous

  9. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  10. La ville comme lieu d'mergence de nouvelles formes d'urbanit. Cas des quartiers rsidentiels de la ville de Constantine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    La ville comme lieu d'émergence de nouvelles formes d'urbanité. Cas des quartiers résidentiels de supprime le monopole des communes sur le patrimoine foncier et autorise la création des lotissements par l;Mais, si l'Etat ne dispose plus des droits absolus sur la gestion des sols, il restera toujours l

  11. Red emitting photonic devices using InGaP/InGaAlP material system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kangude, Yamini

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, two red emitting photonic devices are presented using the InGaP/InGaAlP material system. InGaP/InGaAlP material system provides large flexibility in the band gap energy while being lattice matched to GaAs ...

  12. AlGaAs/InGaAs/AlGaAs Double Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    -state Er. Tunneling Quantum Dot Sensors for Multi-band Infrared and Terahertz Radiation Detection G radiation detection are demonstrated. In T-QDIP structures, photoabsorption takes place in InGaAs QDs (due

  13. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    description of qualified energy conservation bonds, including process and mechanics, case studies, utilization trends, barriers, and regulatory and legal issues. Author:...

  14. Tax-Exempt Bond Financing (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Economic Development Authority provides tax-exempt bond financing for financial assistance to new or expanding businesses, governmental units and certain organizations that are exempt...

  15. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  16. Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial,...

  17. Nuclear reactor multiphysics via bond graph formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosnovsky, Eugeny

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling nuclear reactor multiphysics problems using bond graphs. Conventional multiphysics simulation paradigms normally use operator splitting, which treats the ...

  18. Composition and Interface Analysis of InGaN/GaN Multiquantum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Interface Analysis of InGaNGaN Multiquantum-Wells on GaN Substrates Using Atom Probe Tomography. Composition and Interface Analysis of InGaNGaN Multiquantum-Wells...

  19. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin [Centre for Research in Photonics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon [Cyrium Technologies Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent [Centre de Recherche en Nanofabrication et en Nanocaracterisation CRN2, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  20. PRESSURE DEPENDENCE OF OPTICAL TRANSITIONS IN InGaN/GaN MULTIPLE QUANTUM WELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    -µm thick GaN layer deposited on a sapphire substrate, and it is capped by a 0.2-µm GaN:Mg pPRESSURE DEPENDENCE OF OPTICAL TRANSITIONS IN InGaN/GaN MULTIPLE QUANTUM WELLS W. Shan,* J.W. Ager pressure on optical transitions in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) has been studied

  1. Free carrier accumulation at cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions Q. Y. Wei,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    ) substrate,7 with GaN and AlGaN layer thickness of 600 nm and 30 nm, respectively. The layer thicknessFree carrier accumulation at cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions Q. Y. Wei,1 T. Li,1 J. Y. Huang,1 F. A (Received 24 February 2012; accepted 19 March 2012; published online 3 April 2012) Cubic Al0.3Ga0.7N/GaN

  2. Low-temperature synthesis of gallium nitride thin films using electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition from a GaAs target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, J.; Wu, A.M.; Xu, N.; Ying, Z.F.; Shen, X.K.; Dong, Z.B.; Wu, J.D.; Shi, L.Q. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using reactive pulsed laser deposition assisted by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, we have synthesized GaN thin films from a polycrystalline GaAs target at low temperatures. This was achieved by ablating the GaAs target in the reactive environment of a nitrogen plasma generated from ECR microwave discharge in pure nitrogen gas and depositing the films with concurrent bombardment by the low-energy nitrogen plasma stream. High-energy ion backscattering spectroscopy analysis shows that the synthesized films are gallium rich. Characterizations by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirm the presence of GaN bonds in the films. The recorded absorption spectrum also reveals GaN stretching mode characteristic of the hexagonal GaN phase. The synthesized GaN films are transparent in the visible region and have a band gap of 3.38 eV. Optical emission from the plume during film deposition reveals that the plume created by pulsed laser ablation of the GaAs target consists mainly of monoatomic atoms and ions of gallium and arsenic. Mechanisms responsible for the formation of GaN molecules and the growth of GaN films are also discussed.

  3. How Hydrogen Bond Redundancy Affects Protein Flexibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naomi Fox; Filip Jagodzinski; Jeanne Hardy; Ileana Streinu

    Modeling a Protein as a BodyBarHinge and Associated Graph Main Question: Stability in proteins is the resistance to denaturation, or unfolding. A protein that is highly stable has a high tolerance to bonds breaking before unfolding; an unstable protein has less tolerance. In this study, we focus on the question, how many hydrogen bonds

  4. InGaP/GaAs/InGaP double-heterojunction bipolar transistors grown by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy with a valved phosphorus cracker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    InGaP/GaAs/InGaP double-heterojunction bipolar transistors grown by solid-source molecular; accepted 17 November 1995 The growth and device characterization of an InGaP/GaAs double-quality phosphorus-containing compounds.1­4 The growth of high-performance InGaP/ GaAs and InGaAs/InP single

  5. InGaP/InGaAsN/GaAs NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, P. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Baca, A. G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Li, N. Y. [Emcore Photovoltaics, Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Emcore Photovoltaics, Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Xie, X. M. [Emcore Photovoltaics, Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Emcore Photovoltaics, Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Hou, H. Q. [Emcore Photovoltaics, Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Emcore Photovoltaics, Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Armour, E. [Emcore Corporation, Somerset, New Jersey 08873 (United States)] [Emcore Corporation, Somerset, New Jersey 08873 (United States)

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated a functional NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) using InGaAsN for the base layer. The InGaP/In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01}/GaAs DHBT has a low V{sub ON} of 0.81 V, which is 0.13 V lower than in a InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). The lower turn-on voltage is attributed to the smaller band gap (1.20 eV) of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-grown In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} base layer. GaAs is used for the collector; thus the breakdown voltage (BV{sub CEO}) is 10 V, consistent with the BV{sub CEO} of InGaP/GaAs HBTs of comparable collector thickness and doping level. To alleviate the current blocking phenomenon caused by the larger conduction band discontinuity between InGaAsN and GaAs, a graded InGaAs layer with {delta} doping is inserted at the base-collector junction. The improved device has a peak current gain of seven with ideal current-voltage characteristics. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. InGaP/InGaAsN/GaAs NpN double heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, P.C.; Baca, A.G.; Li, N.Y.; Xie, X.M.; Sharps, P.R.; Hou, H.Q.

    2000-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have demonstrated a functional NpN double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) using InGaAsN for base layer. The InGaP/In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01}/GaAs DHBT has a low V{sub ON} of 0.81 V, which is 0.13 V lower than in a InGaP/GaAs HBT. The lower V{sub ON} is attributed to the smaller bandgap (E{sub g}=1.20eV) of MOCVD grown In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} base layer. GaAs is used for the collector; thus the BV{sub CEO} is 10 V, consistent with the BV{sub CEO} of InGaP/GaAs Hbts of comparable collector thickness and doping level. To alleviate the current blocking phenomenon caused by the larger {triangle}E{sub C} between InGaAsN and GaAs, a graded InGaAs layer with {delta}-doping is inserted at the base-collector junction. The improved device has a peak current gain of 7 with ideal IV characteristics.

  7. Intrafacet migration effects in InGaN/GaN structures grown on triangular GaN ridges studied by submicron beam x-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirenko, Andrei

    Intrafacet migration effects in InGaN/GaN structures grown on triangular GaN ridges studied for x-ray diffraction and reciprocal space mapping of InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well MQW structures grown on the sidewalls of 10- m-wide triangular GaN ridges with 1-1.1 facets. Samples were produced

  8. GaN0.011P0.989–GaP Double-Heterostructure Red Light-Emitting Diodes Directly Grown on GaP Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Charles W

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. W. Tu, GaN diodes on GaP substrates, 2000. [7] J. W.on a GaN directly grown on a GaP substrate was successfullyDH) directly a GaN grown on a (100) GaP substrate. Fig. 1(a)

  9. AlGaAs/InGaAsN/GaAs PnP double heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, P.C.; Baca, A.G.; Li, N.Y.; Sharps, P.R.; Hou, H.Q.; Laroche, J.R.; Ren, F.

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have demonstrated a functional MOCVD-grown AlGaAs/InGaAsN/GaAsPnP DHBT that is lattice matched to GaAs and has a peak current gain ({beta}) of 25. Because of the smaller bandgap (E{sub g}=1.20eV)of In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} used for the base layer, this device has a low V{sub ON} of 0.79 V, 0.25 V lower than in a comparable Pnp AlGaAs/GaAs HBT. The BV{sub CEO} is 12 V, consistent with its GaAs collector thickness and doping level.

  10. Asymmetric interfacial abruptness in N-polar and Ga-polar GaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazumder, B.; Hurni, C. A.; Zhang, J. Y.; Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wong, M. H.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we report on the interfacial abruptness of GaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures with pulsed laser atom probe tomography (APT). The samples were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) under both metal-rich and N-rich conditions on both Ga-polar (0001) GaN templates and N-polar (0001) GaN substrates. An NH{sub 3} assisted MBE technique was involved to grow similar Ga-polar and N-polar structures on GaN:Fe substrates and GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} templates, respectively, for a comparison study. We find in all cases the interface with net positive polarization charge was chemically abrupt, whereas the interface with net negative polarization charge was diffuse. We discuss the implications on device design and performance. These data validate the efficiency of APT in studying interfaces for better performance in devices.

  11. Superior radiation-resistant properties of InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Okuda, T.; Taylor, S.J.; Takamoto, T. [Toyota Technological Institute 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468 (Japan)] [Toyota Technological Institute 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468 (Japan); Ikeda, E.; Kurita, H. [Central Resource Laboratory, Japan Energy Company, Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan)] [Central Resource Laboratory, Japan Energy Company, Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of minority-carrier injection-enhanced annealing of radiation damage to InGa{sub 0.5}P{sub 0.5}/GaAs tandem solar cells is reported. Radiation resistance of InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells as is similar with GaAs-on-Ge cells have been confirmed with 1 MeV electron irradiations. Moreover, minority-carrier injection under light illumination and forward bias conditions is shown to enhance defect annealing in InGaP and to result in the recovery of InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cell properties. These results suggest that the InGaP/GaAs(/Ge) multijunction solar cells and InGaP-based devices have great potential for space applications. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Stress and Fracture Analysis of a Class of Bonded Joints in Wind Turbine Blades 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chang

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    SERR,G strain energy release rate E Young?s modulus of adherend Ea Young?s modulus of adhesive D exural rigidity of adherend Ga shear modulus of adhesive J J-integral K spring sti ness W strain energy density a coordinate of left side of void..., and will deteriorate the structural sti ness and strength, even cause catastrophic failure [23][25] (Fig. 1.12). Figure 1.12: Catastrophic eld failure of wind turbine During a typical-20-year service life, adhesively bonded joints in wind turbine blades...

  13. Modeling Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds and Solution Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theel, Kelly

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling low-barrier hydrogen bonds . . . . . 1.3 ModelingTypical hydrogen-bond 1-D potential energy surface . LBHB 1-representation of a Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond . . . . . . .

  14. sp2 Carbon-Hydrogen Bond (C-H) Functionalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yotphan, Sirilata

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C-C) bonds from carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds in organicof them is unusually short. Hydrogen atoms were included insp 2 Carbon-Hydrogen Bond (C-H) Functionalization By

  15. Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Acyclic Tertiary Diamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodagholian, Sevana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Search of a Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in Proton Bridgedand J.A. Gerlt, “The Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in EnzymaticShow That Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds do not Offer a

  16. Transformation of c-oriented nanowall network to a flat morphology in GaN films on c-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesaria, Manoj; Shetty, Satish [International Centre for Material Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)] [International Centre for Material Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); Cohen, P.I. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Shivaprasad, S.M., E-mail: smsprasad@jncasr.ac.in [International Centre for Material Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} High quality wurtzite structures GaN nanowall network formed on c-plane sapphire. {yields} Tapering of nanowalls at the apex cause electron confinement effects. {yields} Temperature dependent transformation of the six fold nanowall network to a flat morphology. {yields} Growth kinetics is influenced by adatom diffusion, interactions and bonding for GaN layer. -- Abstract: The work significantly optimizes growth parameters for nanostructured and flat GaN film in the 480-830 {sup o}C temperature range. The growth of ordered, high quality GaN nanowall hexagonal honeycomb like network on c-plane sapphire under nitrogen rich (N/Ga ratio of 100) conditions at temperatures below 700 {sup o}C is demonstrated. The walls are c-oriented wurtzite structures 200 nm wide at base and taper to 10 nm at apex, manifesting electron confinement effects to tune optoelectronic properties. For substrate temperatures above 700 {sup o}C the nanowalls thicken to a flat morphology with a dislocation density of 10{sup 10}/cm{sup 2}. The role of misfit dislocations in the GaN overlayer evolution is discussed in terms of growth kinetics being influenced by adatom diffusion, interactions and bonding at different temperatures. The GaN films are characterized by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), field emission scanning electron (FESEM), high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and cathodoluminescence (CL).

  17. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101?0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ertem, Mehmed Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Kharche, Neerav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Batista, Victor S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hybertsen, Mark S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Muckerman, James T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101?0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation of free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O?? requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101?0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.

  18. Beta decay of Ga-62

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, BC; Iacob, VE; Azhari, A.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Hardy, John C.; Mayes, VE; Neilson, RG; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the ex- perimental ft value for a 01?01 b decay between analog states with the relation @3# 0556-2813/2003/68~1!/015501~6!/$20.00 68 015501- of 62Ga . Hardy, V. E. Mayes, R. G. Neilson, M. Sanchez-Vega, and R. E. Tribble y, College Station...

  19. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO); Davis, John W. (Ballwin, MO)

    2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  20. GaN nanowires show more 3D piezoelectricity than bulk GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Logo GaN nanowires show more 3D piezoelectricity than bulk GaN admin / January 11, 2012 individual gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires showing strong piezoelectric effect in 3D. This is in spite of the fact that each nanowire only measures 100nm in diameter. While GaN is ubiquitous in optoelectronic

  1. Self-aligned AlGaN/GaN transistors for sub-mm wave applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadat, Omair I

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes work done towards realizing self-aligned AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Self-aligned transistors are important for improving the frequency of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs by reducing source ...

  2. Invited Paper GaN HEMT reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    Invited Paper GaN HEMT reliability J.A. del Alamo *, J. Joh Microsystems Technology Laboratories mechanism recently identified in GaN high-electron mobility transistors subject to electrical stress. Under high voltage, it has been found that electrically active defects are generated in the AlGaN barrier

  3. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) & New Clean Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presentation overview of qualified energy conservation bond and new clean renewable energy bonds, including characteristics, mechanics, allocated volume, and other information....

  4. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with...

  5. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

  6. A Preorganized Hydrogen Bond Network and Its Effect on Anion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preorganized Hydrogen Bond Network and Its Effect on Anion Stability. A Preorganized Hydrogen Bond Network and Its Effect on Anion Stability. Abstract: Rigid tricyclic locked in...

  7. Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Abstract: A review with 171 references. Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers for...

  8. Local Option- Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Utah Industrial Facilities and Development Act, counties, municipalities, and state universities in Utah may issue Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRBs) or Industrial Development Bonds (IDBs)...

  9. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (ŤQECBs?) & New Clean Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds ("QECBs") & New Clean Renewable Energy Bonds ("New CREBs") Slide 1 DISCLAIMER: The information in this presentation is for informational...

  10. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted...

  11. Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen K-edge Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure Theory . Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen K-edge Spectroscopy...

  12. New GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs, Triple-Bandgap, Tandem Solar Cell for High-Efficiency Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Geisz, J.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Moriarty, T.; Carapella, J.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Emery. K.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs three-junction cells are grown in an inverted configuration on GaAs, allowing high quality growth of the lattice matched GaInP and GaAs layers before a grade is used for the 1-eV GaInAs layer. Using this approach an efficiency of 37.9% was demonstrated.

  13. The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (OEBF) was created in 1988 to promote economic development, create and retain quality jobs and assist governmental operations. The program enables non-profit and for...

  14. Industrial Revenue Bond Program (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The District provides below market bond financing to lower the costs of borrowing for qualified capital construction and renovation projects. The program is available to non-profits, institutions,...

  15. Corporate bond repurchases and earnings management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemayian, Zawadi Rehema

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates whether earnings management incentives are associated with gains/losses recognized when firms repurchase bonds. The research question is motivated by the inclusion of these gains/losses in firms' ...

  16. InAs=InGaP=GaAs heterojunction power Schottky rectifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    InAs=InGaP=GaAs heterojunction power Schottky rectifiers A. Chen, M. Young and J.M. Woodall A low-matched InGaP on GaAs, to make a high-temperature power rectifier. The LT molecular beam epitaxy technique enables the formation of an abrupt interface between InAs and InGaP. This heterojunction rectifier

  17. Monolithic Millimeter-wave Distributed Amplifiers using AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Monolithic Millimeter-wave Distributed Amplifiers using AlGaN/GaN HEMTs Rajkumar Santhakumar, Yi have been designed and fabricated using AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. One of them uses a standard HEMT for the unit-gate distributed amplifier achieves a CW peak output power of 1W and a PAE of about 16% at 4GHz. Index Terms -- GaN

  18. Role of strain in polarization switching in semipolar InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Role of strain in polarization switching in semipolar InGaN/GaN quantum wells Qimin Yan,1,a Patrick November 2010 The effect of strain on the valence-band structure of 112¯2 semipolar InGaN grown on GaN D6 is calculated for GaN and InN using density functional theory with the Heyd­Scuseria­ Ernzerhof

  19. GaN/AlGaN heterojunction infrared detector responding in 814 and 2070 m ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    GaN/AlGaN heterojunction infrared detector responding in 8­14 and 20­70 m ranges G. Ariyawansa, M October 2006 A GaN/AlGaN heterojunction interfacial work function internal photoemission infrared detector, the work demonstrates 54 m 5.5 THz operation of the detector based on 1s­2p± transition of Si donors in GaN

  20. Effect of buffer structures on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xi, Y. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with three different types of buffer layers, including a GaN/AlGaN composite layer, or 1 or 2 lm GaN thick layers, were fabricated and their reliability compared. The HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layer showed the lowest critical voltage (Vcri) during off-state drain step-stress, but this was increased by around 50% and 100% for devices with the composite AlGaN/GaN buffer layers or thinner GaN buffers, respectively. The Voff - state for HEMTs with thin GaN and composite buffers were 100 V, however, this degraded to 50 60V for devices with thick GaN buffers due to the difference in peak electric field near the gate edge. A similar trend was observed in the isolation breakdown voltage measurements, with the highest Viso achieved based on thin GaN or composite buffer designs (600 700 V), while a much smaller Viso of 200V was measured on HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layers. These results demonstrate the strong influence of buffer structure and defect density on AlGaN/GaN HEMT performance and reliability.

  1. Growth of AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistors on semi-insulating GaN using an AlGaN interlayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z.; Denbaars, S. P. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Pei, Y.; Newman, S.; Chu, R.; Brown, D.; Keller, S.; Mishra, U. K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Chung, R.; Nakamura, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-insulating (SI) GaN layers were grown on 4H-SiC substrates by inserting an AlGaN layer between the AlN buffer and the GaN layer. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements showed that the AlGaN layer prevented Si from diffusing from the substrate into the GaN layer. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analyses showed that an optimized AlGaN interlayer does not degrade the crystal quality or surface morphology of the SI GaN. The room temperature mobility of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using this SI GaN was 2200 cm{sup 2}/V s. High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with 0.65 {mu}m long gates were also fabricated on these SI GaN buffers. A power density of 19.0 W/mm with a power added efficiency of 48% was demonstrated at 10 GHz at a drain bias of 78 V. These HEMTs also exhibited sharp pinch off, low leakage, and negligible dispersion.

  2. Strain variations in InGaAsP/InGaP superlattices studied by scanning probe microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Strain variations in InGaAsP/InGaP superlattices studied by scanning probe microscopy Huajie Chen, Kista, Sweden Abstract Strain-compensated InGaAsP/InGaP superlattices are studied in cross- section. The strain compensated InGaAsP/InGaP/InP superlattices studied here have application for light sources

  3. AlGaN/GaN Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors using Titanium Dioxide P. J. HANSEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    AlGaN/GaN Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors using Titanium Dioxide P. J. HANSEN 1 epitaxially on AlGaN/GaN HFET structures by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Growth was first performed on GaN templates to establish epitaxial growth conditions. X-ray diffraction showed [001] TiO2 || [1010]GaN

  4. AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors using barium strontium titanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors using barium strontium; published 13 October 2004) Use of high-k gate dielectrics in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field transconductance and pinchoff voltage. To achieve this, AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field

  5. In this paper, an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device based on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Kyounghoon

    205 Abstract In this paper, an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device basedBm at 2 GHz have been demonstrated from the fabricated device. 1. Introduction In recent years, AlGaN/GaN noise amplifier and switch. Superior results have been reported in microwave power performance of AlGaN/GaN

  6. A New Architecture for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Frequency Doubler Using Active Integrated Antenna Design Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    A New Architecture for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Frequency Doubler Using Active Integrated Antenna Design presents a new architecture for an AlGaN/GaN HEMT frequency doubler using the active integrated antenna. The antenna operates as a fundamental frequency reflector in this circuit. Using AlGaN/GaN with 1mm gate

  7. Generation-Recombination Defects In AlGaN/GaN HEMT On SiC Substrate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Generation-Recombination Defects In AlGaN/GaN HEMT On SiC Substrate, Evidenced By Low Frequency Aristide Briand, 92.195 Meudon, France Abstract. Wide bandgap devices such as AlGaN/GaN High Electron of GR- bulges related respectively to AlGaN/GaN interface and quantum well are identified. Each GR

  8. Effect of dislocations on electron mobility in AlGaN/GaN and AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaun, Stephen W.; Burke, Peter G.; Kyle, Erin C. H.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wong, Man Hoi; Mishra, Umesh K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN (x = 0.06, 0.12, 0.24) and AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures were grown on 6 H-SiC, GaN-on-sapphire, and free-standing GaN, resulting in heterostructures with threading dislocation densities of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}, {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}, and {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, respectively. All growths were performed under Ga-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Dominant scattering mechanisms with variations in threading dislocation density and sheet concentration were indicated through temperature-dependent Hall measurements. The inclusion of an AlN interlayer was also considered. Dislocation scattering contributed to reduced mobility in these heterostructures, especially when sheet concentration was low or when an AlN interlayer was present.

  9. High efficiency InGaP solar cells for InGaP/GaAs tandem cell application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Kurita, H.; Ohmori, M. [Japan Energy Corp., Toda, Saitama (Japan). Central Research Lab.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, high conversion efficiency single junction InGaP solar cells with n-p-p{sup +} structure are presented and their application to InGaP/GaAs monolithic tandem cells is discussed. In the InGaP cells, a best conversion efficiency of 18.48% was achieved by introducing the p{sup +} peak back surface field (BSF) layer with a high carrier concentration of 2 {times} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}, which improved both short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc). However, in the case of InGaP/GaAs tandem cells, a decrease in carrier concentration of the InGaP BSF layer, which was caused by the diffusion of Zn, was found to reduce the Isc and Voc of the tandem cell. The reduction in the carrier concentration was suppressed by using a thicker BSF layer of 0.5 {micro}m, which reduced the current density in the GaAs bottom cell. An InGaP/GaAs tandem cell with 27.3% efficiency and a high Voc of 2.418 V was obtained.

  10. Relaxed, high-quality InP on GaAs by using InGaAs and InGaP graded buffers to avoid phase separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relaxed, high-quality InP on GaAs by using InGaAs and InGaP graded buffers to avoid phaseAs was 70% of that on bulk InP at both temperatures. To achieve this, graded buffers in the InGaAs, InGaP

  11. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on sapphire, Sic, and HVPE GaN templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfra, Michael J.

    PS-4 AlGaN/GaN HEMTs grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on sapphire, Sic, and HVPE GaN templates Nils ABSTRACT Molecular Beam Epitaxy of GaN and related alloys is becoming a rival to the more established, and HVPE SI-GaN templates on sapphire. While sapphire and SI-Sic are established substrates for the growth

  12. ZrO2 gate dielectrics produced by ultraviolet ozone oxidation for GaN and AlGaN/GaN transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOSCAP process ?ow: n-GaN substrate; Ohmic metallization andtion for a AlGaN/ GaN HEMT on a substrate which has a poorsapphire substrate, a well-passivated AlGaN/ GaN HEMT grown

  13. Green light emission by InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well microdisks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Yu-Chi; Lo, Ikai, E-mail: ikailo@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hu, Chia-Hsuan; Wang, Ying-Chieh; Tsai, Cheng-Da; Chou, Mitch M. C. [Department of Physics, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Physics, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Gary Z. L. [United Crystal Corporation, No. 243-3, Wenshan 36061, Miaoli, Taiwan (China)] [United Crystal Corporation, No. 243-3, Wenshan 36061, Miaoli, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-quality In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN multiple quantum wells were grown on GaN microdisks with ?-LiAlO{sub 2} substrate by using low-temperature two-step technique of plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We demonstrated that the hexagonal GaN microdisk can be used as a strain-free substrate to grow the advanced In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN quantum wells for the optoelectronic applications. We showed that the green light of 566-nm wavelength (2.192?eV) emitted from the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN quantum wells was tremendously enhanced in an order of amplitude higher than the UV light of 367-nm wavelength (3.383?eV) from GaN.

  14. July 18, 2012 Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds for Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 18, 2012 Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds for Public Building Upgrades: Reducing Energy Bills in the City of Philadelphia Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) are federally Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) is a bond that enables qualified state, tribal and local government

  15. Qualified Energy Conservation Bond State-by-State Summary Tables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides a list of qualified energy conservation bond state summary tables. Author: Energy Programs Consortium

  16. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Eric D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0GaAs layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  17. The Ties That Bond: Re-Examining the Relationship between Facebook Use and Bonding Social Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    The Ties That Bond: Re-Examining the Relationship between Facebook Use and Bonding Social Capital established a positive relationship between measures of Facebook use and perceptions of social capital. Like other social network sites, Facebook is especially well-positioned to enhance users' bridging social

  18. InGaP/GaAs and InGaAs mechanically-stacked triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Agui, T. [Japan Energy Corp., Toda, Saitama (Japan)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Triple-junction cells with AM1.5 efficiencies of over 33% have been demonstrated. A planar type InGaP/GaAs monolithic dual-junction cell was fabricated on a semi-insulating FaAs substrate, which has high infra-red transparency. Then a dual-junction cell, with efficiency of 27--28%, was mechanically stacked on an InGaAs cell fabricated on an InP substrate. The bottom InGaAs cell showed an efficiency of 6.2% under the InGaP/GaAs cell, and a total efficiency of 33--34% was achieved for the four-terminal triple-junction cell.

  19. Graphene induced remote surface scattering in graphene/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiwen; Li, Dan; Wang, Bobo; Liu, Bin; Chen, Famin; Jin, Guangri; Lu, Yanwu, E-mail: ywlu@bjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobilities of single-layer graphene combined with AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on two-dimensional electron gases in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction are calculated. The impact of electron density in single-layer graphene is also studied. Remote surface roughness (RSR) and remote interfacial charge (RIC) scatterings are introduced into this heterostructure. The mobilities limited by RSR and RIC are an order of magnitude higher than that of interface roughness and misfit dislocation. This study contributes to designing structures for generation of higher electron mobility in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction.

  20. Experimental evidence of Ga-vacancy induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Central Research Laboratory, Bharat Electronics, Bangalore 560013 (India); Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B. [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Kalghatgi, A. T. [Central Research Laboratory, Bharat Electronics, Bangalore 560013 (India); Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A. [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P. O., Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have grown Ga deficient GaN epitaxial films on (0001) sapphire substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and report the experimental evidence of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. The observed yellow emission peak in room temperature photoluminescence spectra and the peak positioning at 300 cm{sup -1} in Raman spectra confirms the existence of Ga vacancies. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements further confirmed the formation of Ga vacancies; since the N/Ga is found to be >1. The ferromagnetism is believed to originate from the polarization of the unpaired 2p electrons of N surrounding the Ga vacancy.

  1. Hydrogen Bond Networks: Structure and Evolution after Hydrogen Bond Breaking John B. Asbury, Tobias Steinel, and M. D. Fayer*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Networks: Structure and Evolution after Hydrogen Bond Breaking John B. Asbury, TobiasVed: September 1, 2003; In Final Form: December 18, 2003 The nature of hydrogen bonding networks following hydrogen bond breaking is investigated using vibrational echo correlation spectroscopy of the hydroxyl

  2. Shirzadi et al. Surface and Interface Analysis 2001; 31:609-618 Interface evolution and bond strength when diffusion bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    strength when diffusion bonding materials with stable oxide films A.A. Shirzadi* , H. Assadi and E morphologies and strengths of aluminium diffusion bonds are reviewed. Previous approaches, proposed to overcome for both solid-state diffusion bonding and conventional transient liquid phase (TLP) diffusion bonding. Non

  3. Ultra-Thin, Triple-Bandgap GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of state-of-the-art, series-connected, lattice-matched (LM), triple-junction (TJ), III-V tandem solar cells could be improved substantially (10-12%) by replacing the Ge bottom subcell with a subcell having a bandgap of {approx}1 eV. For the last several years, research has been conducted by a number of organizations to develop {approx}1-eV, LM GaInAsN to provide such a subcell, but, so far, the approach has proven unsuccessful. Thus, the need for a high-performance, monolithically integrable, 1-eV subcell for TJ tandems has remained. In this paper, we present a new TJ tandem cell design that addresses the above-mentioned problem. Our approach involves inverted epitaxial growth to allow the monolithic integration of a lattice-mismatched (LMM) {approx}1-eV GaInAs/GaInP double-heterostructure (DH) bottom subcell with LM GaAs (middle) and GaInP (top) upper subcells. A transparent GaInP compositionally graded layer facilitates the integration of the LM and LMM components. Handle-mounted, ultra-thin device fabrication is a natural consequence of the inverted-structure approach, which results in a number of advantages, including robustness, potential low cost, improved thermal management, incorporation of back-surface reflectors, and possible reclamation/reuse of the parent crystalline substrate for further cost reduction. Our initial work has concerned GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cells grown on GaAs substrates. In this case, the 1-eV GaInAs experiences 2.2% compressive LMM with respect to the substrate. Specially designed GaInP graded layers are used to produce 1-eV subcells with performance parameters nearly equaling those of LM devices with the same bandgap (e.g., LM, 1-eV GaInAsP grown on InP). Previously, we reported preliminary ultra-thin tandem devices (0.237 cm{sup 2}) with NREL-confirmed efficiencies of 31.3% (global spectrum, one sun) (1), 29.7% (AM0 spectrum, one sun) (2), and 37.9% (low-AOD direct spectrum, 10.1 suns) (3), all at 25 C. Here, we include recent results of testing similar devices under the concentrated AMO spectrum, and also present the first demonstration of a high-efficiency, ultra-thin GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell processed on a flexible kapton handle.

  4. Bond Strength Measurements from an Australian Standard Bond Wrench in Comparison to the Unbalanced ASTM C 1072 Bond Wrench to the Balanced and Unbalanced Wrenches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Sri Vishnu Chaitanya Guptha

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Bond wrenches. The Australian wrench values were significantly higher than the American bond wrenches for similar types of samples. Hence it was recommended that the tests be carried out by replacing the cement with Portland cement. This experimental...

  5. September 16-21, 2007 Las Vegas, Nevada Gate recess technology on AlGaN/GaN HFET with InGaN as etch-stop layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Nezih

    0 2 V(V) C(pF) Before etching (material) After etching (device) G AlGaN substrate i-GaN DS AlN AlGaN substrate AlN i-GaN AlGaN S G DAlGaNAlGaN InGaNInGaN Standard gate recess InGaN stop layer gate recess InGaNICNS 7 September 16-21, 2007 ­ Las Vegas, Nevada Gate recess technology on AlGaN/GaN HFET with InGaN

  6. Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, Raymond D. (Los Alamos, NM); Roe, Lawrence H. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements.

  7. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO)

    1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  8. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has posed a potential threat to the United States. The jet's mission covers thousands of square miles Frequency Microwave Radiometers to NOAA's P-3s. SFMRs measure over-ocean wind speed and rain rate of hurricane-related deaths. NOAA pilots have flown P-3s into hurricanes at low altitudes (1,500-10,000 ft

  9. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , D.C., sponsored by the governments of Canada, Norway, Iceland, and the United States. Recognizing diseases, and Alzheimer's. Studies have linked seafood consumption with lower heart rates, lower outweigh perceived risks, and just two six-ounce seafood meals per week can cut the risk of coronary death

  10. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes (physical, geochemical, ecological) · Build predictive models for use in weather, climate, solar and transferred by NOAA scientists. Federal agencies, state governments, and local authorities rely on NOAA federal and academic scientists · Prepare scientific assessments and information products to enhance

  11. Rutile films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN and AlGaN/GaN P. J. Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Rutile films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN and AlGaN/GaN P. J. Hansen Materials Department March 2005 Titanium dioxide TiO2, with the rutile structure was grown on 0001 oriented GaN and 0001 Al0.33Ga0.67N/GaN heterostructure field effect transistor HFET structures by molecular beam epitaxy. X

  12. Single-Wire Light-Emitting Diodes Based on GaN Wires Containing Both Polar and Nonpolar InGaN/GaN Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single-Wire Light-Emitting Diodes Based on GaN Wires Containing Both Polar and Nonpolar InGaN/GaN based on radial p­i­n multi quantum well (QW) junctions have been realized from GaN wires grown by catalyst- free metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The Inx Ga1Ŕx N/GaN undoped QW system is coated over both

  13. High density plasma damage in InGaP/GaAs as AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.W.; Pearton, S.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ren, F.; Kopf, R.F.; Kuo, J.M. [Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Lucent Technologies; Shul, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Constantine, C.; Johnson, D. [Plasma-Therm Inc., St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of plasma damage in InGaP/GaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been investigated using both inductively coupled plasma and electron cyclotron resonance Ar discharges. The saturated drain-source current is found to be decreased through introduction of compensating deep levels into the InGaP or AlGaAs donor layer. The degradation of device performance is a strong function of ion energy and ion flux, and an advantage of both high density plasma tools is that ion energy can be reduced by increasing the plasma density. Increasing process pressure and source power, and decreasing radio-frequency chuck power produce the lowest amounts of plasma damage in HEMTs.

  14. Comparison of compressive and tensile relaxed composition-graded GaAsP and ,,Al...InGaP substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of compressive and tensile relaxed composition-graded GaAsP and ,,Al...InGaP substrates, around 104 cm-2 . The structures, grown on GaP or GaAs, consist of graded In-fraction InGaP and AlInGaP. High surface roughness and branch defects in Al InGaP lead to the lowest quality virtual substrates we

  15. Carrier Dynamics in InGaN/GaN SQW Structure Probed by the Transient Grating Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamoto, Koichi

    Carrier Dynamics in InGaN/GaN SQW Structure Probed by the Transient Grating Method; 78.55.Cr; 78.67.De; S7.14 Carrier dynamics in GaN and InGaN/GaN SQW structures were observed by using inhomogeneity of In composition. Recently, InGaN/GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been commercialized

  16. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadas, Janos I [ORNL; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  17. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  18. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  19. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN); Paulauskas, Felix L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fathi, Zakaryae (Cary, NC); Wei, Jianghua (Raleigh, NC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

  20. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  1. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  2. N-Face GaN/AlGaN HEMTs Fabricated Through Layer Transfer Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jinwook

    We present a new method to fabricate N-face GaN/AlGaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). These devices are extremely promising for ultrahigh frequency applications where low contact resistances and excellent carrier ...

  3. Development and Industrialization of InGaN/GaN LEDs on Patterned...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of InGaNGaN LEDs on Patterned Sapphire Substrates for Low Cost Emitter Architecture Development and Industrialization of InGaNGaN LEDs on Patterned Sapphire...

  4. Breakdown mechanism in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on Si substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on Si substrates have attracted a great interest for power electronics applications. Despite the low cost of the Si substrate, the breakdown voltage (V[subscript ...

  5. Siemens Pittsburgh, PA Novelis Corporation Atlanta, GA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Industrial Design ­ Shanghai, China Eaton Corporation ­ Pittsburgh, PA CMU, CTTEC ­ PittsburghSiemens ­ Pittsburgh, PA Novelis Corporation ­ Atlanta, GA Expense

  6. Strain-balanced InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Den Broeck, D. M.; Hosalli, A. M.; Bedair, S. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Bharrat, D.; El-Masry, N. A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures suffer from a high amount of compressive strain in the InGaN wells and the accompanied piezoelectric field resulting in both a blue shift in emission and a reduction of emission intensity. We report the growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN “strain-balanced” multiple quantum wells (SBMQWs) grown on thick In{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N templates for x?>?y by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. SBMQWs consist of alternating layers of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N wells and GaN barriers under compressive and tensile stress, respectively, which have been lattice matched to a thick In{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N template. Growth of the In{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N template is also detailed in order to achieve thick, relaxed In{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N grown on GaN without the presence of V-grooves. When compared to conventional In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN MQWs grown on GaN, the SBMQW structures exhibit longer wavelength emission and higher emission intensity for the same InN mole fraction due to a reduction in the well strain and piezoelectric field. By matching the average lattice constant of the MQW active region to the lattice constant of the In{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N template, essentially an infinite number of periods can be grown using the SBMQW growth method without relaxation-related effects. SBMQWs can be utilized to achieve longer wavelength emission in light emitting diodes without the use of excess indium and can be advantageous in addressing the “green gap.”.

  7. High current gain InGaN=GaN HBTs with C operating temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbeck, Peter M.

    with an $20 nm low-temperature (Tg Ľ 550 C) GaN buffer layer on a (0001) sapphire substrate. The layer 1018 cmŔ3 Buffer GaN 2.5 mm ­ Substrate Sapphire ­ ­ HBT device processing began by depositing a 100 nmHigh current gain InGaN=GaN HBTs with 300 C operating temperature D.M. Keogh, P.M. Asbeck, T. Chung

  8. Switchable piezoelectric transduction in AlGaN/GaN MEMS resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Dana

    This work presents a new switching mechanism in piezoelectric transduction of AlGaN/GaN bulk acoustic resonators. A piezoelectric transducer is formed in the AlGaN, between a top Schottky electrode and a 2D electron gas ...

  9. Spontaneous emission in GaN/InGaN photonic crystal nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Sigalas, "InGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure light-emitting diodes employing photonic crystal, "III-nitride blue and ultraviolet photonic crystal light emitting diodes," Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 466, and H. Benisty, "Photonic-crystal GaN light-emitting diodes with tailored guided modes distribution

  10. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  11. Nitride-bonded silicon carbide composite filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, B.N.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an advanced hot gas filter, using ceramic component technology, with enhanced durability to provide increased resistance to thermal fatigue and crack propagation. The material is silicon carbide fiber reinforced nitride bonded silicon carbide.

  12. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  13. Air America: Upholding the Airmen's Bond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    Air America: Upholding the Airmen's Bond April 18, 2009 The University of Texas at Dallas Conference Center Auditorium A Symposium to Acknowledge and Commemorate Air America Rescue Efforts during with Air America Senior Operations Officer, CIA, Retired 2 p.m. Laos Rescues: Lima Site 85 Dr. Tim Castle

  14. Fine structure of Fe-Co-Ga and Fe-Cr-Ga alloys with low Ga content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinerman, Nadezhda M., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Serikov, Vadim V., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Vershinin, Aleksandr V., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Mushnikov, Nikolai V., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Stashkova, Liudmila A., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics UB RAS, S. Kovalevskaya str. 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of Ga influence on the structure of Fe-Cr and Fe-Co alloys was performed with the use of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. In the alloys of the Fe-Cr system, doping with Ga handicaps the decomposition of solid solutions, observed in the binary alloys, and increases its stability. In the alloys with Co, Ga also favors the uniformity of solid solutions. The analysis of Mössbauer experiments gives some grounds to conclude that if, owing to liquation, clusterization, or initial stages of phase separation, there exist regions enriched in iron, some amount of Ga atoms prefer to enter the nearest surroundings of iron atoms, thus forming binary Fe-Ga regions (or phases)

  15. TEM Characterization of InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots Capped by a GaSb/GaAs Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltran, AM [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Ben, Teresa [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Sanchez, AM [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Sales Lerida, David [ORNL; Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Galindo, Pedro [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Ripalda, JM [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Molina Rubio, Sergio I [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that there is intense interest in expanding the usable wavelength for electronic devices. This is one of the reasons to study new self-assembled semiconductor nanostructures. Telecommunication applications use InGaAsP/InP emitting at 1.3 and 1.55 m. Research efforts are dedicated to develop GaAs technology in order to achieve emission at the same range as InP, so GaAs could be used for optical fibre communications. Ga(As)Sb on InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) is a promising nanostructure to be used in telecommunications. The introduction of antimony during or after the QDs growth is an effective solution to obtain a red shift in the emission wavelength, even at room temperature.

  16. Excitonic properties of strained wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNAlxGa1xN quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    Excitonic properties of strained wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNŐAlxGa1ŔxN quantum dots Vladimir A 2003 We investigate exciton states theoretically in strained GaN/AlN quantum dots with wurtzite WZ of GaN QDs.1­8 Molecu- lar beam epitaxial growth in the Stranski­Krastanov mode of wurtzite WZ Ga

  17. Morphological and compositional variations in strain-compensated InGaAsP/InGaP superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    Morphological and compositional variations in strain- compensated InGaAsP/InGaP superlattices R of Technology, Kista, Sweden Abstract We have investigated the properties of strain-compensated InGaAsP/In- GaP superlattices, grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, with and without InP interlayers inserted in the InGaP

  18. Operating Characteristics of GaAs/InGaP Self Aligned Stripe Lasers Benjamin J. Stevens1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Operating Characteristics of GaAs/InGaP Self Aligned Stripe Lasers Benjamin J. Stevens1 , Kristian of GaAs based self-aligned lasers based upon a single overgrowth. A lattice matched n-doped InGaP layer were exposed to oxygen. True buried heterostructures devices utilising InGaP clad- ding layers have

  19. Microstructure and luminescent properties of novel InGaP alloys on relaxed GaAsP substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microstructure and luminescent properties of novel InGaP alloys on relaxed GaAsP substrates M. J of unconventional alloys of InGaP with In fraction of 0.2­0.4 grown on fully relaxed GaAsP virtual substrates demonstrate growth of extremely high quality InGaP heterostructures which hold promise for fabrication

  20. Band Offsets of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Y. Dong and R. M. Feenstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Band Offsets of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Y. Dong and R. M Abstract Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used to study InGaP/GaAs heterojunctions computation of the tunnel current. Curve fitting of theory to experiment is performed. Using an InGaP band gap

  1. Negative capacitance in GaN/AlGaN heterojunction dual-band detectors L. E. Byrum,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    Negative capacitance in GaN/AlGaN heterojunction dual-band detectors L. E. Byrum,1 G. Ariyawansa,1 online 2 September 2009 A study of trap states in n+ -GaN/AlGaN heterostructures using electrical related absorption centers attributed to shallow Si-donor pinned to the AlGaN barrier , N-vacancy/ C

  2. High Power Wideband AlGaN/GaN HEMT Feedback Amplifier Module with Drain and Feedback Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    High Power Wideband AlGaN/GaN HEMT Feedback Amplifier Module with Drain and Feedback Loop amplifier module using AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) has been developed that covers radars and communications systems. GaN-based HEMT's for high power applications at microwave frequencies

  3. Bayesian field theoretic reconstruction of bond potential and bond mobility in single molecule force spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Joshua C; Chou, Tom

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying the forces between and within macromolecules is a necessary first step in understanding the mechanics of molecular structure, protein folding, and enzyme function and performance. In such macromolecular settings, dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy (DFS) has been used to distort bonds. The resulting responses, in the form of rupture forces, work applied, and trajectories of displacements, have been used to reconstruct bond potentials. Such approaches often rely on simple parameterizations of one-dimensional bond potentials, assumptions on equilibrium starting states, and/or large amounts of trajectory data. Parametric approaches typically fail at inferring complex-shaped bond potentials with multiple minima, while piecewise estimation may not guarantee smooth results with the appropriate behavior at large distances. Existing techniques, particularly those based on work theorems, also do not address spatial variations in the diffusivity that may arise from spatially inhomogeneous coupling to...

  4. C-O Bond Activation and C-C Bond Formation Paths in Catalytic CO Hydrogenation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loveless, Brett

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anderson, The Fischer-Tropsch and Related Synthesis, Wiley,Anderson, The Fischer-Tropsch and Related Synthesis, Wiley,C-C bond formation paths in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are

  5. Impact ionization in N-polar AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killat, N., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Uren, M. J.; Kuball, M., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Keller, S.; Kolluri, S.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Santa Barbara California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of impact ionization as one of the open questions for GaN device reliability was studied in N-polar AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Electroluminescence (EL) imaging and spectroscopy from underneath the device gate contact revealed the presence of hot electrons in excess of the GaN bandgap energy even at moderate on-state bias conditions, enabling impact ionization with hole currents up to several hundreds of pA/mm. The detection of high energy luminescence from hot electrons demonstrates that EL analysis is a highly sensitive tool to study degradation mechanisms in GaN devices.

  6. Michael J. Poston Atlanta, GA 30307

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlando, Thomas

    Page | 1 Michael J. Poston Atlanta, GA 30307 Michael.Poston@gatech.edu Cell: 770.561.4756 U.S. Citizen Education PhD Candidate in Chemistry Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA August 2007 with Application to Lunar Observations," JGR ­ Planets, 118, 105, doi: 10.1002/jgre.20025. Poston, M. J

  7. Tunable two-dimensional plasmon resonances in an InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, Robert E.

    of materials systems such as GaAs/AlGaAs,3 InGaP/InGaAs/GaAs,4 GaN/AlGaN,2,5 and Si Ref. 1 have been explored

  8. Various Carbon to Carbon Bond Lengths Inter-related via the Golden Ratio, and their Linear Dependence on Bond Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the relations between the carbon to carbon bond lengths in the single, double and triple bonds and in graphite, butadiene and benzene. The Golden ratio, which was shown to divide the Bohr radius into two parts pertaining to the charged particles, the electron and proton, and to divide inter-atomic distances into their cationic and anionic radii, also plays a role in the carbon-carbon bonds and in the ionic/polar character of those in graphite, butadiene and benzene. Further, the bond energies of the various CC bonds are shown to vary linearly with the bond lengths.

  9. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Atlanta, GA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atlanta, GA FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Atlanta, GA Energy on My Mind FUPWG Atlanta, GA May 3-4, 2006 Hosted by: AGL Resources Logo May 3-4, 2006 Hosted by AGL Resources Atlanta,...

  10. AlGaN/GaN heterostructure prepared on a Si (110) substrate via pulsed sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, T.; Ohta, J.; Kondo, T.; Ohashi, M.; Ueno, K.; Kobayashi, A. [Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Fujioka, H., E-mail: hfujioka@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN films were grown on Si (110) substrates using a low-temperature growth technique based on pulsed sputtering. Reduction of the growth temperature suppressed the strain in the GaN films, leading to an increase in the critical thickness for crack formation. In addition, an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure with a flat heterointerface was prepared using this technique. Furthermore, the existence of a two dimensional electron gas at the heterointerface with a mobility of 1360 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a sheet carrier density of 1.3?×?10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?2} was confirmed. Finally, the use of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure in a high electron mobility transistor was demonstrated. These results indicate that low-temperature growth via pulsed sputtering is quite promising for the fabrication of GaN-based electronic devices.

  11. 56 IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 1, JANUARY 2012 Metamorphic GaAsP and InGaP Solar Cells on GaAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    56 IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 1, JANUARY 2012 Metamorphic GaAsP and InGaP Solar bandgap range. Index Terms--Epitaxy, GaAsP, InGaP, metamorphic. I. INTRODUCTION TODAY'S highest efficiency

  12. Experimental bond critical point and local energy density properties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mn-O, Fe-O and Co-O bonded interactions for Abstract: Bond critical point, bcp, and local energy density properties for the electron density, ED, distributions, calculated with...

  13. Pre-plated reactive diffusion-bonded battery electrode plaques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maskalick, Nicholas J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high strength, metallic fiber battery plaque is made using reactive diffusion bonding techniques, where a substantial amount of the fibers are bonded together by an iron-nickel alloy.

  14. Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Missouri Development Finance Board administers a Single-Issue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bond Program as well as a Taxable Industrial Revenue Bond Program. The Tax-Exempt Program finances (i...

  15. Imaging Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies on TiO2(110). Imaging Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies on TiO2(110). Abstract: Since oxygen atom...

  16. ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  17. Defect structures in rapidly degraded InGaAsP/InGaP double-heterostructure lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, O.; Wakao, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Isozumi, S.; Komiya, S.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapidly degraded InGaAsP/InGaP double-heterostructure lasers grown on (001)-oriented GaAs substrates by liquid phase epitaxy have been investigated by photolumi

  18. Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Haidan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manifesting in fewer/weaker hydrogen bonds and structuralstructures with weaker hydrogen-bonding is recorded viais characteristic of the hydrogen bond network in water. The

  19. Partial-Transient-Liquid-Phase Bonding of Advanced Ceramics Using Surface-Modified Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical-Model for Diffusion Bonding." Metal Science 16,Derby, B. & Wallach, E. "Diffusion Bonding - Development ofInterfacial Contact during Diffusion Bonding." Metallurgical

  20. Hydrogen Bonding DOI: 10.1002/anie.200501349

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    systems[5­13] and crystal engineering.[14­18] Most C�H···O hydrogen bonds have been observed for the soHydrogen Bonding DOI: 10.1002/anie.200501349 Observation of Weak C�H···O Hydrogen Bonding to Unactivated Alkanes** Xue-Bin Wang, Hin-Koon Woo, Boggavarapu Kiran, and Lai-Sheng Wang* The hydrogen bond

  1. In Situ XRD Studies of ZnO/GaN Mixtures at High Pressure and High Temperature: Synthesis of Zn-Rich (Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H.; Wang, L; Bai, J; Hanson, J; Warren, J; Muckerman, J; Fujita, E; Rodriguez, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-pressure, high-temperature conditions for the synthesis of Zn-rich (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions from mixtures of ZnO/GaN were explored using synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD). Following a new synthetic path, (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions with a Zn content up to {approx}75% were prepared for the first time. The structures of the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions were characterized by XRD and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses and were in excellent agreement with the predictions of density functional calculations. These materials adopt a wurtzite crystal structure with metal-N or metal-O bond distances in the range of 1.95-1.98 {angstrom}. Although the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions seem to be stable over the full range of compositions, no ideal solid solution formation was observed. In all cases, the lattice parameters were larger than those of ideal solid solutions. The variation of the lattice parameter c showed an upward double bowing curve, as was predicted by theoretical calculations. Also, no ideal behavior was observed in the electronic properties of the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectra at the Zn and Ga K-edges of the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) systems showed significant electronic perturbations with respect to ZnO and GaN. The synthesized (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solution with a Zn content of 50% displayed the ability to absorb visible light well above 500 nm. This material has a great potential for splitting water under visible light irradiation. The availability of (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions with a high Zn content opens the door to fully explore the application of these materials in photocatalysis.

  2. In Situ XRD Studies of ZnO/GaN Mixtures at High Pressure and High Temperature: Synthesis of Zn-Rich (Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Chen, H.; Wang, L.; Bai, J.; Hanson, J.C.; Warren, J.B.; Muckerman, J.T.; Fujita, E.

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-pressure, high-temperature conditions for the synthesis of Zn-rich (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions from mixtures of ZnO/GaN were explored using synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD). Following a new synthetic path, (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions with a Zn content up to 75% were prepared for the first time. The structures of the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions were characterized by XRD and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses and were in excellent agreement with the predictions of density functional calculations. These materials adopt a wurtzite crystal structure with metal-N or metal-O bond distances in the range of 1.95-1.98 {angstrom}. Although the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions seem to be stable over the full range of compositions, no ideal solid solution formation was observed. In all cases, the lattice parameters were larger than those of ideal solid solutions. The variation of the lattice parameter c showed an upward double bowing curve, as was predicted by theoretical calculations. Also, no ideal behavior was observed in the electronic properties of the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectra at the Zn and Ga K-edges of the (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) systems showed significant electronic perturbations with respect to ZnO and GaN. The synthesized (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solution with a Zn content of 50% displayed the ability to absorb visible light well above 500 nm. This material has a great potential for splitting water under visible light irradiation. The availability of (Ga{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})(N{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) solid solutions with a high Zn content opens the door to fully explore the application of these materials in photocatalysis.

  3. Microstructure and interface control of GaN/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition: Substrate-orientation dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, G.; Chikyow, T. [Advanced Electric Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Chichibu, Shigefusa F. [CANTech, Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN films with single-crystal and polycrystalline structure were deposited on (111) and (100) MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using a substrate modified by chemical etching and thermal passivation. The interface structure and chemical bonding state of the GaN/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface was investigated using angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resulting valence band spectra. Our results indicate that the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffered layer induced by thermal passivation of the (111) substrate remains unchanged during GaN deposition, which is primarily responsible for the epitaxial growth of GaN on (111) MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrate. However, for the as-processed (100) substrate, interfacial reactions take place between the formed MgO-terminated surface and GaN films and GaN with a polycrystalline structure on (100) substrate forms. From the interface engineering viewpoint, the appropriate interface modification will allow control of the interface reaction to obtain high-quality GaN films for future optoelectronic devices.

  4. Emission properties of heterostructures with a (GaAsSb-InGaAs)/GaAs bilayer quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvonkov, B. N.; Nekorkin, S. M.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Dikareva, N. V., E-mail: dikareva@nifti.unn.ru [Nizhni Novgorod State University, Physical-Technical Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific features of the emission characteristics of GaAs-based heterostructures with a GaAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}-In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}As bilayer quantum well are studied. The heterostructures are grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). With an analysis of previously reported data on the MOCVD growth process taken into account, the temperature range (560-580 Degree-Sign C), the relation between the fluxes emitted by the sources of Group-V and -III elements ( Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1), and the order of layer growth for the production of the active region of a GaAs/InGaP laser heterostructure are determined experimentally. The active region is a GaAs{sub 0.75}Sb{sub 0.25}-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As bilayer quantum well. For the structure, a 1075-nm electroluminescence signal attributed to indirect transitions between the valence band of the GaAs{sub 0.75}Sb{sub 0.25} layer and the conduction band of the In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As layer is observed. An increase in the continuous-wave pump current yields a decrease in the 1075-nm emission intensity and initiates stable lasing at a wavelength of 1022 nm at a threshold current density of 1.4 kA cm{sup -2} at room temperature. Lasing occurs at transitions direct in coordinate space.

  5. AlGaN/GaN HFET Single-Ended Frequency Doubler Younkyu Chung and Tatsuo Itoh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    AlGaN/GaN HFET Single-Ended Frequency Doubler Younkyu Chung and Tatsuo Itoh Department-mail: ykchung@ee.ucla.edu Abstract - This paper presents the first single-ended AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field, respectively. For the frequency doubler with 1mm gate periphery AlGaN/GaN HFET, conversion gain of 0.17 d

  6. Materials Science and Engineering B59 (1999) 319322 Microcalorimetric absorption spectroscopy in GaNAlGaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microcalorimetric measurements of small absorption coefficients have been performed on thin GaN­AlGaN quantum wells in GaN­AlGaN quantum wells Axel Go¨ldner a, *, Axel Hoffmann a , Bernard Gil b , Pierre Lefebvre b at the energy of the GaN buffer and at the energy of the thick AlGaN barrier layers, we could also readily

  7. Al fraction induced effects on the capacitance characteristics -GaN/AlxGa1-xN IR detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    substrate. As shown in Fig. 1(a), the device structures consist of a 0.2 m n+ -GaN top contact (emitter.1117/12.828156 Proc. of SPIE Vol. 7467 74670W-1 #12;(a) Sapphire Substrate n GaN Bottom Contact AlxGa1-xN Barrier n GaNAl fraction induced effects on the capacitance characteristics of n+ -GaN/AlxGa1-xN IR detectors

  8. Improvement of breakdown voltage in InGaP/InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure MESFETs for MMICs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, Inoue; Yamane, Yasuro; Shiojima, Kenji [NTT LSI Lab., Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the trade-off between breakdown voltage and RF performance of InGaP/InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure MESFETs for power amplifiers and oscillators in multi-function MMICs in the millimeter-wave range. The authors successfully improved both gate-drain and drain-source breakdown voltages while maintaining excellent high-frequency performance by using a double-layered gate consisting of WSiN with different nitrogen contents, and by varying epitaxial layer thickness and implantation dose.

  9. Measuring Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    , the interfaces will fail, the elements will cease to share load, and the composite will have poor properties property. Nearly all methods for characterizing wood adhesive bonds consider only strength of the bonds. Typically a bond line is loaded until failure and the final load at failure is recorded. Some common

  10. Hydrogen Bonding Penalty upon Ligand Binding Hongtao Zhao, Danzhi Huang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Hydrogen Bonding Penalty upon Ligand Binding Hongtao Zhao, Danzhi Huang* Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract Ligand binding involves breakage of hydrogen bonds with water molecules and formation of new hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand. In this work, the change

  11. Flip chip electrical interconnection by selective electroplating and bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    the interconnection and device substrates to en- hance the ion diffusion during the final electroplating and bondingFlip chip electrical interconnection by selective electroplating and bonding L.-W. Pan, P. Yuen, L of flip-chip, selective elec- troplating and bonding. The electrical interconnection lines are built

  12. Oil prices and government bond risk premiums Herv Alexandre*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Oil prices and government bond risk premiums By Hervé Alexandre*ş Antonin de Benoist * Abstract : This article analyses the impact of oil price on bond risk premiums issued by emerging economies. No empirical study has yet focussed on the effects of the oil price on government bond risk premiums. We develop

  13. Energetics of hydrogen bonds in peptides Sheh-Yi Sheu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi

    for water. We find that the activation energy for the rupture of the hydrogen bond in a -sheet under calculation can be useful for the prediction of hydrogen bond strengths in various environments of interest extensively to calculate free energy changes caused by hydrogen bond rupture. Here the water environment

  14. Analysis of C H...O hydrogen bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    1 Analysis of C H...O hydrogen bonds in high resolution protein crystal structures from the PDB 1.4 Identification of C-H...O hydrogen bonds............................................. 1.4.1 The definition of a C-H...O hydrogen bond.................................... 1.4.2 Fixing the hydrogen and measuring the parameters

  15. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T (Clinton, TN) [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  16. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Gotschke, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Stoica, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Calarco, R. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Sutter, E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ciston, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cusco, R. [Consell Superior d'Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Artus, L. [Consell Superior d'Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Kremling, S. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Hofling, S. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Worschech, L. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Grutzmacher, D. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  17. Necessity of Ga prelayers in GaAs/Ge growth using gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a highly defective GaAs layer.as5 Recently, InGaP light-emitting diodes have been fabricated on Si using

  18. Anesthesia cutoff phenomenon: Interfacial hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiou, J.S.; Ma, S.M.; Kamaya, H.; Ueda, I. (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1990-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Anesthesia cutoff refers to the phenomenon of loss of anesthetic potency in a homologous series of alkanes and their derivatives when their sizes become too large. In this study, hydrogen bonding of 1-alkanol series (ethanol to eicosanol) to dipalmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in DPPC-D2O-in-CCl4 reversed micelles. The alkanols formed hydrogen bonds with the phosphate moiety of DPPC and released the DPPC-bound deuterated water, evidenced by increases in the bound O-H stretching signal of the alkanol-DPPC complex and also in the free O-D stretching band of unbound D2O. These effects increased according to the elongation of the carbon chain of 1-alkanols from ethanol (C2) to 1-decanol (C10), but suddenly almost disappeared at 1-tetradecanol (C14). Anesthetic potencies of these alkanols, estimated by the activity of brine shrimps, were linearly related to hydrogen bond-breaking activities below C10 and agreed with the FTIR data in the cutoff at C10.

  19. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multichip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  20. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multi chip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  1. Thermal Modeling of A Friction Bonding Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Dixon; Douglas Burkes; Pavel Medvedev

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMSOL model capable of predicting temperature evolution during nuclear fuel fabrication is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Fuel plates are fabricated by friction bonding (FB) uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy foils positioned between two aluminum plates. The ability to predict temperature distribution during fabrication is imperative to ensure good quality bonding without inducing an undesirable chemical reaction between U-Mo and aluminum. A three-dimensional heat transfer model of the FB process implementing shallow pin penetration for cladding monolithic nuclear fuel foils is presented. Temperature distribution during the FB process as a function of fabrication parameters such as weld speed, tool load, and tool rotational frequency are predicted. Model assumptions, settings, and equations are described in relation to standard friction stir welding. Current experimental design for validation and calibration of the model is also demonstrated. Resulting experimental data reveal the accuracy in describing asymmetrical temperature distributions about the tool face. Temperature of the bonded plate drops beneath the pin and is higher on the advancing side than the retreating side of the tool.

  2. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  3. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  4. High-efficiency radiation-resistant InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T. [Toyota Technological Inst., Tempaku, Nagoya (Japan); [Japan Energy Corp., Toda, Saitama (Japan); Yamaguchi, M.; Taylor, S.J. [Toyota Technological Inst., Tempaku, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeda, E.; Agui, T.; Kurita, H. [Japan Energy Corp., Toda, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A world-record efficiency of 26.9% (AM0, 28 C) has been obtained for InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells fabricated by the MOCVD method. The radiation resistance of the InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells has also been evaluated following 1 MeV electron irradiation. Degradation in the tandem cell performance has been confirmed to be mainly attributed to large degradation in the GaAs bottom cell, which features a highly doped base layer. Similar radiation-resistance with GaAs-on-Ge cells has been observed for the InGaP/GaAs tandem cell. However, some recovery of the tandem cell performance has been found due to minority-carrier injection under light illumination of forward bias, which causes defect annealing in InGaP cells. The optimal design of the InGaP base layer thickness for current matching at end of life (EOL) (after irradiation with 10{sup 15} electrons cm{sup {minus}2}) has been examined.

  5. Hydrogen Bond Breaking and Reformation in Alcohol Oligomers Following Vibrational Relaxation of a Non-Hydrogen-Bond Donating Hydroxyl Stretch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Breaking and Reformation in Alcohol Oligomers Following Vibrational Relaxation of a Non-Hydrogen-Bond Donating Hydroxyl Stretch K. J. Gaffney, I. R. Piletic, and M. D. Fayer* Department measured with ultrafast infrared pump-probe experiments. Non-hydrogen-bond donating OD stretches (2690 cm-1

  6. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatebayashi, J., E-mail: tatebaya@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ota, Y. [NanoQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y. [NanoQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  7. Strain induced variations in band offsets and built-in electric fields in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Strain induced variations in band offsets and built-in electric fields in InGaN/GaN multiple InxGa1-xN(InGaN)/GaN multilayers on the In composition and misfit strain. The results indicate that for non-polar m-plane configurations with ˝1210InGaN//˝1210GaN and ˝0001InGaN//˝0001GaN epitaxial

  8. Multi-bands photoconductive response in AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Rong, X.; Xu, F. J.; Tang, N. [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, X. Q., E-mail: wangshi@pku.edu.cn; Shen, B., E-mail: bshen@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Fu, K.; Zhang, B. S. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, 215123 Suzhou (China); Hashimoto, H.; Yoshikawa, A. [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ge, W. K. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the optical transitions among the quantum-confined electronic states in the conduction band, we have fabricated multi-bands AlGaN/GaN quantum well infrared photodetectors. Crack-free AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with atomically sharp interfaces have been achieved by inserting an AlN interlayer, which releases most of the tensile strain in the MQWs grown on the GaN underlayer. With significant reduction of dark current by using thick AlGaN barriers, photoconductive responses are demonstrated due to intersubband transition in multiple regions with center wavelengths of 1.3, 2.3, and 4??m, which shows potential applications on near infrared detection.

  9. High-performance InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, J.-H. [National Kaohsiung Normal University, Department of Electronic Engineering (China)], E-mail: jhtsai@nknucc.nknu.edu.tw; Chiu, S.-Y.; Lour, W.-S. [National Taiwan Ocean University, Department of Electrical Engineering (China); Guo, D.-F. [Air Force Academy, Department of Electronic Engineering (China)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, a novel InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor is first demonstrated. Though the valence band discontinuity at InGaP/GaAs heterojunction is relatively large, the addition of a {delta}-doped sheet between two spacer layers at the emitter-base (E-B) junction effectively eliminates the potential spike and increases the confined barrier for electrons, simultaneously. Experimentally, a high current gain of 25 and a relatively low E-B offset voltage of 60 mV are achieved. The offset voltage is much smaller than the conventional InGaP/GaAs pnp HBT. The proposed device could be used for linear amplifiers and low-power complementary integrated circuit applications.

  10. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuppulingam, B., E-mail: drbaskar2009@gmail.com; Singh, Shubra, E-mail: drbaskar2009@gmail.com; Baskar, K., E-mail: drbaskar2009@gmail.com [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai-600025 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  11. Effect of polarization on intersubband transition in AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Li, Z. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Huang, C. C.; Rong, X.; Xu, F. J.; Tang, N.; Qin, Z. X.; Shen, B. [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Chen, Y. H. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Material Science, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Laboratory of Semiconductor Material Science, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China); Ge, W. K. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Intersubband transitions (ISBT) of AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with wavelength towards atmospheric window (3-5 {mu}m) have been investigated. A Ga-excess epitaxial method is used in the molecular beam epitaxy leading to ultra-sharp interface and negligible elements inter-diffusion. The absorption peak wavelength of the ISBT was successfully tuned in the range of 3-4 {mu}m by modifying the GaN well thickness from 2.8 to 5.5 nm. It was further found that the polarization charge density of the AlGaN/GaN MQWs was about -0.034 C/m{sup 2} which gave rise to blueshift of the ISBT wavelength and thus partially compensated its redshift with increasing well thickness.

  12. InGaN/GaN single-quantum-well microdisks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Yu-Chi; Lo, Ikai; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hu, Chia-Hsuan; Wang, Ying-Chieh; Chou, Mitch M. C. [Department of Physics, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China)

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have grown In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN quantum wells atop GaN microdisk with {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} substrate by using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The structural and optical properties of the samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence, and photoluminescence measurements. Based on the measured results, we obtained the indium concentration of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN single quantum well to be x = 0.25 with a band-gap energy of 2.31 eV, which is consistent with the bowing effect of bulk In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N: E{sub g}(x) = [3.42 - x * 2.65 - x * (1 - x) * 2.4] eV.

  13. Method for bonding a transmission line to a downhole tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for bonding a transmission line to the central bore of a downhole tool includes a pre-formed interface for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. The pre-formed interface includes a first surface that substantially conforms to the outside contour of a transmission line and a second surface that substantially conforms to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. In another aspect of the invention, a method for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool includes positioning a transmission line near the inside wall of a downhole tool and placing a mold near the transmission line and the inside wall. The method further includes injecting a bonding material into the mold and curing the bonding material such that the bonding material bonds the transmission line to the inside wall.

  14. Atomic layer deposition of GaN using GaCl3 and NH3 Oh Hyun Kim, Dojun Kim, and Tim Andersona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    be grown at lower temperature than by CVD. As example, ALD growth of device quality GaAs, GaP, and InGaP

  15. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101?0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101?0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation ofmore »free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O?? requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101?0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.« less

  16. Dependence of the ground-state transition energy versus optical pumping in GaAsSb/InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, S. V.; Kryzhkov, D. I., E-mail: krizh@ipmras.ru; Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Yablonsky, A. N.; Krasilnik, Z. F. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V. [Physical-Technical Research Institute, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we report on the time-resolved photoluminescence studies of a double quantum well In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/GaAs{sub 0.8}Sb{sub 0.2}/GaAs heterostructure which, in contrast to the GaAsSb/GaAs structures, is expected to provide effective confinement of electrons due to additional InGaAs layer. The studies at 4.2?K have revealed a complicated nonmonotonic dependence of the ground-state transition energy on the concentration of nonequilibrium charge carriers in the quantum well. The effect observed in this work is important in terms of creating sources of radiation, including stimulated emission, on the basis of InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs structures.

  17. AlGaN/GaN field effect transistors for power electronics—Effect of finite GaN layer thickness on thermal characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, C., E-mail: chris.hodges@bristol.ac.uk; Anaya Calvo, J.; Kuball, M. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)] [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Stoffels, S.; Marcon, D. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B3001 Leuven (Belgium)] [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors with a 150?nm thick GaN channel within stacked Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N layers were investigated using Raman thermography. By fitting a thermal simulation to the measured temperatures, the thermal conductivity of the GaN channel was determined to be 60?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1}, over 50% less than typical GaN epilayers, causing an increased peak channel temperature. This agrees with a nanoscale model. A low thermal conductivity AlGaN buffer means the GaN spreads heat; its properties are important for device thermal characteristics. When designing power devices with thin GaN layers, as well as electrical considerations, the reduced channel thermal conductivity must be considered.

  18. InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers at 810 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakao, K.; Isozumi, S.; Nishi, H.; Ohsaka, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers emitting at 810 nm have been grown on GaAs substrates using two-step liquid-phase epitaxy. A threshold current of 79 mA and an external differential quantum efficiency of 26% are obtained. Fundamental transverse mode operation up to 3 mW is achieved in the laser with the active region of 3.5 ..mu..m wide.

  19. Simplified 2DEG carrier concentration model for composite barrier AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Palash, E-mail: d.palash@gmail.com; Biswas, Dhrubes, E-mail: d.palash@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur - 721302, West Bengal (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The self consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations is used along with the total charge depletion model and applied with a novel approach of composite AlGaN barrier based HEMT heterostructure. The solution leaded to a completely new analytical model for Fermi energy level vs. 2DEG carrier concentration. This was eventually used to demonstrate a new analytical model for the temperature dependent 2DEG carrier concentration in AlGaN/GaN HEMT.

  20. Ohmic contacts to n-GaSb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhengchong

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the Ill-V semiconductor GaSb and its ternary alloys containing antimony have exhibited interesting electrical and optical properties for device applications which include negative resistance tunnel devices, lasers, detectors and FET...

  1. The structure of GaAs/Si(211) heteroepitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Weber, E.R.; Washburn, J.; Liu, T.Y.; Kroemer, H.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium arsenide films grown on (211)Si by molecular-beam epitaxy have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The main defects observed in the alloy were of misfit dislocations, stacking faults, and microtwin lamellas. Silicon surface preparation was found to play an important role on the density of defects formed at the Si/GaAs interface. Two different types of strained-layer superlattices, InGaAs/InGaP and InGaAs/GaAs, were applied either directly to the Si substrate, to a graded layer (GaP-InGaP), or to a GaAs buffer layer to stop the defect propagation into the GaAs films. Applying InGaAs/GaAs instead of InGaAs/InGaP was found to be more effective in blocking defect propagation. In all cases of strained-layer superlattices investigated, dislocation propagation was stopped primarily at the top interface between the superlattice package and GaAs. Graded layers and unstrained AlGaAs/GaAs superlattices did not significantly block dislocations propagating from the interface with Si. Growing of a 50 nm GaAs buffer layer at 505/sup 0/C followed by 10 strained-layer superlattices of InGaAs/GaAs (5 nm each) resulted in the lowest dislocation density in the GaAs layer (approx.5 x 10/sup 7//cm/sup 2/) among the structures investigated. This value is comparable to the recently reported density of dislocations in the GaAs layers grown on (100)Si substrates. Applying three sets of the same strained layers decreased the density of dislocations an additional approx.2 to 3 times.

  2. Partial-Transient-Liquid-Phase Bonding of Advanced Ceramics Using Surface-Modified Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alumina Diffusion Bonding and Titanium Active Brazing."O 3 -Titanium Adhesion in the View of the Diffusion Bonding

  3. Over 30{percent} efficient InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Kurita, H. [Central Research Laboratory, Japan Energy Corporation, 3-17-35 Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan)] [Central Research Laboratory, Japan Energy Corporation, 3-17-35 Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan); Ohmori, M. [Japan Energy Research Center Company, Ltd., 1-11-9 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106 (Japan)] [Japan Energy Research Center Company, Ltd., 1-11-9 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106 (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-terminal monolithic InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cell with a new efficiency record of 30.28{percent} is realized with a practical large area of 4 cm{sup 2} under one-sun air-mass 1.5 global illumination. We report improvements of the tandem cell performance by introducing a double-hetero (hereafter DH) structure InGaP tunnel junction, in which the InGaP layers are surrounded by high band gap AlInP barriers. The DH structure by AlInP barriers increase the peak current of InGaP tunnel junction. The AlInP barrier directly below the InGaP top cell, which takes the part of a back surface field (hereafter BSF) layer, is found to be considerably effective in reflecting minority carriers in the top cell. The AlInP BSF layer does not only form a high potential barrier but also prevents the diffusion of zinc from a high doped tunnel junction toward the top cell during epitaxial growth. Furthermore, an InGaP tunnel junction reduces the absorption loss, which exists in a GaAs tunnel junction, and increases the photogenerated current in the GaAs bottom cell. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Mandal, Krishna C. (Ashland, MA)

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  5. Probing temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with Raman thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, C., E-mail: chris.hodges@bristol.ac.uk; Pomeroy, J.; Kuball, M. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the ability of confocal Raman thermography using a spatial filter and azimuthal polarization to probe vertical temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of operating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Temperature gradients in the GaN layer are measured by using offset focal planes to minimize the contribution from different regions of the GaN buffer. The measured temperature gradient is in good agreement with a thermal simulation treating the GaN thermal conductivity as homogeneous throughout the layer and including a low thermal conductivity nucleation layer to model the heat flow between the buffer and substrate.

  6. COMM-OPINION-ORDER, 76 FERC 61,347, Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non-discriminatory Transmission Services by Public Utilities, Docket No. RM95-8-000, Recovery of Stranded Costs by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    COMM-OPINION-ORDER, 76 FERC ¶61,347, Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non Incorporated Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non-discriminatory Transmission Services Utilities, Docket No. RM94-7-001 [62,646] [¶61,347] Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non

  7. COMM-OPINION-ORDER, 75 FERC 61,208, Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open Access Non-discriminatory Transmission Services by Public Utilities; Recovery of Stranded Costs by Public Utilities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    COMM-OPINION-ORDER, 75 FERC ¶61,208, Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open Access Non Wholesale Competition Through Open Access Non-discriminatory Transmission Services by Public Utilities-7-001 [61,687] [¶61,208] Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open Access Non-discriminatory Transmission

  8. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  9. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Livermore, CA); Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA); Riddle, Robert A. (Tracy, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

  10. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.; Malba, V.; Riddle, R.A.

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules is disclosed. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder. 10 figs.

  11. Covalent Bonding in Actinide Sandwich Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCostsXCovalent Bonding in

  12. Covalent Bonding in Actinide Sandwich Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCostsXCovalent Bonding

  13. Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New

  14. Optimization of ion-atomic beam source for deposition of GaN ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mach, Jind?ich, E-mail: mach@fme.vutbr.cz; Kolíbal, Miroslav; Zlámal, Jakub; Voborny, Stanislav; Bartošík, Miroslav; Šikola, Tomáš [Institute of Physical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC BUT, Brno University of Technology, Technická 10, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Šamo?il, Tomáš [Institute of Physical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the optimization and application of an ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition of ultrathin films in ultrahigh vacuum. The device combines an effusion cell and electron-impact ion beam source to produce ultra-low energy (20–200 eV) ion beams and thermal atomic beams simultaneously. The source was equipped with a focusing system of electrostatic electrodes increasing the maximum nitrogen ion current density in the beam of a diameter of ?15 mm by one order of magnitude (j ? 1000 nA/cm{sup 2}). Hence, a successful growth of GaN ultrathin films on Si(111) 7 × 7 substrate surfaces at reasonable times and temperatures significantly lower (RT, 300?°C) than in conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technologies (?1000?°C) was achieved. The chemical composition of these films was characterized in situ by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and morphology ex situ using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It has been shown that the morphology of GaN layers strongly depends on the relative Ga-N bond concentration in the layers.

  15. Thermoelectric effects in wurtzite GaN and AlxGa1-xN alloys and Alexander A. Balandin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the active thermoelectric cooling implemented on the same material system can improve the device performance, for the pro- posed cooling system should also be based on GaN. To real- ize this, the high-efficiency Ga,6 Great progress has been achieved in GaN-based microwave technology. GaN transistors with very high

  16. Journal of Crystal Growth 298 (2007) 272275 Dislocation analysis in homoepitaxial GaInN/GaN light emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of GaInN/GaN-based light emitting diodes (LED) on quasi-bulk GaN with an atomically flat polished were much improved. The optical output power of the light emitting diode increased by more than one. Cathodoluminescence; A1. Threading dislocation density; A2. Homoepitaxial growth; B1. GaInN; B3. Light emitting diode

  17. The Effect of the Thermal Boundary Resistance on Self-Heating of AlGaN/GaN HFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of the Thermal Boundary Resistance on Self-Heating of AlGaN/GaN HFETs 1. Introduction, performance of these devices has been limited by self-heating [1] [6]. Thus, accurate modeling of heat diffusion and self-heating effects in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures and device optimization based

  18. GaAs-based self-aligned laser incorporating InGaP opto-electronic confinement layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GaAs-based self-aligned laser incorporating InGaP opto-electronic confinement layer K.M. Groom, B fabrication, is demonstrated. An n-doped InGaP layer is utilised for both electrical and optical confinement-doped InGaP current blocking layer that also provides optical confinement. This tech- nology relies

  19. GaN/ZnO and AlGaN/ZnO heterostructure LEDs: growth, fabrication, optical and electrical characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    GaN/ZnO and AlGaN/ZnO heterostructure LEDs: growth, fabrication, optical and electrical 12180-3590, U.S.A. ABSTRACT The wide bandgap polar semiconductors GaN and ZnO and their related alloys fields, and surface terminations. With a small lattice mismatch of ~1.8 % between GaN and Zn

  20. Direct Evidence of Nanoscale Carrier Localization in InGaN/GaN Structures Grown on Si Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Direct Evidence of Nanoscale Carrier Localization in InGaN/GaN Structures Grown on Si Substrates: time-resolved photoluminescence, quantum dots, InGaN, Si substrate There exists a strong continuous expensive and are limited in size. Thus, heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on silicon substrates seems

  1. Inclined dislocation-pair relaxation mechanism in homoepitaxial green GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    -emitting diodes LEDs on low-defect density bulk GaN substrate, but not in green LEDs on sapphire substrate an ideal substrate for homoepitaxial growth. Here we study the microstructural properties of green GaInN/GaN-Koehler force10 resulting from a macroscopic relaxation of strain. II. CRYSTAL GROWTH c plane bulk GaN substrate

  2. Junction Temperature Measurements and Thermal Modeling of GaInN/GaN Quantum Well Light-Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    quantum well (QW) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on sapphire and bulk GaN substrate by micro efficiency in dies grown on GaN substrates with a thermal resistance of 75 K/W. For dies on sapphire of GaN-based blue and green LEDs grown on sapphire and GaN substrates using micro-Raman spectroscopy

  3. Correlation between structural properties and optical amplification in InGaN/GaN heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    . The lateral homogeneity can be drastically improved using a template of GaN grown on the sapphire substrate-grown heterostructures can drastically be reduced by using a template of MOVPE-GaN on the sapphire substrate, which leadsCorrelation between structural properties and optical amplification in InGaN/GaN heterostructures

  4. Ultra-high frequency photoconductivity decay in GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Johnston, S. W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Umbel, R. [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructures (DHs) were grown in-situ using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. High-resolution x-ray rocking curve demonstrates a high-quality GaAs/Ge/GaAs heterostructure by observing Pendelloesung oscillations. The kinetics of the carrier recombination in Ge/GaAs DHs were investigated using photoconductivity decay measurements by the incidence excitation from the front and back side of 15 nm GaAs/100 nm Ge/0.5 {mu}m GaAs/(100)GaAs substrate structure. High-minority carrier lifetimes of 1.06-1.17 {mu}s were measured when excited from the front or from the back of the Ge epitaxial layer, suggests equivalent interface quality of GaAs/Ge and Ge/GaAs. Wavelength-dependent minority carrier recombination properties are explained by the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient of Ge.

  5. Metastable states in InGaN/GaN MQW structures doped with Sm, Eu, and Eu + Sm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezdrogina, M. M., E-mail: Margaret.M@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kozhanova, Yu. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the microphotoluminescence (microPL) spectra of InGaN/GaN:Sm and InGaN/GaN:Eu quantum well (QW) structures show that the action of a magnetic field gives rise to Van Vleck paramagnetism for Eu{sup 3+} and Sm{sup 3+}. The macrophotoluminescence (macroPL) spectra recorded after measuring the microPL spectra of InGaN/GaN QW structures doped with Sm or Eu + Sm at a high excitation level (>10{sup 23} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) in magnetic fields contain no QW emission lines which are present in the macroPL spectra recorded before these microPL measurements. This is indicative of the presence of photoinduced defects. Annealing of the InGaN/GaN:Sm and InGaN/GaN:(Eu + Sm) structures reduces the concentration of photoinduced defects.

  6. Gas-source molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of the (Al,In,Ga)NP/GaP material system and Its applications to light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odnoblyudov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on metamorphic growth of InGaP layers on GaP substrates, astemperature amber photoluminescence from InGaP QWs, grownon a metamorphic InGaP layer. References: Fred Shubert E. ,

  7. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Jeong, Seung Y. (Westmont, IL); Lohan, Dirk (Chicago, IL); Elizabeth, Anne (Chicago, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  8. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 × 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5?×?10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  9. ccsd-00000821(version1):6Nov2003 Alloy effects in Ga1-xInxN/GaN heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00000821(version1):6Nov2003 Alloy effects in Ga1-xInxN/GaN heterostructures Duc-Phuong Nguyen, France We show that the large band offsets between GaN and InN and the heavy carrier effec- tive masses preclude the use of the Virtual Crystal Approximation to describe the electronic structure of Ga1-xInxN/GaN

  10. DESIGN, GROWTH, FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH-BAND GAP InGaN/GaN SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    DESIGN, GROWTH, FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH-BAND GAP InGaN/GaN SOLAR CELLS Omkar Jani1 with a band gap of 2.4 eV or greater. InxGa1-xN is one of a few alloys that can meet this key requirement. InGaN.4 eV. InGaN has the appropriate optical properties and has been well demonstrated for light

  11. AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT Gate Structure Improvement Using Al2O3 Deposited by PEALD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT Gate Structure Improvement Using Al2O3 Deposited by PEALD R. Meunier1 , A, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, France 2 LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, 31400 Toulouse, France AlGaN /GaN behavior. Those trapped charges can be associated to the carbon contamination of the AlGaN surface

  12. Emission mechanisms of bulk GaN and InGaN quantum wells prepared by lateral epitaxial overgrowth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    Emission mechanisms of bulk GaN and InGaN quantum wells prepared by lateral epitaxial overgrowth S for publication 5 January 1999 The emission mechanisms of bulk GaN and InGaN quantum wells QWs were studied suggest that TDs simply reduce the net volume of light-emitting area. This effect is less pronounced in InGaN

  13. Comparison of strong coupling regimes in bulk GaAs, GaN and ZnO semiconductor microcavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , transmission and absorption spectra of bulk GaAs, GaN and ZnO microcavities, in order to compareComparison of strong coupling regimes in bulk GaAs, GaN and ZnO semiconductor microcavities SAs and GaN microcavities. PACS numbers: 78.67.-n, 71.36.+c, 78.20.Ci, 78.55.Cr, 78.55.Et Keywords: polariton

  14. Near ultraviolet emission from nonpolar cubic AlxGa1-xN/GaN quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    molecular beam epitaxy on free standing 3C-SiC 001 substrates. During growth of Al0.15Ga0.85N/GaN quantum growth of the quantum structures an 800 nm thick GaN buffer layer was deposited on the 3C-SiC substrate. The buffer and the c-AlGaN/GaN quantum wells were grown at a substrate temperature of 720 °C. The layers were

  15. Nanoair-bridged lateral overgrowth of GaN on ordered nanoporous GaN template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.D.; Zang, K.Y.; Chua, S.J.; Tripathy, S.; Chen, P.; Fonstad, C.G. [Singapore-MIT Alliance, E4-04-10, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore) and Centre for Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the growth of high-quality GaN epilayers on an ordered nanoporous GaN template by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The nanopores in GaN template were created by inductively coupled plasma etching using anodic aluminum oxide film as an etch mask. The average pore diameter and interpore distance is about 65 and 110 nm, respectively. Subsequent overgrowth of GaN first begins at the GaN crystallite surface between the pores, and then air-bridge-mediated lateral overgrowth leads to the formation of the continuous layer. Microphotoluminescence and micro-Raman measurements show improved optical properties and significant strain relaxation in the overgrown layer when compared to GaN layer of same thickness simultaneously grown on sapphire without any template. Similar to conventional epitaxial lateral overgrown GaN, such overgrown GaN on a nanopatterned surface would also serve as a template for the growth of ultraviolet-visible light-emitting III-nitride devices.

  16. AlGaN/GaN HEMT With 300-GHz fmax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jinwook W.

    We report on a gate-recessed AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) on a SiC substrate with a record power-gain cutoff frequency (f[subscript max]). To achieve this high f[subscript max], we combined a low-damage ...

  17. Gate-First AlGaN/GaN HEMT Technology for High-Frequency Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piner, Edwin L.

    This letter describes a gate-first AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with a W/high-k dielectric gate stack. In this new fabrication technology, the gate stack is deposited before the ohmic contacts, and ...

  18. High Indium Concentration InGaN/GaN Grown on Sapphire Substrate by MOCVD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartono, Haryono

    The InGaN system provides the opportunity to fabricate light emitting devices over the whole visible and ultraviolet spectrum due to band-gap energies E[subscript g] varying between 3.42 eV for GaN and 1.89 eV for InN. ...

  19. Schottky-Drain Technology for AlGaN/GaN High-Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin

    In this letter, we demonstrate 27% improvement in the buffer breakdown voltage of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on Si substrate by using a new Schottky-drain contact technology. Schottky-drain ...

  20. Investigation of Strain in AlGaN/GaN Multi Quantum Wells by Complementary Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraju, G.; Sathish, N.; Pathak, A. P. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Central University (P.0), Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Dhamodaran, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, IIT P O, Kanpur UP 208016 (India); Gaca, J.; Wojcik, M. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 01-919 Warsaw, ul. Wolczynska 133 (Poland); Turos, A. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 01-919 Warsaw, ul. Wolczynska 133 (Poland); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk/Otwock, Warsaw (Poland); Arora, B. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai-400 005 (India)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}N(12 nm)/GaN (13 nm) Multi Quantum Wells of 15 periods are grown on sapphire by MOCVD technique. GaN/AlN, each of thickness 200 nm and 20 nm respectively, are used as buffer layers between substrate and epilayer to incorporate the strain in epilayers. It is a well established technique to engineer the band gap in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N by adjusting alloy composition. These samples are used in visible and UV light emitters. In the present study, we employ a photoluminescence technique to estimate the composition and luminescence peak positions of AlGaN and GaN. Crystallinity and quality of interfaces have been studied by Rocking curve scan. The Threading Dislocations formed at the GaN buffer layer travel across the entire layers to the surface to form good quality films. Photo-luminescence results show a very sharp GaN peak at 3.4 eV, as observed and reported by others, which shows that samples are free from point defects.

  1. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universitŕ di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D{sub 0}?=?0.53(×2.1±1) cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1} that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  2. Lattice-matched epitaxial GaInAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Turner, G.W.; Spears, D.L.; Manfra, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices is reported. Epilayers with cutoff wavelength 2--2.4 {micro}m at room temperature and lattice-matched to GaSb substrates were grown by both low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. These layers exhibit high optical and structural quality. For demonstrating lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic devices, p- and n-type doping studies were performed. Several TPV device structures were investigated, with variations in the base/emitter thicknesses and the incorporation of a high bandgap GaSb or AlGaAsSb window layer. Significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency is observed for devices with an AlGaAsSb window layer compared to those without one.

  3. Green cubic GaInN/GaN light-emitting diode on microstructured silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian, E-mail: wetzel@ieee.org [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Future Chips Constellation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, S. C.; Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Jiang, Y.-B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes free of piezoelectric polarization were prepared on standard electronic-grade Si(100) substrates. Micro-stripes of GaN and GaInN/GaN quantum wells in the cubic crystal structure were grown on intersecting (111) planes of microscale V-grooved Si in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, covering over 50% of the wafer surface area. Crystal phases were identified in electron back-scattering diffraction. A cross-sectional analysis reveals a cubic structure virtually free of line defects. Electroluminescence over 20 to 100??A is found fixed at 487?nm (peak), 516?nm (dominant). Such structures therefore should allow higher efficiency, wavelength-stable light emitters throughout the visible spectrum.

  4. Enhanced efficiency of p-type doping by band-offset effect in wurtzite and zinc-blende GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changsheng; Wang, Jiqing, E-mail: jqwang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Lin, Weixian; Mao, Huibing; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Pingxiong [Key Laboratory of Polarized Materials and Devices, East china Normal University, shanghai 200241 (China); Xing, Huaizhong [Department of Applied Physics, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first principles calculation based on density-functional theory, we investigated p-type electronic structures and the doping mechanism in wurtzite (WZ) and zinc-blende (ZB) GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires (NWs) along the [0001] and [111] directions, respectively. Comparing the doping in WZ and ZB core-shell NWs, we found it is easier and more stable to realize dopant in WZ NWs. Due to the type I band-offset, p-type doping in the GaAs-core of GaAs{sub core}/InAs{sub shell} for both WZ and ZB NWs makes that the valence band-edge electrons in the InAs-shell can spontaneously transfer to the impurity states, forming one-dimensional hole gas. In particular, this process accompanies with a reverse transition in WZ core-shell nanowire due to the existence of antibonding and bonding states.

  5. Low temperature thermoelastic and structural properties of LaGaO{sub 3} perovskite in the Pbnm phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Kevin S., E-mail: kevin.knight@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Dicot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Mineralogy, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoelastic and structural properties of LaGaO{sub 3} perovskite have been studied using high resolution neutron diffractometry at 158 temperatures between 11 K and 548 K. Data collected in 2 K intervals between 410 K and 430 K show no evidence for an intermediate phase between the low temperature phase in space group Pbnm and the high temperature phase in space group F3{sup Macron }2/n. From a simultaneous fit of the unit cell volume and the isochoric heat capacity, the phonon density of states in the Pbnm phase is shown to be approximated by a two-term Debye model, with characteristic temperatures 294(1) K and 831(1) K. Vibrational Debye temperatures, determined from fitting the temperature variation of the atomic displacement parameters, show the cations to be more associated with the lower characteristic temperature, whilst that for the anions, is closer to the higher characteristic temperature. Structural parameters are presented as the amplitudes of the seven symmetry-adapted basis-vectors of the aristotype phase, and a structural basis for the temperature-dependence of the bond lengths is outlined. The phase transition in both temperature and pressure arises when a non-bonded La-O distance approaches the La coordination sphere. - Graphical abstract: The weight fraction of the rhombohedral phase of LaGaO{sub 3} from the onset of the phase transition at 408 K to its completion at 430 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoelastic properties of LaGaO{sub 3} analyzed as a two-term Debye model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure and bonding analyzed in terms of symmetry-adapted basis-vectors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Consistency between calorimetric and crystallographic measurements.

  6. Large internal dipole moment in InGaN/GaN quantum dots Irina A. Ostapenko, Gerald Hnig, Christian Kindel, Sven Rodt, Andr Strittmatter et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Large internal dipole moment in InGaN/GaN quantum dots Irina A. Ostapenko, Gerald Hönig, Christian transitions in wurtzite InGaN/GaN coupled quantum dot nanowire heterostructures with polarization internal dipole moment in InGaN/GaN quantum dots Irina A. Ostapenko,a Gerald Hönig, Christian Kindel, Sven

  7. Investigation of large Stark shifts in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells Guibao Xu, Guan Sun, Yujie J. Ding, Hongping Zhao, Guangyu Liu et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Investigation of large Stark shifts in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells Guibao Xu, Guan Sun, Yujie overgrowth on residual strain and In incorporation in a-plane InGaN/GaN quantum wells on r- sapphire substrates J. Appl. Phys. 113, 023506 (2013) Anisotropic lattice relaxation in non-c-plane InGaN/GaN multiple

  8. Quantum confinement in GaP nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurich, B.K.; Smith, D.C.; Healy, M.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have prepared GaP and GaAs nanoclusters from organometallic condensation reactions of E[Si(ChH{sub 3})3]3 (E = P, As) and GaCl{sub 3}. The size of the as synthesized clusters is 10 {Angstrom} to 15 {Angstrom}. Larger clusters of 20 {Angstrom} to 30 {Angstrom} size were obtained by thermal annealing of the as grown material. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm the high crystalline quality. A lattice contraction of 6.7% could be seen for 10 {Angstrom} sized GaAs clusters. The clusters are nearly spherical in shape. Optical absorption spectra show a distinct line which can be assigned to the fundamental transition of the quantum confined electronic state. The measured blue shift, with respect to the GaP bulk absorption edge is 0.53 eV. As the cluster is smaller than the exciton radius, we can calculate the cluster size from this blue shift and obtain 20.2 {Angstrom}, consistent with the results from X-ray diffraction of 19.5 {Angstrom} for the same sample.

  9. Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds for Public Building...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summarizes how the City of Philadelphia leveraged 6.25 million in qualified energy conservation bonds to upgrade the energy efficiency of city buildings. Author: Lawrence Berkeley...

  10. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) APPENDIX A: QECB...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Qualified energy conservation bonds appendices. Author: U. S. Department of Energy Appendix A: QECB Counsel, Underwriters, Banks and Trustees More Documents & Publications...

  11. Qualified Energy Conservation Bond Webinars | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    listing of past qualified energy conservation bond webinars and associated files. Author: U.S. Department of Energy Qualified Energy Conservation Webinars Website More Documents &...

  12. Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly...

  13. Competition between Covalent and Noncovalent Bond Cleavages in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    localized and mainly affected by the identity of the phosphorylated side chain. The hydrogen bonding in the peptide and ligand properties play a minor role in determining the...

  14. Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Thomas Scott

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024. Helium and oxygensteel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024 was demonstratedAdhesive Bonding of Aluminum Alloys, Metal Finishing, 13.

  15. Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there is partial recovery of shortrange order. Citation: Devanathan R, F Gao, and WJ Weber.2007."Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order...

  16. Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    different rules than prior CREB allocations authorized under 26 USC 54. ''''' Clean renewable energy bonds (CREBs) may be used by certain entities -- primarily in the public...

  17. Municipal Bond - Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for power purchase agreement model to provide low-cost solar energy. Author: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Municipal Bond - Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to...

  18. Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New Guidance from the U.S. Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service...

  19. Effects of atmospheres on bonding characteristics of silver and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature. To investigate the effects of atmospheres on the bonding characteristics of ceramic joints brazed with Ag-CuO braze filler metals, alumina joints prepared using a...

  20. Torsion Testing of Diffusion Bonded LIGA Formed Nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A test technique has been devised which is suitable for the testing of the bond strength of batch diffusion bonded LIGA or DXRL defined structures. The method uses a torsion tester constructed with the aid of LIGA fabrication and distributed torsion specimens which also make use of the high aspect ratio nature of DXRL based processing. Measurements reveal achieved bond strengths of 130MPa between electroplated nickel with a bond temperature of 450 C at 7 ksi pressure which is a sufficiently low temperature to avoid mechanical strength degradation.

  1. FITCH RATES ENERGY NORTHWEST (WA) ELECTRIC REV REF BONDS 'AA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SECURITY Energy Northwest (ENW) bonds are secured by payments from the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). Bonneville's payment to ENW is made as an operating...

  2. adhesively bonded shell: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    various conditions, including the type of surface preparation, pH of the environmental media, (more) Xu, Dingying 2004-01-01 2 Bond Characteristics and Qualifications of...

  3. The effects of the initial stages of native-oxide formation on the surface properties of GaSb (001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, V. M. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomically clean surfaces of n-type GaSb (001) have been prepared by a combination of ex-situ wet-chemical treatment in HCl and in-situ annealing in a flux of H atoms in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The surfaces are exposed to 'excited' O{sub 2} and studied using primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Low O{sub 2} exposures, up to {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} Langmuirs (L), result in a partial passivation of electrically active defects as shown by a decrease in upward band bending. Adsorption of O{sub 2} in this exposure range appears to form mainly Ga{sup +1} sites, with little or no indication of Ga{sup +3}, and saturates at an O coverage of {approx}0.2-0.3 monolayers. For exposures of {approx}10{sup 4} L or higher, oxidation occurs through insertion into Ga-Sb bonds as indicated by the onset of Ga{sup +3} as well as of Sb{sup +4} and/or Sb{sup +5} together with the appearance of an O 1s feature. Defects resulting from this process cause a reversal of the band-bending change seen for smaller exposures. Data obtained for the composition of a native oxide formed in situ in UHV are compared with those for a 'practical' surface produced by processing under ambient conditions. These results suggest an optimum procedure for forming a Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer prior to the growth by atomic layer deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer.

  4. Inductively Coupled Plasma and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Etching of InGaAlP Compound Semiconductor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, C.R.; Hobson, W.S.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Current and future generations of sophisticated compound semiconductor devices require the ability for submicron scale patterning. The situation is being complicated since some of the new devices are based on a wider diversity of materials to be etched. Conventional IUE (Reactive Ion Etching) has been prevalent across the industry so far, but has limitations for materials with high bond strengths or multiple elements. IrI this paper, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma), for the etching of ternary compound semiconductors (InGaP, AIInP, AlGaP) which are employed for electronic devices like heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), and photonic devices such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. High density plasma sources, opeiating at lower pressure, are expected to meet target goals determined in terms of etch rate, surface morphology, surface stoichiometry, selectivity, etc. The etching mechanisms, which are described in this paper, can also be applied to other III-V (GaAs-based, InP-based) as well as III-Nitride since the InGaAIP system shares many of the same properties.

  5. UID-GaN doping1016 cm-3 2 m 5 m2 m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2 µm Drain Silicon UID-GaN ­ doping1016 cm-3 1.1 µm 2 µm GateSource 2 µm 5 µm2 µm AirAir Al0.25GaN ­ doping1015 cm-3 30 nm Drain Silicon UID-GaN P-GaNSource AirAir AlxGaN Drain Silicon UID-GaN GateSource AirAir AlxGaN Gate (a) (b) (c) Drain Silicon UID-GaN P-GaNSource AirAir AlxGaN Gate (d) P-GaN P-GaN 30

  6. Carrier capture dynamics of single InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauhan, K. N.; Riffe, D. M.; Everett, E. A.; Kim, D. J.; Yang, H. [Physics Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-4415 (United States)] [Physics Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-4415 (United States); Shen, F. K. [Center for Surface Analysis and Applications, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-4415 (United States)] [Center for Surface Analysis and Applications, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-4415 (United States)

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 800 nm, 25-fs pulses from a mode locked Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser, we have measured the ultrafast optical reflectivity of MBE-grown, single-layer In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) samples. The QDs are formed via two-stage Stranski-Krastanov growth: following initial InGaAs deposition at a relatively low temperature, self assembly of the QDs occurs during a subsequent higher temperature anneal. The capture times for free carriers excited in the surrounding GaAs (barrier layer) are as short as 140 fs, indicating capture efficiencies for the InGaAs quantum layer approaching 1. The capture rates are positively correlated with initial InGaAs thickness and annealing temperature. With increasing excited carrier density, the capture rate decreases; this slowing of the dynamics is attributed to Pauli state blocking within the InGaAs quantum layer.

  7. Epitaxial GaN films by hyperthermal ion-beam nitridation of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, J. W.; Ivanov, T.; Neumann, L.; Hoeche, Th.; Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung (IOM), D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial GaN film formation on bare 6H-SiC(0001) substrates via the process of transformation of Ga droplets into a thin GaN film by applying hyperthermal nitrogen ions is investigated. Pre-deposited Ga atoms in well defined amounts form large droplets on the substrate surface which are subsequently nitridated at a substrate temperature of 630 Degree-Sign C by a low-energy nitrogen ion beam from a constricted glow-discharge ion source. The Ga deposition and ion-beam nitridation process steps are monitored in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Ex situ characterization by x-ray diffraction and reflectivity techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and electron microscopy shows that the thickness of the resulting GaN films depends on the various amounts of pre-deposited gallium. The films are epitaxial to the substrate, exhibit a mosaic like, smooth surface topography and consist of coalesced large domains of low defect density. Possible transport mechanisms of reactive nitrogen species during hyperthermal nitridation are discussed and the formation of GaN films by an ion-beam assisted process is explained.

  8. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, G.M.; Baca, A.G.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device is disclosed. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices. 5 figs.

  9. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Sandia Park, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices.

  10. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  11. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curlee, R.M.; Tuthill, C.D.; Watkins, R.D.

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals. 2 figures.

  12. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curlee, Richard M. (Tijeras, NM); Tuthill, Clinton D. (Edgewood, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals.

  13. High-temperature molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlGaN/GaN on GaN templates with reduced interface impurity levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koblmueller, G. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Chu, R. M.; Raman, A.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present combined in situ thermal cleaning and intentional doping strategies near the substrate regrowth interface to produce high-quality AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on semi-insulating (0001) GaN templates with low interfacial impurity concentrations and low buffer leakage. By exposing the GaN templates to an optimized thermal dissociation step in the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy environment, oxygen, carbon, and, to lesser extent, Si impurities were effectively removed from the regrowth interface under preservation of good interface quality. Residual Si was further compensated by C-doped GaN via CBr{sub 4} to yield highly resistive GaN buffer layers. Improved N-rich growth conditions at high growth temperatures were then utilized for subsequent growth of the AlGaN/GaN device structure, yielding smooth surface morphologies and low residual oxygen concentration with large insensitivity to the (Al+Ga)N flux ratio. Room temperature electron mobilities of the two-dimensional electron gas at the AlGaN/GaN interface exceeded >1750 cm{sup 2}/V s and the dc drain current reached {approx}1.1 A/mm at a +1 V bias, demonstrating the effectiveness of the applied methods.

  14. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V[sub Ga]. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1[mu]m. Gallium vacancies, V[sub Ga], was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As[sub Ga] in the layer. As As[sub Ga] increases, photoquenchable As[sub Ga] decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As[sub Ga] content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga[sub As], as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As[sub Ga]-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V[sub Ga] enhanced diffusion of As[sub Ga] to As precipitates. The supersaturated V[sub GA] and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As[sub Ga]-related defects gives 2.0 [plus minus] 0.3 eV and 1.5 [plus minus] 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As[sub Ga] and V[sub Ga]. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As[sub Ga]-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 [plus minus] 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As[sub Ga]-Be[sub Ga] pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 045319 (2012) Photoluminescence from In0.5Ga0.5As/GaP quantum dots coupled to photonic crystal cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in materials systems, including InP/InGaP,6­9 InP/GaP,10,11 InP/AlGaInP,12,13 GaInP/GaP,14 InAs/GaP,15 and Al have been observed only in the InP/InGaP and InP/AlGaInP systems. GaP-based materials, by contrastP compared to InGaP is preferable for on-chip frequency downconversion to telecom wavelengths. Recently,17

  16. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Yarrison-Rice, Jan [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Etheridge, Joanne [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Wong, Bryan M. [Materials Chemistry Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  17. Strain-induced fundamental optical transition in (In,Ga)As/GaP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert, C., E-mail: cedric.robert@insa-rennes.fr, E-mail: cedric.robert@tyndall.ie; Pedesseau, L.; Cornet, C.; Jancu, J.-M.; Even, J.; Durand, O. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA Rennes, France and CNRS, UMR 6082 Foton, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35708 Rennes (France)] [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA Rennes, France and CNRS, UMR 6082 Foton, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35708 Rennes (France); Nestoklon, M. O. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Pereira da Silva, K. [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain) [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, P.O. Box 6030, Fortaleza–CE, 60455-970 (Brazil); Alonso, M. I. [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)] [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Gońi, A. R. [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain) [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Turban, P. [Equipe de Physique des Surfaces et Interfaces, Institut de Physique de Rennes UMR UR1-CNRS 6251, Université de Rennes 1, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)] [Equipe de Physique des Surfaces et Interfaces, Institut de Physique de Rennes UMR UR1-CNRS 6251, Université de Rennes 1, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the ground optical transition in an (In,Ga)As/GaP quantum dot is thoroughly investigated through a million atoms supercell tight-binding simulation. Precise quantum dot morphology is deduced from previously reported scanning-tunneling-microscopy images. The strain field is calculated with the valence force field method and has a strong influence on the confinement potentials, principally, for the conduction band states. Indeed, the wavefunction of the ground electron state is spatially confined in the GaP matrix, close to the dot apex, in a large tensile strain region, having mainly Xz character. Photoluminescence experiments under hydrostatic pressure strongly support the theoretical conclusions.

  18. Midinfrared intersubband absorption in GaN/AlGaN superlattices on Si(111) templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandaswamy, P. K.; Monroy, E. [CEA/CNRS group 'Nanophysique et semiconducteurs', INAC/SP2M/NPSC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Machhadani, H.; Sakr, S.; Tchernycheva, M.; Julien, F. H. [Photis, Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougerol, C. [CEA/CNRS group 'Nanophysique et semiconducteurs', Institut Neel, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of midinfrared intersubband absorption in Si-doped GaN/AlGaN superlattices grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on semi-insulating GaN-on-Si(111) templates. TM-polarized absorption attributed to transition between the first two electronic levels in the quantum wells peaked in the range from 2 to 9 {mu}m. The relative spectral width remains around 20% in the whole midinfrared spectral range. Doping is predicted to have a large influence on the intersubband absorption energy due to screening of polarization-induced internal electric field.

  19. Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options Belal E. Baaquie RMI are financial derivatives that can be analyzed in the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum finance. Forward-2963 Fax: (65) 6777-6126 Email: phybeb@nus.edu.sg #12;Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European

  20. July 18, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 18, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New Guidance from the U.S. Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs a range of energy conservation projects at very attractive borrowing rates over long contract terms

  1. BOND PROPERTIES OF CFCC PRESTRESSING STRANDS IN PRETENSIONED CONCRETE BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOND PROPERTIES OF CFCC PRESTRESSING STRANDS IN PRETENSIONED CONCRETE BEAMS by Nolan G. Domenico plastic prestressing strands (CFCC) in pretensioned concrete beams. The bond characteristics are examined for 15.2 mm diameter and 12.5 mm diameter seven-wire CFCC strands. Ten prestressed concrete beams

  2. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W. [Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  3. Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Valentin

    Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological Systems: A Force Field Approach and support. i #12;ii #12;Abstract Proton transfer and hydrogen bonds are fundamental for the function be regarded as incipient proton transfer reactions, so theoretically they can be de- scribed in unitary way

  4. Diffusion Bonding Aluminium Alloys and Composites: New Approaches and Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Diffusion Bonding Aluminium Alloys and Composites: New Approaches and Modelling Amir A. Shirzadi for advanced aluminium alloys and composites will enable them to be more widely used. The aim of this Ph of the research, two new methods for TLP diffusion bonding of aluminium-based composites (aluminium alloys

  5. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snowden, Jr., Thomas M. (P.O. Box 4231, Clearwater, FL 33518); Wells, Barbara J. (865 N. Village Dr., Apt. 101B, St. Petersburg, FL 33702)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40.degree. to 365.degree. C. to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  6. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snowden, T.M. Jr.; Wells, B.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40 to 365/sup 0/C to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  7. Energy absorption in Ni-Mn-Ga/ polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feuchtwanger, Jorge

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years Ni-Mn-Ga has attracted considerable attention as a new kind of actuator material. Off-stoichiometric single crystals of Ni2MnGa can regularly exhibit 6% strain in tetragonal martensites and orthorhombic ...

  8. Degradation mechanisms of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joh, Jungwoo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of their extraordinary performance, GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) have still limited reliability. In RF power applications, GaN HEMTs operate at high voltage where good reliability is essential. ...

  9. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur [Department of Statistics, Giresun University, Giresun (Turkey); Akdemir, Hande Günay; ??can, ?mdat [Department of Mathematics, Giresun University, Giresun (Turkey)

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  10. TEM-Untersuchungen an GaN basierten Halbleiterheterostrukturen fur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    TEM-Untersuchungen an GaN basierten Halbleiterheterostrukturen f¨ur optoelektronische Anwendungen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 5.1.2 Versetzungen bei Homoapitaxie auf GaN-Substraten . . . . 79 5.2 Versetzungsreduktion durch

  11. GaN Nanopore Arrays: Fabrication and Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yadong

    GaN nanopore arrays with pore diameters of approximately 75 nm were fabricated by inductively coupled plasma etching (ICP) using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films as etch masks. Nanoporous AAO films were formed on the GaN ...

  12. Height stabilization of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots by Al-rich capping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smakman, E. P., E-mail: e.p.smakman@tue.nl; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); DeJarld, M.; Martin, A. J.; Millunchick, J. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Luengo-Kovac, M.; Sih, V. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaSb quantum dots (QDs) in a GaAs matrix are investigated with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (X-STM) and photoluminescence (PL). We observe that Al-rich capping materials prevent destabilization of the nanostructures during the capping stage of the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth process and thus preserves the QD height. However, the strain induced by the absence of destabilization causes many structural defects to appear around the preserved QDs. These defects originate from misfit dislocations near the GaSb/GaAs interface and extend into the capping layer as stacking faults. The lack of a red shift in the QD PL suggests that the preserved dots do not contribute to the emission spectra. We suggest that a better control over the emission wavelength and an increase of the PL intensity is attainable by growing smaller QDs with an Al-rich overgrowth.

  13. 2DEG electrodes for piezoelectric transduction of AlGaN/GaN MEMS resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Dana

    A 2D electron gas (2DEG) interdigitated transducer (IDT) in Gallium Nitride (GaN) resonators is introduced and demonstrated. This metal-free transduction does not suffer from the loss mechanisms associated with more commonly ...

  14. High-field quasi-ballistic transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A.; Tripachko, N. A. [Institute of Physics, NASU, Pr. Nauki 46, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Belyaev, A. E. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NASU, Pr. Nauki 45, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Vitusevich, S. A., E-mail: s.vitusevich@fz-juelich.de; Hardtdegen, H.; Lüth, H. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-8,PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanisms of electron transport formation in 2D conducting channels of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures in extremely high electric fields at 4.2?K have been studied. Devices with a narrow constriction for the current flow demonstrate high-speed electron transport with an electron velocity of 6.8?×?10{sup 7}?cm/s. Such a velocity is more than two times higher than values reported for conventional semiconductors and about 15% smaller than the limit value predicted for GaN. Superior velocity is attained in the channel with considerable carrier reduction. The effect is related to a carrier runaway phenomenon. The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for GaN-based materials.

  15. Clean renewable energy bonds (CREBs) present a low-cost opportunity for public entities to issue bonds to finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clean renewable energy bonds (CREBs) present a low-cost opportunity for public entities to issue bonds to finance renewable energy projects. The federal government lowers the cost of debt by providing created under the Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005 (and detailed in Internal Revenue Code Section 54

  16. AlGaN/GaN High-Electron-Mobility Transistor Employing an Additional Gate for High-Voltage Switching Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    AlGaN/GaN High-Electron-Mobility Transistor Employing an Additional Gate for High-Voltage Switching 16, 2004; accepted May 10, 2005; published September 8, 2005) We have proposed and fabricated an AlGaN/GaN: GaN, AlGaN, HEMT, switch 1. Introduction GaN has attracted attention for high-power and high

  17. Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-effect transistors (HFETs) in GaN technology. HFET structures were fabricated of non-polar cubic AlGaN/GaN hetero insulation of 3C-SiC was realized by Ar+ implantation before c-AlGaN/GaN growth. HFETs with normally

  18. A 3-10 GHZLCR-matched Power Amplifier using Flip-Chip Mounted AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    WE4A-5 A 3-10 GHZLCR-matched Power Amplifier using Flip-Chip Mounted AlGaN/GaN HEMTs Jane J a GaN-based broadband power amplifier using AlGaN/GaN-HEMTs, grown on sapphire substrates amplifier using GaN- HEMTs-on-Sapphire. I INTRODUCTION GaN HEMTs have enormous potential for realizing high

  19. IPAP Conference Series 1: IWN2000, Nov., 2000 1 Morphology Dependent Growth Kinetics of Ga-polar GaN(0001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Philip I.

    IPAP Conference Series 1: IWN2000, Nov., 2000 1 Morphology Dependent Growth Kinetics of Ga-polar GaN, cohen@ece.umn.edu GaN grown on Ga polar GaN templates prepared by metal-organic vapor deposition shows to equilibrium models of the growth. The results indicate that Ga-polar GaN(0001) has a step energy of the order

  20. Engineering of AlGaN-Delta-GaN Quantum-Well Gain Media for Mid-and Deep-Ultraviolet Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Engineering of AlGaN-Delta-GaN Quantum-Well Gain Media for Mid- and Deep-Ultraviolet Lasers Volume.1109/JPHOT.2013.2248705 1943-0655/$31.00 Ó2013 IEEE #12;Engineering of AlGaN-Delta-GaN Quantum-Well Gain@Lehigh.Edu). Abstract: The gain characteristics of AlGaN-delta-GaN quantum wells (QWs) with varying delta-GaN positions

  1. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe-and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    , Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, UniVersity of Western Australia, Australia ReceiVed: August 7, 2006 between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions G. V; In Final Form: December 6, 2006 Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net

  2. Recent progress in InGaAsSb/GaSb TPV devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shellenbarger, Z.A.; Mauk, M.G.; DiNetta, L.C. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States); Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AstroPower is developing InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices. This photovoltaic cell is a two-layer epitaxial InGaAsSb structure formed by liquid-phase epitaxy on a GaSb substrate. The (direct) bandgap of the In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} alloy is 0.50 to 0.55 eV, depending on its exact alloy composition (x,y); and is closely lattice-matched to the GaSb substrate. The use of the quaternary alloy, as opposed to a ternary alloy--such as, for example InGaAs/InP--permits low bandgap devices optimized for 1,000 to 1,500 C thermal sources with, at the same time, near-exact lattice matching to the GaSb substrate. Lattice matching is important since even a small degree of lattice mismatch degrades device performance and reliability and increases processing complexity. Internal quantum efficiencies as high as 95% have been measured at a wavelength of 2 microns. At 1 micron wavelengths, internal quantum efficiencies of 55% have been observed. The open-circuit voltage at currents of 0.3 A/cm{sup 2} is 0.220 volts and 0.280 V for current densities of 2 A/cm{sup 2}. Fill factors of 56% have been measured at 60 mA/cm{sup 2}. However, as current density increases there is some decrease in fill factor. The results to date show that the GaSb-based quaternary compounds provide a viable and high performance energy conversion solution for thermophotovoltaic systems operating with 1,000 to 1,500 C source temperatures.

  3. AlGaAs/GaAs photovoltaic converters for high power narrowband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostikov, Vladimir; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey; Potapovich, Nataliia; Shvarts, Maxim; Sorokina, Svetlana; Andreev, Viacheslav [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Luque, Antonio [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021, Russia and Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaAs/GaAs-based laser power PV converters intended for operation with high-power (up to 100 W/cm{sup 2}) radiation were fabricated by LPE and MOCVD techniques. Monochromatic (? = 809 nm) conversion efficiency up to 60% was measured at cells with back surface field and low (x = 0.2) Al concentration 'window'. Modules with a voltage of 4 V and the efficiency of 56% were designed and fabricated.

  4. Sheet resistance under Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haj?asz, M., E-mail: m.hajlasz@m2i.nl [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Donkers, J. J. T. M.; Sque, S. J.; Heil, S. B. S. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gravesteijn, D. J. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Rietveld, F. J. R. [NXP Semiconductors, Gerstweg 2, 6534 AE, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schmitz, J. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    For the determination of specific contact resistance in semiconductor devices, it is usually assumed that the sheet resistance under the contact is identical to that between the contacts. This generally does not hold for contacts to AlGaN/GaN structures, where an effective doping under the contact is thought to come from reactions between the contact metals and the AlGaN/GaN. As a consequence, conventional extraction of the specific contact resistance and transfer length leads to erroneous results. In this Letter, the sheet resistance under gold-free Ti/Al-based Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates has been investigated by means of electrical measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and technology computer-aided design simulations. It was found to be significantly lower than that outside of the contact area; temperature-dependent electrical characterization showed that it exhibits semiconductor-like behavior. The increase in conduction is attributed to n-type activity of nitrogen vacancies in the AlGaN. They are thought to form during rapid thermal annealing of the metal stack when Ti extracts nitrogen from the underlying semiconductor. The high n-type doping in the region between the metal and the 2-dimensional electron gas pulls the conduction band towards the Fermi level and enhances horizontal electron transport in the AlGaN. Using this improved understanding of the properties of the material underneath the contact, accurate values of transfer length and specific contact resistance have been extracted.

  5. TEM and HRXRD Analysis of LP MOVPE Grown InGaP/GaAs epilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelosi, Claudio; Bosi, Matteo; Attolini, Giovanni; Germini, Fabrizio; Frigeri, Cesare [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37a, Loc Fontanini 43010 Parma (Italy); Prutskij, Tatiana [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, no. 3417, colSanMiguel Hueyotlipan, 72050 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffusion phenomena at interfaces between GaAs/InGaP layers grown by low pressure MOVPE have been studied by dark field (DF) transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and High resolution X-ray Diffractometry (HRXRD). By comparing the results of the two techniques a mismatched layer containing P or P and In has been evidenced. The causes of this behavior are briefly discussed.

  6. Guided Neuronal Growth on Arrays of Biofunctionalized GaAs/InGaAs Semiconductor Microtubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelius S. Bausch; Aune Koitmäe; Eric Stava; Amanda Price; Pedro J. Resto; Yu Huang; David Sonnenberg; Yuliya Stark; Christian Heyn; Justin C. Williams; Erik W. Dent; Robert H. Blick

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate embedded growth of cortical mouse neurons in dense arrays of semiconductor microtubes. The microtubes, fabricated from a strained GaAs/InGaAs heterostructure, guide axon growth through them and enable electrical and optical probing of propagating action potentials. The coaxial nature of the microtubes -- similar to myelin -- is expected to enhance the signal transduction along the axon. We present a technique of suppressing arsenic toxicity and prove the success of this technique by overgrowing neuronal mouse cells.

  7. InGaN/GaN quantum wells for polariton laser diodes: Role of inhomogeneous broadening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glauser, Marlene; Mounir, Christian; Rossbach, Georg; Feltin, Eric; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to the case of III-nitride based visible light-emitting diodes for which the inhomogeneous linewidth broadening characteristic of InGaN-based multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures does not appear as a detrimental parameter, such a broadening issue can prevent a microcavity (MC) system entering into the strong light-matter coupling regime (SCR). The impact of excitonic disorder in low indium content (x???0.1) In{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}N/GaN MQW active regions is therefore investigated for the subsequent realization of polariton laser diodes by considering both simulations and optical characterizations. It allows deriving the requirements for such MQWs in terms of absorption, emission linewidth, and Stokes shift. Systematic absorption-like and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy experiments are performed on single and multiple In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N/GaN quantum wells (QWs). Micro-PL mappings reveal a low temperature PL linewidth of ?30?meV, compatible with SCR requirements, for single QWs for which the microscopic origin responsible for this broadening is qualitatively discussed. When stacking several InGaN/GaN QWs, a departure from such a narrow linewidth value and an increase in the Stokes shift are observed. Various possible reasons for this degradation such as inhomogeneous built-in field distribution among the QWs are then identified. An alternative solution for the MC design to achieve the SCR with the InGaN alloy is briefly discussed.

  8. Rapid Communications Strong piezoelectricity in individual GaN nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Rapid Communications Strong piezoelectricity in individual GaN nanowires Majid Minary@northwestern.edu (Received 12 July 2011; accepted 15 September 2011) Abstract GaN nanowires are promising building blocks piezoelectricity in individual single-crystal GaN nanowires revealed by direct measurement of the piezoelectric

  9. GaN Radiation Detectors for Particle Physics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    GaN Radiation Detectors for Particle Physics and Synchrotron Applications James Paul Grant and monitoring applications. Gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated as a radiation hard particle detector diameter on three epitaxial GaN wafers grown on a sapphire sub- strate. Two of the wafers were obtained

  10. New Faces of GaN: Growth, Doping and Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    New Faces of GaN: Growth, Doping and Devices James S. Speck Materials Department University of California Santa Barbara, CA LEO of a-GaN from circular opening Engineering Insights 2006 #12;#12;Personnel. Wraback (ARL) $$$ JST ­ ERATO UCSB SSLDC AFOSR ONR #12;Reversed direction of polarization Bulk GaN

  11. Analysis of the AlGaN/GaN vertical bulk current on Si, sapphire, and free-standing GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Tomas, A.; Fontsere, A.; Llobet, J. [IMB-CNM-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, CAT (Spain); Placidi, M. [IREC, Jardins Dones de Negre 1, 08930 Sant Adria de Besos, Barcelona (Spain); Rennesson, S.; Chenot, S.; Moreno, J. C.; Cordier, Y. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Baron, N. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); PICOGIGA International, Pl M. Rebuffat, Courtaboeuf 7, 91140 Villejust (France)

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical bulk (drain-bulk) current (I{sub db}) properties of analogous AlGaN/GaN hetero-structures molecular beam epitaxially grown on silicon, sapphire, and free-standing GaN (FS-GaN) have been evaluated in this paper. The experimental I{sub db} (25-300 Degree-Sign C) have been well reproduced with physical models based on a combination of Poole-Frenkel (trap assisted) and hopping (resistive) conduction mechanisms. The thermal activation energies (E{sub a}), the (soft or destructive) vertical breakdown voltage (V{sub B}), and the effect of inverting the drain-bulk polarity have also been comparatively investigated. GaN-on-FS-GaN appears to adhere to the resistive mechanism (E{sub a} = 0.35 eV at T = 25-300 Degree-Sign C; V{sub B} = 840 V), GaN-on-sapphire follows the trap assisted mechanism (E{sub a} = 2.5 eV at T > 265 Degree-Sign C; V{sub B} > 1100 V), and the GaN-on-Si is well reproduced with a combination of the two mechanisms (E{sub a} = 0.35 eV at T > 150 Degree-Sign C; V{sub B} = 420 V). Finally, the relationship between the vertical bulk current and the lateral AlGaN/GaN transistor leakage current is explored.

  12. A New Combustion Synthesis Method for GaN:Eu3+ and Ga2O3 :Eu3+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKittrick, Joanna

    A New Combustion Synthesis Method for GaN:Eu3+ and Ga2O3 :Eu3+ Luminescent Powders G. A. Hirata1 between the precursors. The preparation of Eu-doped Ga2O3 powders was achieved using a new combustion)3 and Ga(NO3)3 as the precursors and hydrazine as (non-carbonaceous) fuel. A spontaneous combustion

  13. Electron mobility enhancement in AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures with InGaN nanogrooves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improve the room-temperature carrier mobility in wurtzite AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures, which is limited consider a narrow groove made of InxGa1-xN with small In content x inside a wurtzite AlN/GaN/AlN heteroN 2 nm /GaN 3 nm /AlN 3 nm . A well-known feature of wurtzite heterostructures is a strong buit

  14. Growth of GaN on porous SiC and GaN substrates C. K. Inoki1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Growth of GaN on porous SiC and GaN substrates C. K. Inoki1 , T. S. Kuan1 , Ashutosh Sagar2 , C, Albuquerque, NM 87185 4 Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 GaN films were grown on porous SiC and GaN templates using both plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) and metal

  15. Structural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer and interlayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    N buffer layer BL grown on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL grown under the AlGaN ternary layer TL. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an AlN BL on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL between an AlGaNStructural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer

  16. Transient-Liquid-Phase (TLP) Bonding of Al2O3 Using Nb-based Multilayer Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Sung Moo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alumina Diffusion Bonding and Titanium Active Brazing.Requirements for Diffusion Bonding Titanium. In: Jaffee RI,O 3 -Titanium Adhesion in the View of the Diffusion Bonding

  17. Transient-Liquid-Phase (TLP) Bonding of Al2O3 Using Nb-based Multilayer Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Sung Moo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 539-44. Derby B. Diffusion Bonding. In: Nicholas M (ed).Requirements for Diffusion Bonding Titanium. In: Jaffee RI,Contact During Diffusion Bonding. Metallurgical Transactions

  18. c IEEE, 2013. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of IEEE for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version is accepted for 2013 IEEE Online Conference on Green Communications (OnlineGreenComm 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    and backbone network) [2]. However, the energy consumption in wired access networks is proportional's energy consumption are expected (potentially even overtaking the access network's consumption [3 Conference on Green Communications (OnlineGreenComm 2013). Power Consumption Evaluation of Circuit

  19. Hydrogen Bond Dynamics Probed with Ultrafast Infrared Heterodyne-Detected Multidimensional Vibrational Stimulated Echoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Dynamics Probed with Ultrafast Infrared Heterodyne-Detected Multidimensional, USA (Received 24 February 2003; published 3 December 2003) Hydrogen bond dynamics are explicated hydrogen bonded network are measured with ultrashort (

  20. Metal-and hydrogen-bonding competition during water absorption on Pd(111) and Ru(0001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatarkhanov, Mouslim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal- and hydrogen-bonding competition during waterwith the greater degree of hydrogen-bonded network formationH and OH to maximize both hydrogen bonding and oxygen-metal

  1. An Investigation of Bonding Mechanism in Metal Cladding by Warm Rolling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wei

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , this research presents a bonding mechanism for the roll cladding process of dissimilar metals. The roll bonding model can help optimize rolling parameters for varying bonding strength depending on the demands of the application. It can also provide insights...

  2. From Schottky to Ohmic graphene contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures: Role of the AlGaN layer microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisichella, G. [CNR-IMM, Strada VIII, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Catania, 95124 Catania (Italy); Greco, G.; Roccaforte, F.; Giannazzo, F. [CNR-IMM, Strada VIII, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical behaviour of graphene (Gr) contacts to Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN heterostructures has been investigated, focusing, in particular, on the impact of the AlGaN microstructure on the current transport at Gr/AlGaN interface. Two Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N/GaN heterostructures with very different quality in terms of surface roughness and defectivity, as evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy, were compared in this study, i.e., a uniform and defect-free sample and a sample with a high density of typical V-defects, which locally cause a reduction of the AlGaN thickness. Nanoscale resolution current voltage (I-V) measurements by an Au coated conductive AFM tip were carried out at several positions both on the bare and Gr-coated AlGaN surfaces. Rectifying contacts were found onto both bare AlGaN surfaces, but with a more inhomogeneous and lower Schottky barrier height (?{sub B}???0.6?eV) for AlGaN with V-defects, with respect to the case of the uniform AlGaN (?{sub B}???0.9?eV). Instead, very different electrical behaviours were observed in the presence of the Gr interlayer between the Au tip and AlGaN, i.e., a Schottky contact with reduced barrier height (?{sub B} ? 0.4?eV) for the uniform AlGaN and an Ohmic contact for the AlGaN with V-defects. Interestingly, excellent lateral uniformity of the local I-V characteristics was found in both cases and can be ascribed to an averaging effect of the Gr electrode over the AlGaN interfacial inhomogeneities. Due to the locally reduced AlGaN layer thickness, V defect act as preferential current paths from Gr to the 2DEG and can account for the peculiar Ohmic behaviour of Gr contacts on defective AlGaN.

  3. X-ray diffraction analysis of InGaP/GaAs heterointerfaces grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nittono, T.; Hyuga, F. [NTT System Electronics Laboratories 3-1, Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa, 243-01 (Japan)] [NTT System Electronics Laboratories 3-1, Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa, 243-01 (Japan)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaP/GaAs heterointerfaces grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition have been characterized by a high-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis of multiple quantum well structures. The flow of AsH{sub 3} to InGaP surface produces an InGaAs-like interfacial layer at the GaAs-on-InGaP interface, indicating P atoms of the InGaP surface are easily replaced by As atoms. The flow of PH{sub 3} to GaAs surface, on the other hand, does not make any detectable interfacial layer, indicating that almost no As atoms of the GaAs surface are replaced by P atoms. It is also found that the flow of trimethylgallium (TMG) to the InGaP surface produces a GaP-like interfacial layer. This interfacial layer is probably formed by the reaction between TMG and excessive P atoms on the InGaP surface or residual PH{sub 3} in the growth chamber. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Physica B 376377 (2006) 486490 Preferential substitution of Fe on physically equivalent Ga sites in GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in GaN W. GehlhoffĂ, D. Azamat1 , U. Haboeck, A. Hoffmann Institute for Solid State Physics, Technical freestanding hydride vapor phase grown GaN have been studied in the X- and Q-band. A complex resonance pattern with C3v symmetry in the wurtzite structure of GaN. Aside from the displacement of their magnetic axis

  5. Superluminescence in Green Emission GaInN/GaN Quantum Well Structures under Pulsed Laser Excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    and bulk GaN substrates, respectively. Under intense pulsed photo excitation, we observed strong the same excitation conditions, the blue shift for the m-axis grown structure on bulk GaN substrate is less-plane sapphire substrate and along the non-polar m-axis on m-plane bulk GaN substrate. The frequently used

  6. Composition and Interface Analysis of InGaN/GaN Multiquantum-Wells on GaN Substrates Using Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fang; Huang, Li; Davis, Robert F.; Porter, Lisa M.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Preble, Edward; Paskova, Tanya; Evans, K. R.

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In0.20Ga0.80N/GaN multi-quantum wells grown on [0001]-oriented GaN substrates with and without an InGaN buffer layer were characterized using three-dimensional atom probe tomography. In all samples, the upper interfaces of the QWs were slightly more diffuse than the lower interfaces. The buffer layers did not affect the roughness of the interfaces within the quantum well structure, a result attributed to planarization of the surface of the 1st GaN barrier layer which had an average root-mean-square roughness of 0.177 nm. The In and Ga distributions within the MQWs followed the expected distributions for a random alloy with no indications of In clustering.

  7. Point defect balance in epitaxial GaSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segercrantz, N., E-mail: natalie.segercrantz@aalto.fi; Slotte, J.; Makkonen, I.; Kujala, J.; Tuomisto, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 14100, FIN-00076 Aalto Espoo (Finland); Song, Y.; Wang, S. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy in both conventional and coincidence Doppler broadening mode is used for studying the effect of growth conditions on the point defect balance in GaSb:Bi epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Positron annihilation characteristics in GaSb are also calculated using density functional theory and compared to experimental results. We conclude that while the main positron trapping defect in bulk samples is the Ga antisite, the Ga vacancy is the most prominent trap in the samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results suggest that the p–type conductivity is caused by different defects in GaSb grown with different methods.

  8. Room-temperature cw operation of InGaAsP/InGaP lasers at 727 nm grown on GaAs substrates by liquid phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakao, K.; Nishi, H.; Kusunoki, T.; Isozumi, S.; Ohsaka, S.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaAsP/InGaP lasers emitting at 724--727 nm have been fabricated on GaAs substrates using liquid phase epitaxy. The threshold current is reduced to 8 kA/cm/sup 2/ by thinning the active layer. Room-temperature cw operation is achieved for the first time in the lasing wavelength range below 760 nm in this quaternary system.

  9. Self-assembled In0.5Ga0.5As quantum dots on GaP Yuncheng Song,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    SAQDs . Several groups have investigated the growth of both InP and In-rich InGaP SAQDs on GaP.7­12 Most temperature operation of vis- ible light emitting diodes LEDs using InP/GaP and InGaP/ GaP SAQDs, respectively

  10. Current crowding in GaInN / GaN LEDs grown on insulating substrates X. Guo, E. F. Schubert and J. Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Current crowding in GaInN / GaN LEDs grown on insulating substrates X. Guo, E. F. Schubert and J spreading in a mesa-structure GaN-based LED grown on an insulating or semi-insulating substrate. (b. Jahns Current crowding in mesa-structure GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on insulating

  11. Gas-source molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of the (Al,In,Ga)NP/GaP material system and Its applications to light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odnoblyudov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? G, Kcal/mol GaP GaN AlN o Substrate temperature, C Figurenm-thick GaN 0.006 P 0.994 layer on substrate temperature.substrate temperature for Reactions formation of AlP, GaP, GaN and

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 51, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2003 653 AlGaN/GaN HFET Power Amplifier Integrated With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    the first demonstration of a GaN-based HFET was done on a sapphire substrate in 1993 [1]­[3]. This is due crystal quality compared to that of the sapphire substrate. Thanks to steadfast progress in AlGaN/GaN HFETIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 51, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2003 653 AlGaN/GaN

  13. Hydrogen-Bond Networks: Strengths of Different Types of Hydrogen Bonds and An Alternative to the Low Barrier Hydrogen-Bond Proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Yanping; O'Doherty, George A.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report quantifying the strengths of different types of hydrogen bonds in hydrogen bond networks (HBNs) via measurement of the adiabatic electron detachment energy of the conjugate base of a small covalent polyol model compound (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) in the gas phase and the pKa of the corresponding acid in DMSO. The latter result reveals that the hydrogen bonds to the charged center and those that are one solvation shell further away (i.e., primary and secondary) provide 5.3 and 2.5 pKa units of stabilization per hydrogen bond in DMSO. Computations indicate that these energies increase to 8.4 and 3.9 pKa units in benzene and that the total stabilizations are 16 (DMSO) and 25 (benzene) pKa units. Calculations on a larger linear heptaol (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) reveal that the terminal hydroxyl groups each contribute 0.6 pKa units of stabilization in DMSO and 1.1 pKa units in benzene. All of these results taken together indicate that the presence of a charged center can provide a powerful energetic driving force for enzyme catalysis and conformational changes such as in protein folding due to multiple hydrogen bonds in a HBN.

  14. Tunable THz plasmon resonances in InGaAs/InP HEMT R. E. Peale*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, Robert E.

    , high ns, and small m*. A variety of materials systems such as GaAs/AlGaAs [3], InGaP/InGaAs/GaAs [4

  15. Prospective emission efficiency and in-plane light polarization of nonpolar m-plane InxGa1-xN/GaN blue light emitting diodes fabricated on freestanding GaN substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fabricated on freestanding GaN substrates T. Koyama and T.on freestanding m-plane GaN substrates. Although the ? inton the freestanding GaN substrate. cause the current was

  16. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - amide bonds stabilize Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amide-Amide and Amide-Water Hydrogen Bonds Summary: Bonds: Implicationsfor Protein Folding and Stability Eric S.Eberhardt and Ronald T. Rained Department... folds, many of...

  18. The Role of Non-Bonded Interactions in the Conformational Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Bonded Interactions in the Conformational Dynamics of Organophosphorous Hydrolase Adsorbed onto Functionalized The Role of Non-Bonded Interactions in the Conformational...

  19. Influence of Ga content on the structure and anomalous Hall effect of Fe{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x} thin films on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Tuan, Duong; Shin, Yooleemi; Viet Cuong, Tran; Cho, Sunglae, E-mail: slcho@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Energy Harvest-Storage Research Center, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Phan, The-Long [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fe{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x} thin films (x?=?0.4, 0.5) have been grown on GaSb(100) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. An epitaxial film with bcc ?-Fe crystal structure (A2) is observed in Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} film, while an impure Fe{sub 3}Ga phase with DO{sub 3} structure is appeared in Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. The saturated magnetizations at room temperature are observed to be 570?emu/cm{sup 3} and 180?emu/cm{sup 3} and the coercivities to be 170 and 364?Oe for Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} and Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}, respectively. A hysteresis trend in Hall resistance vs. magnetic field is observed for Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. However, there is a weak hysteresis noticed in Fe{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6} thin film.

  20. Catastrophic degradation of InGaAsP/InGaP double-heterostructure lasers grown on (001) GaAs substrates by liquid-phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, O.; Wakao, K.; Komiya, S.; Yamaguchi, A.; Isozumi, S.; Umebu, I.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catastrophically degraded InGaAsP/InGaP double-heterostructure lasers grown on (001) GaAs substrates by liquid-phase epitaxy, emitting at 727 and 810 nm are investigated by photoluminescence topography, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The degradation is mainly due to catastrophic optical damage at the facet, i.e., development of <110> dark-line defects from the facet, and rarely due to catastrophic optical damage at some defects, i.e., development of <110> dark-line defects from the defects inside the stripe region. These <110> dark-line defects correspond to complicated dislocation networks connected with dark knots, and are quite similar to those observed in catastrophically degraded GaAlAs/GaAs double-heterostructure lasers. The degradation characteristics of the InGaAsP/InGaP double-heterostructure lasers are rather similar to those in GaAlAs/GaAs double-heterostructure lasers concerning the catastrophic degradation.

  1. Influence of chain topology and bond potential on the glass transition of polymer chains simulated with the bond fluctuation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan J. Freire

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The bond fluctuation model with a bond potential has been applied to investigation of the glass transition of linear chains and chains with a regular disposition of small branches. Cooling and subsequent heating curves are obtained for the chain energies and also for the mean acceptance probability of a bead jump. In order to mimic different trends to vitrification, a factor B gauging the strength of the bond potential with respect to the long-range potential (i.e. the intramolecular or intermolecular potential between indirectly bonded beads) has been introduced. (A higher value of B leads to a preference for the highest bond lengths and a higher total energy, implying a greater tendency to vitrify.) Different cases have been considered for linear chains: no long-range potential, no bond potential and several choices for B. Furthermore, we have considered two distinct values of B for alternate bonds in linear chains. In the case of the branched chains, molecules with different values of B for bonds in the main chain and in the branches have also been investigated. The possible presence of crystallization has been characterized by calculating the collective light scattering function of the different samples after annealing at a convenient temperature below the onset of crystallization. It is concluded that crystallization is inherited more efficiently in the systems with branched chains and also for higher values of B. The branched molecules with the highest B values in the main chain bonds exhibit two distinct transitions in the heating curves which may be associated with two glass transitions. This behavior has been detected experimentally for chains with relatively long flexible branches.

  2. Dynamics of thermalization in GaInN/GaN quantum wells grown on ammonothermal GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, J.; Korona, K. P.; Wysmo?ek, A.; Kami?ska, M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Köhler, K.; Kirste, L.; Ambacher, O. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastr. 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Zaj?c, M.; Dwili?ski, R. [AMMONO SA, Czerwonego Krzy?a 2/31, 00-377 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present measurements of the dynamics of photoexcited carriers in GaInN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on ammonothermal GaN, especially thermalization and recombination rates. Emission properties were measured by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence spectroscopy. Due to the use of high quality homoepitaxial material, we were able to obtain very valuable data on carrier thermalization. The temperature dependence of the QW energy observed in PL shows characteristic S-shape with a step of about 10?meV. Such a behavior (related to thermalization and localization at potential fluctuations) is often reported for QWs; but in our samples, the effect is smaller than in heteroepitaxial InGaN/GaN QWs due to lower potential fluctuation in our material. Absorption properties were studied by photocurrent spectroscopy measurements. A comparison of emission and absorption spectra revealed a shift in energy of about 60?meV. Contrary to PL, the QW energy observed in absorption decreases monotonically with temperature, which can be described by a Bose-like dependence E(T)?=?E(0) ? ?/(exp(?/T) ? 1), with parameters ??=?(0.11?±?0.01) eV, ??=?(355?±?20)?K, or by a Varshni dependence with coefficients ??=?(10?±?3) × 10{sup ?4}?eV/K and ??=?(1500?±?500) K. Taking into account absorption and emission, the fluctuation amplitude (according to Eliseev theory) was ??=?14?meV. The time resolved PL revealed that in a short period (<1?ns) after excitation, the PL peaks were broadened because of the thermal distribution of carriers. We interpreted this distribution in terms of quasi-temperature (T{sub q}) of the carriers. The initial T{sub q} was of the order of 500?K. The thermalization led to a fast decrease of T{sub q}. The obtained cooling time in the QW was ?{sub C}?=?0.3?ns, which was faster than the observed recombination time ?{sub R}?=?2.2?ns (at 4?K)

  3. Semi-flexible hydrogen-bonded and non-hydrogen bonded lattice polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Krawczyk; AL Owczarek; T Prellberg

    2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the addition of stiffness to the lattice model of hydrogen-bonded polymers in two and three dimensions. We find that, in contrast to polymers that interact via a homogeneous short-range interaction, the collapse transition is unchanged by any amount of stiffness: this supports the physical argument that hydrogen bonding already introduces an effective stiffness. Contrary to possible physical arguments, favouring bends in the polymer does not return the model's behaviour to that comparable to the semi-flexible homogeneous interaction model, where the canonical $\\theta$-point occurs for a range of parameter values. In fact, for sufficiently large bending energies the crystal phase disappears altogether, and no phase transition of any type occurs. We also compare the order-disorder transition from the globule phase to crystalline phase in the semi-flexible homogeneous interaction model to that for the fully-flexible hybrid model with both hydrogen and non-hydrogen like interactions. We show that these phase transitions are of the same type and are a novel polymer critical phenomena in two dimensions. That is, it is confirmed that in two dimensions this transition is second-order, unlike in three dimensions where it is known to be first order. We also estimate the crossover exponent and show that there is a divergent specific heat, finding $\\phi=0.7(1)$ or equivalently $\\alpha=0.6(2)$. This is therefore different from the $\\theta$ transition, for which $\\alpha=-1/3$.

  4. FITCH RATES PORT OF MORROW (OR) TRANSMISSION FACILITIES REV BONDS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FITCH RATES PORT OF MORROW (OR) TRANSMISSION FACILITIES REV BONDS 'AA'; OUTLOOK STABLE Fitch Ratings-Austin-24 November 2014: Fitch Ratings assigns 'AA' ratings to the Port of...

  5. Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q Sun

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

  6. Wafer bonding : mechanics-based models and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Kevin Thomas, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct wafer bonding has emerged as an important technology in the manufacture of silicon-on-insulator substrates (SOI), microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D IC's). While the ...

  7. aliphatic ch bonds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015-01-01 39 H-atom high-n Rydberg time-of-flight spectroscopy of CH bond fission in acrolein dissociated at 193 nm Chemistry Websites Summary: H-atom high-n Rydberg...

  8. Bond Angle Torsion http://www.nobelprize.org/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    MARBLE-K 20141024 1 #12;2 MARBLE MARBLE #12;MD Bond Angle Torsion http) MARBLE-K PME CHARMM Force Field AMBER Force Field NMRSAXS molx XNMR #12;MARBLE

  9. Mechanistic Examination of C?-C? Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (X C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The C?–C? bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue (M - CO2•+) can generate M - CO2 - 116+,...

  10. Creep effects in diffusion bonding of oxygen-free copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moilanen, Antti

    Diffusion is the transport of atoms or particles through the surrounding material. Various microstructural changes in metals are based on the diffusion phenomena. In solid metals the diffusion is closely related to crystallographic defects. In single-component metals the dominant mechanism of diffusion is the vacancy mechanism. Diffusion bonding is a direct technological application of diffusion. It is an advanced solidstate joining process in which the surfaces of two components are brought to contact with each other and heated under a pressing load in a controlled environment. During the process, the contact surfaces are bonded by atomic diffusion across the interface and as a result, one solid piece is formed. The condition of high temperature and low applied stress combined with relatively long process duration enables the creep effects to take place in bonded metals. Furthermore, creep causes unwanted permanent deformations in the bonded components. Some authors suggest that there could be a threshold fo...

  11. Spectroscopic investigations of hydrogen bond dynamics in liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fecko, Christopher J., 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the remarkable physical and chemical properties of liquid water are due to the strong influence hydrogen bonds have on its microscopic dynamics. However, because of the fast timescales involved, there are relatively ...

  12. Resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for bond cooperativity in associating fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Bennett D., E-mail: bennettd1980@gmail.com; Chapman, Walter G. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, 6100 S. Main, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, 6100 S. Main, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for bond cooperativity in associating fluids by extension of Wertheim's multi-density formalism. We specifically consider the case of an associating hard sphere with two association sites and both pairwise and triplet contributions to the energy, such that the first bond in an associated cluster receives an energy ??{sup (1)} and each subsequent bond in the cluster receives an energy ??{sup (2)}. To test the theory we perform new Monte Carlo simulations for potentials of this type. Theory and simulation are found to be in excellent agreement. We show that decreasing the energetic benefit of hydrogen bonding can actually result in a decrease in internal energy in the fluid. We also predict that when ?{sup (1)} = 0 and ?{sup (2)} is nonzero there is a transition temperature where the system transitions from a fluid of monomers to a mixture of monomers and very long chains.

  13. Ultrafast structural fluctuations and rearrangements of water's hydrogen bonded network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loparo, Joseph J. (Joseph John)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous chemistry is strongly influenced by water's ability to form an extended network of hydrogen bonds. It is the fluctuations and rearrangements of this network that stabilize reaction products and drive the transport ...

  14. Manipulation of emission energy in GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires with radial heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa, B. G.; Arakaki, H.; Souza, C. A. de; Pusep, Yu. A. [Instituto de Fisica de Săo Carlos, Universidade de Săo Paulo, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoluminescence was studied in GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires (NWs) with different radial heterostructures. We demonstrated that manipulation of the emission energy may be achieved by appropriate choice of the shell structure. The emission at highest energy is generated in the NWs with tunneling thin AlGaAs inner shell and thin GaAs outer shell due to recombination of the photoexcited electrons confined in the outer shell with the holes in the core. Lower energy emission was shown to occur in the NWs with thick outer shell grown in the form of a short-period GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well structure. In this case, the tunneling probability through the multiple quantum wells controls the energy emitted by the NWs. The doping of core results in dominated low energy emission from the GaAs core.

  15. Microbial cleavage of organic C-S bonds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial process is described for selective cleavage of organic C-S bonds which may be used for reducing the sulfur content of sulfur-containing organic carbonaceous materials. Microorganisms of Rhodococcus rhodochrous and Bacillus sphaericus have been found which have the ability of selective cleavage of organic C-S bonds. Particularly preferred microorganisms are Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain ATCC 53968 and Bacillus sphaericus strain ATCC 53969 and their derivatives.

  16. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1eV)/GaInAs(0.7eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5} P/GaAs/Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  17. Bonded Bracket Assmebly for Frameless Solar Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Todd

    2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 2011 the US Department of Energy announced their new Sunshot Initiative. The Sunshot goal is to reduce the total cost of solar energy systems by about 75 percent before the end of the decade. The DOE estimated that a total installed cost of $1 per watt for photovoltaic systems would be equivalent to 6���¢/kilowatt hour (kWh) for energy available from the grid. The DOE also estimated that to meet the $1 per watt goal, PV module costs would need to be reduced to $.50 per watt, balance of systems costs would need to be reduced to $.40 per watt, and power electronic costs would need to reach $.10 per watt. To address the BOS balance of systems cost component of the $1 per watt goal, the DOE announced a funding opportunity called (BOS-X) Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reductions. The DOE identified eight areas within the total BOS costs: 1) installation labor, 2) installation materials, 3) installation overhead and profit, 4) tracker, 5) permitting and commissioning, 6) site preparation, 7) land acquisition, 8) sales tax. The BOS-X funding announcement requested applications in four specific topics: Topic 1: Transformational Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Modules Topic 2: Roof and Ground Mount Innovations Topic 3: Transformational Photovoltaic System Designs Topic 4: Development of New Wind Load Codes for PV Systems The application submitted by ARaymond Tinnerman reflected the requirements listed in Topic #2, Roof and Ground Mount Innovations. The goal of topic #2 was to develop technologies that would result in the extreme reduction of material and labor costs associated with applications that require physical connections and attachments to roof and ground mount structures. The topics researched in this project included component cost reduction, labor reduction, weight reduction, wiring innovations, and alternative material utilization. The project objectives included: 1) The development of an innovative quick snap bracket assembly that would be bonded to frameless PV modules for commercial rooftop installations. 2) The development of a composite pultruded rail to replace traditional racking materials. 3) In partnership with a roofing company, pilot the certification of a commercial roof to be solar panel compliant, eliminating the need for structural analysis and government oversight resulting in significantly decreased permitting costs. 4) Reduce the sum of all cost impacts in topic #2 from a baseline total of $2.05/watt to $.34/watt.

  18. Mercury stabilization in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagh, A. S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S. Y.

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury stabilization and solidification is a significant challenge for conventional stabilization technologies. This is because of the stringent regulatory limits on leaching of its stabilized products. In a conventional cement stabilization process, Hg is converted at high pH to its hydroxide, which is not a very insoluble compound; hence the preferred route for Hg sulfidation to convert it into insoluble cinnabar (HgS). Unfortunately, efficient formation of this compound is pH-dependent. At a high pH, one obtains a more soluble Hg sulfate, in a very low pH range, insufficient immobilization occurs because of the escape of hydrogen sulfide, while efficient formation of HgS occurs only in a moderately acidic region. Thus, the pH range of 4 to 8 is where stabilization with Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPC) is carried out. This paper discusses the authors experience on bench-scale stabilization of various US Department of Energy (DOE) waste streams containing Hg in the CBPC process. This process was developed to treat DOE's mixed waste streams. It is a room-temperature-setting process based on an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and monopotassium phosphate solution that forms a dense ceramic within hours. For Hg stabilization, addition of a small amount (< 1 wt.%) of Na{sub 2}S or K{sub 2}S is sufficient in the binder composition. Here the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results on CBPC waste forms of surrogate waste streams representing secondary Hg containing wastes such as combustion residues and Delphi DETOX{trademark} residues are presented. The results show that although the current limit on leaching of Hg is 0.2 mg/L, the results from the CBPC waste forms are at least one order lower than this stringent limit. Encouraged by these results on surrogate wastes, they treated actual low-level Hg-containing mixed waste from their facility at Idaho. TCLP results on this waste are presented here. The efficient stabilization in all these cases is attributed to chemical immobilization as both a sulfide (cinnabar) and a phosphate, followed by its physical encapsulation in a dense matrix of the ceramic.

  19. Ga adsorbate on (0001) GaN: In situ characterization with quadrupole mass spectrometry and reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, J S; Koblmuller, G; Wu, F; Averbeck, R; Riechert, H; Speck, J S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PA-MBE GaN growth conditions, with substrate temperatures ofthe GaN surface roughness evolution, substrate vicinality,vapor and substrate temperature could form the basis for GaN

  20. Delocalization and hybridization enhance the magnetocaloric effect in Ni2Mn0.75Cu0.25Ga

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Sujoy; Blackburn, E.; Valvidares, S. M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Vogel, Sven C.; Khan, M.; Dubenko, I.; Stadler, S.; Ali, N.; Sinha, S. K.; Kortright, J. B.

    2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of the looming energy crisis facing our planet, attention increasingly focuses on materials potentially useful as a basis for energy saving technologies. The discovery of giant magnetocaloric (GMC) compounds - materials that exhibit especially large changes in temperature as the externally applied magnetic field is varied - is one such compound 1. These materials have potential for use in solid state cooling technology as a viable alternative to existing gas based refrigeration technologies that use choro-fluoro - and hydro-fluoro-carbon chemicals known to have a severe detrimental effect on human health and environment 2,3. Examples of GMC compounds include Gd5(SiGe)4 4, MnFeP1-xAsx 5 and Ni-Mn-Ga shape memory alloy based compounds 6-8. Here we explain how the properties of one of these compounds (Ni2MnGa) can be tuned as a function of temperature by adding dopants. By altering the free energy such that the structural and magnetic transitions coincide, a GMC compound that operates at just the right temperature for human requirements can be obtained 9. We show how Cu, substituted for Mn, pulls the magnetic transition downwards in temperature and also, counterintuitively, increases the delocalization of the Mn magnetism. At the same time, this reinforces the Ni-Ga chemical bond, raising the temperature of the martensite-austenite transition. At 25percent doping, the two transitions coincide at 317 K.

  1. Refractive index of erbium doped GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alajlouni, S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Zavada, J. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN is an excellent host for erbium (Er) to provide optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safe 1540?nm wavelength window. Er doped GaN (GaN:Er) epilayers were synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing a pulsed growth scheme, the crystalline quality of GaN:Er epilayers was significantly improved over those obtained by conventional growth method of continuous flow of reaction precursors. X-ray diffraction rocking curve linewidths of less than 300?arc sec were achieved for the GaN (0002) diffraction peak, which is comparable to the typical results of undoped high quality GaN epilayers and represents a major improvement over previously reported results for GaN:Er. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the GaN:Er epilayers in the 1540?nm wavelength window and a linear dependence on Er concentration was found. The observed refractive index increase with Er incorporation and the improved crystalline quality of the GaN:Er epilayers indicate that low loss GaN:Er optical waveguiding structures are feasible.

  2. Effect of Temperature on GaGdO/GaN Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, C.R.; Baca, A.; Chu, S.N.G.; Hong, M.; Lothian, J.R.; Marcus, M.A.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Schurman, M.J.

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    GaGdO was deposited on GaN for use as a gate dielectric in order to fabricate a depletion metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). This is the fmt demonstration of such a device in the III-Nitride system. Analysis of the effect of temperature on the device shows that gate leakage is significantly reduced at elevated temperature relative to a conventional metal semiconductor field effeet transistor (MESFET) fabricated on the same GaN layer. MOSFET device operation in fact improved upon heating to 400 C. Modeling of the effeet of temperature on contact resistance suggests that the improvement is due to a reduction in the parasitic resistances present in the device.

  3. Graphene in ohmic contact for both n-GaN and p-GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Shi, Lin; Xu, Gengzhao; Fan, Yingmin; Huang, Zengli [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Xu, Ke, E-mail: kxu2006@sinano.ac.cn [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Suzhou Nanowin Science and Technology Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The wrinkles of single layer graphene contacted with either n-GaN or p-GaN were found both forming ohmic contacts investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The local I–V results show that some of the graphene wrinkles act as high-conductive channels and exhibiting ohmic behaviors compared with the flat regions with Schottky characteristics. We have studied the effects of the graphene wrinkles using density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the standing and folded wrinkles with zigzag or armchair directions have a tendency to decrease or increase the local work function, respectively, pushing the local Fermi level towards n- or p-type GaN and thus improving the transport properties. These results can benefit recent topical researches and applications for graphene as electrode material integrated in various semiconductor devices.

  4. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  5. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

  6. Intersubband absorption in AlN/GaN/AlGaN coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, Kristina; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Paiella, Roberto; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Photonics Center, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Physics and School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AlN/GaN/AlGaN coupled quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been developed and characterized via intersubband absorption spectroscopy. In these structures, an AlGaN layer of sufficiently low Al content is used to achieve strong interwell coupling without the need for ultrathin inner barriers. At the same time, AlN is used in the outer barriers to provide the large quantum confinement required for near-infrared intersubband transitions. The composition of the inner barriers also provides a continuously tunable parameter to control the coupling strength. Double intersubband absorption peaks are measured in each sample, at photon energies in good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  7. GaN based nanorods for solid state lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Shunfeng; Waag, Andreas [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Braunschweig University of Technology, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, GaN nanorods are emerging as a very promising novel route toward devices for nano-optoelectronics and nano-photonics. In particular, core-shell light emitting devices are thought to be a breakthrough development in solid state lighting, nanorod based LEDs have many potential advantages as compared to their 2 D thin film counterparts. In this paper, we review the recent developments of GaN nanorod growth, characterization, and related device applications based on GaN nanorods. The initial work on GaN nanorod growth focused on catalyst-assisted and catalyst-free statistical growth. The growth condition and growth mechanisms were extensively investigated and discussed. Doping of GaN nanorods, especially p-doping, was found to significantly influence the morphology of GaN nanorods. The large surface of 3 D GaN nanorods induces new optical and electrical properties, which normally can be neglected in layered structures. Recently, more controlled selective area growth of GaN nanorods was realized using patterned substrates both by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Advanced structures, for example, photonic crystals and DBRs are meanwhile integrated in GaN nanorod structures. Based on the work of growth and characterization of GaN nanorods, GaN nanoLEDs were reported by several groups with different growth and processing methods. Core/shell nanoLED structures were also demonstrated, which could be potentially useful for future high efficient LED structures. In this paper, we will discuss recent developments in GaN nanorod technology, focusing on the potential advantages, but also discussing problems and open questions, which may impose obstacles during the future development of a GaN nanorod based LED technology.

  8. Reduction of gap states of ternary IIIV semiconductor surfaces by sulfur passivation: Comparative studies of AlGaAs and InGaP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    studies of AlGaAs and InGaP J. M. Seo School of Physics and Technology, Jeonbuk National University on liquid-phase-epitaxy-grown n-type InGaP and AlGaAs surfaces have been studied using x-ray photoelectron treatment in air. For InGaP, sulfur atoms initially reacted with both surface In and Ga atoms and reacted

  9. In0.6Ga0.4AsGaAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector with operating temperature up to 260 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the large band gap material such as AlGaAs or InGaP as blocking barrier to reduce the device dark current 100 K by us- ing a large band gap material such as AlGaAs or InGaP as the blocking barrier to reduce temperature up to 260 K without using the wide band gap AlGaAs or InGaP current blocking bar- rier. The sample

  10. Phase-locking of an InP/InGaP/InGaAs resonant tunneling diode relaxation oscillator by direct optical injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, Gadi

    Phase-locking of an InP/InGaP/InGaAs resonant tunneling diode relaxation oscillator by direct relaxation oscillator is demonstrated. The diode is an Al-free InP/InGaP/InGaAs structure in the InP/InGaAs/InGaP aluminum-free material system, following the work of Cohen and Ritter [6

  11. Simultaneous enhancement of electron overflow reduction and hole injection promotion by tailoring the last quantum barrier in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    the last quantum barrier in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes Zabu Kyaw, Zi-Hui Zhang, Wei Liu, Swee Tiam Tan injection and efficiency droop in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with step-stage multiple- quantum distribution in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with graded thickness quantum barriers Appl. Phys. Lett. 102

  12. IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 21, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2000 549 Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN Modulation-Doped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 21, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2000 549 Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN Modulation--We demonstrate dual-gate AlGaN/GaN modula- tion-doped field-effect transistors (MODFETs) with gate-lengths of 0 power amplifiers. Index Terms--AlGaN/GaN, broadband power amplifiers, dual-gate FETs. I. INTRODUCTION

  13. Graded-base InGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar light-emitting transistors B. F. Chu-Kung,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbeck, Peter M.

    Graded-base InGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar light-emitting transistors B. F. Chu-Kung,a M. Feng, G; published online 25 August 2006 The authors report radiative recombination from a graded-base InGaN/GaN microwave power has been obtained from GaN field-effect transistors, very few operational GaN-based HBTs

  14. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/apl/105/3?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in High efficiency InGaN/GaN (2014); 10.1063/1.4867023 Effect of V-defects on the performance deterioration of InGaN/GaN multiple

  15. Polarized emission lines from A-and B-type excitonic complexes in single InGaN/GaN quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Polarized emission lines from A- and B-type excitonic complexes in single InGaN/GaN quantum dots M Cathodoluminescence measurements on single InGaN/GaN quantum dots QDs are reported. Complex spectra with up to five spectral region have been realized based on InGaN structures.1 Single-photon emission from GaN/AlN quantum

  16. Fabry-Perot effects in InGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si-substrate C. Hums, T. Finger, T. Hempel, J. Christen, and A. Dadgara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Fabry-Perot effects in InGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si-substrate C. Hums, T. Finger, T. Hempel, J spectra of InGaN/GaN heterostructures and quantum wells epitaxially grown on Si 111 substrates. This Fabry-Perot effect results from the high refractive index contrasts at the GaN/Si and the Air/InGaN interfaces

  17. Determination of two-dimensional electron and hole gas carriers in AlGaN/GaN/AlN heterostructures grown by Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    on nominally undoped Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN/AlN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates prepared by metal undoped Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN/ AlN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrate. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All of AlGaN on a thick GaN epilayer on a semi- insulating substrate. Spontaneous and strain induced

  18. Nonpolar cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field-effect transistor on Ar+ implanted 3CSiC ,,001...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    through the substrate. Cubic AlGaN/GaN heterostructures were grown in a RibeNonpolar cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field-effect transistor on Ar+ implanted 3C­SiC ,,001... E HFET was fabricated of nonpolar cubic AlGaN/GaN grown on Ar+ implanted 3C­SiC 001 by molecular beam

  19. On the mechanisms of InGaN electron cooler in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    . Schubert, Q. Dai, J. K. Kim, E. F. Schubert, J. Piprek, and Y. Park, "Origin of efficiency droop in Ga. Tansu, "Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light. Van de Walle, "Indirect Auger recombination as a cause of efficiency droop in nitride light

  20. Generation and transportation mechanisms for two-dimensional hole gases in GaN/AlGaN/GaN double heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Akira, E-mail: a-nakajima@aist.go.jp; Ogura, Masahiko; Makino, Toshiharu; Nishizawa, Shin-ichi; Ohashi, Hiromichi; Yamasaki, Satoshi [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Liu, Pucheng; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Iwai, Hiroshi [Frontier Collaborative Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical properties of two-dimensional hole gases (2DHGs) in GaN/AlGaN/GaN double heterostructures were investigated. The layers were grown on sapphire substrates and a high-quality bulk GaN substrate. The coexistence of 2DHG and 2D electron gases on both sides of the AlGaN layer was confirmed by Hall effect measurements at 80–460?K. It was also verified that the 2DHGs were generated by negative polarization at the undoped GaN/AlGaN interface, which did not have a doped Mg acceptor. It was also demonstrated that the 2DHG density could be controlled by varying the AlGaN layer thickness and was inversely related to the 2DHG mobility. The measured relation indicated that the 2DHG mobility is mainly limited by phonon scatterings at around room temperature. As a result, the maximum 2DHG mobility of 16 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 300?K was achieved with a density of 1?×?10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?2}.

  1. Temperature dependency of the emission properties from positioned In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, T.; Schneider, C.; Maier, S.; Forchel, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M. [Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074, Würzburg (Germany); Igusa, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y. [University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we study the influence of temperature and excitation power on the emission linewidth from site-controlled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on nanoholes defined by electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching. We identify thermal electron activation as well as direct exciton loss as the dominant intensity quenching channels. Additionally, we carefully analyze the effects of optical and acoustic phonons as well as close-by defects on the emission linewidth by means of temperature and power dependent micro-photoluminescence on single quantum dots with large pitches.

  2. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Sofferman, D. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York 11530-0701 (United States); Beskin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport.

  3. Wavelength limits for InGaN quantum wells on GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pristovsek, Markus, E-mail: markus@pristovsek.de [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission wavelength of coherently strained InGaN quantum wells (QW) is limited by the maximum thickness before relaxation starts. For high indium contents x>40% the resulting wavelength decreases because quantum confinement dominates. For low indium content x<40% the electron hole wave function overlap (and hence radiative emission) is strongly reduced with increasing QW thickness due to the quantum confined Stark effect and imposes another limit. This results in a maximum usable emission wavelength at around 600?nm for QWs with 40%-50% indium content. Relaxed InGaN buffer layers could help to push this further, especially on non- and semi-polar orientations.

  4. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J. (USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Koploy, M.A. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  5. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Koploy, M.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  6. Two-color picosecond and continuous-wave experiments on anti-Stokes and Stokes carrier-transfer phenomena in GaAs/AlxGa1 xAs and InGaP2 /AlxGa1 xAs heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohng, Sung Chul

    -transfer phenomena in GaAs/AlxGa1 xAs and InGaP2 /AlxGa1 xAs heterostructures S. C. Hohng, D. W. Khang, Y. H. Ahn, J evidence of the two-step absorption process in anti-Stokes photoluminescence in both GaAs/AlxGa1 xAs and InGaP

  7. Demonstration of a semipolar (10(1)over-bar(3)over-bar) InGaN/GaN green light emitting diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaN / GaN green light emitting diode R. Sharma, a? P. M.green ??525 nm? light emitting diode ?LED?. The fabricated

  8. Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical ExchangeVed: January 12, 2010 Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution

  9. Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for Power Electronics Packaging Applications (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devoto, D.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the thermal performance and reliability of bonded interfaces for power electronics packaging applications.

  10. The C OH O hydrogen bond: A determinant of stability and specificity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senes, Alessandro

    recovered by hydro- gen bond formation, so hydrogen bonds provide a small or even unfavorable net energy hydro- gen bond has been unclear and its interaction energy has been believed to be small. Recently that apparent carbon hydro- gen bonds cluster frequently at glycine-, serine-, and threonine-rich packing

  11. Mechanical Study of Copper Bonded at Low Temperature using Spark Plasma Sintering Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is approximatively 6.47 MPa [7]. J. W. Elmer & al [8] have presented a diffusion bonding of high purity copper using a conventional furnace. A series of diffusion bonds was done to determine the relationship between bond strengthMechanical Study of Copper Bonded at Low Temperature using Spark Plasma Sintering Process Bassem

  12. Highly Efficient Vertical Outgassing Channels for Robust, Void-Free, Low-Temperature Direct Wafer Bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    molecules diffusion at bonding interface to VOCs. Conventional anneal time of 12-18 hours required to bond Bonding Di Liang1 , Erik A. Lucero2 , John E. Bowers1 1 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering wafer bonding is favored for dissimilar materials integration, particularly in III-V compound

  13. A new hydrogen-bonding potential for the design of proteinRNA interactions predicts specific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    A new hydrogen-bonding potential for the design of protein­RNA interactions predicts specific-dependent hydrogen-bonding potential based on the statistical analysis of hydrogen-bonding geometries of hydrogen-bonding atom pairs at protein­ nucleic acid interfaces. A scoring function based on the hydrogen

  14. Distributed bragg reflector using AIGaN/GaN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Lee, Stephen R.; Han, Jung

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A supported distributed Bragg reflector or superlattice structure formed from a substrate, a nucleation layer deposited on the substrate, and an interlayer deposited on the nucleation layer, followed by deposition of (Al,Ga,B)N layers or multiple pairs of (Al,Ga,B)N/(Al,Ga,B)N layers, where the interlayer is a material selected from AlN, Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N, and AlBN with a thickness of approximately 20 to 1000 angstroms. The interlayer functions to reduce or eliminate the initial tensile growth stress, thereby reducing cracking in the structure. Multiple interlayers utilized in an AlGaN/GaN DBR structure can eliminate cracking and produce a structure with a reflectivity value greater than 0.99.

  15. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  16. GaInN light-emitting diodes using separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region to attain polarization-inverted electron-blocking layer, reduced electron leakage, and improved hole injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyaard, David S., E-mail: meyaad@rpi.edu; Lin, Guan-Bo; Ma, Ming; Fred Schubert, E. [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Cho, Jaehee [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Semiconductor Physics Research Center, School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Heon; Kim, Min-Ho; Shim, HyunWook; Sun Kim, Young [LED Business, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-920 (Korea, Republic of)] [LED Business, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-920 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A GaInN light-emitting diode (LED) structure is analyzed that employs a separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region, i.e., the AlGaN electron-blocking layer (EBL) and p-type GaN cladding layer, followed by wafer or chip bonding. Such LED structure has a polarization-inverted EBL and allows for uncompromised epitaxial-growth optimization of the p-type region, i.e., without the need to consider degradation of the quantum-well active region during p-type region growth. Simulations show that such an LED structure reduces electron leakage, reduces the efficiency droop, improves hole injection, and has the potential to extend high efficiencies into the green spectral region.

  17. O?[]O? nuclear ?-decay of ?˛Ga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, Bruce Carl

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information, MARS was focused such that only fully stripped N=Z ions were passed, with the vast majority of them being Ga. The second phase of the experiment was a I3-y coincidence experiment. At the back-end of MARS, a 1" x 1 '!4" x 3" four..., using the Weinberg-Salam model of electroweak interactions, to be [23]: A& ? d, ?= ? [41n(mz/m )+ln(m /m?)+2K+A +" ]. (16) Here mz is the mass of the Z boson, me the proton mass, mx is the low energy cutoff for the second and third terms that arise...

  18. P-type doping of GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, R.K.

    2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    After implantation of As, As + Be, and As + Ga into GaN and annealing for short durations at temperatures as high as 1500 C, the GaN films remained highly resistive. It was apparent from c-RBS studies that although implantation damage did not create an amorphous layer in the GaN film, annealing at 1500 C did not provide enough energy to completely recover the radiation damage. Disorder recovered significantly after annealing at temperatures up to 1500 C, but not completely. From SIMS analysis, oxygen contamination in the AIN capping layer causes oxygen diffusion into the GaN film above 1400 C. The sapphire substrate (A1203) also decomposed and oxygen penetrated into the backside of the GaN layer above 1400 C. To prevent donor-like oxygen impurities from the capping layer and the substrate from contaminating the GaN film and compensating acceptors, post-implantation annealing should be done at temperatures below 1500 C. Oxygen in the cap could be reduced by growing the AIN cap on the GaN layer after the GaN growth run or by depositing the AIN layer in a ultra high vacuum (UHV) system post-growth to minimize residual oxygen and water contamination. With longer annealing times at 1400 C or at higher temperatures with a higher quality AIN, the implantation drainage may fully recover.

  19. Segregation of In to dislocations in InGaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horton, Matthew K.; Rhode, Sneha; Sahonta, Suman-Lata; Kappers, Menno J.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Dusane, Rajiv O.; Moram, Michelle A.

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    .; Fischer, A. J.; Thaler, G.; Banas, M. A. Effect of dislocation density on efficiency droop in GaInN?GaN light-emitting diodes. Applied Physics Letters 2007, 91, 231114 DOI: 10.1063/1.2822442. (3) Schubert, M. F.; Xu, J.; Kim, J. K.; Schubert, E. F.; Kim... , M. H.; Yoon, S.; Lee, S. M.; Sone, C.; Sakong, T.; Park, Y. Polarization-matched GaInN?AlGaInN multi-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with reduced efficiency droop. Applied Physics Letters 2008, 93, 041102 DOI: 10.1063/1.2963029. (4) Hsu, J. W. P...

  20. Surface Science Analysis of GaAs Photocathodes Following Sustained...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of GaAs Photocathodes Following Sustained Electron Beam Delivery. Abstract: Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for...