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  1. Bons Ventos Geradora de Energia S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bons Ventos Geradora de Energia S A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bons Ventos Geradora de Energia S.A. Place: Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil Sector: Wind energy Product:...

  2. Britt Ide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Britt Ide About Us Britt Ide - President, Ide Law & Strategy, PLLC, C3E Ambassador Most Recent The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat September

  3. Bon Homme Yankton El Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bon Homme Yankton El Assn, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bon Homme Yankton El Assn, Inc Place: South Dakota Phone Number: (605) 463-2507 Website: byelectric.com Facebook:...

  4. Bon Homme County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Homme County, South Dakota Broin Enterprises Places in Bon Homme County, South Dakota Avon, South Dakota Scotland, South Dakota Springfield, South Dakota Tabor, South Dakota...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/8-ID-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-e < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/3-ID-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-e < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  7. 2-ID-E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Users. For example, in collaboration with G. Woloschak et al, we have looked at TiO2-DNA nanocomposites in mammalian cells 1; B. Twining et al investigate trace elements...

  8. Donald Frederick, LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donald Frederick, LLNL - Presented at Supercomputing 11 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551! Case Study: Beyond Homogeneous Decomposition with Qbox Scaling Long-Range Forces on Massively Parallel Systems LLNL---PRES---508651 Case S tudy: O utline * Problem D escripBon * ComputaBonal A pproach * Changes f or S caling LLNL---PRES---508651 Computer s imulaBons o f m aterials Computer s imulaBons a re w idely used t o p redict t he p roperBes o f new m aterials

  9. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ide, Kayo (Kayo Ide) - Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland at College Park Ide, Kayo (Kayo Ide) - Department of ...

  10. Chesterfield County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Places in Chesterfield County, Virginia Bellwood, Virginia Bensley, Virginia Bon Air, Virginia Chester, Virginia Chesterfield Court House, Virginia Ettrick, Virginia...

  11. Talladega County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Talladega County, Alabama Bon Air, Alabama Childersburg, Alabama Lincoln, Alabama Mignon, Alabama Munford, Alabama...

  12. BPA-2015-01168-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    federal facility in the NW. Example projects that have been completed or are underway: BON hatchery efficiency upgrades, DET lighting upgrades, DWK hatchery VFDs on circulation...

  13. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  14. VII-7 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Bon asera, INF N, Catan ia, Italy 1 V. Kolomietz, INR, Kiev, Ukraine 2 B.H. Sa, CIAE, Beijing, China 3 Y.-M. Zheng, CIAE, Beijing, China 4 RESEARCH STAFF Robert B urch, Jr., Re ...

  15. A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The kerogen is classifed as Type II (with minor admixture of Type III) and oil-prone when immature (1.41 hydrogencarbon ratio and 0.10 oxygencar- bon ratio). Pollastro and others ...

  16. REPORT OF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    when the website was released for use during the first week of April 2012, to enable Bon neville to correctly address actions in each month, starting in April 2012. Bonneville...

  17. Managements Discussion and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supply depends on the amount and timing of precipitation in the Columbia Rive es y he Bon T kets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydroelectric projects owned and...

  18. BPA-2014-00382-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bon neville Power Admin istration P.O. Box 362 1 Portla nd, Oregon 97208-3621 August 13, 2014 In reply refer to: FOIA BPA-2014-00382-F Jerry Healy Columbia Basin Electric...

  19. Inder\tMonga CTO,\tEnergy\tSciences\tNetwork Deputy,\tScienEfic\tNetworking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to New Zealand 2816 2 Image from NZ, Maori Design Pa:ern 2816 3 Talk 2816 4 ESnet and NRENs IntroducBon Established Design Pa:erns Emerging Design Pa:erns DOE's Energy ...

  20. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  1. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; et al

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisinglymore » impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.« less

  2. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XVI; Alternative Designs for Future Adult PIT-Tag Detection Studies, 2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Comas, Jose A.; Skalski, John R.

    2000-09-25

    In the advent of the installation of a PIT-tag interrogation system in the Cascades Island fish ladder at Bonneville Dam (BON), and other CRB dams, this overview describes in general terms what can and cannot be estimated under seven different scenarios of adult PIT-tag detection capabilities in the CRB. Moreover, this overview attempted to identify minimal adult PIT-tag detection configurations required by the ten threatened Columbia River Basin (CRB) chinook and steelhead ESUs. A minimal adult PIT-tag detection configuration will require the installation of adult PIT-tag detection facilities at Bonneville Dam and another dam above BON. Thus, the Snake River spring/summer and fall chinook salmon, and the Snake River steelhead will require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities to guarantee estimates of ''ocean survival'' and at least of one independent, in-river returning adult survival (e.g., adult PIT-tag detection facilities at BON and LGR dams and at any other intermediary dam such as IHR). The Upper Columbia River spring chinook salmon and steelhead will also require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and two other dams on the BON-WEL reach. The current CRB dam system configuration and BPA's and COE's commitment to install adult PIT-tag detectors only in major CRB projects will not allow the estimation of an ''ocean survival'' and of any in-river adult survival for the Lower Columbia River chinook salmon and steelhead. The Middle Columbia River steelhead ESU will require a minimum of two dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and another upstream dam on the BON-McN reach. Finally, in spite of their importance in terms of releases, PIT-tag survival studies for the Upper Willamette chinook and Upper Willamette steelhead ESUs cannot be perform with the current CRB dam system configuration and PIT-tag detection capabilities.

  3. Yields at Forward Rapidity A. Poulsen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p rocedure i s f ound t o r eject t he background c ontribuBons. M ost o f t he d i---jets t hat r emain c an b e m atched t o i niBal h ard s caIered p artons w ith m omentum f...

  4. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of thQ rmt9x.i of holdlk3q Lb de and RfJna Thoroforca, it fs bul:med thsx'bit ii :wy 5s ussfux to aontsr3,ao Bon* Of thO8@ OXf3-iXlt8 at *&' lVOCit?F)r A aa ple of ths...

  5. Route-Specific Passage and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at The Dalles and Bonneville Dams, 2012 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayamajhi, Bishes; Ploskey, Gene R.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derek M.; Kim, Jin A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao

    2013-07-31

    This study was mainly focused on evaluating the route-specific passage and migration success of steelhead kelts passing downstream through The Dalles Dam (TDA) and Bonneville Dam (BON) at Columbia River (CR) river kilometers 309 and 234 respectively. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel collected, tagged and released out-migrating steelhead kelts in the tributaries of the Deschutes River, 15 Mile Creek and Hood River between April 14 and June 4, 2012. A PIT tag was injected into each kelt’s dorsal sinus whereas a Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic micro-transmitter was attached to an external FLoy T-bar tag and inserted into the dorsal back musculature using a Floy tagging gun. JSATS cabled arrays were deployed at TDA and BON and autonomous node arrays were deployed near Celilo, Oregon (CR325); the BON forebay (CR236); the BON tailrace (CR233); near Knapp, Washington (CR156); and near Kalama, Washington (CR113) to monitor the kelts movement while passing through the dams and above mentioned river cross-sections.

  6. Time-Resolved Research (XSD-TRR) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at 8-ID-E is focused on correlating the structure of OPV thin films with light-harvesting performance and probing defects in self-assembled block copolymers with applications...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ), a ceramic-metal material showing a highmore electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. ...

  8. PDSF User Meeting 09-01-15.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 --- Past Outages * 81215 ( 2 d ays): N ERSC s ystem w ide o utage f rom power e vent Planned Outages * None Several PDSF Nodes Moved to CRT * About 3 00 c ores w ork o f c ...

  9. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    correspondence with the Agenc y about your request. You have renuested the following; Prop ide copies of all A gcmic I)ccision Frameworks related to the Network Open Season 2009...

  10. TRANSIMS Interface Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transims TRANSIMS Interface Development TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling TRANSIMS Studio (Figure 1) has been developed by TRACC for the TRANSIMS community as part of the TRANSIMS Open Source project. It provides an integrated development environment (IDE) for TRANSIMS by combining a number of components that work seamlessly with each other. The visible part of the IDE is the graphical user interface (GUI) that allows

  11. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  12. Structure–activity relationships of imidazole-derived 2-[N-carbamoylmethyl-alkylamino]acetic acids, dual binders of human insulin-degrading enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charton, Julie; Dumont, Julie; Liang, Wenguang G.; Leroux, Florence; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-10-30

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is a zinc metalloprotease that degrades small amyloid peptides such as amyloid-â and insulin. So far the dearth of IDE-specific pharmacological inhibitors impacts the understanding of its role in the physiopathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-â clearance, and its validation as a potential therapeutic target. Hit 1 was previously discovered by high-throughput screening. Here we describe the structure-activity study, that required the synthesis of 48 analogues. We found that while the carboxylic acid, the imidazole and the tertiary amine were critical for activity, the methyl ester was successfully optimized to an amide or a 1,2,4-oxadiazole. Along with improving their activity, compounds were optimized for solubility, lipophilicity and stability in plasma and microsomes. The docking or co-crystallization of some compounds at the exosite or the catalytic site of IDE provided the structural basis for IDE inhibition. The pharmacokinetic properties of best compounds 44 and 46 were measured in vivo. As a result, 44 (BDM43079) and its methyl ester precursor 48 (BDM43124) are useful chemical probes for the exploration of IDE's role.

  13. Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Public Service of Colorado Ponnequin Wind Farm Geothermal Technologies Program 2013 Peer Review Bons (2000) Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs Principal Investigator: Ahmad Ghassemi EGS Component R&D Stimulation Prediction Models April , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of

  14. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNIVERSIT Y OF CALIFORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Berkeley, California Contract No. W -740S-eng -48 UCRL-9966 I THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Nobel Prize Lecture December 11, 1961 ) Nobel Prize Lecture December 11, 1961 UCRL-9966 THE PATH OF Ck'1BON IN PHOI'CBYHTHESIS Melvin Calvin Department of Chemistry and Lawrence Radiation Laboratory University of California, Berkeley 4, California ll'JTRODUCTION It is almost sixty years since Emil Fischer was describing on 8

  15. The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat September 4, 2014 - 1:36pm Addthis Britt Ide President, Ide Law & Strategy, PLLC, C3E Ambassador Editor's Note: This blog is cross-posted from the Clean Energy, Education, Empowerment (C3E) online network, www.c3enet.org. Learn more about C3E here. I am delighted to be serving as a C3E Ambassador. The retreat in July was my first and I learned a ton and deeply enjoyed

  16. Using electromagnetic sensors (magnetometers and dielectrometers) to detect corrosion beneath and moisture within paint coatings on aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldfine, N.; Greig, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    Current nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques, such as visual inspection, ultrasonic testing, and eddy current testing, do not adequately detect the early stages of hidden corrosion under paint in critical structures such as airframes. This paper proposes a sensor system that uses meandering winding magnetometers (MWMs) and interdigital electrode dielectrometers (IDEDs) to detect hidden corrosion under paint and to measure the depth of moisture within barrier paint coatings. The MWM uses magnetic fields and inductive coupling to measure profiles of the properties of conducting media (such as the reduced conductivity near a metal surface caused by an oxygen diffusion layer resulting from early-stage corrosion). The IDED uses electric fields and capacitive coupling to measure the properties of multiple-layered insulating media, such as paint or the metal oxides formed during corrosion. MWM and IDED sensor designs permit Cartesian coordinate modal continuum modeling, which takes advantage of sensor geometries to provide more precise response predictions than are generally possible with conventional eddy current probes. Data are presented to describe the limitations of current NDI techniques, address the need for a new type of corrosion-detection system and discuss the underlying theory and potential of using MWMs and IDEDs to detect corrosion.

  17. CX-011861: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Easts Ide Renovation Project Zone 1-Revision (T-1-11) CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.2, B5.4, B5.5 Date: 03/13/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  18. Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The N ortheast c onsists o f a n umber o f l arge a nd d ensely populated u rban a nd i ndustrial a reas, a s w ell a s w ide--- ranging r ural a reas a nd d eciduous f orestland. ...

  19. NERSC_ASCR_Requirements_Review-1.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2014 LBNL Outline * Goal: i mproved w idely u sed l inear a lgebra (and o ther) l ... t o a Nain n eeded a ccuracy * What H WSW f eatures d o w e n eed t o d o t his? ...

  20. CX-011863: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Easts Ide Renovation Project Zone 1-Revision (T-1-11) CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.2, B5.4, B5.5 Date: 03/13/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  1. Survival Rates of Juvenile Salmonids Passing Through the Bonneville Dam and Spillway in 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Johnson, Gary E.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.; McComas, Roy L.; Everett, Jason

    2009-12-28

    This report describes a 2008 acoustic telemetry survival study conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study estimated the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead passing Bonneville Dam (BON) and its spillway. Of particular interest was the relative survival of smolts detected passing through end spill bays 1-3 and 16-18, which had deep flow deflectors immediately downstream of spill gates, versus survival of smolts passing middle spill bays 4-15, which had shallow flow deflectors.

  2. Richard Gerber & Clayton Bagwell! NUG Business Meeting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - Allocations Summary * How the NERSC pie is distributed - A li'le history * DOE Offices & Programs * NERSC reserves * The ERCAP process * How user accounts and allocaBons work * What happens when user/repo run out of Bme * Q & A - 2 - Allocations History 0 500000000 1E+09 1.5E+09 2E+09 2.5E+09 3E+09 3.5E+09 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 NERSC DOE ProducEon - 3 - 3 Billion Hrs 55 Million Hrs - 4 - 2017 Outlook * Cori Phase 2 will arrive this

  3. Astronomie, écologie et poésie par Hubert Reeves

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Hubert ReevesL'astrophysicien donne une conférence puis s'entretient avec l'écrivain François Bon autour de :"Astronomie, écologie et poésie"Pour plus d'informations : http://outreach.web.cern.ch/outreach/FR/evenements/conferences.htmlNombre de places limité. Réservation obligatoire à la Réception du CERN : +41 22 767 76 76  Soirée diffusée en direct sur le Web : http://webcast.cern.ch/      

  4. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  5. Applications for ACTS Workshop Due June 24

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for ACTS Workshop Due June 24 Applications for ACTS Workshop Due June 24 June 1, 2012 by Francesca Verdier The 13th Workshop on the DOE Advanced Computational Software (ACTS) Collection, Scalable and Robust Computational Libraries and Tools for High-End Computing, will be held in Berkeley, CA, on August 14-17, 2012.ide range of applications and fields in computational sciences. The four-day workshop will include tutorials on the tools currently available in the collection, discussion sessions to

  6. Polymerization of MIP-1 chemokine (CCL3 and CCL4) and clearance of MIP-1 by insulin-degrading enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Min; Guo, Qing; Guo, Liang; Lenz, Martin; Qian, Feng; Koenen, Rory R.; Xu, Hua; Schilling, Alexander B.; Weber, Christian; Ye, Richard D.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2010-12-07

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1), MIP-1{alpha} (CCL3) and MIP-1{beta} (CCL4) are chemokines crucial for immune responses towards infection and inflammation. Both MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-1{beta} form high-molecular-weight aggregates. Our crystal structures reveal that MIP-1 aggregation is a polymerization process and human MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-1{beta} form rod-shaped, double-helical polymers. Biophysical analyses and mathematical modelling show that MIP-1 reversibly forms a polydisperse distribution of rod-shaped polymers in solution. Polymerization buries receptor-binding sites of MIP-1{alpha}, thus depolymerization mutations enhance MIP-1{alpha} to arrest monocytes onto activated human endothelium. However, same depolymerization mutations render MIP-1{alpha} ineffective in mouse peritoneal cell recruitment. Mathematical modelling reveals that, for a long-range chemotaxis of MIP-1, polymerization could protect MIP-1 from proteases that selectively degrade monomeric MIP-1. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is identified as such a protease and decreased expression of IDE leads to elevated MIP-1 levels in microglial cells. Our structural and proteomic studies offer a molecular basis for selective degradation of MIP-1. The regulated MIP-1 polymerization and selective inactivation of MIP-1 monomers by IDE could aid in controlling the MIP-1 chemotactic gradient for immune surveillance.

  7. Richard Gerber & Clayton Bagwell! NUG Business Meeting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -- 1 --- Allocations Summary * How t he N ERSC p ie i s d istributed - A l i'le h istory * DOE O ffices & P rograms * NERSC r eserves * The E RCAP p rocess * How u ser a ccounts a nd a llocaBons w ork * What h appens w hen u ser/repo r un o ut o f B me * Q & A --- 2 --- Allocations History 0 500000000 1E+09 1.5E+09 2E+09 2.5E+09 3E+09 3.5E+09 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 NERSC DOE P roducEon --- 3 --- 3 Billion Hrs 55 M illion H rs --- 4 --- 2017

  8. A Study of the Optical Properties of Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arienti, Marco; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Kopacz, Adrian M; Geier, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The report focu ses on the modification of the optical properties of ice crystals due to atmospheric black car bon (BC) contamination : the objective is to advance the predictive capabilities of climate models through an improved understanding of the radiative properties of compound particles . The shape of the ice crystal (as commonly found in cirrus clouds and cont rails) , the volume fraction of the BC inclusion , and its location inside the crystal are the three factors examined in this study. In the multiscale description of this problem, where a small absorbing inclusion modifies the optical properties of a much la rger non - absorbing particle, state - of - the - art discretization techniques are combined to provide the best compromise of flexibility and accuracy over a broad range of sizes .

  9. PDSF User Meeting 09-02-14.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, 2014 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past Outages * 8/12/14 ( all d ay): P DSF m aintenance, m igraBon t o global h omes Planned Outages * Eliza18 s witch s omeBme t his w eek. E sBmate 1 2 hours o f d own B me U-Hunting * Old P DSF h omes a re m ounted r ead o nly * Need to be removed eventually (no date yet) * Any r eference t o " /u/" o r " /home" w ill f ail o nce this happens * Please r eplace t hese w ith " $HOME" o r / global/ homes/.... * The e nBre S

  10. 2016-3-17_Allocations_Brown_Bag

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bagwell & Richard Gerber! ! NERSC Brown Bag! March 17, 2016 Allocations --- 1 --- Allocations Summary * How t he N ERSC p ie i s d istributed - A l i'le h istory * DOE O ffices & P rograms * NERSC r eserves * The E RCAP p rocess * How u ser a ccounts a nd a llocaBons w ork * What h appens w hen u ser/repo r un o ut o f B me * Q & A --- 2 --- Allocations History 0 500000000 1E+09 1.5E+09 2E+09 2.5E+09 3E+09 3.5E+09 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

  11. Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Group Using Modules at NERSC --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 NERSC Supported Software * NERSC p rovides a w ide r ange o f s cien=fic a nd c omputer programming s o@ware t o u sers - Scien)fic A pplica)ons: V ASP, A mber, N AMD, ABySS, ... - Compilers: p gi, i ntel, g cc, c ray - Scrip)ng L anguages: perl, p ython, R * and p ackages f or e ach! - SoIware L ibraries: b las/lapack ( MKL), b oost, h df5, n etcdf, ... - U)li)es: gnuplot, g it, m ercurial, 7 zip, c make, . .. - Debuggers &

  12. Communication: X-ray coherent diffractive imaging by immersion in nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanyag, Rico Mayro P.; Bernando, Charles; Jones, Curtis F.; Bacellar, Camila; Ferguson, Ken R.; Anielski, Denis; Boll, Rebecca; Carron, Sebastian; Cryan, James P.; Englert, Lars; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Gomez, Luis F.; Hartmann, Robert; Neumark, Daniel M.; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Ullrich, Joachim; Weise, Fabian; Bostedt, Christoph; Gessner, Oliver; Vilesov, Andrey F.

    2015-10-14

    Lensless x-ray microscopy requires the recovery of the phase of the radiation scattered from a specimen. Here, we demonstrate a <i>de novo phase retrieval technique by encapsulating an object in a superfluid helium nanodroplet, which provides both a physical support and an approximate scattering phase for the iterative image reconstruction. The technique is robust, fast-converging, and yields the complex density of the immersed object. As a result, images of xenon clusters embedded in superfluid helium droplets reveal transient configurations of quantum vortices in this fragile system.

  13. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS); Design and Analysis, 2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwes, Nick; Petrosky, Charlie; Schaller, Howard

    2002-04-01

    representation of production. Tag loss and mortality is monitored, and the tagging files are then uploaded to the regional PTAGIS database. The PIT tags are read as the fish pass through the coils of the detector. For detection of smolts, there are detectors installed at six Snake and Columbia River dams, including Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), Lower Monumental (LMN), McNary (MCN), John Day (JDA), and Bonneville (BON). These site abbreviations will be used throughout this document. For detection of returning adults, there is current detection capability at LGR, and starting in migration year 2002, PIT tagged adults will be detected at both BON and MCN.

  14. Acoustic Telemetry Studies of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Survival at the Lower Columbia Projects in 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; McComas, Roy L.

    2008-02-01

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct three studies using acoustic telemetry to estimate detection probabilities and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon at three hydropower projects on the lower Columbia River. The primary goals were to estimate detection and survival probabilities based on sampling with JSATS equipment, assess the feasibility of using JSATS for survival studies, and estimate sample sizes needed to obtain a desired level of precision in future studies. The 2006 JSATS arrays usually performed as well or better than radio telemetry arrays in the JDA and TDA tailwaters, and underperformed radio arrays in the BON tailwater, particularly in spring. Most of the probabilities of detection on at least one of all arrays in a tailwater exceeded 80% for each method, which was sufficient to provide confidence in survival estimates. The probability of detection on one of three arrays includes survival and detection probabilities because fish may die or pass all three arrays undetected but alive.

  15. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  16. NERSC Schedule.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    :00---9:30 Registration a nd l aptop s et---up 9:30---9:45 Introductions 9:45---10:45 Chapter 1 . W hy o bject---oriented p rogramming ( OOP)? 10:45---11:00 Break 11:00---11:30 Example: F ireworks s imulation v ia p rocedural p rogramming 11:30---12:00 Section 2 .1 N omenclature, S ection 2 .2 O bject---Oriented A nalysis a nd D esign 12:00---1:00 Lunch B reak 1:00---1:30 Section 2 .3 E ncapsulation a nd I nformation H iding , S ection 2 .4 W rapping L egacy S oftware 1:30---2:00 Section 2 .5 C

  17. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grsoy, Do?a; Bier, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  18. WIPP Update 3_29_14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2 014 Seven a ctivities t o r ecovery a nd r e---entry NWP h as d eveloped a nd i mplemented a r ecovery p lan t hat i ncorporates s even a ctivities n ecessary t o keep the p ublic, e nvironment, a nd employees s afe, m itigate t he r adiation s ource, a nd r estore operations. T he s even a ctivities i nclude: * Activity 1 - I solate v entilation f low---through: T wo 1 0---foot w ide b ypass d ampers, t hat c ould a llow limited a irflow t o b ypass H EPA f ilters, w ere s ealed w ith h

  19. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grsoy, Do?a; Bier, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversionmoreapproaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.less

  20. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-07-21

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  1. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  2. Rational design and adaptive management of combination therapies for Hepatitis C virus infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; Sun, Ren; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-06-30

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for <i>de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensate when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.

  3. Ecophysiology of an uncultivated lineage of Aigarchaeota from an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, Jacob P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Schmid, Markus C.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan de M.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Wagner, Michael; Inskeep, William P.

    2015-07-03

    In this study, the candidate archaeal phylum ‘Aigarchaeota’ contains microorganisms from terrestrial and subsurface geothermal ecosystems. The phylogeny and metabolic potential of Aigarchaeota has been deduced from several recent single-cell amplified genomes; however, a detailed description of their metabolic potential and in situ transcriptional activity is absent. Here, we report a comprehensive metatranscriptome-based reconstruction of the in situ metabolism of Aigarchaeota in an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that these newly discovered Aigarchaeota are filamentous, which is consistent with the presence and transcription of an actin-encoding gene. Aigarchaeota filaments are intricately associated with other community members, which include both bacteria (for example, filamentous Thermocrinis spp.) and archaea. Metabolic reconstruction of genomic and metatranscriptomic data suggests that this aigarchaeon is an aerobic, chemoorganoheterotroph with autotrophic potential. A heme copper oxidase complex was identified in the environmental genome assembly and highly transcribed in situ. Potential electron donors include acetate, fatty acids, amino acids, sugars and aromatic compounds, which may originate from extracellular polymeric substances produced by other microorganisms shown to exist in close proximity and/or autochthonous dissolved organic carbon (OC). Transcripts related to genes specific to each of these potential electron donors were identified, indicating that this aigarchaeon likely utilizes several OC substrates. Characterized members of this lineage cannot synthesize heme, and other cofactors and vitamins <i>de novo, which suggests auxotrophy. We propose the name Candidatus ‘Calditenuis aerorheumensis’ for this aigarchaeon, which describes its filamentous morphology and its primary electron acceptor, oxygen.

  4. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the

  5. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as <i>de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  6. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

    2014-09-30

    levels found on in service vanes (Bons, et al., 2001, up to 300 microns) flow blockage in first stage turbine nozzles can easily reach 1 to 2 percent in conventional turbines. Deposition levels in syngas fueled gas turbines are expected to be even more problematic. The likelihood of significant deposition to the leading edge of vanes in a syngas environment indicates the need to examine this effect on the leading edge cooling problem. It is critical to understand the influence of leading edge geometry and turbulence on deposition rates for both internally and showerhead cooled leading edge regions. The expected level of deposition in a vane stagnation region not only significantly changes the heat transfer problem but also suggests that cooling arrays may clog. Addressing the cooling issue suggests a need to better understand stagnation region heat transfer with realistic roughness as well as the other variables affecting transport near the leading edge. Also, the question of whether leading edge regions can be cooled internally with modern cooling approaches should also be raised, thus avoiding the clogging issue. Addressing deposition in the pressure side throat region of the nozzle is another critical issue for this environment. Issues such as examining the protective effect of slot and full coverage discrete-hole film cooling on limiting deposition as well as the influence of roughness and turbulence on effectiveness should be raised. The objective of this present study is to address these technical challenges to help enable the development of high efficiency syngas tolerant gas turbine engines.

  7. Transuranic (Tru) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Nixon, Archie E; Dodge, Robert L; Fife, Keith W; Sandoval, Arnold M; Garcia, Vincent E

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA 55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actin ide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter-long glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glove box as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste generation by almost 2% times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National

  8. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to <i>de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These

  9. JBlulce Data Acquisition Software for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-06-01

    JBlulce (Java Beam Line Universal Integrated Configuration Environment is a data acquisition software for macromolecular crystallography conforming user interface of the SSRL Blulce that has become a de-factor standard in the field. Besides this interface conformity, JBlulce is a unique system in terms of architecture, speec, capability and osftware implementation. It features only two software layers, the JBlulce clients and the EPICS servers, as compared to three layers present in Blulc and most of similarmore » systems. This layers reduction provides a faster communication with hardware and an easier access to advanced hardware capabilities like on-the-fly scanning. Then JBlulc clients are designed to operate in parallel with the other beamline controls which streamlines the tasks performed by staff such as beamline preparation, maitenance, audting and user assistance. Another distinction is the deployment of multiple plugins that can be written in any programming languag thus involving more staff into the development. further on, JBlulce makes use of unified motion controls allowing for easy scanning and optimizing of any beamline component. Finally, the graphic interface is implemented in Java making full use of rich Java libraries and Jave IDE for debugging. to compare, Blulce user interface is implemented with aging Tcl/tk language providing very restricted capabilities. JBlulce makes full use of the industrial power and wide drivers selection of EPICS in controlling hardware; all hardware commuication is routed via multiple EPICS servers residing on local area network. JBlulce also includes several EPICS State Notation servers aimed at making hardware communication more robust. Besides using EPICS for controlling hardware, JBlulce extensively uses EPICS databases for efficien communications between multiple instances of JBlulce clients and JBlulce pplugins that can run in parallel on different computers. All of the above makes JBlulce one of the biggest