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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Boiler using combustible fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

1974-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

2

Oxy-combustion Boiler Material Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-combustion Boiler Material Oxy-combustion Boiler Material Development Background In an oxy-combustion system, combustion air (79 percent nitrogen, 21 percent oxygen) is replaced by oxygen and recycled flue gas (carbon dioxide [CO 2 ] and water), eliminating nitrogen in the flue gas stream. When applied to an existing boiler, the flue gas recirculation rate is adjusted to enable the boiler to maintain its original air-fired heat absorption performance, eliminating the need to derate the boiler

3

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System October 7, 2013 - 9:12am Addthis This composite photo shows...

4

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Technology FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP

5

Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development  

SciTech Connect

Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO2 level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to two year) data. The test program details and data are presented herein.

Gagliano, Michael; Seltzer, Andrew; Agarwal, Hans; Robertson, Archie; Wang, Lun

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development  

SciTech Connect

Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO{sub 2} level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to two year) data. The test program details and data are presented herein.

Michael Gagliano; Andrew Seltzer; Hans Agarwal; Archie Robertson; Lun Wang

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Boiler Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project to build a PYROFLOW circulating fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boiler at the BFGoodrich Chemical Plant at Henry, Illinois, is described. This project is being partially funded by Illinois to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing high-sulfur Illinois coal. Design production is 125,000 pounds per hour of 400 psig saturated steam. An Illinois EPA construction permit has been received, engineering design is under way, major equipment is on order, ground breaking occurred in January 1984 and planned commissioning date is late 1985. This paper describes the planned installation and the factors and analyses used to evaluate the technology and justify the project. Design of the project is summarized, including the boiler performance requirements, the PYROFLOW boiler, the coal, limestone and residue handling systems and the pollutant emission limitations.

Farbstein, S. B.; Moreland, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System October 7, 2013 - 9:12am Addthis This composite photo shows technicians observing operation at the monitoring station and making subsequent fine adjustments on combustion system controls Technical staff are making boiler adjustments with the control and monitoring system. Photo courtesy of the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. Technology Description A novel combustion control system, along with gas sensors, sets the opening of fuel and air inlets based on flue-gas concentrations. Continuous feedback from measurements of oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide concentrations enable the control system

9

Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on boiler combustion efficiency provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion Boiler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development Project No.: DE-NT0005262 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Foster Wheeler Oxy-combustion CFD Graphic The objectives of this Foster Wheeler Corporation-managed program are to assess the corrosion characteristics of oxy-combustion relative to air-fired combustion; identify the corrosion mechanisms involved; and determine the effects of oxy-combustion on conventional boiler tube materials, conventional protective coatings, and alternative materials and coatings when operating with high to low sulfur coals. The program involves the prediction of oxy-combustion gas compositions by computational fluid dynamic calculations, exposure of coupons of boiler materials and coverings coated with coal ash deposit to simulated oxy-combustion gases in electric

11

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal Flow in an Industrial Boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial boilers that produce steam or electric power represent a crucial facility for overall plant operations. To make the boiler more efficient, less emission (cleaner) and less prone to tube rupture problems, it is important to understand the combustion and thermal flow behaviors inside the boiler. This study performs a detailed simulation of combustion and thermal flow behaviors inside an industrial boiler. The simulations are conducted using the commercial CFD package FLUENT. The 3-D Navier-Stokes equations and five species transport equations are solved with the eddy-breakup combustion model. The simulations are conducted in three stages. In the first stage, the entire boiler is simulated without considering the steam tubes. In the second stage, a complete intensive calculation is conducted to compute the flow and heat transfer across about 496 tubes. In the third stage, the results of the saturator/superheater sections are used to calculate the thermal flow in the chimney. The results provide insight into the detailed thermal-flow and combustion in the boiler and showing possible reasons for superheater tube rupture. The exhaust gas temperature is consistent with the actual results from the infrared thermograph inspection.

Saripalli, R.; Wang, T.; Day, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers  

SciTech Connect

The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

Taler, J.; Taler, D. [Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Numerical Simulation Of Utility Boilers With Advanced Combustion Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations of a pulverized coal flame and a coal-fired utility boiler with advanced combustion technologies. A combustion model based on an extended Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) combined with finite rate chemistry is described and some applications are shown. This model can be regarded as an extension of the previously used Eddy Breakup model (EBU) where infinite fast chemistry is assumed. It is part of a 3D-prediction code for quasi-stationary turbulent reacting flows which is based on a conservative finite-volume solution procedure. Equations are solved for the conservation of mass, momentum and scalar quantities. A domain decomposition method is used to introduce locally refined grids. Validation and comparison of both combustion models are made by comparison with measurement data of a swirled flame with air staging in a semi-industrial pulverized coal combustion facility. The application to three-dimensional combustion systems is demonstrated by the simulati...

H. C. Magel; R. Schneider; B. Risio; U. Schnell; K. R. G. Hein

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Continuous Measurement of Carbon Monoxide Improves Combustion Efficiency of CO Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper describes the application of in-situ flue gas CO measurement in the operation of CO Boilers and details the steps needed to optimize combustion efficiency.

Gilmour, W. A.; Pregler, D. N.; Branham, R. L.; Prichard, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computation Capabilities Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems Background Staged combustion is a method of reducing nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions in boilers by controlling the combustion mixture of air and fuel. Its process conditions are particularly corrosive to lower furnace walls. Superheaters and/or reheaters are often employed in the upper furnace to reuse hot combustion gasses to further raise the

16

Temperature and combustion quality control in power station boilers using artificial neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classification is an important domain in boiler flame image processing and is a preliminary step toward detection, recognition and understanding of combustion condition. In this paper, Back Propagation Algorithm (BPA) is introduced for boiler flame ... Keywords: Back Propagation Algorithm, Fisher's linear discriminant analysis, combustion quality, features, flame colour, image processing, temperature identification

K. Sujatha; N. Pappa

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Influence of combustion parameters on NOx production in an industrial boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of combustion parameters on NOx production in an industrial boiler M.A. Habib a,*, M; accepted 14 April 2007 Available online 24 June 2007 Abstract NOx formation during the combustion process occurs mainly through the oxidation of nitrogen in the combustion air (thermal NOx) and through oxidation

Aldajani, Mansour A.

18

The combustion and the thermal-energetic behavior of an oil-fired condensing boiler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this Masters Thesis is to analyze an oil-fired condensing boiler describing the aspects concerning the combustion, condensation latent heat recovery from the (more)

Cattarinussi, Cristian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Task 2: Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterize advanced boiler (oxy-fuel combustion, biomass cofired) gas compositions and ash deposits Generate critical data on the effects of environmental conditions; develop a unified test method with a view to future standardisation

G. R. Holcomb and B. McGhee

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal Flow inside an Industrial Boiler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Industrial boilers that produce steam or electric power represent a large capital investment as well as a crucial facility for overall plant operations. In real (more)

Saripalli, Raja

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Repowering oil-fired boilers with combustion turbines fired with gas from coal. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a study on repowering of oil fired reheat steam plants using combustion turbines and coal gas from the Texaco oxygen blown gasifier are presented. The steam plant utilizes combustion turbine exhaust gas as its combustion air supply. In some examples coal gas is fired in both the combustion turbines and the main boiler, while, in other cases, oil firing is retained in the boiler. Plant configurations, equipment changes, and performance are determined for three basic forms: (1) repowering based on coal gas supplied by pipeline (remote source); (2) repowering based on complete integration of the gasification system with the power plant; and (3) repowering based on partial integration of the gasification system wherein the boiler retains oil firing.

Garland, R.V.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

EPRI 2002 Workshop on Combustion-Based NOx Controls for Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Workshop on Combustion-Based NOx Controls for Coal-Fired Boilers, formerly the Workshop on NOx Controls for Utility Boilers, was the sixth in a series sponsored by EPRI and offered attendees a comprehensive picture of recent developments and full-scale applications of control technologies for nitrogen oxides (NOx). The workshop took place on October 24-25, 2002, in Atlanta, Georgia.

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt mixtures and compared with sodium-based binary and higher order systems. Predictions and measurements were demonstrated for both salt systems and for some more complex silicate-bearing systems, substantially exceeding the original scope of this work. 4. A multi-dimensional model of char bed reactivity developed under this project demonstrated that essentially all reactions in char beds occur on or near the surface, with the internal portions of the bed being essentially inert. The model predicted composition, temperature, and velocity profiles in the bed and showed that air jet penetration is limited to the immediate vicinity of the char bed, with minimal impact on most of the bed. The modeling efforts substantially exceeded the original scope of this project. 5. Near the completion of this project, DOE withdrew the BYU portion of a multiparty agreement to complete this and additional work with no advanced warning, which compromised the integration of all of this material into a commercial computer code. However, substantial computer simulations of much of this work were initiated, but not completed. 6. The gasification modeling is nearly completed but was aborted near its completion according to a DOE redirection of funds. This affected both this and the previous tasks.

Baxter, Larry L.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Residual carbon from pulverized coal fired boilers 1: Size distribution and combustion reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of residual, or unburned, carbon in fly ash is an important concern in the design and operation of pulverized coal-fired boilers. Char oxidation is the slowest step in the coal combustion process, and the rate at which this heterogeneous reaction-proceeds has an important effect on the degree of carbon burnout. There is an extensive literature on char combustion kinetics based on data in the early and intermediate stages of carbon conversion. A critical fundamental question is whether the small fraction of the fuel carbon that passes unreacted through a boiler is representative of the char during the main portion of the combustion process. This article addresses that question through a detailed characterization of eight carbon-containing fly ash samples acquired from commercial-scale combustion systems. The fly ash characterization included measurement-of joint carbon/size distribution and determination.of the combustion reactivity of the residual carbon. To minimize mineral matter interactions in the reactivity tests, the technique of incipient fluidization was developed for separation of carbon-rich extracts from the inorganic portion of the fly ash. Reactivity measurements were made at 1400--1800 K to represent conditions in pulverized coal fired boilers. Measurements were also made at 700--1100 K to. minimize transport effects and isolate the influence of char chemistry and microstructure. In both temperature regimes, the residual carbon extracts. were significantly less reactive than chars extracted from a laboratory-scale laminar flow reactor in the early-to-intermediate stages of combustion. It is concluded that the boiler environment deactivates chars, making high carbon burnout more difficult to achieve than is predicted by existing char combustion kinetic models that were developed from data on the laboratory chars. Finally, the results are used to discuss potential char deactivation mechanisms, both thermal and oxidative, in coal-fired boilers.

Hurt, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Gibbins, J.R. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Development of Cost Effective Oxy-Combustion Retrofitting for Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to further develop the oxy-combustion technology for commercial retrofit in existing wall-fired and Cyclone boilers by 2012. To meet this goal, a research project was conducted that included pilot-scale testing and a full-scale engineering and economic analysis.

Hamid Farzan

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Low emission U-fired boiler combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least one main combustion chamber contains at least one pulverized coal burner. Each pulverized coal burner is operatively arranged for minimizing NO.sub.X production and for maintaining a predetermined operating temperature to liquefy ash within the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber includes a slag drain for removing slag from the combustion chamber. A slag screen is positioned in a generally U-shaped furnace flow pattern. The slag screen is positioned between the combustion chamber and a radiant furnace. The radiant furnace includes a reburning zone for in-furnace No.sub.X reduction. The reburning zone extends between a reburning fuel injection source and at least one overfire air injection port for injecting air.

Ake, Terence (North Brookfield, MA); Beittel, Roderick (Worcester, MA); Lisauskas, Robert A. (Shrewsbury, MA); Reicker, Eric (Barre, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Oxy-combustion Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers Background Technology and policy options are being investigated for mitigating CO 2 emissions. Electric power generation represents one of the largest CO 2 contributors in the United States and is expected to grow with fossil fuels continuing to be the dominant fuel source. Oxy-combustion is a developing technology that could become part of a national carbon capture effort to mitigate climate change. At a pulverized coal

29

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxygen-Based PC Boiler Project No.: FC26-04NT42207 & FC26-03NT41736 Spatial Comparison of an Air-Fired Furnace versus an Oxygen-Fired Furnace. Spatial Comparison of an Air-Fired Furnace versus an Oxygen-Fired Furnace. Foster Wheeler North America Corporation will conduct to two projects to improve carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology by developing a conceptual pulverized coal-fired boiler system design using oxygen as the combustion medium. Using oxygen instead of air produces a flue gas with a high CO2 concentration, which will facilitate CO2 capture for subsequent sequestration. The first project will develop modeling simulations that will lead to a conceptual design that addresses costs, performance, and emissions, and

30

Utilization of ventilation air methane as a supplementary fuel at a circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation air methane (VAM) accounts for 60-80% of the total emissions from underground coal mining activities in China, which is of serious greenhouse gas concerns as well as a waste of valuable fuel sources. This contribution evaluates the use of the VAM utilization methods as a supplementary fuel at a circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler. The paper describes the system design and discusses some potential technical challenges such as methane oxidation rate, corrosion, and efficiency. Laboratory experimentation has shown that the VAM can be burnt completely in circulated fluidized bed furnaces, and the VAM oxidation does not obviously affect the boiler operation when the methane concentration is less than 0.6%. The VAM decreased the incomplete combustion loss for the circulating fluidized bed combustion furnace. The economic benefit from the coal saving insures that the proposed system is more economically feasible. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Changfu You; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reaction Engineering International (REI) managed a team of experts from University of Utah, Siemens Energy, Praxair, Vattenfall AB, Sandia National Laboratories, Brigham Young University (BYU) and Corrosion Management Ltd. to perform multi-scale experiments, coupled with mechanism development, process modeling and CFD modeling, for both applied and fundamental investigations. The primary objective of this program was to acquire data and develop tools to characterize and predict impacts of CO2 flue gas recycle and burner feed design on flame characteristics (burnout, NOx, SOx, mercury and fine particle emissions, heat transfer) and operational concerns (fouling, slagging and corrosion) inherent in the retrofit of existing coal-fired boilers for oxy-coal combustion. Experimental work was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Entrained Flow Reactor, the University of Utah Industrial Combustion Research Facility, and Brigham Young University. Process modeling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was performed at REI. Successful completion of the project objectives resulted in the following key deliverables: 1) Multi-scale test data from 0.1 kW bench-scale, 100 kW and 200 kW laboratory-scale, and 1 MW semi-industrial scale combustors that describe differences in flame characteristics, fouling, slagging and corrosion for coal combustion under air-firing and oxygen-firing conditions, including sensitivity to oxy-burner design and flue gas recycle composition. 2) Validated mechanisms developed from test data that describe fouling, slagging, waterwall corrosion, heat transfer, char burnout and sooting under coal oxy-combustion conditions. The mechanisms were presented in a form suitable for inclusion in CFD models or process models. 3) Principles to guide design of pilot-scale and full-scale coal oxy-firing systems and flue gas recycle configurations, such that boiler operational impacts from oxy-combustion retrofits are minimized. 4) Assessment of oxy-combustion impacts in two full-scale coal-fired utility boiler retrofits based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of air-fired and oxygen-fired operation. This research determined that it is technically feasible to retrofit the combustion system in an air-fired boiler for oxy-fired operation. The impacts of CO2 flue gas recycle and burner design on flame characteristics (burnout, NOx, SOx, mercury and fine particle emissions, heat transfer) and operational concerns (fouling, slagging and corrosion) were minimal, with the exception of high sulfur levels resulting from untreated flue gas recycle with medium and high-sulfur coals. This work focused on combustion in the radiant and convective sections of the boiler and did not address boiler system integration issues, plant efficiencies, impacts on downstream air pollution control devices, or CO2 capture and compression. The experimental data, oxy-firing system principles and oxy-combustion process mechanisms provided by this work can be used by electric utilities, boiler OEMs, equipment suppliers, design firms, software vendors, consultants and government agencies to assess retrofit applications of oxy-combustion technologies to existing boilers and to guide development of new designs.

Adams, Bradley; Davis, Kevin; Senior, Constance; Shim, Hong Shim; Otten, Brydger; Fry, Andrew; Wendt, Jost; Eddings, Eric; Paschedag, Alan; Shaddix, Christopher; Cox, William; Tree, Dale

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of Cost Effective Oxy-Combustion Technology for Retrofitting Coal-Fired Boilers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost effeCtive Cost effeCtive oxy-Combustion teChnology for retrofitting Coal-fireD boilers Background Electric power generation from fossil fuels represents one of the largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Various technologies and concepts are being investigated as means to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. The concept of pulverized coal (PC) oxy-combustion is one potential economical solution, whereby coal is combusted in an enriched oxygen environment using pure oxygen diluted with recycled flue gas. In this manner, the flue gas is composed primarily of CO 2 and H 2 O, so that a concentrated stream of CO 2 is produced by simply condensing the water in the exhaust stream. An advantage of

34

Combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of two kinds of swirl burners in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler. Enhanced ignition-dual register (EI-DR) burners and centrally fuel rich (CFR) swirl coal combustion burners were installed in the bottom row of the furnace during experiments. Local mean concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx gas species, gas temperatures, and char burnout were determined in the region of the two types of burners. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners, local mean CO concentrations, gas temperatures and the temperature gradient are higher and mean concentrations of O{sub 2} and NOx along the jet flow direction in the burner region are lower than for the enhanced ignition-dual register burners. Moreover, the mean O{sub 2} concentration is higher and the gas temperature and mean CO concentration are lower in the side wall region. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners in the bottom row, the combustion efficiency of the boiler increases from 96.73% to 97.09%, and NOx emission decreases from 411.5 to 355 ppm at 6% O{sub 2} compared to enhanced ignition-dual register burners and the boiler operates stably at 110 MWe without auxiliary fuel oil.

Li, Z.Q.; Jing, J.P.; Chen, Z.C.; Ren, F.; Xu, B.; Wei, H.D.; Ge, Z.H. [Harbin Institute for Technology, Harbin (China). School for Energy Science & Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 5 (Appendix V)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 5 contains model validation simulations and comparison with data.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes Year 1 results of a research program designed to use multi-scale experimental studies and fundamental theoretical models to characterize and predict the impacts of retrofit of existing coal-fired utility boilers for oxy-combustion. Through the course of Year 1 activities, great progress was made toward understanding the issues associated with oxy-combustion retrofit of coal-fired boilers. All four Year 1 milestones and objectives have been, or will be, completed on schedule and within budget. Progress in the four milestone areas may be summarized as follows: University of Utah has performed size segregated ash composition measurements in the Oxy-Fuel Combustor (OFC). These experiments indicate that oxy-combustion retrofit may impact ash aerosol mineral matter composition. Both flame temperature and flue gas composition have been observed to influence the concentration of calcium, magnesium and iron in the fine particulate. This could in turn impact boiler fouling and slagging. Sandia National Labs has shown that char oxidation rate is dependent on particle size (for sizes between 60 and 100 microns) by performing fundamental simulations of reacting char particles. These predictions will be verified by making time-resolved optical measurements of char particle temperature, velocity and size in bench-scale experiments before the end of Year 1. REI and Siemens have completed the design of an oxy-research burner that will be mounted on University of Utahs pilot-scale furnace, the L1500. This burner will accommodate a wide range of O2, FGR and mixing strategies under conditions relevant for utility boiler operation. Through CFD modeling of the different burner designs, it was determined that the key factor influencing flame stabilization location is particle heat-up rate. The new oxy-research burner and associated equipment is scheduled for delivery before the end of Year 1. REI has completed a literature survey of slagging and fouling mechanisms in coal-fired power plants to understand key issues influencing these deposition regimes and infer their behavior under oxy-fired conditions. Based on the results of this survey, an algorithm for integrating slagging predictions into CFD models was outlined. This method accounts for ash formation, particle impaction and sticking, deposit growth and physical properties and impact of the deposit on system flow and heat transfer. A model for fouling in the back pass has also been identified which includes vaporization of sodium, deposition of sodium sulfate on fly ash particles and tube surfaces, and deposit growth rate on tubes. In Year 1, REI has also performed a review of the literature describing corrosion in order to understand the behavior of oxidation, sulfidation, chloridation, and carburization mechanisms in air-fired and oxy-combustion systems. REI and Vattenfall have met and exchanged information concerning oxy-coal combustion mechanisms for CFD simulations currently used by Vattenfall. In preparation for Year 2 of this program, two coals (North Antelope PRB, Western bituminous) have been ordered, pulverized and delivered to the University of Utah and Sandia National Labs. Materials for the corrosion experiments have been identified, suppliers located, and a schedule for equipment fabrication and shakedown has been established. Finally, a flue gas recycle system has been designed and is being constructed for the OFC.

Bradley Adams; Andrew Fry; Constance Senior; Hong Shim; Huafeng Wang; Jost Wendt; Christopher Shaddix

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Advanced Combustion Diagnostics and Control for Furnaces, Fired Heaters and Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and apply enabling tools and methods towards advanced combustion diagnostics and control of fired-equipment in large-scale petrochemical manufacturing. There are a number of technology gaps and opportunities for combustion optimization, including technologies involving advanced in-situ measurements, modeling, and thermal imaging. These technologies intersect most of manufacturing and energy systems within the chemical industry. This project leveraged the success of a previous DOE funded project led by Dow, where we co-developed an in-situ tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzer platform (with Analytical Specialties Inc, now owned by Yokogawa Electric Corp.). The TDL platform has been tested and proven in a number of combustion processes within Dow and outside of Dow. The primary focus of this project was on combustion diagnostics and control applied towards furnaces, fired heaters and boilers. Special emphasis was placed on the development and application of in-situ measurements for O2, CO and methane since these combustion gases are key variables in optimizing and controlling combustion processes safely. Current best practice in the industry relies on measurements that suffer from serious performance gaps such as limited sampling volume (point measurements), poor precision and accuracy, and poor reliability. Phase I of the project addressed these gaps by adding improved measurement capabilities such as CO and methane (ppm analysis at combustion zone temperatures) as well as improved optics to maintain alignment over path lengths up to 30 meters. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated on a modern olefins furnace located at Dow Chemical's facility in Freeport TX where the improved measurements were compared side-by-side to accepted best practice techniques (zirconium oxide and catalytic bead or thick film sensors). After developing and installing the improved combustion measurements (O2, CO, and methane), we also demonstrated the ability to improve control of an olefins furnace (via CO-trim) that resulted in significant energy savings and lower emissions such as NOx and other greenhouse gases. The cost to retrofit measurements on an existing olefins furnace was found to be very attractive, with an estimated payback achieved in 4 months or less.

Tate, J. D.; Le, Linh D.; Knittel,Trevor; Cowie, Alan

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Advanced Combustion Diagnostics and Control for Furnaces, Fired Heaters and Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and apply enabling tools and methods towards advanced combustion diagnostics and control of fired-equipment in large-scale petrochemical manufacturing. There are a number of technology gaps and opportunities for combustion optimization, including technologies involving advanced in-situ measurements, modeling, and thermal imaging. These technologies intersect most of manufacturing and energy systems within the chemical industry. This project leveraged the success of a previous DOE funded project led by Dow, where we co-developed an in-situ tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzer platform (with Analytical Specialties Inc, now owned by Yokogawa Electric Corp.). The TDL platform has been tested and proven in a number of combustion processes within Dow and outside of Dow. The primary focus of this project was on combustion diagnostics and control applied towards furnaces, fired heaters and boilers. Special emphasis was placed on the development and application of in-situ measurements for O2, CO and methane since these combustion gases are key variables in optimizing and controlling combustion processes safely. Current best practice in the industry relies on measurements that suffer from serious performance gaps such as limited sampling volume (point measurements), poor precision and accuracy, and poor reliability. Phase I of the project addressed these gaps by adding improved measurement capabilities such as CO and methane (ppm analysis at combustion zone temperatures) as well as improved optics to maintain alignment over path lengths up to 30 meters. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated on a modern olefins furnace located at Dow Chemical's facility in Freeport TX where the improved measurements were compared side-by-side to accepted best practice techniques (zirconium oxide and catalytic bead or thick film sensors). After developing and installing the improved combustion measurements (O2, CO, and methane), we also demonstrated the ability to improve control of an olefins furnace (via CO-trim) that resulted in significant energy savings and lower emissions such as NOx and other greenhouse gases. The cost to retrofit measurements on an existing olefins furnace was found to be very attractive, with an estimated payback achieved in 4 months or less.

Tate, J. D.; Le, Linh D.; Knittel,Trevor; Cowie, Alan

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

REACH: Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware: A Low-Cost, Retrofit Approach to Reducing Stack Emissions and Enhancing t he Performance of Oil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved oil combustion technology, based upon optimization of oil atomizer and flame stabilizer design, has been developed for retrofit to oil-fired utility boilers. This technology is referred to as Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware, or REACH. REACH is commercially available for retrofit to oil-fired boilers to simultaneously reduce NOx, PM, and opacity, as well as provide operational and performance benefits.

1995-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement Improvement Initiative (PPII) CONTACTS Brad Tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PARTNER Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Garden City, KS Sunflower's 360 MWe Wall-fired Holcomb Station Achieving new Source PerformAnce StAndArdS (nSPS) through integrAtion of Low-no X BurnerS with An oPtimizAtion PLAn for BoiLer comBuStion (comPLeted) A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems was planned to be tested on a coal-fired boiler at Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Power Station in Finney County, Kansas, to demonstrate how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. However, due to larger than anticipated costs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method of regulating the amount of underfire air for combustion of wood fuels in spreader-stroke boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of metering underfire air for increasing efficiency and reducing particulate emissions from wood-fire, spreader-stoker boilers is disclosed. A portion of the combustion air, approximately one pound of air per pound of wood, is fed through the grate into the fuel bed, while the remainder of the combustion air is distributed above the fuel in the furnace, and the fuel bed is maintained at a depth sufficient to consume all oxygen admitted under fire and to insure a continuous layer of fresh fuel thereover to entrap charred particles inside the fuel bed.

Tuttle, Kenneth L. (Federal Way, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Intelligent emissions controller for substance injection in the post-primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The control of emissions from fossil-fired boilers wherein an injection of substances above the primary combustion zone employs multi-layer feedforward artificial neural networks for modeling static nonlinear relationships between the distribution of injected substances into the upper region of the furnace and the emissions exiting the furnace. Multivariable nonlinear constrained optimization algorithms use the mathematical expressions from the artificial neural networks to provide the optimal substance distribution that minimizes emission levels for a given total substance injection rate. Based upon the optimal operating conditions from the optimization algorithms, the incremental substance cost per unit of emissions reduction, and the open-market price per unit of emissions reduction, the intelligent emissions controller allows for the determination of whether it is more cost-effective to achieve additional increments in emission reduction through the injection of additional substance or through the purchase of emission credits on the open market. This is of particular interest to fossil-fired electrical power plant operators. The intelligent emission controller is particularly adapted for determining the economical control of such pollutants as oxides of nitrogen (NO.sub.x) and carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by fossil-fired boilers by the selective introduction of multiple inputs of substances (such as natural gas, ammonia, oil, water-oil emulsion, coal-water slurry and/or urea, and combinations of these substances) above the primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers.

Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL); Feldman, Earl E. (Willowbrook, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Glickert, Roger W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Small boiler uses waste coal  

SciTech Connect

Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

Virr, M.J. [Spinheat Ltd. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Task 2 Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems (NETL-US)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposures were completed to ~1400 hr. Analysis of kinetics are close to completion. No oxy-combustion gas phase effects were found at 700{degrees}C.

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL; Tylczak, Joseph [NETL

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1992--February 15, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

Wayne Penrod

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this project are to investigate the behavior of sulfur and chlorine during pyrolysis and combustion of Illinois coals, the chemistry and mineralogy of boiler deposits, the effects of combustion gases on boiler materials, and remedial measures to reduce the sulfur and chlorine compounds in combustion gases. Replicate determinations of chlorine and sulfur evolution during coal pyrolysis-gas combustion were conducted using a pyrolysis apparatus in conjunction with a quadrupole gas analyzer. HCl is the only gaseous chlorine species measured in combustion gases. Pyrolysis of coal IBC-109 spiked with NaCl solution shows a strong peak of HCl evolution above 700C. The absence of this peak during pyrolysis of Illinois coal indicates that little chlorine in Illinois coal occurs in the NaCl form. Evolution of sulfur during coal pyrolysis was studied; the sulfur evolution profile may be explained by the sulfur forms in coal. To determine the fate of sulfur and chlorine during combustion, a set of six samples of boiler deposits from superheater and reheater tubes of an Illinois power plant was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy shows microscopic calcium sulfate droplets on cenospheres. Superheater deposits are high in mullite, hematite, and cristobalite, whereas a reheater deposit is enriched in anhydrite. The chlorine content is very low, indicating that most of the chlorine in the feed coal is lost as volatile HCl during he combustion process. The profiles of SO{sub 2} released during combustion experiments at 825 C indicate that calcium hydroxide added to the coal has a significant effect on reducing the SO{sub 2} vapors in combustion gases.

Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Cao, J.; Moore, D.M.; Xu, J.; Ruch, R.R. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Pan, W.P.; Upchurch, M.L.; Cao, H.B. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Computer Control of Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapidly rising energy costs present the opportunity for substantial cost savings through improved boiler combustion control. A process computer control system was installed at an Air Products & Chemicals facility in 1978. As a result the boiler efficiency has increased over 11%. The control system includes; air flow, fuel flow, pressure and drum level control. Air flow control is achieved through modulation of the F.D. fan inlet vanes. Demand for airflow is produced from a high signal selection of the steam pressure controller or the total fuel signal. The output of the oxygen controller is used to modify this airflow index by the desired air/fuel ratio. The air/fuel ratio is a polynomial function of the type of fuel used. In summary, the computer control system provides for; greater overall boiler stability, operation within tight air/gas limits, increased boiler efficiency, capability to burn multiple fuels, faster response to demand changes, and fewer shutdowns.

Pareja, G. E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Combustion Impacts of Flexible Operation: Low Load, Load Following, and Increased Staging Impact on Boiler Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past few years, coal-fired generating units have changed from stable base load operation to flexible operation, including periods of prolonged low-load operation. These changes in operation can have various adverse effects on all plant equipment, particularly in older units and may impact their ability to operate without tube failures due to elevated levels of fireside corrosion and circumferential cracking. This report discusses the combustion-related impacts of low-load, load-following, ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Postcombustion and its influences in 135 MWe CFB boilers  

SciTech Connect

In the cyclone of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a noticeable increment of flue gas temperature, caused by combustion of combustible gas and unburnt carbon content, is often found. Such phenomenon is defined as post combustion, and it could introduce overheating of reheated and superheated steam and extra heat loss of exhaust flue gas. In this paper, mathematical modeling and field measurements on post combustion in 135MWe commercial CFB boilers were conducted. A novel one-dimensional combustion model taking post combustion into account was developed. With this model, the overall combustion performance, including size distribution of various ashes, temperature profile, and carbon content profiles along the furnace height, heat release fraction in the cyclone and furnace were predicted. Field measurements were conducted by sampling gas and solid at different positions in the boiler under different loads. The measured data and corresponding model-calculated results were compared. Both prediction and field measurements showed post combustion introduced a temperature increment of flue gas in the cyclone of the 135MWe CFB boiler in the range of 20-50{sup o}C when a low-volatile bituminous coal was fired. Although it had little influence on ash size distribution, post combustion had a remarkable influence on the carbon content profile and temperature profile in the furnace. Moreover, it introduced about 4-7% heat release in the cyclone over the total heat release in the boiler. This fraction slightly increased with total air flow rate and boiler load. Model calculations were also conducted on other two 135MWe CFB boilers burning lignite and anthracite coal, respectively. The results confirmed that post combustion was sensitive to coal type and became more severe as the volatile content of the coal decreased. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Shaohua Li; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Qing Liu; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Flame Doctor for Cyclone Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOx control and combustion optimization in cyclone boilers requires a monitoring technique that can assess the quality of combustion in the burner and barrel and provide guidance to the operator to make adjustments in the air distribution. This report describes the results through the end of 2008 of a beta demonstration of the Flame Doctor combustion diagnostic system at five working cyclone boilers.

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

CFD study of using a tube insert and an air blowing system to prevent tube failure in the Bisotoun power plant boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study attempts to find a theoretical solution to prevent tube explosion of the tubes placed in the superheater region of the Bisotoun Power Plant boiler, Iran. The boiler has three types of tube and the tube failure was occurred in the long length ... Keywords: CFD, air blowing, boiler, combustion, modeling, tube insert

Masoud Rahimi; Seyed Mehdi Shariati; Abbas Khoshhal

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Industrial Boiler Optimization Utilizing CO Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escalating energy costs have caused industry to search the technical section for the current state-of-the-art in combustion and control technology for power generation. Long a forgotten area in many industrial facilities, today the steam generating complex is the focus of many corporate and plant managers. This paper discusses the approach of a large chemical company that is effectively utilizing a direct digital control (DOC) system coupled with the measurement of carbon monoxide to optimize boiler combustion and generate steam in the most cost effective manner. Significant reductions in the amount of excess air have resulted from the use of CO as a control parameter. Previously, combustion effectiveness was determined by the more typical 02 measurement. For reasons of boiler leakage and gas stratification, this control technique was not suitable when operating close to stoichiometry. The use of DOC type control in our multiple boiler installation has also enabled the intelligent allocation of boiler capacity by evaluating steam demand versus incremental boiler steam cost. The system selectively increases or decreases boiler loads within specified constraints to provide the lowest overall steam production cost while continuing to meet the steam demand.

Ruoff, C. W.; Reiter, R. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Turbulent Combustion in Type Ia Supernova Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the astrophysical modeling of type Ia supernova explosions and describe numerical methods to implement numerical simulations of these events. Some results of such simulations are discussed.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Boiler Stack Economizer Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Boiler Stack Economizer Tube Failure ... performed to investigate the failure of a type 304 stainless steel tube from a boiler stack economizer.

59

The Effect of Coal Chlorine on Waterwall Wastage in Coal-Fired Boilers with Staged Low-NOx Combustion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several boilers retrofitted with nitrogen oxides reducing (low-NOx) burner systems have experienced severe waterwall wastage. In this report, the link between chlorine in coal and accelerated wastage will be explored.

2002-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

60

BOILER PERF MODEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BOILER PERFORMANCE MODEL is a package of eleven programs for predicting the heat transfer performance of fossil-fired utility boilers. The programs can model a wide variety of boiler designs, provide boiler performance estimates for coal, oil or gaseous fuels, determine the influence of slagging and fouling characteristics on boiler performance, and calculate performance factors for tradeoff analyses comparing boilers and fuels. Given a set of target operating conditions, the programs can estimate control settings, gas and steam operating profiles through the boiler, overall boiler efficiency, and fuel consumption. The programs are broken into three categories: data, calculation, and reports with a central processor program acting as the link allowing the user to access any of the data or calculation programs and easily move between programs. The calculations are divided among the following five programs: heat duty calculation, combustion calculation, furnace performance calculation, convection pass performance calculation, and air heater performance calculation. The programs can model subcritical or supercritical boilers, most configurations of convective passes including boilers that achieve final reheat steam temperature control by split back pass, boilers with as many as two reheat circuits and/or multiple attemperator stations in series, and boilers with or without economizers and/or air heaters. Either regenerative or tubular air heaters are supported. For wall-fired or tangentially-fired furnaces, the furnace performance program predicts the temperature of the flue gases leaving the furnace. It accounts for variations in excess air, gas recirculation, burner tilt, wall temperature, and wall cleanliness. For boilers having radiant panels or platens above the furnace, the convective pass program uses the results of the combustion chamber calculation to estimate the gas temperature entering the convective pass.

Winslow, J.C. (USDOE, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON THE KINETIC BEHAVIOR OF WATER BOILER TYPE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The KEWB Program is devoted to the study of the dynamic behavior of homogeneous type research reactors. The objectives of this program include studies to develop better and more complete understanding of phenomena which contribute to the kinetic behavior and the inherent safety of the water boiler reactor. The approach to the objectives has heen to construct a prototype 50 kw homogeneous reactor with the necessary auxiliary apparatus and to study the transient behavior of the system as a function of the more significant parameters which affect this behavior. These include the amount of reactivity release, rate of reactivity release, initial core pressure, initial core temperature, initial reactor power, and void volume above the core. Data are plotted. (auth)

Remley, M.E.; Flora, J.W.; Hetrick, D.L.; Muller, D.R.; Gardner, E.L.; Wimmer, R.E.; Stitt, R.K.; Gamble, D.P.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Analysis of Unsafe Failure in Shell Type Boiler Working with Safe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boiler was working under normal water level, it's safety valve operating normal. The design was normal and proven. All parameters were as usual and there...

63

Retrofitted coal-fired firetube boiler and method employed therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal-fired firetube boiler and a method for converting a gas-fired firetube boiler to a coal-fired firetube boiler are disclosed. The converted boiler includes a plurality of combustion zones within the firetube and controlled stoichiometry within the combustion zones. 19 figs.

Wagoner, C.L.; Foote, J.P.

1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

Retrofitted coal-fired firetube boiler and method employed therewith  

SciTech Connect

A coal-fired firetube boiler and a method for converting a gas-fired firetube boiler to a coal-fired firetube boiler, the converted boiler including a plurality of combustion zones within the firetube and controlled stoichiometry within the combustion zones.

Wagoner, Charles L. (Tullahoma, TN); Foote, John P. (Tullahoma, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Quantifying Energy Savings by Improving Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On/off operation and excess combustion air reduce boiler energy efficiency. This paper presents methods to quantify energy savings from switching to modulation control mode and reducing excess air in natural gas fired boilers. The methods include calculation of combustion temperature, calculation of the relationship between internal convection coefficient and gas flow rate, and calculation of overall heat transfer assuming a parallel-flow heat exchanger model. The method for estimating savings from changing from on/off to modulation control accounts for purge and drift losses through the boiler and the improved heat transfer within the boiler due to the reduced combustion gas flow rate. The method for estimating savings from reducing excess combustion air accounts for the increased combustion temperature, reduced internal convection coefficient and increased residence time of combustion gasses in the boiler. Measured boiler data are used to demonstrate the accuracy of the methods.

Carpenter, K.; Kissock, J. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NO ) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers X Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment March 2000 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

68

Water cooled scavenged crankcase type otto internal combustion engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a system for a water cooled scavenged crankcase type two-cycle internal combustion engine comprising: a heat reclaimation system for extracting heat from an engine jacket for heating water supplied form an add-on reservoir via a heat exchanger located within the engine cylinder cooling system, the water being subsequently additionally heated by an exhaust pipe type heat exchanger to a superheated steam state and thence conveyed by a conduit to a steam lubricator for adjustably conveying in variably timed spaced succession intervals of regulated droplets of high viscous oil, fortified with adde graphite and tallow enrichment lubricant ingredients, and thence conveying such by steam at atmospheric pressure into an intake manifold which receives a carbureted air/fuel mixture into the crankcase via a manually operated auxiliary air intake device and way check valve and fire screen, due to suction effect of the piston up stroke action of the piston during engine operation.

Bidwell, H.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy Department Awards $2.6 Million to Boost Combustion Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.6 Million to Boost Combustion Efficiency in Industrial Boilers Energy Department Awards 2.6 Million to Boost Combustion Efficiency in Industrial Boilers September 26, 2005 -...

70

Flame Doctor for Cyclone Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This development program was designed to enhance monitoring and diagnostic technology for cyclone furnaces using the Flame Doctor combustion diagnostic system. First developed for wall-fired pulverized-coal burner systems and boilers, Flame Doctor allows simultaneous, continuous monitoring and evaluation of each burner in a boiler using signals from optical flame scanners. An initial feasibility test conducted at the AmerenUE Sioux cyclone boiler indicated Flame Doctor technology could be extended to cyc...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Research on virtual assembly of supercritical boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical boiler is an important measure to solve problems like electricity shortage or energy intensity, with its high combustion efficiency. As supercritical boiler is a large and complex product, it may appear some problems of collision, location ... Keywords: interaction, lightweight model, supercritical boiler, virtools, virtual assembly, virtual reality

Pi-Guang Wei; Wen-Hua Zhu; Hao Zhou

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Boiler steam engine with steam recovery and recompression  

SciTech Connect

A boiler type of steam engine is described which uses a conventional boiler with an external combustion chamber which heats water in a pressure chamber to produce steam. A mixing chamber is used to mix the steam from the boiler with recovered recompressed steam. Steam from the mixing chamber actuates a piston in a cylinder, thereafter the steam going to a reservoir in a heat exchanger where recovered steam is held and heated by exhaust gases from the combustion chamber. Recovered steam is then recompressed while being held saturated by a spray of water. Recovered steam from a steam accumulator is then used again in the mixing chamber. Thus, the steam is prevented from condensing and is recovered to be used again. The heat of the recovered steam is saved by this process.

Vincent, O.W.

1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Techno-economic analysis of wood biomass boilers for the greenhouse industry  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to perform a techno-economic analysis on a typical wood pellet and wood residue boiler for generation of heat to an average-sized greenhouse in British Columbia. The variables analyzed included greenhouse size and structure, boiler efficiency, fuel types, and source of carbon dioxide (CO2) for crop fertilization. The net present value (NPV) show that installing a wood pellet or a wood residue boiler to provide 40% of the annual heat demand is more economical than using a natural gas boiler to provide all the heat at a discount rate of 10%. For an assumed lifespan of 25 years, a wood pellet boiler system could generate NPV of C$259,311 without electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and C$74,695 with ESP, respectively. While, installing a wood residue boiler with or without an ESP could provide NPV of C$919,922 or C$1,104,538, respectively. Using a wood biomass boiler could also eliminate over 3000 tonne CO2 equivalents of greenhouse gases annually. Wood biomass combustion generates more particulate matters than natural gas combustion. However, an advanced emission control system could significantly reduce particulate matters emission from wood biomass combustion which would bring the particulate emission to a relatively similar level as for natural gas.

Chau, J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Preto, F. [Natural Resources Canada; Melin, Staffan [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document presents an overview of combustion as a waste management strategy in relation to the development of material-specific emission factors for EPAs Waste Reduction Model (WARM). Included are estimates of the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from combustion of most of the materials considered in WARM and several categories of mixed waste. 1. A SUMMARY OF THE GHG IMPLICATIONS OF COMBUSTION Combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) results in emissions of CO 2 and N2O. Note that CO2 from combustion of biomass (such as paper products and yard trimmings) is not counted because it is biogenic (as explained in the Introduction & Overview chapter). WARM estimates emissions from combustion of MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. WARM does not consider any recovery of materials from the MSW stream that may occur before MSW is delivered to the combustor. WTE facilities can be divided into three categories: (1) mass burn, (2) modular and (3) refusederived fuel (RDF). A mass burn facility generates electricity and/or steam from the combustion of

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Pulse combustion: Commercial, industrial, and residential applications. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the evolution of pulse combustion, the types of pulse combustion burners and their applications, and selected fuels utilized. Topics include fuel combustion efficiency, energy conversion and utilization technologies, modeling of chemical kinetics, and dynamics and thermal characteristics of pulse combustors. Pulse combustion systems for water heaters, gas furnaces, industrial and residential boilers, commercial cooking equipment, and space heating devices are presented. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Comparative results of the combustion of lignin briquettes and black coal  

SciTech Connect

A new type of biofuel - hydrolytic lignin briquettes - was tested as compared with ordinary SS coal from the Kuznetsk Basin in fuel-bed firing in a Universal-6 boiler. It was found that the (total) efficiency of the boiler with the firing of lignin briquettes was 38% higher than that with the use of black coal. Carbon loss in the combustion of briquettes was 1%, whereas it was 48.2% in the combustion of black coal. The emission of harmful gas pollutants into the environment in the combustion of briquettes was lower than that in the combustion of coal by a factor of 4.5.

V.G. Lurii [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Laboratory illustrations of the transformations and deposition of inorganic material in biomass boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boilers fired with certain woody biomass fuels have proven to be a viable, reliable means of generating electrical power. The behavior of the inorganic material in the fuels is one of the greatest challenges to burning the large variety of fuels available to biomass combustors. Unmanageable ash deposits and interactions between ash and bed material cause loss in boiler availability and significant increase in maintenance costs. The problems related to the behavior of inorganic material now exceed all other combustion-related challenges in biomass-fired boilers. This paper reviews the mechanisms of ash deposit formation, the relationship between fuel properties and ash deposit properties, and a series of laboratory tests in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor designed to illustrate how fuel type, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions impact ash deposit properties.

Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological and Argicultural Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Super Boiler 2nd Generation Technology for Watertube Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase I of a proposed two phase project to develop and demonstrate an advanced industrial watertube boiler system with the capability of reaching 94% (HHV) fuel-to-steam efficiency and emissions below 2 ppmv NOx, 2 ppmv CO, and 1 ppmv VOC on natural gas fuel. The boiler design would have the capability to produce >1500 F, >1500 psig superheated steam, burn multiple fuels, and will be 50% smaller/lighter than currently available watertube boilers of similar capacity. This project is built upon the successful Super Boiler project at GTI. In that project that employed a unique two-staged intercooled combustion system and an innovative heat recovery system to reduce NOx to below 5 ppmv and demonstrated fuel-to-steam efficiency of 94% (HHV). This project was carried out under the leadership of GTI with project partners Cleaver-Brooks, Inc., Nebraska Boiler, a Division of Cleaver-Brooks, and Media and Process Technology Inc., and project advisors Georgia Institute of Technology, Alstom Power Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase I of efforts focused on developing 2nd generation boiler concepts and performance modeling; incorporating multi-fuel (natural gas and oil) capabilities; assessing heat recovery, heat transfer and steam superheating approaches; and developing the overall conceptual engineering boiler design. Based on our analysis, the 2nd generation Industrial Watertube Boiler when developed and commercialized, could potentially save 265 trillion Btu and $1.6 billion in fuel costs across U.S. industry through increased efficiency. Its ultra-clean combustion could eliminate 57,000 tons of NOx, 460,000 tons of CO, and 8.8 million tons of CO2 annually from the atmosphere. Reduction in boiler size will bring cost-effective package boilers into a size range previously dominated by more expensive field-erected boilers, benefiting manufacturers and end users through lower capital costs.

Mr. David Cygan; Dr. Joseph Rabovitser

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Control of coal combustion SO[sub 2]and NO[sub x] emissions by in- boiler injection of CMA  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA); and (B) To evaluate the NO[sub x], reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N[sub 2]. The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO[sub 2], SO[sub x],NO[sub x], H[sub 2]O, O[sub 2] etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail. The possibility of introducing two different sorbents sequentially will also be examined. For instance, such a scheme may employ injection of the rather inexpensive calcium carbonate initially, followed by the more costly CMA. The effectiveness of a homemade'' CMA using woody biomass as a low-cost source of acetate will be explored if such a product becomes available during the course of this work. Finally, CMA will be introduced in the matrix of the coal by an ion exchange or a precipitation technique. Upon subsequent combustion, the composition and physical structure of the remaining ash will be examined, as well as the gas phase SO[sub x], concentration. Both techniques (CMA pretreatment and CMA injection) may also be implemented simultaneously to assess their combined effect on sulfur capture.

Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Furnace and Boiler Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Furnace and Boiler Basics Furnace and Boiler Basics Furnace and Boiler Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:50pm Addthis Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts; boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Furnaces Furnaces are the most common heating systems used in homes in the United States. They can be all electric, gas-fired (including propane or natural gas), or oil-fired. Boilers Boilers consist of a vessel or tank where heat produced from the combustion of such fuels as natural gas, fuel oil, or coal is used to generate hot water or steam. Many buildings have their own boilers, while other buildings have steam or hot water piped in from a central plant. Commercial boilers are manufactured for high- or low-pressure applications.

82

A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion in the development of combustion science. Several aspects of these two-dimensional flame cells are identified for premixed combustion when the other types of idealized flames are inapplicable. 1 #12;Nomenclature fuel

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

83

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Agency/Company /Organization: CONEG Policy Research Center Inc. Partner: Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, Rick Handley and Associates, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, Economic Development Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.mass.gov/Eoeea/docs/doer/renewables/biomass/DOER%20Biomass%20Emiss Country: United States

84

Investigation of the Relationship Between Particulate Bound Mercury and Properties of Fly Ash in a Full-Scale 100 MWE Pulverized Coal Combustion Boiler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is an increasing concern over mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. Coal-fired power generation accounts for approximately 33% of total mercury emission in the United (more)

Li, Sen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Innovative clean coal technology: 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report, Phases 1 - 3B  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project was conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The technologies demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NOx burner. The primary objective of the demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 was to determine the long-term effects of commercially available wall-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. Short-term tests of each technology were also performed to provide engineering information about emissions and performance trends. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications was established for the project. Short-term and long-term baseline testing was conducted in an {open_quotes}as-found{close_quotes} condition from November 1989 through March 1990. Following retrofit of the AOFA system during a four-week outage in spring 1990, the AOFA configuration was tested from August 1990 through March 1991. The FWEC CF/SF low NOx burners were then installed during a seven-week outage starting on March 8, 1991 and continuing to May 5, 1991. Following optimization of the LNBs and ancillary combustion equipment by FWEC personnel, LNB testing commenced during July 1991 and continued until January 1992. Testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration was completed during August 1993. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NOx burners and advanced overfire systems.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The next generation of oxy-fuel boiler systems  

SciTech Connect

Research in the area of oxy-fuel combustion which is being pioneered by Jupiter Oxygen Corporation combined with boiler research conducted by the USDOE/Albany Research Center has been applied to designing the next generation of oxy-fuel combustion systems. The new systems will enhance control of boiler systems during turn-down and improve response time while improving boiler efficiency. These next generation boiler systems produce a combustion product that has been shown to be well suited for integrated pollutant removal. These systems have the promise of reducing boiler foot-print and boiler construction costs. The modularity of the system opens the possibility of using this design for replacement of boilers for retrofit on existing systems.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Gross, Alex (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Patrick, Brian (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.; Turner, Paul C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ECUT energy data reference series: boilers  

SciTech Connect

Information on the population and fuel consumption of water-tube, fire-tube and cast iron boilers is summarized. The use of each boiler type in the industrial and commercial sector is examined. Specific information on each boiler type includes (for both 1980 and 2000) the average efficiency of the boiler, the capital stock, the amount of fuel consumed, and the activity level as measured by operational load factor.

Chockie, A.D.; Johnson, D.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Boiler Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Major international research and development efforts...650 °C Ferritic steel development EPRI, U.S.A. Electric Power Research Institute 1978??2003 ? Boiler and turbine thick-walled components; standardization

89

Development program for heat balance analysis fuel to steam efficiency boiler and data wireless transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aim to improve a combustion system of boiler within increase combustion efficiency and use all out of the energy. The large boilers were used in the industrial factories which consume a lot of energy for production. By oil and gas fuel ... Keywords: boiler, cogeneration energy, heat balance, steam efficiency, wireless data transfer

Nattapong Phanthuna; Warunee Srisongkram; Sunya Pasuk; Thaweesak Trongtirakul

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

An Energy Analysis of the Catalytic Combustion Burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas boilers of conventional flame always produce varying degrees of combustion products NOx and CO, which pollute the environment and waste energy. As a new way of combustion, catalytic combustion breaks the flammable limits of conventional flame combustion, and realizes the combustion of ultra-natural gas/air mixture under the flammable limits. Its combustion efficiency is higher, which improves the ratio of energy utilization. Applying the catalytic combustion to gas boilers could solve the gas boilers' lower combustion efficiency, and achieve energy savings. On the basis of the catalytic combustion burner, the catalytic combustion burner was designed according to the catalytic combustion and water heaters. In this paper, we analyzed the heat loss and thermal efficiency of the catalytic combustion burner, and compared it to that of flame combustion boilers. The results showed that catalytic combustion burner ?'s heat loss is not so high as originally considered, and its pollutant emissions are lower.

Dong, Q.; Zhang, S.; Duan, Z.; Zhou, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modification of boiler operating conditions for mercury emissions reductions in coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modification of boiler operating conditions for mercury emissions reductions in coal-fired utility boilers Carlos E. Romero *, Ying Li, Harun Bilirgen, Nenad Sarunac, Edward K. Levy Energy Research Center type, boiler operation, fly ash characteristics and type of environmental control equipment installed

Li, Ying

92

Steam Conservation and Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines several cost-effective steam conservation and boiler plant efficiency advancements that were implemented during a recently completed central steam boiler plant replacement project at a very large semiconductor manufacturing complex. The measures include: 1) Reheating of dehumidified cleanroom make-up air with heat extracted during precooling. 2) Preheating of deionization feedwater with refrigerant heat of condensation. 3) Preheating of boiler combustion air with heat extracted from boiler flue gas. 4) Preheating of boiler feedwater with heat extracted from gas turbine exhaust. 5) Variable speed operation of boiler feedwater pumps and forced-draft fans. 6) Preheating of boiler make-up water with heat extracted from boiler surface blow-down. The first two advancements (steam conservation measures) reduced the amount of steam produced by about 25% and saved about $1,010,000/yr by using recovered waste heat rather than steam-derived heat at selected heating loads. The last four advancements (boiler plant efficiency measures) reduced the unit cost of steam produced by about 13% and saved about $293,500/yr by reducing natural gas and electricity usage at the steam boiler plant. The combined result was a 35% reduction in annual steam costs (fuel and power).

Fiorino, D. P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Field Test of a Semi-Continuous Fly Ash Unburned Carbon Monitor: Cyclone Boiler Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unburned carbon (UBC) is the measure of the carbon level in the fly ash of a coal-fired boilerwith increased carbon indicating less-complete and less-efficient combustion. Boiler design is one important factor that affects UBC levels. Cyclone boilers burn coal at high combustion temperatures (ca. 1650C) and exhibit relatively high, but quite variable, fly ash UBC levels. Recently, because of competitive fuel pricing and reduced SO2 and NOX emissions, cyclone boilers ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Experimental Study on the Optimization Control of Main Steam Pressure System in the Biomass Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion adjusting system in biomass fuel boiler is the research objective and its dynamic characteristics are also analyzed. The optimal control algorithm is provided, according to the main subsystem in main steam pressure control system of combustion ... Keywords: biomass fuel boiler, combustion control system, steam pressure control, fuzzy-SMITH

Junman Sun; Chun Huang; Junran Jin; Huijun Sun; Liping Li

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Reduction of NO/sub x/ through staged combustion in combined cycle supplemental boilers. Volume I. Systems optimization analyses. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An investigation directed to control of emissions from supplemental-fired combined cycles with the use of staged combustion in the steam generating portion of the system is discussed. A combined cycle, as considered in this report, is the assembly of any number of gas turbines, steam generators, and steam turbines for electric power generation in which the exhaust of the gas turbines is passed through the steam generators. A supplementary-fired combined cycle employs combustion of fuel in the gas turbine exhaust to increase temperatures in the steam system. Staged combustion is achieved by the separation of the exhaust from the gas turbines into two streams prior to entering the steam generator with provisions for primary combustion of fuel in one stream with a deficiency of air. Combustion is completed in a secondary stage by mixing the unfired stream into the products of the fired stream. The use of staged combustion provides conditions favorable for the occurrence of chemical reactions that result in a reduction of mass flow of nitric oxide (NO) present in the gas turbine exhaust. Volume I is concerned with the engineering analysis of combined cycle performance and NO/sub x/ reduction potential. (GRA)

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Straw pellets as fuel in biomass combustion units  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to estimate the suitability of straw pellets as fuel in small combustion units, the Danish Technological Institute accomplished a project including a number of combustion tests in the energy laboratory. The project was part of the effort to reduce the use of fuel oil. The aim of the project was primarily to test straw pellets in small combustion units, including the following: ash/slag conditions when burning straw pellets; emission conditions; other operational consequences; and necessary work performance when using straw pellets. Five types of straw and wood pellets made with different binders and antislag agents were tested as fuel in five different types of boilers in test firings at 50% and 100% nominal boiler output.

Andreasen, P.; Larsen, M.G. [Danish Technological Inst., Aarhus (Denmark)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Alternate Materials for Recovery Boiler Superheater Tubes  

SciTech Connect

The ever escalating demands for increased efficiency of all types of boilers would most sensibly be realized by an increase in the steam parameters of temperature and pressure. However, materials and corrosion limitations in the steam generating components, particularly the superheater tubes, present major obstacles to boiler designers in achieving systems that can operate under the more severe conditions. This paper will address the issues associated with superheater tube selection for many types of boilers; particularly chemical recovery boilers, but also addressing the similarities in issues for biomass and coal fired boilers. It will also review our recent study of materials for recovery boiler superheaters. Additional, more extensive studies, both laboratory and field, are needed to gain a better understanding of the variables that affect superheater tube corrosion and to better determine the best means to control this corrosion to ultimately permit operation of recovery boilers at higher temperatures and pressures.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy Conservation for Boiler Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last ten years energy costs have soared. The cost of coal and # 2 fuel oil have gone up by a factor of 3-5. Residual fuel oil cost has increased by approximately ten times. The cost of natural gas has gone up at an even higher rate. This paper reviews methods to conserve energy in industrial boiler water systems. Both mechanical and chemical approaches for energy conservation are discussed. The important aspects of efficient combustion are covered as well as other mechanical factors such as boiler blowdown heat recovery, economizers, air preheaters, and boiler blowdown control. The chemical aspects discussed for energy conservation include fuel additives, boiler internal treatment, and condensate treatments. The emphasis in this paper, for both mechanical and chemical approaches to energy conservation covers three areas: 1) maximizing the use of available Btu's in fuel through more efficient combustion, 2) improving the efficiency of heat transfer, and 3) recovering Btu's that have been previously considered uneconomical.

Beardsley, M. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1994, July 1994--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise evaluation of the following NOx reduction technologies: Advanced overfire air (AOFA), Low NOx burners (LNB), LNB, with AOFA, and Advanced Digital Controls and Optimization Strategies. Baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB plus AOFA test segments have been completed. Based on a preliminary analysis, approximately 17 percent of the incremental change in NOx emissions between the LNB and LNB+AOFA configurations is the result of AOFA, the balance of the NOx reduction resulting from other operational adjustments. Preliminary diagnostic testing was conducted during August and September. The purpose of these tests was to determine the emissions and performance characteristics of the unit prior to activation of the advanced control/optimization strategies. Short-term, full load NOx emissions were near 0.47 lb/MBtu, slightly higher than that seen during the LNB+AOFA test phase. Long-term NO{sub x} emissions for this quarter averaged near 0.41 lb/MBtu. Due to turbine problems, a four week outage has been planned for Hammond 4 starting October 1. Two on-line carbon-in-ash monitors are being installed at Hammond Unit 4 as part of the Wall-Fired Project. These monitors will be evaluated as to their accuracy, repeatability, reliability, and serviceability.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 11-12, 2005 1 Quantifying Savings From Improved Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Savings From Improved Boiler Operation Kevin Carpenter Kelly Kissock Graduate Research Assistant Associate/off operation and excess combustion air reduce boiler energy efficiency. This paper presents methods to quantify boilers. The methods include calculation of combustion temperature, calculation of the relationship

Kissock, Kelly

104

Fluidized bed boiler feed system  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Boiler efficiency methodology for solar heat applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of boiler efficiency measurements which can be applied to evaluate the performance of steam-generating boilers via both the direct and indirect methods. This methodology was written to assist industries in calculating the boiler efficiency for determining the applicability and value of thermal industrial heat, as part of the efforts of the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) funded by Sandia National Laboratories. Tables of combustion efficiencies are enclosed as functions of stack temperatures and the amount of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the gas stream.

Maples, D.; Conwell, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Boiler Efficiency Inst.; Pacheco, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Assessment of FTIR and Tunable Diode Laser Monitoring of Combustion-Based Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy (TDLAS) make continuous in-situ combustion measurements of boiler gases possible and have already demonstrated an ability to make temperature measurements as well as conventional species concentration and density measurements in many applications. The two spectroscopic techniques permit a new generation and type of combustion sensors based on infrared absorption spectroscopy. This report reviews the basic theory behind th...

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Boilers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Boilers Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Boilers Incentives...

108

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allow ultra-supercritical boilers to achieve still higherthat supercritical-coal boilers, at least in the 1970s, didGW/year) by type of boiler. Source: [25]. Net Efficiency (

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter, 1994, October 1994--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. The project provides a stepwise evaluation of the following NOx reduction technologies: Advanced overfire air (AOFA), Low NOx burners (LNB), LNB with AOFA, and Advanced Digital Controls and Optimization Strategies. The project has completed the baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB+AOFA test segments, fulfilling all testing originally proposed to DOE. Analysis of the LNB long-term data collected show the full load NOx emission levels to be near 0.65 lb/MBtu. This NOx level represents a 48 percent reduction when compared to the baseline, full load value of 1.24 lb/MBtu. These reductions were sustainable over the long-term test period and were consistent over the entire load range. Full load, fly ash LOI values in the LNB configuration were near 8 percent compared to 5 percent for baseline. Results from the LNB+AOFA phase indicate that full load NOx emissions are approximately 0.40 lb/MBtu with a corresponding fly ash LOI value of near 8 percent. Although this NOx level represents a 67 percent reduction from baseline levels, a substantial portion of the incremental change in NOx emissions between the LNB and LNB+AOFA configurations was the result of operational changes and not the result of the AOFA system. Phase 4 of the project is now underway.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Measurement of air toxic emissions from a coal-fired boiler equipped with a tangentially-fired low NOx combustion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of measurements of chemical emissions from a coal-burning, tangentially-fired, utility boiler equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a low NOx firing system. The tests were conducted in response to Title III of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which lists 189 chemicals to be evaluated as {open_quotes}Air Toxics.{close_quotes} The project was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the US Department of Energy under an existing Innovative Clean Coal Technology Cooperative Agreement managed by Southern Company Services. Field chemical emissions monitoring was conducted in two phases: a baseline {open_quotes}pre-low NOx burner{close_quotes} condition in September 1991 and in the LNCFS Level III low NOx firing condition in January 1992. In addition to stack emissions measurements of both organic and inorganic chemicals, plant material balance evaluations were performed to determine the efficiency of the hot-side ESP at controlling emissions of air toxics and to determine the fate of the target chemicals in various plant process streams.

Dismukes, E.B. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Clarkson, R.J.; Hardman, R.R. [Southern Company Services, Birmingham, AL (United States); Elia, G.G. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers. Semiannual technical report, January 14, 1997--August 14, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Research is presently being conducted to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituent size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. Bulk powder processed Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with an average particle size of 12 um. Also, to deposit model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings, an electrodeposition technique was developed and coatings with various volume fractions (0-35%) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were produced. The powder and electrodeposition processing of Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Composites provide the ability to produce two phase microstructure without changing the microstructure of the matrix material. Therefore, the effect of hard second phase particles size and volume fraction on erosion resistance could be analyzed.

Schorr, B.S.; Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Guidelines for the Nondestructive Examination of Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the boiler fleet ages, new demands are being placed upon them including operating in cycling modes for which they were not originally designed. Operators are experiencing an increasing incidence of boiler tube failures (BTFs). These guidelines provide guidance on the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) so that operators will know what type of NDE to perform and where to perform NDE within the boiler. The use of appropriate NDE methods is an essential approach to detecting and mitigating boi...

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. homes Title Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. homes Publication Type Report...

114

FUEL LEAN BIOMASS REBURNING IN COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final technical report describes research conducted between July 1, 2000, and June 30, 2002, for the project entitled ''Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning in Coal-Fired Boilers,'' DOE Award No. DE-FG26-00NT40811. Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning is a method of staging fuel within a coal-fired utility boiler to convert nitrogen oxides (NOx) to nitrogen by creating locally fuel-rich eddies, which favor the reduction of NOx, within an overall fuel lean boiler. These eddies are created by injecting a supplemental fuel source, designated as the reburn fuel, downstream of the primary combustion zone. Chopped biomass was the reburn fuel for this project. Four parameters were explored in this research: the initial oxygen concentration ranged between 1%-6%, the amount of biomass used as the reburn fuel ranged between from 0%-23% of the total % energy input, the types of biomass used were low nitrogen switchgrass and high nitrogen alfalfa, and the types of carrier gases used to inject the biomass (nitrogen and steam). Temperature profiles and final flue gas species concentrations are presented in this report. An economic evaluation of a potential full-scale installation of a Fuel-Lean Biomass Reburn system using biomass-water slurry was also performed.

Jeffrey J. Sweterlitsch; Robert C. Brown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

FUEL LEAN BIOMASS REBURNING IN COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report describes research conducted between July 1, 2000, and June 30, 2002, for the project entitled ''Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning in Coal-Fired Boilers,'' DOE Award No. DE-FG26-00NT40811. Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning is a method of staging fuel within a coal-fired utility boiler to convert nitrogen oxides (NOx) to nitrogen by creating locally fuel-rich eddies, which favor the reduction of NOx, within an overall fuel lean boiler. These eddies are created by injecting a supplemental fuel source, designated as the reburn fuel, downstream of the primary combustion zone. Chopped biomass was the reburn fuel for this project. Four parameters were explored in this research: the initial oxygen concentration ranged between 1%-6%, the amount of biomass used as the reburn fuel ranged between from 0%-23% of the total % energy input, the types of biomass used were low nitrogen switchgrass and high nitrogen alfalfa, and the types of carrier gases used to inject the biomass (nitrogen and steam). Temperature profiles and final flue gas species concentrations are presented in this report. An economic evaluation of a potential full-scale installation of a Fuel-Lean Biomass Reburn system using biomass-water slurry was also performed.

Jeffrey J. Sweterlitsch; Robert C. Brown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Super Boiler: Packed Media/Transport Membrane Boiler Development and Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Cleaver-Brooks developed a new gas-fired steam generation system???¢????????the Super Boiler???¢????????for increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, and reduced emissions. The system consists of a firetube boiler with a unique staged furnace design, a two-stage burner system with engineered internal recirculation and inter-stage cooling integral to the boiler, unique convective pass design with extended internal surfaces for enhanced heat transfer, and a novel integrated heat recovery system to extract maximum energy from the flue gas. With these combined innovations, the Super Boiler technical goals were set at 94% HHV fuel efficiency, operation on natural gas with boilers of similar steam output. To demonstrate these technical goals, the project culminated in the industrial demonstration of this new high-efficiency technology on a 300 HP boiler at Clement Pappas, a juice bottler located in Ontario, California. The Super Boiler combustion system is based on two stage combustion which combines air staging, internal flue gas recirculation, inter-stage cooling, and unique fuel-air mixing technology to achieve low emissions rather than external flue gas recirculation which is most commonly used today. The two-stage combustion provides lower emissions because of the integrated design of the boiler and combustion system which permit precise control of peak flame temperatures in both primary and secondary stages of combustion. To reduce equipment size, the Super Boiler's dual furnace design increases radiant heat transfer to the furnace walls, allowing shorter overall furnace length, and also employs convective tubes with extended surfaces that increase heat transfer by up to 18-fold compared to conventional bare tubes. In this way, a two-pass boiler can achieve the same efficiency as a traditional three or four-pass firetube boiler design. The Super Boiler is consequently up to 50% smaller in footprint, has a smaller diameter, and is up to 50% lower in weight, resulting in very compact design with reduced material cost and labor costs, while requiring less boiler room floor space. For enhanced energy efficiency, the heat recovery system uses a transport membrane condenser (TMC), a humidifying air heater (HAH), and a split-stage economizer to extract maximum energy from the flue gas. The TMC is a new innovation that pulls a major portion of water vapor produced by the combustion process from the flue gases along with its sensible and latent heat. This results in nearly 100% transfer of heat to the boiler feed water. The HAH improves the effectiveness of the TMC, particularly in steam systems that do not have a large amount of cold makeup water. In addition, the HAH humidifies the combustion air to reduce NOx formation. The split-stage economizer preheats boiler feed water in the same way as a conventional economizer, but extracts more heat by working in tandem with the TMC and HAH to reduce flue gas temperature. These components are designed to work synergistically to achieve energy efficiencies of 92-94% which is 10-15% higher than today???¢????????s typical firetube boilers.

Liss, William E; Cygan, David F

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Super Boiler: Packed Media/Transport Membrane Boiler Development and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Cleaver-Brooks developed a new gas-fired steam generation system???¢????????the Super Boiler???¢????????for increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, and reduced emissions. The system consists of a firetube boiler with a unique staged furnace design, a two-stage burner system with engineered internal recirculation and inter-stage cooling integral to the boiler, unique convective pass design with extended internal surfaces for enhanced heat transfer, and a novel integrated heat recovery system to extract maximum energy from the flue gas. With these combined innovations, the Super Boiler technical goals were set at 94% HHV fuel efficiency, operation on natural gas with <5 ppmv NOx (referenced to 3%O2), and 50% smaller than conventional boilers of similar steam output. To demonstrate these technical goals, the project culminated in the industrial demonstration of this new high-efficiency technology on a 300 HP boiler at Clement Pappas, a juice bottler located in Ontario, California. The Super Boiler combustion system is based on two stage combustion which combines air staging, internal flue gas recirculation, inter-stage cooling, and unique fuel-air mixing technology to achieve low emissions rather than external flue gas recirculation which is most commonly used today. The two-stage combustion provides lower emissions because of the integrated design of the boiler and combustion system which permit precise control of peak flame temperatures in both primary and secondary stages of combustion. To reduce equipment size, the Super Boiler's dual furnace design increases radiant heat transfer to the furnace walls, allowing shorter overall furnace length, and also employs convective tubes with extended surfaces that increase heat transfer by up to 18-fold compared to conventional bare tubes. In this way, a two-pass boiler can achieve the same efficiency as a traditional three or four-pass firetube boiler design. The Super Boiler is consequently up to 50% smaller in footprint, has a smaller diameter, and is up to 50% lower in weight, resulting in very compact design with reduced material cost and labor costs, while requiring less boiler room floor space. For enhanced energy efficiency, the heat recovery system uses a transport membrane condenser (TMC), a humidifying air heater (HAH), and a split-stage economizer to extract maximum energy from the flue gas. The TMC is a new innovation that pulls a major portion of water vapor produced by the combustion process from the flue gases along with its sensible and latent heat. This results in nearly 100% transfer of heat to the boiler feed water. The HAH improves the effectiveness of the TMC, particularly in steam systems that do not have a large amount of cold makeup water. In addition, the HAH humidifies the combustion air to reduce NOx formation. The split-stage economizer preheats boiler feed water in the same way as a conventional economizer, but extracts more heat by working in tandem with the TMC and HAH to reduce flue gas temperature. These components are designed to work synergistically to achieve energy efficiencies of 92-94% which is 10-15% higher than today???¢????????s typical firetube boilers.

Liss, William E; Cygan, David F

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

Low Temperature Heat Recovery for Boiler Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low temperature corrosion proof heat exchangers designed to reduce boiler flue gas temperatures to 150F or lower are now being commercially operated on gas, oil and coal fired boilers. These heat exchangers, when applied to boiler flue gas, are commonly called condensing economizers. It has traditionally been common practice in the boiler industry to not reduce flue gas temperatures below the 300F to 400F range. This barrier has now been broken by the development and application of corrosion proof heat exchanger technology. This opens up a vast reservior of untapped recoverable energy that can be recovered and reused as an energy source. The successful recovery of this heat and the optimum use of it are the fundemental goals of the technology presented in this paper. This Recovered Low Level Heat Is Normally Used To Heat Cold Make-up Water Or Combustion Air.

Shook, J. R.; Luttenberger, D. B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

List of Boilers Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boilers Incentives Boilers Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 550 Boilers Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-550) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Furnaces Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Roofs Windows Yes AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools

120

NETL: IEP ? Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to determine the performance of the oxy-combustion process for the respective boiler configurations. Phase I will evaluate the effect of coal rank used in existing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MWe, but is capable of producing 200 MWe. The boiler is a Combustion Engineering, Inc. radiant reheat, natural circulation, steam generator, with five elevations of burners fed...

122

BPM2.0. Fossil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BOILER PERFORMANCE MODEL (BPM2.0) is a set of programs for predicting the heat transfer performance of fossil-fired utility boilers. The programs can model a wide variety of boiler designs, provide boiler performance estimates for coal, oil or gaseous fuels, determine the influence of slagging and fouling characteristics on boiler performance, and calculate performance factors for tradeoff analyses comparing boilers and fuels. Given a set of target operating conditions, the programs can estimate control settings, gas and steam operating profiles through the boiler, overall boiler efficiency, and fuel consumption. The programs are broken into three categories: data, calculation, and reports with a central processor program acting as the link allowing the user to access any of the data or calculation programs and easily move between programs. The calculations are divided among the following five programs: heat duty calculation, combustion calculation, furnace performance calculation, convection pass performance calculation, and air heater performance calculation. The programs can model subcritical or supercritical boilers, most configurations of convective passes including boilers that achieve final reheat steam temperature control by split back pass, boilers with as many as two reheat circuits and/or multiple attemperator stations in series, and boilers with or without economizers and/or air heaters. Either regenerative or tubular air heaters are supported. For wall-fired or tangentially-fired furnaces, the furnace performance program predicts the temperature of the flue gases leaving the furnace. It accounts for variations in excess air, gas recirculation, burner tilt, wall temperature, and wall cleanliness. For boilers having radiant panels or platens above the furnace, the convective pass program uses the results of the combustion chamber calculation to estimate the gas temperature entering the convective pass.

Winslow, J.C. [USDOE, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

BPM3.0. Fossil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BOILER PERFORMANCE MODEL (BPM3.0) is a set of programs for predicting the heat transfer performance of fossil-fired utility boilers. The programs can model a wide variety of boiler designs, provide boiler performance estimates for coal, oil or gaseous fuels, determine the influence of slagging and fouling characteristics on boiler performance, and calculate performance factors for tradeoff analyses comparing boilers and fuels. Given a set of target operating conditions, the programs can estimate control settings, gas and steam operating profiles through the boiler, overall boiler efficiency, and fuel consumption. The programs are broken into three categories: data, calculation, and reports with a central processor program acting as the link allowing the user to access any of the data or calculation programs and easily move between programs. The calculations are divided among the following five programs: heat duty calculation, combustion calculation, furnace performance calculation, convection pass performance calculation, and air heater performance calculation. The programs can model subcritical or supercritical boilers, most configurations of convective passes including boilers that achieve final reheat steam temperature control by split back pass, boilers with as many as two reheat circuits and/or multiple attemperator stations in series, and boilers with or without economizers and/or air heaters. Either regenerative or tubular air heaters are supported. For wall-fired or tangentially-fired furnaces, the furnace performance program predicts the temperature of the flue gases leaving the furnace. It accounts for variations in excess air, gas recirculation, burner tilt, wall temperature, and wall cleanliness. For boilers having radiant panels or platens above the furnace, the convective pass program uses the results of the combustion chamber calculation to estimate the gas temperature entering the convective pass.

Winslow, J.C. [USDOE, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Mitigation of Boiler Tubing Damage from Use of Explosive Cleaning Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion of fossil fuels results in formation of slags that cover boiler tubes. Efficient boiler operation requires periodic removal of these slags, and explosive cleaning is an excellent cleaning method. While boiler tube cleaning using explosives is an established technology, a number of cases of tube damage have been reported, including cracking and denting of boiler tubes. This report details the work accomplished in Phase I of this project to capture the current understanding and practice of explo...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of modeling the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in EPRI report 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004. This report presents findings of follow-up activities directed toward the ultimate goal of developing an aggregate model that is applicable to the important deposition phenomena in fossil drum-type boilers.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cost-Effective Industrial Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas and electricity are expensive to the extent that annual fuel and power costs can approach the initial cost of an industrial boiler plant. Within this context, this paper examines several cost-effective efficiency advancements that were implemented during a recently completed boiler plant replacement project at a large semiconductor manufacturing complex. The "new" boiler plant began service in November, 1996 and consists of four 75,000 lb/hr water-tube boilers burning natural gas and producing 210 psig saturated steam for heating and humidification. Efficiency advancements include: 1) Reheating of cleanroom make-up air with heat extracted during precooling. 2) Preheating of combustion air with heat extracted from boiler flue gas. 3) Preheating of boiler feedwater with heat extracted from the exhaust of a nearby gas turbine. 4) Variable speed operation of boiler feedwater pumps and forced-draft fans. 5) Preheating of boiler make-up water with heat extracted from boiler blow-down. These efficiency advancements should prove of interest to industrial energy users faced with replacement of aging, inefficient boiler plants, rising fuel and power prices, and increasing pressures to reduce operating costs in order to enhance competitiveness.

Fiorino, D. P.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 3, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2007 73 Constraint-Based Control of Boiler Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Based Control of Boiler Efficiency: A Data-Mining Approach Zhe Song and Andrew Kusiak, Member, IEEE Abstract-utility boiler subject to operating constraints. Selection of process vari- ables to optimize combustion- fired boiler in the presence of operating constraints. Two schemes of generating control settings

Kusiak, Andrew

128

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion Technology Development for Industrial-Scale Boiler Applications Project No.: DE-NT0005290 Alstom oxy-combustion test facility Alstom oxy-combustion test facility. Alstom will develop an oxyfuel firing system design specifically for retrofit to tangential-fired (T-fired) boilers and provide information to address the technical gaps for commercial boiler design. Several oxyfuel system design concepts, such as internal flue gas recirculation and various oxygen injection schemes, will be evaluated for cost-effectiveness in satisfying furnace design conditions in a T-fired boiler. The evaluation will use an array of tools, including Alstom's proprietary models and design codes, along with 3-D computational fluid dynamics modeling. A

129

Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only October 8, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the base model and other assumptions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement What is the deliverable fluid type? Water Steam What fuel is used? Gas Oil How many boilers will you purchase? unit(s) Performance Factors Existing What is the capacity of the existing boiler? MBtu/hr* What is the thermal efficiency of the existing boiler? % Et New What is the capacity of the new boiler?

130

The reapplication of energetic materials as boiler fuels  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of weapons stockpiles, off-specification production, and upgrading of weapons systems results in a large amount of energetic materials (EM) such as rocket propellant and primary explosives that need to be recycled or disposed of each year. Presently, large quantities of EM are disposed of in a process known as open-burn/open-detonation (OB/OD), which not only wastes their energy content, but may release large quantities of hazardous material into the environment. Here the authors investigate the combustion properties of several types of EM to determine the feasibility of reapplication of these materials as boiler fuels, a process that could salvage the energy content of the EM as well as mitigate any potential adverse environmental impact. Reapplication requires pretreatment of the fuels to make them safe to handle and to feed. Double-base nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin, trinitrotoluene (TNT), nitroguanidine, and a rocket propellant binder primarily composed of polybutidiene impregnated with aluminum flakes have been burned in a 100-kW downfired flow reactor. Most of these fuels have high levels of fuel-bound nitrogen, much of it bound in the form of nitrate groups, resulting in high NO{sub x} emissions during combustion. The authors have measured fuel-bound nitrate conversion efficiencies to NO{sub x} of up to 80%, suggesting that the nitrate groups do not follow the typical path of fuel nitrogen through HCN leading to NO{sub x}, but rather form NO{sub x} directly. They show that staged combustion is effective in reducing NO{sub x} concentrations in the postcombustion gases by nearly a factor of 3. In the rocket binder, measured aluminum particle temperatures in excess of 1700{degrees}C create high levels of thermal NO{sub x}, and also generate concern that molten aluminum particles could potentially damage boiler equipment. Judicious selection of the firing method is thus required for aluminum-containing materials.

Buckley, S.G.; Sclippa, G.C.; Ross, J.R. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.[Taken from https://www-pls.llnl.gov/?url=science_and_technology-chemistry-combustion

132

Modeling of a Drum Boiler Using MATLAB/Simulink.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic simulator was developed for a natural circulation drum type boiler through a joint Youngstown State University/The Babcock and Wilcox Company cooperative agreement. The (more)

Anderson, Scott B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Flame Spectral Analysis for Boiler Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An instrument has been developed by Tecogen, Inc., to determine the combustion characteristics of individual burners in multiburner installations. The technology is based on measuring the emissions in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral range from the flames and using these measurements to determine the burner operating conditions. Two prototype instruments have been installed on package boilers at a Con Edison powerplant and Polaroid facility, and their performance has been evaluated. These instruments provide data relating to the variations in the IR and UV spectrum with a change in the combustion condition in individuals burners. This paper describes the instruments operation and these tests.

Metcalfe, C. I.; Cole, W. E.; Batra, S. K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Demonstration of Advanced Boiler Instrumentation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New and increasing limits on emissions (in particular, NOx) and new emphasis on heat rate have underscored the need to measure flue gas constituents more accurately and in more locations. Utilities are making large capital investments in boiler improvements and emission control devices. These investments can be enhanced through the use of innovative, on-line instrumentation closer to the furnace combustion zone. Traditionally, sensors for flue gas constituents, such as NOx and CO, are implemented as part...

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Review of Combustion Modification Emerging Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion modification emerging technologies for coal-fired boilers represent new developments in NOx control through changes in the fuel/air mixing of the combustion process. Technologies examined in this report fall into the categories of low-NOX burners (LNB), overfire air (OFA), enriched combustion, and combustion diagnostics. The technology reviews are comprised of the following sections where sufficient information was available: background, NOX reduction principle, performance and experience base...

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

Synergies of PCCI-Type Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that future NOx and PM emission targets for diesel engines cannot be met solely via advanced combustion over the full engine drive cycle. Therefore some combination of advanced combustion methodology with an aftertreatment technology will be required. In this study, NOx reduction, fuel efficiency, and regeneration performance of lean NOx trap (LNT) were evaluated for four operating conditions. The combustion approaches included baseline engine operation with and without EGR, two exhaust enrichment methods (post injection and delayed injection), and one advanced combustion mode to enable high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A 1.7 liter 4-cylinder diesel engine was operated under five conditions, which represent key interest points for light-duty diesel operation. At the low load setting the exhaust temperature was too low to enable LNT regeneration and oxidation; however, HECC (low NOx) was achievable. HECC was also reached under more moderate loads and the exhaust temperatures were high enough to enable even further NOx reductions by the LNT. At high loads HECC becomes difficult but the LNT performance improves and acceptable regeneration can be met with enrichment methodologies.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Boilers and Fired Systems  

SciTech Connect

This chapter examines how energy is consumed, how energy is wasted, and opportunities for reducing energy consumption and costs in the operation of boilers.

Parker, Steven A.; Scollon, R. B.

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Minimize Boiler Blowdown  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on minimizing boiler blowdown provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Shield for Water Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Siimplified shielding calculations indicating the proposed design for the water boiler assembly will reduce the radiation at normal operaton to values well below those which are considered tolerable.

Balent, R.

1951-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Furnaces and Boilers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts; boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Impact of Biomass Fuels on Flame Structure and Pollutant Formation during Biomass Cofiring Combustion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cofiring of biomass in pulverized coal boilers for large-scale power generation requires that current combustion standards of stability, reliability, emission and fuel conversion efficiency are (more)

Holtmeyer, Melissa Lauren

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultra-lean, hydrogen-air mixtures are found to support another kind of laminar flame that is steady and stable beside flat flames and flame balls. Direct numerical simulations are performed of flames that develop into steadily and stably propagating cells. These cells were the original meaning of the word"flamelet'' when they were observed in lean flammability studies conducted early in the development of combustion science. Several aspects of these two-dimensional flame cells are identified and are contrasted with the properties of one-dimensional flame balls and flat flames. Although lean hydrogen-air flames are subject to thermo-diffusive effects, in this case the result is to stabilize the flame rather than to render it unstable. The flame cells may be useful as basic components of engineering models for premixed combustion when the other types of idealized flames are inapplicable.

Grcar, Joseph F; Grcar, Joseph F

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Title Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Brown, Nancy J.,...

144

A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joulin, P. Ronney, Combust. Flame 84 (1991) 411422. [9] I.R. A. Strehlow, Combust. Flame 49 (1983) 123140. [11] B.F. A. Williams, Combust. Flame 33 (1978) 3345. [12] T.

Grcar, Joseph F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

411422. [9] I. Glassman, Combustion, 3rd Edition, AcademicB. Lewis, G. von Elbe, Combustion, Flames and Explosions ofin Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion Joseph F. Grcar a a

Grcar, Joseph F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Use in combustion processes for a new type of gaseous fuel based on hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper approaches a very actual problem worldwide, concerning the replacing, in combustion processes, of classical fossil fuels by clean energy sources, in order to reduce the greenhouse effect gases, as well as for fossil fuels' saving. The experiments ... Keywords: burner, clean energy, energy saving, flame, greenhouse effect gases, hydrogen

Lucian Paunescu; Gheorghe Surugiu; Ion Melinte; Corneliu Dica; Paul Dan Stanescu; Gheorghe Iorga; Horia Necula

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

EVALUATION OF COAL-DERIVED LIQUIDS AS BOILER FUELS Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived liquid fuels indicated that these fuels are suitable for use in utility boilers. These fuels, exhibiting acceptable emissions and performance, would require only minimal fuel system modifications.

1985-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

EVALUATION OF COAL-DERIVED LIQUIDS AS BOILER FUELS Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived liquid fuels indicated that these fuels are suitable for use in utility boilers. These fuels, exhibiting acceptable emissions and performance, would require only minimal fuel system modifications.

1985-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

EVALUATION OF COAL-DERIVED LIQUIDS AS BOILER FUELS Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived liquid fuels indicated that these fuels are suitable for use in utility boilers. These fuels, exhibiting acceptable emissions and performance, would require only minimal fuel system modifications.

1985-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

EVALUATION OF COAL-DERIVED LIQUIDS AS BOILER FUELS Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived liquid fuels indicated that these fuels are suitable for use in utility boilers. These fuels, exhibiting acceptable emissions and performance, would require only minimal fuel system modifications.

1985-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

EVALUATION OF COAL-DERIVED LIQUIDS AS BOILER FUELS Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived liquid fuels indicated that these fuels are suitable for use in utility boilers. These fuels, exhibiting acceptable emissions and performance, would require only minimal fuel system modifications.

1985-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

Oxy-Combustion Activities Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews oxy-combustion development activities throughout the world. The report opens by reviewing carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies and their relative advantages and disadvantages before focusing on oxy-combustion concepts and giving details on potential designs. It then delves into each sub-system (air separation, oxy boiler, gas quality control, and CO2 purification) giving the latest updates on technologies and associated development issues, pulling from work reported at the Second...

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Drum-boiler dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear dynamic model for natural circulation drum-boilers is presented. The model describes the complicated dynamics of the drum, downcomer, and riser components. It is derived from first principles, and is characterized by a few physical parameters. ...

K. J. StrM; R. D. Bell

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Boiler Condition Assessment Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report Boiler Condition Assessment Guideline provides a concise overview of procedures developed by the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI to help power plant operators cost-effectively determine the extent of degradation and remaining life of key boiler components. The Guideline draws from EPRIs detailed area-specific guidelines, which in turn are based on extensive research findings by EPRI, member companies, and other organizations. This Guideline offers a starting point for power plant perso...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modeling NOx emissions from coal-fired utility boilers using support vector regression with ant colony optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling NO"x emissions from coal fired utility boiler is critical to develop a predictive emissions monitoring system (PEMS) and to implement combustion optimization software package for low NO"x combustion. This paper presents an efficient NO"x emissions ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Artificial neural networks, Combustion modeling, NOx emissions modeling, Support vector regression

Hao Zhou; Jia Pei Zhao; Li Gang Zheng; Chun Lin Wang; Ke Fa Cen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers: Arsenic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue; the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants has been greatly expanded through passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Arsenic and arsenic compounds are of concern mainly because of their generally recognized toxicity. Arsenic is also regarded as one of the trace elements in coal subject to significant vaporization. This report summarizes and evaluates available published information on the arsenic content of coals mined in the United States, on arsenic emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Bituminous and lignite coals have the highest mean arsenic concentrations, with subbituminous and anthracite coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in arsenic concentrations. Arsenic emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific arsenic compounds. Variations in emission, rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of arsenic by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with cold electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 50 to 98% have been reported. Limited data for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems show widely varying removals of from 6 to 97%. On the other hand, waste incineration plants report removals in a narrow range of from 95 to 99%. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in arsenic control for existing flue-gas-cleanup technologies and summarizes the status of analytical techniques for measuring arsenic emissions from combustion sources.

Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

On-line operating adjustment of small biomass fired boilers optimizing CO and NOx emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control of combustion conditions in small-scale biomass boilers for heating purposes is a specific task because it must be carried out without any high additional costs. If a basic control of heating water on a desired value is performed by means of ... Keywords: PI temperature control, combustion, efficiency, emission limits, fuel consumption

Jan Hrdlicka; Bohumil Sulc

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combustibles Alternativos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustibles Alternativos Dispensador de Combustible Alternativo Los combustibles alternativos estn derivados de otras fuentes adems del petrleo. Unos son producidos en el...

160

Energy Department Awards $2.6 Million to Boost Combustion Efficiency in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.6 Million to Boost Combustion 2.6 Million to Boost Combustion Efficiency in Industrial Boilers Energy Department Awards $2.6 Million to Boost Combustion Efficiency in Industrial Boilers September 26, 2005 - 10:53am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of three new combustion technology research and development (R&D) projects that will receive nearly $2.6 million in total cost-shared funding over the next two years. The selected R&D teams plan to develop advanced industrial boilers that deliver superior energy and environmental performance. By 2020, these boiler technologies are expected to reduce energy use in industrial boilers by seven percent, saving industry $2 billion per year in energy costs. "Combustion systems use nearly three-quarters of all energy consumed in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Orimulsion Combustion By-Products: Chemical Composition and Leaching Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orimulsion (R) is a synthetic fuel derived by mixing heavy bitumen with water to produce an emulsion that can be burned as a primary fuel in electric utility boilers. It can be used for generation of electricity in modified oil-fired utility boilers. This report presents the results of a study on by-products generated from the combustion of Orimulsion.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Inherently Reliable Boiler Component Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the lessons learned during the last decade in efforts to improve the reliability and availability of boilers used in the production of electricity. The information in this report can assist in component modifications and new boiler designs.

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Boiler Efficiency--Consider All the Angles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost of steam has become a very real part of Product cost. U.S. Industry strives to become more fuel efficient, while increasing productivity. At the same time it must adhere to stringent emission regulations. The plant manager is faced with a bewildering number of avenues to explore to achieve efficiency improvements through the use of the widest conceivable array of products. These range from simple fuel additives to highly sophisticated Computer Programs. Each has merit. This paper recognizes that only a small percentage of plant managers have an in-depth understanding of combustion processes and presents simple yet factual measurements for the determination of boiler combustion, operating and maintenance efficiencies.

Blakeley, C. P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Compilation of EPRI Boiler Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler component failures are the most common cause of unplanned outages in fossil steam plants. Headers and drums are two of the largest and most expensive boiler components; however, tube failures have posed the primary availability problem for operators of conventional and combinedcycle plants for as long as reliable statistics have been kept. This product provides a compilation of technical reports covering boiler condition assessment, header and drum failures, and boiler and heat recovery steam gene...

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cofiring Wood and Coal to Stoker Boilers in Pittsburgh  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The prime objective of the University of Pittsburgh's overall wood/coal cofiring program is the successful introduction of commercial cofiring of urban wood wastes into the stoker boilers of western Pennsylvania. Central to this objective is the demonstration test at the Pittsburgh Brewing Company. In this test the project team is working to show that two commercially-available clean wood wastes - tub-ground pallet waste and chipped clearance wood - can be included in the fuel fed daily to an industrial stoker boiler. Irrespective of its economic outcome, the technical success of the demonstration at the brewery will allow the local air quality regulation agency to permit a parametric test at the Bellefield Boiler Plant. The objective of this test is to obtain comprehensive data on all key parameters of this operational boiler while firing wood with coal. The data would then be used for thorough generic technical and economic analyses. The technical analysis would be added to the open literature for the general planning and operational guidance for boiler owners and operators. The economic analysis would gage the potential for providing this stoker fuel commercially in an urban setting and for purchasing it regularly for combustion in an urban stoker boiler.

Cobb, J.T., Jr.; Elder, W.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Analysis of drying wood waste fuels with boiler exhaust gases: simulation, performance, and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study evaluates the feasibility of retrofitting a rotary dryer to a hog fuel boiler, using the boiler exhaust gases as the drying medium. Two simulation models were developed. Each model accurately predicts system performance given site-specific parameters such as boiler steam demand, fue moisture content, boiler exhaust temperature and combustion excess air. Three rotary dryers/hog fuel boilers currently in operation in the forest products industry were analyzed. The data obtained were used to validate te accuracy of the simulation models and to establish the performance of boiler/dryer systems under field conditions. The boiler exhaust temperatures observed ranged from 340 to 500/sup 0/F and indicated that significant drying could be realized at moderate stack temperatures, as substantitated by experimental moisture content data. The simulation models were used to evaluate a general boiler/dryer system's sensitivity to variation in operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses indicated that under moderate conditions (400/sup 0/F boiler exhaust, etc.) the installation of a rotary dryer results in a 15% increase in boiler efficiency and a 13% decrease in fuel consumption. Both the field data and sensitivity analyses indicated that a greater increase in boiler efficiency could be realized at higher stack temperatures, approximately a 30% increase in boiler efficiency for a stack temperature of 600/sup 0/F. The cash flow basis payback periods based on hog fuel savings due to dryer installation ranged from 2.7 years for a used dryer to 3.9 years for a new dryer. The payback periods for equivalent BTU savings of gas and oil ranged from 1.2 to 2.0 for gas and from 1.3 to 2.1 years for oil. This study concludes that retrofitting a rotary dryer to an existing hog fuel boiler is an economically feasible option to the forest products industry. 31 references, 24 figures, 18 tables.

Kirk, R.W.; Wilson, J.B.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Turbulent Combustion Properties of Premixed Syngases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbulent Combustion Properties of Premixed Syngases Title Turbulent Combustion Properties of Premixed Syngases Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors...

168

An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler ... boiler designers, and boiler tube manufacturers since quite a few number of boiler...

169

Microprocessor Based Combustion Monitoring and Control Systems Utilizing in Situ Opacity, Oxygen and CO Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hybrid combustion control system has been developed which combines the functions which have traditionally been performed by separate stand-alone measurement and control instruments into one low-cost integrated system. Complete O2 Trim Control Systems will soon be available starting at less than 6,000 dollars. By utilizing a high performance low-cost microprocessor, both measurement and control functions can now be performed simultaneously. The new systems will feature automatic calibration, self-diagnostics, field programmable memory, and improved operator interface. By measuring the products of combustion utilizing the latest In Situ Opacity, Oxygen, and CO Monitoring technology, the fuel air mixture ratio of industrial fuel burning equipment can be optimized to insure reduced fuel consumption end improved combustion efficiency. Typical fuel savings of 3 to 5 percent have been experienced on a wide variety of different types of fuel burning sources, including packaged boilers, incinerators, and process heaters.

Molloy, R. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Clean Firetube Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet #7 (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

A steam energy tip sheet for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO). The prevention of scale formation in firetube boilers can result in substantial energy savings. Scale deposits occur when calcium, magnesium, and silica, commonly found in most water supplies, react to form a continuous layer of material on the waterside of the boiler heat exchange tubes. Scale creates a problem because it typically possesses a thermal conductivity, an order of magnitude less than the corresponding value for bare steel. Even thin layers of scale serve as an effective insulator and retard heat transfer. The result is overheating of boiler tube metal, tube failures, and loss of energy efficiency. Fuel consumption may increase by up to 5% in firetube boilers because of scale. The boilers steam production may be reduced if the firing rate cannot be increased to compensate for the decrease in combustion efficiency. Energy losses as a function of scale thickness and composition are given. Any scale in a boiler is undesirable. The best way to deal with scale is not to let it form in the first place. Prevent scale formation by: (1) Pretreating of boiler makeup water (using water softeners, demineralizers, and reverse osmosis to remove scale-forming minerals); (2) Injecting chemicals into the boiler feedwater; and (3) Adopting proper boiler blowdown practices.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Retrofit NOx Controls for Coal-Fired Utility Boilers - 2000 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last four years (1996-2000), NOx control retrofits increased significantly in response to further tightening of NOx regulations. Approximately one hundred complete burner retrofits of wall- and T-fired boilers were implemented during this period, bringing the total burner retrofits to 357. Also, 32 burner component modification BCM) projects were implemented. Other control options included combustion optimization in more than two hundred boilers, thirteen reburns, five selective non-catalytic ...

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recovery Boiler Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary computations of the cold flow in a simplified geometry of a recovery boiler are presented. The computations have been carried out using a new code containing multigrid methods and segmentation techniques. This approach is shown to provide good resolution of the complex flow near the air ports and greatly improve the convergence characteristics of the numerical procedure. The improved resolution enhances the predictive capabilities of the computations, and allows the assessment of the relative performance of different air delivery systems.

Abdullah, Z.; Salcudean, M.; Nowak, P.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Application of advanced technologies to ash-related problems in boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prediction of ash behavior in boilers has, for many years, been based on relatively simple relationships involving the composition of inorganic material in fuels. In recent years, advanced analyses for both fuels and deposits have seen increasing use in the solid fuel combustion community. The combination of the standard and advanced analyses, together with a knowledge of boiler design and operating conditions, allow better interpretation of ash behavior in boilers than has previously been possible. This paper discusses several case histories where advanced technologies have been applied to interpret ash behavior in boilers where standard techniques were insufficient. Included in the discussion are: (1) the behavior of blends of fuels; (2) explanations for markedly different behavior between fuels with similar ASTM characteristics; and (3) effects of boiler operating conditions on ash deposit formation.

Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility); Richards, G.; Harb, J. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Heat Recovery Considerations for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Heat Recovery Consideration for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Heat Recovery Considerations for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Heat Recovery Considerations for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size and unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Heat Recovery Consideration for Process Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) for Firetube Boilers PIER, industrial combined heat and power (CHP) boiler burner energy system technology ("BBEST"). Their research (unrecuperated) with an ultra- low nitrous oxide (NOx) boiler burner for firetube boilers. The project goals

180

METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to ready technology for full-scale commercial deployment to meet the market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies. Over half of the electric power generated in the U.S. is produced by coal combustion, and more than 80% of these units utilize PC combustion technology. Conventional measures for NOx reduction in PC combustion processes rely on combustion and post-combustion modifications. A variety of combustion-based NO{sub x} reduction technologies are in use today, including low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBs), flue gas recirculation (FGR), air staging, and natural gas or other fuel reburning. Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are post-combustion techniques. NO{sub x} reduction effectiveness from these technologies ranges from 30 to 60% and up to 90-93% for SCR. Typically, older wall-fired PC burner units produce NO{sub x} emissions in the range of 0.8-1.6 lb/million Btu. Low-NO{sub x} burner systems, using combinations of fuel staging within the burner and air staging by introduction of overfire air in the boiler, can reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 50-60%. This approach alone is not sufficient to meet the desired 0.15 lb/million Btu NO{sub x} standard with a range of coals and boiler loads. Furthermore, the heavy reliance on overfire air can lead to increased slagging and corrosion in furnaces, particularly with higher-sulfur coals, when LNBs are operated at sub-stoichiometric conditions to reduce fuel-derived NOx in the flame. Therefore, it is desirable to minimize the need for overfire air by maximizing NO{sub x} reduction in the burner. The proposed combustion concept aims to greatly reduce NO{sub x} emissions by incorporating a novel modification to conventional or low-NO{sub x} PC burners using gas-fired coal preheating to destroy NO{sub x} precursors and prevent NO{sub x} formation. A concentrated PC stream enters the burner, where flue gas from natural gas combustion is used to heat the PC up to about 1500 F prior to coal combustion. Secondary fuel consumption for preheating is estimated to be 3 to 5% of the boiler heat input. This thermal pretreatment releases coal volatiles, including fuel-bound nitrogen compounds into oxygen-deficient atmosphere, which converts the coal-derived nitrogen compounds to molecular N{sub 2} rather than NO. Design, installation, shakedown, and testing on Powder River Basin (PRB) coal at a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at RPI's (Riley Power, Inc.) pilot-scale combustion facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA demonstrated that the PC PREHEAT process has a significant effect on final O{sub x} formation in the coal burner. Modifications to both the pilot system gas-fired combustor and the PC burner led to NO{sub x} reduction with PRB coal to levels below 0.15 lb/million Btu with CO in the range of 35-112 ppmv without any furnace air staging.

Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Joseph Rabovitser; Stan Wohadlo

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Fuel Cost Savings Through Computer Control of a Boiler Complex - - Two Case Histories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the growing need for energy efficiency in industry and describes a new, packaged approach to fuel optimization through direct digital control and accurate in-stack measurement of combustion products. Results are presented for a large pulp and paper mill complex in which multiple power boilers and turbine generators are controlled so as to meet the total energy demand of the mill at minimum cost. Also discussed are results from a second installation involving control of a combined bark and gas boiler, a gas package boiler and a turbine generator, including utility tie-line control.

Worthley, C. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Oxy-Combustion Activities Worldwide: 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a review of oxy-combustion development activities throughout the world, most of which occurred in the calendar year of 2013. The report opens by introducing oxy-combustion and discussing its relative advantages and disadvantages and associated costs. It then delves into each sub-system (air separation, oxy boiler, gas quality control system [GQCS], and carbon dioxide [CO2] purification) giving the latest updates on technologies and associated development issues in ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

183

Support Vector Machines Applied to a Combustion Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following research aims to make the characterization of flames in the combustion process in an industrial boiler fossil fuel composed of one burner. The characterization of the flames is performed by analysis of electrical signals that are obtained ... Keywords: Combustion, electromagnetic radiation, principal components analysis, statistical moments, support vector machines

Claudia I. Torres, Fernando Hernandez, Antonio Trejo, Guillermo Ronquillo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. Final project report, July 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of carboxylic calcium and magnesium salts (e.g., calcium magnesium acetate or CMA, CaMg{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 6}) for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in oxygen-lean atmospheres. Experiments were performed in a high-temperature furnace that simulated the post-flame environment of a coal-fired boiler by providing similar temperatures and partial pressures of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. When injected into a hot environment, the salts calcined and formed highly porous {open_quotes}popcorn{close_quotes}-like cenospheres. Residual MgO and/or CaCO{sub 3} and CaO reacted heterogeneously with SO{sub 2} to form MgSO{sub 4} and/or CaCO{sub 4}. The organic components - which can be manufactured from wastes such as sewage sludge - gasified and reduced NO{sub x }to N{sub 2} efficiently if the atmosphere was moderately fuel-rich. Dry-injected CMA particles at a Ca/S ratio of 2, residence time of 1 second and bulk equivalence ratio of 1.3 removed over 90% of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at gas temperatures {>=} 950{degrees}C. When the furnace isothermal zone was {acid salts as dual SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} reduction agents. For example, wet injection of the salts could be combined with less expensive hydrocarbons such as lignite or even polymers such as poly(ethylene) that could be extracted from the municipal waste stream.

Levendis, Y.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Return Condensate to the Boiler  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on returning condensate to boilers provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evaluation of Explosive Cleaning Damage in Ferritic Boiler Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have reported boiler tube damage after explosive cleaning to control or remove slag deposits. The damage typically consists of tube crushing, denting, microcracking, and inner diameter (ID) initiated cracking. Because the latter two might not propagate through tube wall thickness initially, these types of cracking are not commonly detected during the cleaning process. However, tube failures after the boiler resumed service have been attributed to these ID-related cracking. Many utilities have r...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report: 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with up-to-date information on trends in gas markets in the United States and around the world, the 2011 edition of the Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report (CTEIR) addresses the impact of shales on natural gas markets and associated risks and includes an overview of boiler windbox repowering using gas turbines.

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. Final project report, July 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of carboxylic calcium and magnesium salts (e.g., calcium magnesium acetate or CMA, CaMg{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 6}) for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in oxygen-lean atmospheres. Experiments were performed in a high-temperature furnace that simulated the post-flame environment of a coal-fired boiler by providing similar temperatures and partial pressures of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. When injected into a hot environment, the salts calcined and formed highly porous {open_quotes}popcorn{close_quotes}-like cenospheres. Residual MgO and/or CaCO{sub 3} and CaO reacted heterogeneously with SO{sub 2} to form MgSO{sub 4} and/or CaCO{sub 4}. The organic components - which can be manufactured from wastes such as sewage sludge - gasified and reduced NO{sub x }to N{sub 2} efficiently if the atmosphere was moderately fuel-rich. Dry-injected CMA particles at a Ca/S ratio of 2, residence time of 1 second and bulk equivalence ratio of 1.3 removed over 90% of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at gas temperatures {>=} 950{degrees}C. When the furnace isothermal zone was {<=} 950{degrees}C, Ca was essentially inert in the furnace quenching zone, while Mg continued to sorb SO{sub 2} as the gas temperature cooled at a rate of -130{degrees}C/sec. Hence, the removal of SO{sub 2} by CMA could continue for nearly the entire residence time of emissions in the exhaust stream of a power plant. Additional research is needed to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of the relatively expensive carboxylic acid salts as dual SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} reduction agents. For example, wet injection of the salts could be combined with less expensive hydrocarbons such as lignite or even polymers such as poly(ethylene) that could be extracted from the municipal waste stream.

Levendis, Y.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in EPA's Boiler Rules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from commercial, industrial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. These new rules, known as the Boiler MACT (major sources) and...

190

At-the-Burner Combustion Measurement Case Study Report: Demonstrations of Forney's OptiFlame and MK Engineering's MPV-1 Combustion S ensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While detailed manual testing can optimize combustion conditions in a utility boiler, current instrumentation is not sufficient to monitor whether or not tuned conditions persist. Two new technologies have the potential to supplement current techniques to tune boilers and also provide a means to continuously monitor the systems.

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Boiler Reliability Optimization: Interim Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Competitive pressures to drive costs down in the new business environment sometimes conflict with the demands of increased reliability and quality of supply. The Boiler Reliability Optimization program, which makes use of a number of applicable EPRI technologies, was developed to assess, create, and implement an effective boiler maintenance strategy for the changing business environment.

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion performance guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Performance specifications for conventional coal-fired boilers typically call for tests to be conducted in accordance with the ASME Performance Test Code for Steam Generating Units, PTC 4.1. The Code establishes procedures for conducting performance tests primarily to determine efficiency and capacity. The current edition of the PTC 4.1 is not entirely applicable to atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion boilers, however. AFBC boilers typically are equipped with integral sulfur capture through the addition of a sorbent material along with the fuel feed to the combustor, and this new technology introduces heat losses and credits that are not described in PTC 4.1. These heat losses and credits include combustion heat loss due to the calcination of the sorbent, heat credit due to sulfation, and the effects of calcination and sulfation on the dry flue gas flow, all of which significantly affect boiler efficiency calculations. The limitations of the current issue of the PTC 4.1 is recognized and the Code is now being reviewed to include heat losses and credits common to AFBC boilers. While this work will take some time, there is an immediate need for procedures for performance testing of AFBC boilers. These Guidelines are prepared to meet that need in the interim. The Guidelines detail procedures for boiler efficiency tests. They introduce technical and economic issues that may influence the test level of detail and accuracy. Methods of identifying required measurements, selection of measurement schemes, and assessment of measured versus estimated values are presented. A case study is used to illustrate the procedures and indicate which are the major credits and losses in the efficiency of a typical AFBC boiler. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Sotelo, E. (Sotelo (Ernest), Berkeley, CA (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reviews the work performed during the quarter January-March 2003. The main objectives of the project are: To demonstrate the feasibility of the full-oxy combustion with flue gas recirculation on Babcock & Wilcox's 1.5MW pilot boiler, To measure its performances in terms of emissions and boiler efficiency while selecting the right oxygen injection strategies, To perform an economical feasibility study, comparing this solution with alternate technologies, and To design a new generation, full oxy-fired boiler. The main objective of this quarter was to initiate the project, primarily the experimental tasks. The contractor and its subcontractors have defined a working plan, and the first tasks have been started. Task 1 (Site Preparation) is now in progress, defining the modifications to be implemented to the boiler and oxygen delivery system. The changes are required in order to overcome some current limitations of the existing system. As part of a previous project carried out in 2002, several changes have already been made on the pilot boiler, including the enrichment of the secondary and tertiary air with oxygen or the replacement of these streams with oxygen-enriched recycled flue gas. A notable modification for the current project involves the replacement of the primary air with oxygen-enriched flue gas. Consequently, the current oxygen supply and flue gas recycle system is being modified to meet this new requirement. Task 2 (Combustion and Emissions Performance Optimization) has been initiated with a preliminary selection of four series of tests to be performed. So far, the project schedule is on-track: site preparation (Task 1) should be completed by August 1st, 2003 and the tests (Task 2) are planned for September-October 2003. The Techno-Economic Study (Task 3) will be initiated in the following quarter.

Ovidiu Marin; Fabienne Chatel-Pelage

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Commonwealth Small Pellet Boiler Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commonwealth Small Pellet Boiler Grant Program Commonwealth Small Pellet Boiler Grant Program Commonwealth Small Pellet Boiler Grant Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Bioenergy Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info Funding Source Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund Start Date 03/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Base Grant: $7,000 Automated Conveyance of Fuel Adder: $3,000 Thermal Storage Adder: $2,000 Solar Thermal Hybrid System Adder: $1,000 Moderate Income Adder or Moderate Home Value Adder: $2,000 Maximum Grant: $15,000 Provider Massachusetts Clean Energy Center The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) are offering the Commonwealth Small Pellet Boiler

195

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in EPA's Boiler Rules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities in EPA's Boiler Rules Opportunities in EPA's Boiler Rules On December 20, 2012, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized new regulations to control emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from commercial, industrial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. These new rules, known as the Boiler MACT (major sources) and Boiler Area Source Rule (smaller sources), will reduce the amount of HAPS such as mercury, heavy metals, and other toxics that enter the environment. Since emissions from boilers are linked to fuel consumption, energy efficiency is an important strategy for complying with the new Boiler rules. Who is affected? Most existing industrial, commercial and institutional (ICI) boilers will not be affected by the Boiler MACT. These unaffected boilers are mostly small natural gas-fired boilers. Only about 14% of all existing

197

Effect of liquefaction processing conditions on combustion characteristics of solvent-refined coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of several direct liquefaction processes currently under advanced stages of development is the Solvent-Refined Coal-I (SRC-I) process. A major SRC-1 product option is a low sulfur, low ash solid (SRC) which could be used as an electric utility boiler fuel much in the same manner that pulverized coal is currently fired in this type of combustion equipment. SRC-I processing has been performed using three variations in the manner in which mineral matter and unconverted coal are separated from the hot coal liquid. These processes are the Pressure Filtration Deashing (PFD), Anti-Solvent Deashing (ASD), and Critical Solvent Deashing (CSD). Since processing conditions may influence the combustion of SRC-I solids produced, an experimental program was carried out at both the bench and pilot plant scale to determine the influence of processing (i.e. solids separation method) and combustion conditions on carbon burnout of these three varieties of SRC solid boiler fuels. Included in this study was an examination of NO/sub x/ emissions (particularly for the CSD SRC and PFD SRC) with the objective of attaining low NO/sub x/ emissions without adversely affecting combustion efficiency. The work was carried out at the laboratory, bench and pilot plant scales employing Thermo-Gravimetric analyses, Drop Tube Furnace testing, and Controlled Mixing History furnace testing, respectively. Reactivity and NO/sub x/ emissions results were compared with those obtained from two coals previously tested and used as reference coals. One of these coals was a high reactivity Wyoming subbituminous coal and the other was a low reactivity Kentucky high volatile bituminous coal. The type of processing scheme used in the SRC-I deashing step was found to have a major impact on the combustion properties of the resultant solid SRC product.

Goetz, G.J.; Lao, T.C.; Mehta, A.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} emissions by in- boiler injection of CMA. Second quarterly project status report, 1 January 1993--31 March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA); and (B) To evaluate the NO{sub x}, reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N{sub 2}. The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x},NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail. The possibility of introducing two different sorbents sequentially will also be examined. For instance, such a scheme may employ injection of the rather inexpensive calcium carbonate initially, followed by the more costly CMA. The effectiveness of a ``homemade`` CMA using woody biomass as a low-cost source of acetate will be explored if such a product becomes available during the course of this work. Finally, CMA will be introduced in the matrix of the coal by an ion exchange or a precipitation technique. Upon subsequent combustion, the composition and physical structure of the remaining ash will be examined, as well as the gas phase SO{sub x}, concentration. Both techniques (CMA pretreatment and CMA injection) may also be implemented simultaneously to assess their combined effect on sulfur capture.

Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Phase 3A, Low NO{sub x} burner tests  

SciTech Connect

This Phase 3A test report summarizes the testing activities and results for the third testing phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. Described in this report are the test plans, data measurements, and data analyses performed during the Phase 3A effort. The present report also contains sufficient background material to provide an understanding of the overall program scope, the relationship of Phase 3A to the overall program, the testing methodologies, testing procedures, and unit configuration. Results from 66 short-term tests indicate increasing NO{sub x} emissions over the load range ranging from 0.5 lb/MBtu at 300 NM to around 0.65 lb/MBtu at 480 MW. Fly ash loss-on-ignition (LOI) for these loads ranged from 5.4 to 8.6 percent. Long-term test results indicated high load (480 MW) NO{sub x} emissions of approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. At the 300 MW mid load point, the emissions dropped to 0.47 lb/MBtu which is slightly lower than the 0.50 lb/MBtu shown for the short-term data. The annual and 30-day average achievable NO{sub x} emissions were determined to be 0.55 and 0.64 lb/MBtu, respectively, for the load scenario experienced during the Phase 3A, long-term test period. Based on the long-term test results for Phase 3A, at full-load the low NO{sub x} burners (LNB) retrofit resulted in a NO{sub x} reduction of 48 percent from baseline, while at 300 MW the reduction was approximately 50 percent. A series of tests was also conducted to evaluate the effects of various burner equipment settings and mill coal flow biasing on both NO{sub x} and LOI emissions.

Not Available

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CO2 Capture for PC-Boiler Using Flue-Gas Recirculation: Evaluation of CO2 CaptureUtilizationDisposal Options Project No.: FWP49539...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

New and Underutilized Technology: Condensing Boilers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following information outlines key deployment considerations for condensing boilers within the Federal sector.

202

Chlorine in solid fuels fired in pulverized fuel boilers sources, forms, reactions, and consequences: a literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorine is a significant source of corrosion and deposition, both from coal and from biomass, and in PF boilers. This investigation was designed to highlight the potential for corrosion risks associated with once-through units and advanced cycles. The research took the form of a detailed literature investigation to evaluate chlorine in solid fuels: coals of various ranks and origins, biomass fuels of a variety of types, petroleum cokes, and blends of the above. The investigation focused upon an extensive literature review of documents dating back to 1991. The focus is strictly corrosion and deposition. To address the deposition and corrosion issues, this review evaluates the following considerations: concentrations of chlorine in available solid fuels including various coals and biomass fuels, forms of chlorine in those fuels, and reactions - including reactivities - of chlorine in such fuels. The assessment includes consideration of alkali metals and alkali earth elements as they react with, and to, the chlorine and other elements (e.g., sulfur) in the fuel and in the gaseous products of combustion. The assessment also includes other factors of combustion: for example, combustion conditions including excess O{sub 2} and combustion temperatures. It also considers analyses conducted at all levels: theoretical calculations, bench scale laboratory data and experiments, pilot plant experiments, and full scale plant experience. Case studies and plant surveys form a significant consideration in this review. The result of this investigation focuses upon the concentrations of chlorine acceptable in coals burned exclusively, in coals burned with biomass, and in biomass cofired with coal. Values are posited based upon type of fuel and combustion technology. Values are also posited based upon both first principles and field experience. 86 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

David A. Tillman; Dao Duong; Bruce Miller [Foster Wheeler North America Corp. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Feasibility of burning refuse derived fuel in institutional size oil-fired boilers. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the feasibility of retrofitting existing oil-fired boilers of institutional size, approximately 3.63 to 36.3 Mg steam/h (8000 to 80,000 lbs steam/h) for co-firing with refuse-derived fuel (RDF). Relevant quantities describing mixtures of oil and RDF and combustion products for various levels of excess air are computed. Savings to be realized from the use of RDF are derived under several assumptions and allowable costs for a retrofit are estimated. An extensive survey of manufacturers of burners, boilers, and combustion systems showed that no hardware or proven design is yet available for such retrofit. Approaches with significant promises are outlined: the slagging burner, and a dry ash double vortex burner for low heat input from RDF. These two systems, and an evaluation of a small separate RDF dedicated combustor in support of the oil-fired boiler, are recommended as topics for future study.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Research, Development and Demonstration of Bio-Mass Boiler for Food Industry  

SciTech Connect

Frito-Lay is working to reduce carbon emissions from their manufacturing plants. As part of this effort, they invested in a ??biomass-fired? boiler at the Topeka, Kansas, plant. Frito-Lay partnered with Burns & McDonnell Engineering, Inc. and CPL Systems, Inc., to design and construct a steam producing boiler using ??carbon neutral? fuels such as wood wastes (e.g. tree bark), shipping pallets, and used rubber vehicle tires. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joined with Frito-Lay, Burns & McDonnell, and CPL to analyze the reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that result from use of biomass-fired boilers in the food manufacturing environment. DOE support provided for the data collection and analysis, and reporting necessary to evaluate boiler efficiencies and reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions. The Frito-Lay biomass-fired boiler has resulted in significant reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions from the Topeka production facility. The use of natural gas has been reduced by 400 to 420 million standard cubic feet per year with corresponding reductions of 24,000 to 25,000 tons of CO{sub 2}. The boiler does require auxiliary ??functions,? however, that are unnecessary for a gas-fired boiler. These include heavy motors and fans for moving fuel and firing the boiler, trucks and equipment for delivering the fuel and moving at the boiler plant, and chippers for preparing the fuel prior to delivery. Each of these operations requires the combustion of fossil fuels or electricity and has associated CO{sub 2} emissions. Even after accounting for each of these auxiliary processes, however, the biomass-fired boiler results in net emission reductions of 22,500 to 23,500 tons of CO{sub 2} per year.

Fisher, Steve; Knapp, David

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Health Effects of Inhalation of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential human health effects of inhaled coal combustion products (CCPs), which consist of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products. The focus is on as-managed CCPs, with evaluation of the potential effects of exposure through fugitive emissions from storage facilities. Because the literature pertaining to bottom ash, boiler slag, and FGD solids is scarce, this review draws almost entirely from studies of fly ash as a surrogate particulate ma...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Practical Procedures for Auditing Industrial Boiler Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial boiler plants are an area of opportunity in virtually every industry to save energy and reduce costs by using relatively simple, inexpensive auditing procedures. An energy audit consists of inspection, measurement, analysis, and the preparation of recommendations. A complete boiler plant program will consider each individual boiler, boiler room auxiliary equipment, steam distribution and return systems, and steam end use equipment. This paper summarizes the practical procedures, techniques, and instrumentation which Nabisco uses in its boiler plant energy conservation program.

O'Neil, J. P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Improving boiler performance through operator training  

SciTech Connect

The majority of the technical training in many plant facilities is the self-study type. These courses consist of packaged text materials as well as plant specific lessons. Video-based training is more effective than textbooks alone, and computer interactive training is becoming increasingly popular. Demonstration of technical competence can be conducted in a variety of ways: supervised system check off and verification system walk-throughs; simulator evaluation; written examinations required for promotion; and oral examinations. Boiler operators can be required to demonstrate in a practical way that they can apply the boiler plant theory to actual job performance in the plant. Some classifications may be required to perform a supervised system check off and verification before promotion to the next higher classification. Personnel who operate boilers from a control room or gauge board may be required to successfully complete simulator training and evaluation. All classifications may require successful completion of written and oral examinations before being promoted to the next higher classification.

DeHart, R.M. [Cogentrix Energy, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Recover Heat from Boiler Blowdown  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on recovering heat from boiler blowdown provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effect of Hydrocarbon Emissions From PCCI-Type Combustion On The Performance of Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Core samples cut from full size commercial Fe-and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. Subsequently, the NOx reduction performance of the exposed catalysts was evaluated on a laboratory bench- reactor fed with simulated exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOx conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (<250 C), after the catalyst was exposed to the engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite was much more resistant to HC fouling than the Fe-zeolite catalyst. In the case of the Cu-zeolite, PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOx conversion efficiency. For all cases, the clean catalyst performance was recovered after heating to 600 C. GC-MS analysis of the HCs adsorbed to the catalyst surface provided insights into the observed NOx reduction performance trends.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effect of Hydrocarbon Emissions From PCCI-Type Combustion On The Performance of Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core samples cut from full size commercial Fe-and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. Subsequently, the NOx reduction performance of the exposed catalysts was evaluated on a laboratory bench- reactor fed with simulated exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOx conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (catalyst was exposed to the engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite was much more resistant to HC fouling than the Fe-zeolite catalyst. In the case of the Cu-zeolite, PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOx conversion efficiency. For all cases, the clean catalyst performance was recovered after heating to 600 C. GC-MS analysis of the HCs adsorbed to the catalyst surface provided insights into the observed NOx reduction performance trends.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Field Guide: Boiler Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional and combined-cycle plants, boiler tube failures (BTFs) have been the main availability problem for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. The three volumes of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice (1012757) present an in-depth discussion of the various BTF and degradation mechanisms, providing plant owners and operators with the technical basis to address tube failu...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment = furnace Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orequipment = boiler Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orHOME HEATING FUEL CON 3 NATURAL GAS FROM UNDERGROUND PIPES = 1 BOTTLED GAS (LPG OR PROPANE) = 2 FUEL OIL

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Utilization of coal-water fuels in fire-tube boilers. Final report, October 1990--August 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE sponsored project was to successfully fire coal-water slurry in a fire-tube boiler that was designed for oil/gas firing and establish a data base that will be relevant to a large number of existing installations. Firing slurry in a fire-tube configuration is a very demanding application because of the extremely high heat release rates and the correspondingly low furnace volume where combustion can be completed. Recognizing that combustion efficiency is the major obstacle when firing slurry in a fire-tube boiler, the program was focused on innovative approaches for improving carbon burnout without major modifications to the boiler. The boiler system was successfully designed and operated to fire coal-water slurry for extended periods of time with few slurry related operational problems. The host facility was a 3.8 million Btu/hr Cleaver-Brooks fire-tube boiler located on the University of Alabama Campus. A slurry atomizer was designed that provided outstanding atomization and was not susceptible to pluggage. The boiler was operated for over 1000 hours and 12 shipments of slurry were delivered. The new equipment engineered for the coal-water slurry system consisted of the following: combustion air and slurry heaters; cyclone; baghouse; fly ash reinjection system; new control system; air compressor; CWS/gas burner and gas valve train; and storage tank and slurry handling system.

Sommer, T.; Melick, T.; Morrison, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Oxy-coal Combustion Studies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol. To these ends, the project has focused on the following: ? The development of reliable Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of oxy-coal flames using the Direct Quadrature Method of Moments (DQMOM) (Subtask 3.1). The simulations were validated for both non-reacting particle-laden jets and oxy-coal flames. ? The modifications of an existing oxy-coal combustor to allow operation with high levels of input oxygen to enable in-situ laser diagnostic measurements as well as the development of strategies for directed oxygen injection (Subtask 3.2). Flame stability was quantified for various burner configurations. One configuration that was explored was to inject all the oxygen as a pure gas within an annular oxygen lance, with burner aerodynamics controlling the subsequent mixing. ? The development of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for identification of velocity fields in turbulent oxy-coal flames in order to provide high-fidelity data for the validation of oxy-coal simulation models (Subtask 3.3). Initial efforts utilized a laboratory diffusion flame, first using gas-fuel and later a pulverized-coal flame to ensure the methodology was properly implemented and that all necessary data and image-processing techniques were fully developed. Success at this stage of development led to application of the diagnostics in a large-scale oxy-fuel combustor (OFC). ? The impact of oxy-coal-fired vs. air-fired environments on SO{sub x} (SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}) emissions during coal combustion in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) (Subtask 3.4). Profiles of species concentration and temperature were obtained for both conditions, and profiles of temperature over a wide range of O{sub 2} concentration were studied for oxy-firing conditions. The effect of limestone addition on SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} emissions were also examined for both air- and oxy- firing conditions. ? The investigation of O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} environments on SO{sub 2 emissions during coal combustion in a bench-scale single-particle fluidized-bed reactor (Subtask 3.5). Moreover, the sulfation mechanisms of limestone in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} environments were studied, and a generalized gassolid and diffusion-reaction single-particle model was developed to study the effect of major operating variables. ? The investigation of the effect of oxy-coal combustion on ash formation, particle size distributions (PSD), and size-segregated elemental composition in a drop-tube furnace and the 100 kW OFC (Subtask 3.6). In particular, the effect of coal type and flue gas recycle (FGR, OFC only) was investigated.

J. Wendt; E. Eddings; J. Lighty; T. Ring; P. Smith; J. Thornock; Y. Jia, W. Morris; J. Pedel; D. Rezeai; L. Wang; J. Zhang; K. Kelly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Reduction of NO[sub x] emissions coke oven gas combustion process  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes by-product processing at Clairton Works which uses a unique cryogenic technology. Modifications to the desulfurization facility, nitrogen oxide formation in combustion processes (both thermal and fuel NO[sub x]), and the boilers plants are described. Boilers were used to study the contribution of fuel NO[sub x] formation during the combustion of coke oven gas. Results are summarized. The modifications made to the desulfurization facility resulted in the overall H[sub 2]S emission being reduced by 2-4 grains/100scf and the NO[sub x] emission being reduced by 21-42% in the boiler stacks.

Terza, R.R. (USS Clairton Works, PA (United States)); Sardesai, U.V. (Westfield Engineering and Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Condensing Heat Exchangers Optimize Steam Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of fluorocarbon resin covered tubes has advanced to the point where full scale marketing in connection with condensing heat exchangers has begun. Field installations show simple paybacks of one to one and a half years with resulting steam boiler fuel to steam efficiencies in excess of 90%. The studies and evaluations done to date indicate that units of this type will be cost effective in sizes ranging from 10,000 to 300,0000 steam per hour as long as cold makeup water is available for preheating with the waste flue gases.

Sullivan, B.; Sullivan, P. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and missions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects test; and full-scale combustion tests.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NOx Control for Utility Boiler OTR Compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under sponsorship of the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and Fuel Tech teamed together to investigate an integrated solution for NO{sub x} control. The system is comprised of B and W's DRB-4Z{trademark} ultra low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner technology and Fuel Tech's NOxOUT{reg_sign}, a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology. Development of the low-NO{sub x} burner technology has been a focus in B and W's combustion program. The DRB-4Z{trademark} burner is B and W's newest low-NO{sub x} burner capable of achieving very low NO{sub x}. The burner is designed to reduce NO{sub x} by controlled mixing of the fuel and air. Based on data from several 500 to 600 MWe boilers firing PRB coal, NOx emissions levels of 0.15 to 0.20 lb/ 106 Btu have been achieved from the DRB-4Z{trademark} burners in combination with overfire air ports. Although NOx emissions from the DRB-4Z{trademark} burner are nearing the Ozone Transport Rule (OTR) level of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/106 Btu, the utility boiler owners can still benefit from the addition of an SNCR and/or SCR system in order to comply with the stringent NO{sub x} emission levels facing them. Large-scale testing is planned in B and W's 100-million Btu/hr Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) that simulates the conditions of large coal-fired utility boilers. The objective of the project is to achieve a NO{sub x} level below 0.15 lb/106 Btu (with ammonia slip of less than 5 ppm) in the CEDF using PRB coal and B and W's DRB-4Z{trademark} low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner in combination with dual zone overfire air ports and Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT{reg_sign}. During this period B and W prepared and submitted the project management plan and hazardous substance plan to DOE. The negotiation of a subcontract for Fuel Tech has been started.

Hamid Farzan

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Computational Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Implementation of Boiler Best Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boilers are an essential part of any industrial plant, and their efficient, economical operation can significantly affect the reliability and profitability of the entire plant. Best Practices for Boilers include tools to determine where a plant or corporation is with respect to boiler treatment, what needs to be done to make the plant (corporation) the "best of the best," and how to get there. When implemented, Best Practices provide a method to measure and track progress, and represent a benchmark for continuous improvement. Best Practices combine our global collective experience from the areas of research, consulting, sales and marketing, and involve not only recommendations and specifications, but also the rationale behind them for the application of the chosen treatment, monitoring, and instrumentation. Best practices provide energy savings, profitability improvement, reduction in total cost of operations, project management, optimized treatment choices, enhanced safety, system assessment processes and facilitated system improvements.

Blake, N. R.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ultraclean Low Swirl Combustion  

Commercial HVAC Systems ; Industrial Boilers ; Distillation Columns ; Water Heaters ; Furnaces ; Clothes Dryers

227

Advanced Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered in this presentation include: the continued importance of coal; related materials challenges; combining oxy-combustion & A-USC steam; and casting large superalloy turbine components.

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Furnaces and Boilers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces and Boilers June 24, 2012 - 4:56pm Addthis Upgrading to a high efficiency furnace or boiler is an effective way to save money on home heating. Upgrading to a high efficiency furnace or boiler is an effective way to save money on home heating. What does this mean for me? To maintain your heating system's efficiency and ensure healthy indoor air quality, it's critical to maintain the unit and its venting mechanism. Proper maintenance extends the life of your furnace or boiler and saves you money. Most U.S. homes are heated with either furnaces or boilers. Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through the house using ducts. Boilers heat water, and provide either hot water or steam for heating. Steam is distributed via pipes to steam radiators, and hot water can be distributed

229

Furnaces and Boilers | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Boilers June 24, 2012 - 4:56pm Addthis Upgrading to a high efficiency furnace or boiler is an effective way to save money on home heating. Upgrading to a high efficiency...

230

Effect of bed pressure drop on performance of a CFB boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of bed pressure drop and bed inventory on the performances of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was studied. By using the state specification design theory, the fluidization state of the gas-solids flow in the furnace of conventional CFB boilers was reconstructed to operate at a much lower bed pressure drop by reducing bed inventory and control bed quality. Through theoretical analysis, it was suggested that there would exist a theoretical optimal value of bed pressure drop, around which the boiler operation can achieve the maximal combustion efficiency and with significant reduction of the wear of the heating surface and fan energy consumption. The analysis was validated by field tests carried out in a 75 t/h CFB boiler. At full boiler load, when bed pressure drop was reduced from 7.3 to 3.2 kPa, the height of the dense zone in the lower furnace decreased, but the solid suspension density profile in the upper furnace and solid flow rate were barely influenced. Consequently, the average heat transfer coefficient in the furnace was kept nearly the same and the furnace temperature increment was less than 17{sup o}C. It was also found that the carbon content in the fly ash decreased first with decreasing bed pressure drop and then increased with further increasing bed pressure drop. The turning point with minimal carbon content was referred to as the point with optimal bed pressure drop. For this boiler, at the optimum point the bed pressure was around 5.7 kPa with the overall excess air ratio of 1.06. When the boiler was operated around this optimal point, not only the combustion efficiency was improved, but also fan energy consumption and wear of heating surface were reduced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Shi Yang; Guangxi Yue; Jun Su; Zhiping Fu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Steam Boiler Control Specification Problem:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our solution to the specification problem in the specification language TLA+ is based on a model of operation where several components proceed synchronously. Our first specification concerns a simplified controller and abstracts from many details given in the informal problem description. We successively add modules to build a model of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed controller specification and prove that it refines the abstract controller. We also address the relationship between the physical state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss the reliability of failure detection. Finally, we discuss the implementability of our specification.

Tla Solution Frank; Frank Le Ke; Stephan Merz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer for sulfuric acid decomposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus, constructed of ceramics and other corrosion resistant materials, for decomposing sulfuric acid into sulfur dioxide, oxygen and water using an integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer unit comprising a bayonet-type, dual-tube, counter-flow heat exchanger with a catalytic insert and a central baffle to increase recuperation efficiency.

Moore, Robert (Edgewood, NM); Pickard, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Parma, Jr., Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Gelbard, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Lenard, Roger X. (Edgewood, NM)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

Circumferential Cracking Investigation on a Supercritical Boiler Martin Lake Unit 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminants Martin Lake unit 3 is one of three supercritical boilers at the site. Lignite from nearby mines is the principal source of fuel, which is mixed with 10-20% Powder River Basin or western coal to assist combustion. The boiler was originally designed to generate around 750 MW, although it is now generating up to 850 MW. In 2000, water cannons were installed in the walls as a replacement for the wall blowers. At about the same time, after 21 years of operation without signs of cracking, the unit wa...

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fossil Boiler Life News July 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil Boiler Life News, published twice yearly, is the newsletter of EPRI's Boiler Life and Availability Improvement Program (P63). The July 2008 issue includes articles on upcoming meetings, new program personnel, R&D projects for 2009, a boiler drum fracture assessment guideline, protocols for manufacturing and inspecting CSEF steels, predictive FAC codes for fossil units, corrosion-resistant nanocoatings, preventive designs for eliminating boiler tube failures, and other deliverables. The newsletter ...

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Spontaneous Human Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spontaneous Human Combustion Spontaneous Human Combustion Name: S. Phillips. Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: One of our 8th grade students has tried to find information in our library about spontaneous human combustion, but to no avail. Could you tell us where we might locate a simple reference, or provide some in information about this subject for him. Replies: Sorry, but this is definitely "fringe science"...try asking in bookstores. I seem to recall one of those "believe it or not" type of TV shows did an episode on spontaneous human combustion a few years ago in which they reported on some British scientists who investigated this purported phenomenon. Remember that people (back in the Dark Ages, and before) used to believe in "spontaneous generation" of certain plants and animals because they were not aware of the reproduction methods used by those plants and animals.

236

Free Energy and Internal Combustion Engine Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of one type (Carnot) of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) cycle is analyzed within the framework of thermodynamic free energies. ICE performance is different from that of an External Combustion Engine (ECE) which is dictated by Carnot's rule.

Harris, William D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Combustion properties of Kraft Black Liquors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a previous study of the phenomena involved in the combustion of black liquor droplets a numerical model was developed. The model required certain black liquor specific combustion information which was then not currently available, and additional data were needed for evaluating the model. The overall objectives of the project reported here was to provide experimental data on key aspects of black liquor combustion, to interpret the data, and to put it into a form which would be useful for computational models for recovery boilers. The specific topics to be investigated were the volatiles and char carbon yields from pyrolysis of single black liquor droplets; a criterion for the onset of devolatilization and the accompanying rapid swelling; and the surface temperature of black liquor droplets during pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification. Additional information on the swelling characteristics of black liquor droplets was also obtained as part of the experiments conducted.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Hupa, M. (Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Sootblowing optimization for improved boiler performance  

SciTech Connect

A sootblowing control system that uses predictive models to bridge the gap between sootblower operation and boiler performance goals. The system uses predictive modeling and heuristics (rules) associated with different zones in a boiler to determine an optimal sequence of sootblower operations and achieve boiler performance targets. The system performs the sootblower optimization while observing any operational constraints placed on the sootblowers.

James, John Robert; McDermott, John; Piche, Stephen; Pickard, Fred; Parikh, Neel J

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sootblowing optimization for improved boiler performance  

SciTech Connect

A sootblowing control system that uses predictive models to bridge the gap between sootblower operation and boiler performance goals. The system uses predictive modeling and heuristics (rules) associated with different zones in a boiler to determine an optimal sequence of sootblower operations and achieve boiler performance targets. The system performs the sootblower optimization while observing any operational constraints placed on the sootblowers.

James, John Robert; McDermott, John; Piche, Stephen; Pickard, Fred; Parikh, Neel J.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Characterization and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization and Prediction of Oxy-Combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers Characterization and Prediction of Oxy-Combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers Project No.: DE-NT0005288 Pilot-scale 100 kW oxy-fuel combustor Pilot-scale 100 kW oxy-fuel combustor Reaction Engineering International will conduct multi-scale experiments, coupled with mechanism development and computational fluid dynamics modeling, to evaluate the impacts of retrofitting existing coal-fired boilers for oxy-combustion. Test data will be obtained from oxy-combustion experiments at the 0.1-kilowatt (kW), 100-kW, and 1.2-megawatt scale. Related Papers and Publications: Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers [PDF-9MB] (Nov 2013) Final Project Review Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA, November 6, 2013. Characterization of Oxy-Combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-Fired Boilers [PDF-1.67MB] (July 2013)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Particulate matter emissions from combustion of wood in district heating applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utilization of wood biomass to generate district heat and power in communities that have access to this energy source is increasing. In this paper the effect of wood fuel properties, combustion condition, and flue gas cleaning system on variation in the amount and formation of particles in the flue gas of typical district heating wood boilers are discussed based on the literature survey. Direct measurements of particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood boilers with district heating applications are reviewed and presented. Finally, recommendations are given regarding the selection of wood fuel, combustion system condition, and flue gas cleaning system in district heating systems in order to meet stringent air quality standards. It is concluded that utilization of high quality wood fuel, such as wood pellets produced from natural, uncontaminated stem wood, would generate the least PM emissions compared to other wood fuel types. Particulate matter emissions from grate burners equipped with electrostatic precipitators when using wood pellets can be well below stringent regulatory emission limit such as particulate emission limit of Metro Vancouver, Canada.

Ghafghazi, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Characterizing and modeling combustion of mild-gasification chars in pressurized fluidized beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance estimates for the UCC2, IGTP1, and IGTP2 chars were made for a typical utility PFBC boiler having nominal characteristics similar to those of the American Electric Power 75 MW(e) Tidd PFBC demonstration facility. Table 2 summarizes the assumed boiler operating conditions input to the PFBC simulation code. Input fuel parameters for the chars and reference fuels were determined from their standard ASTM analyses (Table 1) and the results of the bench-scale characterization tests at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The required characterization information for the reference fuels was available from the B&W data base, and the combustion reactivity information for the mild-gasification chars was generated in the pressurized bench-scale reactor as described earlier. Note that the combustion reactivity parameters for Beulah lignite are those previously measured at low-pressure conditions. It was necessary to use the previous values as the new parameters could not be accurately measured in the pressurized bench-scale facility. Based on very limited measurements of particle size attrition in paste-type feed systems, it was assumed that all of the fuels (including the chars) would have a very small (essentially negligible) degree of attrition in the feed system. Char devolatilization parameters were assumed to be equal to those of anthracite because of the very low levels of volatiles present in UCC2, IGTP1, and IGTP2. Major fuel input parameters and higher heating values are summarized in Table 3.

Daw, C.S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

244

Post-test examination of a pool boiler receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A subscale pool boiler test apparatus to evaluate boiling stability developed a leak after being operated with boiling NaK for 791.4 hr at temperatures from 700 to 750 {degrees}C. The boiler was constructed using Inconel 625 with a type 304L stainless steel wick for the boiler and type 316 stainless steel for the condenser. The boiler assembly was metallurgically evaluated to determine the cause of the leak and to assess the effects of the NaK on the materials. It was found that the leak was caused by insufficient (about 30 percent) joint penetration in a butt joint. There was no general corrosion of the construction materials, but the room temperature ductility of the Inconel 625 was only about 6.5 percent. A crack in the heat affected zone of the Inconel 625 near the Inconel 625 to type 316 stainless steel butt joint was probably caused by excessive heat input. The crack was observed to have a zone depleted of iron at the crack surface and porosity below that zone. The mechanism of the iron depletion was not conclusively determined. 3 refs.

Dreshfield, R.L.; Moore, T.J.; Bartolotta, P.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reviews the work performed during the quarter October-December 2003. Task 1 (Site Preparation) had been completed in the previous reporting period. In this reporting period, one week of combustion parameters optimization has been performed in Task 2 (experimental test performance) of the project. Under full-oxy conditions (100% air replacement with O{sub 2}-enriched flue gas) in 1.5MW{sub th} coal-fired boiler, the following parameters have been varied and their impact on combustion characteristics measured: the recirculated flue gas flow rate has been varied from 80% to 95% of total flue gas flow, and the total oxygen flow rate into the primary air zone of the boiler has been set to levels ranging from 15% to 25% of the total oxygen consumption in the overall combustion. In current reporting period, significant progress has also been made in Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study) of the project: mass and energy balance calculations and cost assessment have been completed on plant capacity of 533MW{sub e} gross output while applying the methodology described in previous reporting periods. Air-fired PC Boiler and proposed Oxygen-fired PC Boiler have been assessed, both for retrofit application and new unit. The current work schedule is to review in more details the experimental data collected so far as well as the economics results obtained on the 533MWe cases, and to develop a work scope for the remainder of the project. Approximately one week of pilot testing is expected during the first quarter of 2004, including mercury emission measurement and heat transfer characterization. The project was on hold from mid-November through December 2003 due to non-availability of funds. Out of the {approx}$785k allocated DOE funds in this project, $497k have been spent to date ($480 reported so far), mainly in site preparation, test performance and economics assessment. In addition to DOE allocated funds, to date approximately $330k has been cost-shared by the participants, bringing the total project cost up to $827k ($810k reported so far) as on December 31st, 2003.

Fabienne Chatel-Pelage

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to engineer, design, fabricate, and field demonstrate a Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) that integrates a low-cost, clean burning, gas-fired simple-cycle (unrecuperated) 100 kWe (net) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra low-NOx gas-fired burner (ULNB) into one compact Combined Heat and Power (CHP) product that can be retrofit on new and existing industrial and commercial boilers in place of conventional burners. The Scope of Work for this project was segmented into two principal phases: (Phase I) Hardware development, assembly and pre-test and (Phase II) Field installation and demonstration testing. Phase I was divided into five technical tasks (Task 2 to 6). These tasks covered the engineering, design, fabrication, testing and optimization of each key component of the CHP system principally, ULNB, SCMT, assembly BBEST CHP package, and integrated controls. Phase I work culminated with the laboratory testing of the completed BBEST assembly prior to shipment for field installation and demonstration. Phase II consisted of two remaining technical tasks (Task 7 and 8), which focused on the installation, startup, and field verification tests at a pre-selected industrial plant to document performance and attainment of all project objectives. Technical direction and administration was under the management of CMCE, Inc. Altex Technologies Corporation lead the design, assembly and testing of the system. Field demonstration was supported by Leva Energy, the commercialization firm founded by executives at CMCE and Altex. Leva Energy has applied for patent protection on the BBEST process under the trade name of Power Burner and holds the license for the burner currently used in the product. The commercial term Power Burner is used throughout this report to refer to the BBEST technology proposed for this project. The project was co-funded by the California Energy Commission and the Southern California Gas Company (SCG), a division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the projects subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial operation and has achieved all the performance goals.

Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

In-Field Performance of Condensing Boilers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IN-FIELD PERFORMANCE OF CONDENSING IN-FIELD PERFORMANCE OF CONDENSING BOILERS Lois B. Arena Steven Winter Associates, Inc. March 2012 Why Research Hydronic Heating? © 2012 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved Reasons to Research Boilers  Approx. 14 million homes (11%) in the US are heated with a steam or hot water system  Almost 70 percent of existing homes were built prior to 1980  Boilers built prior to 1980 generally have AFUE's of 0.65 or lower  Energy savings of 20+% are possible by simply replacing older boilers with standard boilers & up to 30% with condensing boilers.  Optimizing condensing boilers in new and existing homes could mean the difference of 8-10% savings with little to no

249

Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion Guidebook -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current operating experience shows that atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) boilers meet high environmental standards and are commercially viable and economically attractive. To make the best business decision, power producers need to fully evaluate the technology as a power generation option. The content of this AFBC Guidebook allows readers to become quickly informed about all aspects of the technology.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Second-Generation System Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant--called a Second-Generation or Advanced Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (APCFB) plant--offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 45% (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. The APCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed boiler (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer syngas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2300 F and higher. A conceptual design was previously prepared for this new type of plant and an economic analysis presented, all based on the use of a Siemens Westinghouse W501F gas turbine with projected carbonizer, PCFB, and topping combustor performance data. Having tested these components at the pilot plant stage, the referenced conceptual design is being updated to reflect more accurate performance predictions together with the use of the more advanced Siemens Westinghouse W501G gas turbine and a conventional 2400 psig/1050 F/1050 F/2-1/2 in. steam turbine. This report describes the updated plant which is projected to have an HHV efficiency of 48% and identifies work completed for the October 2001 through September 2002 time period.

A. Robertson; D. Horazak; R. Newby; H. Goldstein

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

MULTI-FUEL BOILER TECHNOLOGY RICK A. HAVERLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fired boiler was replaced with a N. V. Vyncke multi-fuel boiler with a rated capacity of 17,600 lb/hr (8000 kg of $0.785/gal ($0.208/L). The oil-fired boiler was replaced with a N. V. Vyncke multi-fuel boiler on the conveyor. Multi-Fuel Boiler Both boilers are the JUMBO OR) series boiler man ufactured by N. V. Vyncke

Columbia University

252

Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, (more)

Yang, Dong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Superheater Corrosion In Biomass Boilers: Today's Science and Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report broadens a previous review of published literature on corrosion of recovery boiler superheater tube materials to consider the performance of candidate materials at temperatures near the deposit melting temperature in advanced boilers firing coal, wood-based fuels, and waste materials as well as in gas turbine environments. Discussions of corrosion mechanisms focus on the reactions in fly ash deposits and combustion gases that can give corrosive materials access to the surface of a superheater tube. Setting the steam temperature of a biomass boiler is a compromise between wasting fuel energy, risking pluggage that will shut the unit down, and creating conditions that will cause rapid corrosion on the superheater tubes and replacement expenses. The most important corrosive species in biomass superheater corrosion are chlorine compounds and the most corrosion resistant alloys are typically FeCrNi alloys containing 20-28% Cr. Although most of these materials contain many other additional additions, there is no coherent theory of the alloying required to resist the combination of high temperature salt deposits and flue gases that are found in biomass boiler superheaters that may cause degradation of superheater tubes. After depletion of chromium by chromate formation or chromic acid volatilization exceeds a critical amount, the protective scale gives way to a thick layer of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} over an unprotective (FeCrNi){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel. This oxide is not protective and can be penetrated by chlorine species that cause further acceleration of the corrosion rate by a mechanism called active oxidation. Active oxidation, cited as the cause of most biomass superheater corrosion under chloride ash deposits, does not occur in the absence of these alkali salts when the chloride is present as HCl gas. Although a deposit is more corrosive at temperatures where it is molten than at temperatures where it is frozen, increasing superheater tube temperatures through the measured first melting point of fly ash deposits does not necessarily produce a step increase in corrosion rate. Corrosion rate typically accelerates at temperatures below the first melting temperature and mixed deposits may have a broad melting temperature range. Although the environment at a superheater tube surface is initially that of the ash deposits, this chemistry typically changes as the deposits mature. The corrosion rate is controlled by the environment and temperature at the tube surface, which can only be measured indirectly. Some results are counter-intuitive. Two boiler manufacturers and a consortium have developed models to predict fouling and corrosion in biomass boilers in order to specify tube materials for particular operating conditions. It would be very useful to compare the predictions of these models regarding corrosion rates and recommended alloys in the boiler environments where field tests will be performed in the current program. Manufacturers of biomass boilers have concluded that it is more cost-effective to restrict steam temperatures, to co-fire biofuels with high sulfur fuels and/or to use fuel additives rather than try to increase fuel efficiency by operating with superheater tube temperatures above melting temperature of fly ash deposits. Similar strategies have been developed for coal fired and waste-fired boilers. Additives are primarily used to replace alkali metal chloride deposits with higher melting temperature and less corrosive alkali metal sulfate or alkali aluminum silicate deposits. Design modifications that have been shown to control superheater corrosion include adding a radiant pass (empty chamber) between the furnace and the superheater, installing cool tubes immediately upstream of the superheater to trap high chloride deposits, designing superheater banks for quick replacement, using an external superheater that burns a less corrosive biomass fuel, moving circulating fluidized bed (CFB) superheaters from the convective pass into the hot recirculated fluidizing medium and adding an insulating layer to superh

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Operational Performance Evaluation of Boiler 9 at the TAMU Power Plant at College Station, Submitted to the Power Plant of Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the engineering assistance project, the ESL staff worked with operating staff at the power plant: (1) to evaluate the boiler efficiency of boiler 9 by using combustion analysis; (2) to evaluate gas and steam meters by using measured air flow rate; (3) to identify air leakage through the pre-heater by balancing 0, before and after the pre-heater; and (4) to correct air and steam metered data.

Wei, G.; Veteto, B.; Liu, M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Emissions Tradeoffs Between Boiler Operations and a Selective Catalytic Reduction System: Field Test Results on an 850-MW Opposed-Wall Design Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burning low-cost, high-sulfur coals under staged combustion conditions can lead to increased waterwall wastage. Utilities are thus in need of a method for determining the least-cost approach for minimizing nitrogen oxide (NOx) through both boiler and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) operations, while taking into account potential cost impacts of various operating scenarios. This report is one in an EPRI series to quantify the costs and benefits associated with different boiler and SCR ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) in 2001 to carry out a project entitled ''Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control by Oxygen Firing in Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers.'' This two-phased project is in effect from September 28, 2001, to October 27, 2004. (U.S. DOE NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41146). Phase I consisted of an evaluation of the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants, and supporting bench-scale testing. And Phase II consists of pilot-scale testing, supporting a refined performance and economic evaluation of the oxygen-fired AFC concept. Phase I, detailed in this report, entails a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen separate but related cases (listed below), representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated as described herein. The first seven cases represent coal combustion cases in CFB type equipment. The next four cases represent Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The last two cases represent advanced Chemical Looping systems, which were completely paid for by ALSTOM and included herein for completeness.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

NOx Reduction Assessment for Tangentially Fired Boilers Burning Powder River Basin Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of and the most cost-effective approaches for reducing nitrous oxide (NOx) emissions for tangentially fired boilers burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in order to achieve average NOx emission rates of 0.15 lb/mmBtu (110 ppm), or lower. This is typically achievable by a deep level of combustion air staging, which may be possible if operational issues experienced during low combustion air operation (for example, slagging) can be mitigated. Acc...

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

Program on Technology Innovation: Formation of Large-Particle Ash in Coal-Fired Boilers Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is a follow-on study of large particle ash (LPA) formation mechanisms in combustion systems equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst systems for nitrogen oxide reduction. In an earlier study, the chemical and physical properties of LPA were examined, and potential origins were identified. LPA samples, along with fireside deposits and coals from selected utility boilers, were characterized in order to find the root cause or the origin of the LPA ...

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Rich Reagent Injection Technology for NOx Control in Cyclone-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes multiple demonstration projects that have led to commercial development of the Rich Reagent Injection (RRI) technology. RRI was developed by Reaction Engineering International (REI) with funding from EPRI and U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL). Prior to RRI, most NOx reduction efforts that focused on modifying combustion to reduce NOx formation in fossil-fuel-fired boilers and furnaces involved air or fuel staging. Even with significant levels of furnace stag...

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy Basics: Furnaces and Boilers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a vessel or tank where heat produced from the combustion of such fuels as natural gas, fuel oil, or coal is used to generate hot water or steam. Many buildings have their own...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

COMBUSTION RESEARCH - FY-1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical Measurement of Combustion Products by Zeeman Atomicand T. Hadeishi . . . . . Combustion Sources offrom Pulverized Coal Combustion J. Pennucci, R. Greif, F.

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary for the Combustion Program The Combustion Technologies Product promotes the advancement of coal combustion power generation for use in industrial, commercial, and utility...

263

Upgrade Boilers with Energy-Efficient Burners  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP steam tip sheet on upgrading boilers provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ENERGY STAR Qualified Boilers | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualified Boilers Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov Communities Consumer Data ENERGY STAR Qualified...

265

Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

2006-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Furnace and Boiler Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

preparation, and industrial processes. In homes with boilers, steam is distributed via pipes to steam radiators, and hot water can be distributed via baseboard radiators or...

267

BOILER-SUPERHEATED REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power reactor of the type in which a liquid moderator-coolant is transformed by nuclear heating into a vapor that may be used to drive a turbo- generator is described. The core of this reactor comprises a plurality of freely suspended tubular fuel elements, called fuel element trains, within which nonboiling pressurized liquid moderator-coolant is preheated and sprayed through orifices in the walls of the trains against the outer walls thereof to be converted into vapor. Passage of the vapor ovcr other unwetted portions of the outside of the fuel elements causes the steam to be superheated. The moderatorcoolant within the fuel elements remains in the liqUid state, and that between the fuel elements remains substantiaily in the vapor state. A unique liquid neutron-absorber control system is used. Advantages expected from the reactor design include reduced fuel element failure, increased stability of operation, direct response to power demand, and circulation of a minimum amount of liquid moderatorcoolant. (A.G.W.)

Heckman, T.P.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

OEIM 210. Industrial Mechanics III 4 cr. Air compressors, sliding surface bearings, boiler maintenance, boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OEIM 210. Industrial Mechanics III 4 cr. Air compressors, sliding surface bearings, boiler maintenance, boiler tube repairs, basic arc and gas welding, measurement tools, gauge glass maintenance, heat by employer and instructor on boiler inspection and cleaning, centrifugal pumps, basic rigging, piping

Castillo, Steven P.

269

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Advanced Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Higher efficiency also reduces CO2 production for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency hit, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture, utilize and sequester. NETL's Advanced Combustion Project and members of the NETL-Regional University

271

State of Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new combustion technology has been developed in the last decade that permits the burning of low quality coal, lignite and other fuels, while maintaining stack emissions within State and Federal EPA limits. Low quality fuels can be burned directly in fluidized beds while taking advantage of low furnace temperatures and chemical activity within the bed to limit SO2 and NOx emissions, thereby eliminating the need for stack gas scrubbing equipment. The excellent heat transfer characteristics of the fluidized beds also result in a reduction of total heat transfer surface requirements, thus reducing the size and cost of steam generators. Tests on beds operating at pressures of one to ten atmospheres, at temperatures as high as 1600oF, and with gas velocities in the vicinity of four to twelve feet per second, have proven the concept. Early history of this technology is traced, and the progress that has been made in the development of fluidized bed combustion boilers, as well as work currently underway, in the United States and overseas, is reviewed. Details on the fluidized bed boiler installations at Alexandria, Virginia (5,000 lbs/hr), Georgetown University (100,000 lbs/hr), and Rivesville, West Virginia (300,000 Ibs/hr) are presented, and test results are discussed. Potential application of fluidized bed boilers in industrial plants using lignite and lignite refuse is examined. The impact of proposed new DOE and EPA regulations on solid fuels burning is also examined.

Pope, M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants are a significant part of the nation???¢????????s power generating capacity, currently accounting for more than 55% of the country???¢????????s total electricity production. Extending the reliable lifetimes of fossil fired boiler components and reducing the maintenance costs are essential for economic operation of power plants. Corrosion and erosion are leading causes of superheater and reheater boiler tube failures leading to unscheduled costly outages. Several types of coatings and weld overlays have been used to extend the service life of boiler tubes; however, the protection afforded by such materials was limited approximately one to eight years. Power companies are more recently focused in achieving greater plant efficiency by increasing steam temperature and pressure into the advanced-ultrasupercritical (A-USC) condition with steam temperatures approaching 760???????°C (1400???????°F) and operating pressures in excess of 35MPa (5075 psig). Unfortunately, laboratory and field testing suggests that the resultant fireside environment when operating under A-USC conditions can potentially cause significant corrosion to conventional and advanced boiler materials1-2. In order to improve reliability and availability of fossil fired A-USC boilers, it is essential to develop advanced nanostructured coatings that provide excellent corrosion and erosion resistance without adversely affecting the other properties such as toughness and thermal fatigue strength of the component material.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plum Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plum Combustion Plum Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Name Plum Combustion Place Atlanta, Georgia Product Combustion technology, which reduces NOx-emissions. Coordinates 33.748315°, -84.391109° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.748315,"lon":-84.391109,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

274

Combustion characteristics of red alder sawdust. Technical Progress Report No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant quantities of wood resdiue fuels are presently being used in industrial steam generating facilities. Recent studies indicate that substantial additional quantities of wood residue fuels are available for energy generation in the form of steam and/or electricity. A limited data base on the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels has resulted in the installation and operation of inefficient combustion systems for these fuels. This investigation of the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels was undertaken to provide a data base which could be used to optimize the combustion of such fuels. Optimization of the combustion process in industrial boilers serves to improve combustion efficiency and to reduce air pollutant emissions generated in the combustion process. Data are presented on the combustion characteristics of red alder sawdust.

Junge, D.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

BPACK -- A computer model package for boiler reburning/co-firing performance evaluations. User`s manual, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual presents and describes a package of computer models uniquely developed for boiler thermal performance and emissions evaluations by the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The model package permits boiler heat transfer, fuels combustion, and pollutant emissions predictions related to a number of practical boiler operations such as fuel-switching, fuels co-firing, and reburning NO{sub x} reductions. The models are adaptable to most boiler/combustor designs and can handle burner fuels in solid, liquid, gaseous, and slurried forms. The models are also capable of performing predictions for combustion applications involving gaseous-fuel reburning, and co-firing of solid/gas, liquid/gas, gas/gas, slurry/gas fuels. The model package is conveniently named as BPACK (Boiler Package) and consists of six computer codes, of which three of them are main computational codes and the other three are input codes. The three main codes are: (a) a two-dimensional furnace heat-transfer and combustion code: (b) a detailed chemical-kinetics code; and (c) a boiler convective passage code. This user`s manual presents the computer model package in two volumes. Volume 1 describes in detail a number of topics which are of general users` interest, including the physical and chemical basis of the models, a complete description of the model applicability, options, input/output, and the default inputs. Volume 2 contains a detailed record of the worked examples to assist users in applying the models, and to illustrate the versatility of the codes.

Wu, K.T.; Li, B.; Payne, R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Waste heat boiler with feed mixing nozzle  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat boiler of the type which is particularly suited for use in marine applications and which incorporates a feed mixing nozzle that is operative for purposes of effecting, by utilizing steam taken from the steam generating bank, a preheating of the feedwater that is fed to the steam drum. In addition to the aforesaid feed mixing nozzle, the subject waste heat boiler includes a feedwater control valve, a steam drum, a circulation pump, a steam generating bank and a centrifugal water separator. The feedwater control valve is employed to modulate the flow rate of the incoming feedwater in order to maintain the desired level of water in the steam drum. In turn the latter steam drum is intended to function in the manner of a reservoir for the circulating water that through the operation of the circulating pump is supplied to the steam generating bank. The circulating water which is supplied to the steam generating bank is heated therein to saturation temperature, and steam is generated thus. A water-steam mixture is returned from the steam generating bank to the steam drum and is directed into the centrifugal water separator that is suitably located within the steam drum. It is in the centrifugal water separator that the separation of the water-steam mixture is effected such that water is returned to the lower portion of the steam drum and the steam is supplied to the upper portion of the steam drum. The preheating of the feedwater is accomplished by directing the incoming feedwater through an internal feed pipe to the mixing nozzle, the latter being positioned in the line through which the water-steam mixture is returned to the steam drum.

Mastronarde, Th.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Application of the CALPHAD method for ferritic boiler steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Application of the CALPHAD method for ferritic boiler steels ... of the CALPHAD method on various questions concerning ferritic boiler steels...

279

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval...

280

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Passivity based control of drum boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel state space model for the drum boilers with natural recirculation. This model uses the total mass and energy inventories of the boiler as the state variables, and has an affine structure in the control variables. A passivity ...

Chengtao Wen; B. Erik Ydstie

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Chemical and biological 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents in fly ash from combustion of bleached kraft pulp mill sludge  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash was collected from five large-scale or pilot tests in which burning of bleached kraft pulp mill sludge was studied. The content of dioxin-like compounds in this fly ash was estimated both chemically and biologically. Fly ash was analyzed chemically for 17 PCDD and PCDF congeners by high-resolution GC-MS, and the data were transformed to Nordic TCDD equivalents. The biological analyses were based on the induction of several enzymes (aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase [AHH], 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase [EROD], aldehyde dehydrogenase-3 [ALDG3]) by the fly ash extracts in a mouse hepatoma cell line, Hepa-1. The inducing potencies were expressed as biological TCDD equivalents. There was a good correlation between the Nordic and the biological TCDD equivalents. Differences in the amounts of dioxin-like compounds among the combustions were attributed mainly to the boiler types and not to fuel characteristics or combustion parameters.

Kopponen, P.; Toerroenen, R. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Physiology); Vaelttilae, O.; Talka, E. (Finnish Pulp and Paper Research Inst., Espoo (Finland)); Tarhanen, J.; Ruuskanen, J. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences); Kaerenlampi, S. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biotechnology)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Design and development for a low emission boiler system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy initiated the Combustion 2000 program to develop the next generation of coal-fired power plants. Sargent & Lundy (S&L) is working on the Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) portion of the program led by Riley Stoker Corporation, with support from Textron Defense Systems, Tecogen, and Reaction Engineering International. Together these organizations form {open_quotes}the Riley Team.{close_quotes} There are four phases of the LEBS development program. Currently, we are working in Phase I, which involves the design of a 400 MWe unit. Phase II through IV will involve pilot scale component testing and a Proof-of-Concept facility ({approximately}40MWe) design, construction, and operation. This document comprises the Design and Development Report for the LEBS. The report describes the design basis, design uncertainties and development plan for each of the major LEBS subsystems.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the twelfth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a new effort was begun on the development of a corrosion management system for minimizing the impacts of low NOx combustion systems on waterwalls; a kickoff meeting was held at the host site, AEP's Gavin Plant, and work commenced on fabrication of the probes. FTIR experiments for SCR catalyst sulfation were finished at BYU and indicated no vanadium/vanadyl sulfate formation at reactor conditions. Improvements on the mass-spectrometer system at BYU have been made and work on the steady state reactor system shakedown neared completion. The slipstream reactor continued to operate at AEP's Rockport plant; at the end of the quarter, the catalysts had been exposed to flue gas for about 1000 hours. Some operational problems were addressed that enable the reactor to run without excessive downtime by the end of the quarter.

Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $6,000 Program Info Funding Source New Hampshire Renewable Energy Fund (FY 2013) Start Date 04/14/2010 Expiration Date When progr State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 30% Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is offering rebates of 30% of the installed cost of qualifying new residential bulk-fed, wood-pellet central heating boilers or furnaces. The maximum rebate is $6,000. To qualify, systems must (1) become operational on or after May 1,

286

Economic Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based PC Boiler  

SciTech Connect

This report determines the capital and operating costs of two different oxygen-based, pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants and compares their economics to that of a comparable, air-based PC plant. Rather than combust their coal with air, the oxygen-based plants use oxygen to facilitate capture/removal of the plant CO{sub 2} for transport by pipeline to a sequestering site. To provide a consistent comparison of technologies, all three plants analyzed herein operate with the same coal (Illinois No 6), the same site conditions, and the same supercritical pressure steam turbine (459 MWe). In the first oxygen-based plant, the pulverized coal-fired boiler operates with oxygen supplied by a conventional, cryogenic air separation unit, whereas, in the second oxygen-based plant, the oxygen is supplied by an oxygen ion transport membrane. In both oxygen-based plants a portion of the boiler exhaust gas, which is primarily CO{sub 2}, is recirculated back to the boiler to control the combustion temperature, and the balance of the flue gas undergoes drying and compression to pipeline pressure; for consistency, both plants operate with similar combustion temperatures and utilize the same CO{sub 2} processing technologies. The capital and operating costs of the pulverized coal-fired boilers required by the three different plants were estimated by Foster Wheeler and the balance of plant costs were budget priced using published data together with vendor supplied quotations. The cost of electricity produced by each of the plants was determined and oxygen-based plant CO{sub 2} mitigation costs were calculated and compared to each other as well as to values published for some alternative CO{sub 2} capture technologies.

Andrew Seltzer; Archie Robertson

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Final Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project was to develop cost-effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low-NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program. This project included research on: (1) In furnace NOx control; (2) Impacts of combustion modifications on boiler operation; (3) Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst testing and (4) Ammonia adsorption/removal on fly ash. Important accomplishments were achieved in all aspects of the project. Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), an in-furnace NOx reduction strategy based on injecting urea or anhydrous ammonia into fuel rich regions in the lower furnace, was evaluated for cyclone-barrel and PC fired utility boilers. Field tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the RRI process to significantly reduce NOx emissions from a staged cyclone-fired furnace operating with overfire air. The field tests also verified the accuracy of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling used to develop the RRI design and highlighted the importance of using CFD modeling to properly locate and configure the reagent injectors within the furnace. Low NOx firing conditions can adversely impact boiler operation due to increased waterwall wastage (corrosion) and increased soot production. A corrosion monitoring system that uses electrochemical noise (ECN) corrosion probes to monitor, on a real-time basis, high temperature corrosion events within the boiler was evaluated. Field tests were successfully conducted at two plants. The Ohio Coal Development Office provided financial assistance to perform the field tests. To investigate soot behavior, an advanced model to predict soot production and destruction was implemented into an existing reacting CFD modeling tool. Comparisons between experimental data collected in a pilot scale furnace and soot behavior predicted by the CFD model showed good agreement. Field and laboratory tests were performed for SCR catalysts used for coal and biomass co-firing applications. Fundamental laboratory studies were performed to better understand mechanisms involved with catalyst deactivation. Field tests with a slip stream reactor were used to create catalyst exposed to boiler flue gas for firing coal and for co-firing coal and biomass. The field data suggests the mechanisms leading to catalyst deactivation are, in order of importance, channel plugging, surface fouling, pore plugging and poisoning. Investigations were performed to better understand the mechanisms involved with catalyst regeneration through mechanical or chemical methods. A computer model was developed to predict NOx reduction across the catalyst in a SCR. Experiments were performed to investigate the fundamentals of ammonia/fly ash interactions with relevance to the operation of advanced NOx control technologies such as selective catalytic reduction. Measurements were performed for ammonia adsorption isotherms on commercial fly ash samples subjected to a variety of treatments and on the chemistry of dry and semi-dry ammonia removal processes. This work resulted in the first fundamental ammonia isotherms on carbon-containing fly ash samples. This work confirms industrial reports that aqueous solution chemistry takes place upon the introduction of even very small amounts of water, while the ash remains in a semi-dry state.

Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior; Hong-Shig Shim; Dave Swenson; Bob Hurt; Eric Suuberg; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Advances in pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion system has been developed to operate cost effectively in the difficult regulatory and economic climate of the 1980's. The system is designed to reduce auxiliary fuel oil comsumption by at least 30% while meeting all relevant emissions limits. This is achieved with the fewest components consistent with practical reliable design criteria. The Controlled Flow Split/Flame low NO/sub x/ burner, MBF pulverizer and Two-Stage ignition system are integrated into a mutually supporting system which is applicable to both new steam generators and, on a retrofit basis, to existing units. In the future, a pulverized coal ignition system will be available to eliminate fuel oil use within the boiler.

Vatsky, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Analysis of the Current Signature in a Constant-Volume Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Current Signature in a Constant-Volume Combustion Chamber Title Analysis of the Current Signature in a Constant-Volume Combustion Chamber Publication Type Journal...

290

Boiler Efficiency vs. Steam Quality- The Challenge of Creating Quality Steam Using Existing Boiler Efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A boiler works under pressure and it is not possible to see what is happening inside of it. The terms "wet steam" and "carry over" are every day idioms in the steam industry, yet very few people have ever seen these phenomena and the actual water movement inside a boiler has remained highly speculative. This paper and support test video of actual boiler operations will illustrate the effects steam quality vs. boiler efficiency during different boiler and steam system demands. There are four different operating situations that effect the steam quality. Each of the following situation will be described in detail using visual aids and supporting literature: Case I: On/Off Feedwater Control: Wide swings in the water level of the boiler can result in unnecessary low water alarms and shut downs. Case II: Reduced Operating Pressure: By running a boiler at a lower pressure, the boiling action within the boiler becomes much more violent causing water to be carried over in to the steam system. Case III: A Demand of 15% over Capacity: Over loading a boiler will cause excessive amounts of water to be carried along with the steam into the system. Case IV: TDS Control: Without proper control of IDS within the boiler carry-over of water into the steam system will occur causing damage to equipment and/or waterhammer.

Hahn, G.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A study of ignition and combustion characteristics of isolated coal water slurry droplet using digital image processing technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A digital image processing technique is used to investigate the ignition and combustion characteristics of an isolated coal water slurry droplet in low Re flow. Coal water slurry droplet study is useful for dilute coal suspensions based on the premise that ignitability of a spray of coal water slurry must depend on the ignition characteristic of an isolated coal water slurry droplet. A flat flame burner is used for optical accessibility and also for simulating vitiated gases as existing in boiler burners. A quartz wire of 0.175 mm diameter is chosen for low thermal conductivity and to hold the droplet above theflat flame burner. The following sequence of events is observed: (i) Water first evaporates leaving agglomerated coal particle, (ii) glowing first occurs at the leading edge of the droplet, (iii) for a droplet with diameter of the order less than I mm it was observed that the volatile combustion usually occurs away from the droplet in the wake of the combustible gases made upstream, while for droplet more than I mm, the flame is attached to the particle, (iv) combustion of coal water slurry droplet is intermittent. The ignition time and volatile combustion times are obtained. Parametric studies include the effect of drop diameter and ambient oxygen concentrations. Simplified phenomen ological type models are presented in order to determine the number of particles. interparticle spacing and density of coal water slurry droplet. Finally qualitative relations between ignition and combustion times and particle diameter are obtained and the results are then compared with experimental data.

Bhadra, Tanmoy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 4, February--April 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and missions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects test; and full-scale combustion tests.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Integrated process and apparatus for control of pollutants in coal-fired boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing SO.sub.x and NO.sub.x levels in flue gases generated by the combustion of coal in a boiler in which low NO.sub.x burners and air staging ports are utilized to inhibit the amount of NO.sub.x initially produced in the combustion of the coal, a selected concentration of urea is introduced downstream of the combustion zone after the temperature has been reduced to the range of 1300.degree. F. to 2000.degree. F., and a sodium-based reagent is introduced into the flue gas stream after further reducing the temperature of the stream to the range of 200.degree. F. to 900.degree. F. Under certain conditions, calcium injection may be employed along with humidification of the flue gas stream for selective reduction of the pollutants.

Hunt, Terry G. (Aurora, CO); Offen, George R. (Woodside, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Integrated process and apparatus for control of pollutants in coal-fired boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for reducing SO[sub x] and NO[sub x] levels in flue gases generated by the combustion of coal in a boiler in which low NO[sub x] burners and air staging ports are utilized to inhibit the amount of NO[sub x] initially produced in the combustion of the coal. A selected concentration of urea is introduced downstream of the combustion zone after the temperature has been reduced to the range of 1300 F to 2000 F, and a sodium-based reagent is introduced into the flue gas stream after further reducing the temperature of the stream to the range of 200 F to 900 F. Under certain conditions, calcium injection may be employed along with humidification of the flue gas stream for selective reduction of the pollutants. 7 figs.

Hunt, T.G.; Offen, G.R.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Design of an Inspection Robot for Boiler Tubes Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climbing robot with magnetic wheels is designed for the inspection of boiler tubes in fossil power plants, which can inspect the boiler tubes automatically. The climbing robot will move on the boiler tubes. The magnetic wheels of the robot can be move ... Keywords: boiler tubes, climbing robot, magnetic flux leakage sensor, VSC controller

Lu Xueqin; Qiu Rongfu; Liu Gang; Huang Fuzhen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A new blowdown compensation scheme for boiler leak detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new blowdown compensation scheme for boiler leak detection A. M. Pertew ,1 X. Sun ,1 R. Kent considers the blowdown effect in industrial boiler operation. This adds to the efficiency of recent advances in identification-based leak detection techniques of boiler steam- water systems. Keywords: Industrial Boilers, Tube

Marquez, Horacio J.

297

Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.

Max Christie; Rick Victor; Bart van Hassel; Nagendra Nagabushana; Juan Li; Joseph Corpus; Jamie Wilson

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Methodology for Optimizing Boiler Operating Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the many ways by which an energy manager can conserve energy is the establishment of a strategy for operation of fired boilers. In particular, he can effect total fuel consumption by his decision on how much on-line boiler surplus is required. There is a need to be able to balance the cost advantages of operating with less boiler surplus against the potential economic losses that might result from the increased risk of not meeting demand. A methodology for doing this along with an example calculation, is presented in this paper.

Jones, K. C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NOx Control for Utility Boiler OTR Compliance  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) and Fuel Tech, Inc. (Fuel Tech) teamed to evaluate an integrated solution for NO{sub x} control comprised of B&W's DRB-4Z{reg_sign} low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner technology and Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT{reg_sign}, a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology, capable of meeting a target emission limit of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu. In a previous project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), promising results were obtained with this technology from large-scale testing in B&W's 100-million Btu/hr Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) which simulates the conditions of large coal-fired utility boilers. Under the most challenging boiler temperatures at full load conditions, NO{sub x} emissions of 0.19 lb/10{sup 6} Btu were achieved firing Powder River Basin coal while controlling ammonia slip to less than 5 ppm. At a 40 million Btu/hr firing rate, NO{sub x} emissions were as low as 0.09 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. Improved performance with this system was proposed for this new program with injection at full load via a convective pass multiple nozzle lance (MNL) in front of the superheater tubes or in the convective tube bank. Convective pass lances represent the current state-of-the-art in SNCR and needed to be evaluated in order to assess the full potential of the combined technologies. The objective of the program was to achieve a NO{sub x} level below 0.15 lb/10{sup 6} Btu (with ammonia slip of less than 5 ppm) in the CEDF using PRB coal and B&W's DRB-4Z{reg_sign} low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner in combination with dual zone overfire air ports and Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT{reg_sign} System. Commercial installations of B&W's low-NO{sub x} burner, in combination with overfire air ports using PRB coal, have demonstrated a NO{sub x} level of 0.15 to 0.2 lb/10{sup 6} Btu under staged combustion conditions. The proposed goal of the combustion system (no SNCR) for this project is a NO{sub x} level at 0.15 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. The NO{sub x} reduction goal for SNCR is 25% from the low-NO{sub x} combustion emission levels. Therefore, overall NO{sub x} emissions would approach a level of 0.11 lb/10{sup 6} Btu in commercial installation. The goals of the program were met. At 100% load, using the MNL for very low baseline NO{sub x} (0.094 to 0.162 lb/10{sup 6} Btu depending on burner stoichiometry), an approximately 25% NO{sub x} reduction was achieved (0.071 to 0.124 lb/10{sup 6} Btu) while maintaining NH{sub 3} slip less than 6.4 ppm. At 60% load, using MNL or only wall-injectors for very low baseline NO{sub x} levels, more than 30% NO{sub x} reduction was achieved. Although site specific economic evaluation is required for each unit, our economic evaluation of DRB-4Z{reg_sign} burner and SNCR for a 500 MW{sub e} plant firing PRB shows that the least cost strategy is low-NO{sub x} burner and OFA at a cost of $210 to $525 per ton of NO{sub x} removed. Installation of SNCR allows the utilities to sell more NO{sub x} credit and it becomes economical when NO{sub x} credit cost is more than $5,275 per ton of NO{sub x}.

Hamid Farzan; Jennifer L. Sivy

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Furnaces Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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301

Measure Guideline: Condensing Boilers - Control Strategies for Optimizing Performance and Comfort in Residential Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater has become a common option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. While there are many condensing boilers available on the market with rated efficiencies in the low to mid 90% efficient range, it is imperative to understand that if the control systems are not properly configured, these heaters will perform no better than their non-condensing counterparts. Based on previous research efforts, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency (Arena 2010). It was found that there is a significant lack of information for contractors on how to configure the control systems to optimize overall efficiency. For example, there is little advice on selecting the best settings for the boiler reset curve or how to measure and set flow rates in the system to ensure that the return temperatures are low enough to promote condensing. It has also been observed that recovery from setback can be extremely slow and, at times, not achieved. Recovery can be affected by the outdoor reset control, the differential setting on the boiler and over-sizing of the boiler itself. This guide is intended for designers and installers of hydronic heating systems interested in maximizing the overall system efficiency of condensing boilers when coupled with baseboard convectors. It is applicable to new and retrofit applications.

Arena, L.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

DOE Webcast: GTI Super Boiler Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webcast Webcast GTI Super Boiler Technology by Dennis Chojnacki, Senior Engineer by Curt Bermel, Business Development Mgr. R&D > November 20, 2008 November 20, 2008 2 November 20, 2008 2 WHO WE ARE Gas Technology Institute >Leading U.S. research, development, and training organization serving the natural gas industry and energy markets ─ An independent, 501c (3) not-for-profit Serving the Energy Industry Since 1941 > Over 1,000 patents > Nearly 500 products commercialized November 20, 2008 3 November 20, 2008 3 Super Boiler Background > U.S. industrial and commercial steam boilers ─ Consume over 6 quads of natural gas per year ─ Wide range of steam uses from process steam to space heating > Installed base of steam boilers ─ Largely over 30 years old

304

Clean Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on cleaning boiler water-side heat transfer surfaces provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water treatment program raises boiler operating efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the boiler water treatment program which played a vital role in changing an aging steam plant into a profitable plant in just three years. Boiler efficiency increased from approximately 70 percent initially to 86 percent today. The first step in this water treatment program involves use of a sodium zeolite water softener that works to remove scale-forming ions from municipal water used in the system. A resin cleaner is also added to prolong the life of resins in the softener. The water is then passed through a new blow-down heat exchanger, which allows preheating from the continuous blow-down from the boiler system. The water gets pumped into a deaerator tank where sulfite treatment is added. The water then passes from feedpumps into the boiler system.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Boiler scale prevention employing an organic chelant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of treating boiler water which employs an oxygen scavenging compound and a compound to control pH together with a chelating agent, wherein the chelating agent is hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid.

Wallace, Steven L. (Lake Jackson, TX); Griffin, Jr., Freddie (Missouri City, TX); Tvedt, Jr., Thorwald J. (Angleton, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

Baxter, L.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Metallurgical Guidebook for Fossil Power Plant Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide range of steels has been used to manufacture boilers and associated piping components for fossil power plants. Detailed information on the various alloys and component design considerations is contained in applicable specifications and standards, but utility personnel often need to access basic metallurgical information to support decision making for various projects. This guidebook, developed to meet this need, provides information on all of the most common boiler and piping materials.

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Coal combustion products 2007 production and use report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Coal Ash Association's 2007 Annual Coal Combustion Products (CCP) are derived from data from more than 170 power plants. The amount of CCPs used was 40.55%, a decrease of 2.88% from 2006, attributed to reduced fuel burn and a decrease in demand in the building industry. Figures are given for the production of fly ash, flue gas desulfurization gypsum, bottom ash, FBC ash and boiler slag. The article summarises results of the survey. 1 ref., 1 tab.

NONE

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems'' Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NO[sub x] emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SO[sub x] emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

Not Available

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

High Temperature Oxidation Issues in Fossil Boilers  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the conclusion of a multi-year project that examined the oxidation resistance of Al-rich coatings and a new project examining the effect of higher CO{sub 2} contents on corrosion mechanisms in oxy-fired coal-fueled boilers. The coating work primarily examined diffusion coatings for the steam side of typical ferritic (9-12%Cr) and austenitic (e.g., Type 304L) tube materials in accelerated testing at 650-800 C in wet air. The final phase of this work has attempted to obtain additional coating failures to determine a critical Al content (at coating failure) as a function of exposure temperature. However, no failures have been observed for austenitic substrates including >25 kh at 700 C and >6 kh at 800 C. Preliminary results are presented from the oxy-firing project, where the initial focus is on ferritic alloys. Initial coal-ash experiments were conducted at 600 C to evaluate some of the test parameters and three different levels of CO{sub 2} were investigated. An in-situ creep rig is being constructed to evaluate the effect of environment on creep properties. Initial ex-situ creep experiments are presented as a baseline.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 FURNACE AND BOILER TECHNOLOGY19 Furnace and Boiler Lifetimes Used in the LCC Analysis (PBP RESULTS FOR GAS BOILERS USING ALTERNATIVE INSTALLATION

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Section 5.2.1 Boilers: Greening Federal Facilities; Second Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more efficient than single boilers, espe- cially under part-load conditions. * Consider solar-assisted systems and biomass-fired boilers as alternatives to conventional boiler...

315

Combustion Technologies Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Technologies Group Combustion research generates the fundamental physical and chemical knowledge on the interaction between flame and turbulence. Experimental and...

316

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Combustion A number of companies are participating in DOE's evaluation of Combustion Systems products. The list below gives you access to each participant company's home page....

317

Technical and economic feasibility of utilizing apple pomace as a boiler feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Apple pomace or presscake, was evaluated for suitability as a boiler feedstock for Michigan firms processing apple juice. Based upon the physical and chemical characteristics of pomace, handling/direct combustion systems were selected to conform with operating parameters typical of the industry. Fresh pomace flow rates of 29,030 and 88,998 kg/day (64,000 and 194,000 lb/day) were considered as representative of small and large processors, respectively, and the material was assumed to be dried to 15% moisture content (wet basis) prior to storage and combustion. Boilers utilizing pile-burning, fluidized-bed-combustion, and suspension-firing technologies were sized for each flow rate, resulting in energy production of 2930 and 8790 kW (10 and 30 million Btu/h), respectively. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed giving Average Annual Costs for the three handling/combustion system combinations (based on the Uniform Capital Recovery factor). An investment loan at 16% interest with a 5-year payback period was assumed. The break-even period for annual costs was calculated by anticipated savings incurred through reduction of fossil-fuel costs during a 5-month processing season. Large processors, producing more than 88,998 kg pomace/day, could economically convert to a suspension-fired system substituting for fuel oil, with break-even occurring after 4 months of operation of pomace per year. Small processors, producing less than 29,030 kg/day, could not currently convert to pomace combustion systems given these economic circumstances. A doubling of electrical-utility costs and changes in interest rates from 10 to 20% per year had only slight effects on the recovery of Average Annual Costs. Increases in fossil-fuel prices and the necessity to pay for pomace disposal reduced the cost-recovery period for all systems, making some systems feasible for small processors. 39 references, 13 figures, 10 tables.

Sargent, S.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - OTM-Based Oxycombustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OTM-Based Oxycombustion for CO2 Recovery OTM-Based Oxycombustion for CO2 Recovery Project No.: FC26-01NT41147 & FC26-07NT43088 Praxair Advanced Boiler Praxair Advanced Boiler Praxair, Inc. will conduct two projects to develop and demonstrate the integration of a novel, ceramic oxygen transport membrane (OTM) with the combustion process to enhance boiler efficiency. The economics of oxy-combustion processes are currently limited by the parasitic power required for oxygen (O2) production using cryogenic air separation units (ASU). OTMs can be integrated such that there is minimal need for air compression and the parasitic power consumption required for O2 production is reduced by 70 to 80 percent as compared to a cryogenic ASU. Praxair will design, construct, and operate a bench-scale OTM at the

319

Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, Version 6. 0. Model-Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) Model was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency for use by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) in preparing future assessments of industrial-boiler emissions. The ICE Model user's manual includes a summary of user options and software characteristics, a description of the input data files, and a description of the procedures for operation of the ICE Model. Proper formatting of files and creation of job-control language are discussed. The ICE Model projects for each State the sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and nitrogen oxides emissions from fossil fuel combustion in industrial boilers. Projections of emissions and costs of boiler generation, including emission-control costs, are projected for the years 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2010, 2020, and 2030.

Elliott, D.J.; Hogan, T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Measurements of the flame emissivity and radiative properties of particulate medium in pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces by image processing of visible radiation  

SciTech Connect

Due to the complicated processes for coal particles burning in industrial furnaces, their radiative properties, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which are essential to make reliable calculation of radiative transfer in combustion computation, are hard to be given exactly by the existing methods. In this paper, multiple color image detectors were used to capture approximately red, green, and blue monochromatic radiative intensity images in the visible wavelength region, and the flame emissivity and the radiative properties of the particulate media in three pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces were got from the flame images. It was shown that as the load increased, the flame emissivity and the radiative properties increased too; these radiative parameters had the largest values near the burner zone, and decreased along the combustion process. Compared with the combustion medium with a low-volatile anthracite coal burning in a 670 t/h boiler, the emissivity and the absorption coefficient of the medium with a high-volatile bituminous coal burning in a 1025 t/h boiler were smaller near the outlet zone, but were larger near the burner zone of the furnace, due to the significant contribution of soot to the radiation. This work will be of practical importance in modeling and calculating the radiative heat transfer in combustion processes, and improving the technology for in situ, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale combustion processes in coal-fired furnaces of power plants. 18 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Chun Lou; Huai-Chun Zhou; Peng-Feng Yu; Zhi-Wei Jiang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Recycle/reuse of boiler chemical cleaning wastes in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler chemical cleaning wastes (BCCW) are generated by the periodic waterside cleaning of utility boilers to remove metallic deposits from boiler tube surfaces. Depending on boiler metallurgy, BCCW generally contain high concentrations of iron and copper or both, as well as other heavy metals such as chromium, lead, nickel, and zinc. BCCW treatment and disposal methods include precipitation, coponding in an ash pond, evaporation in the fireside of an operating boiler (for organic solvents), and contracted off-site disposal. Depending on the type of BCCW chemical treatment methods achieve varying degrees of success. BCCW which contain organic chelating agents can be especially difficult to treat to national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) limits (1 mg/L for both iron and copper) with conventional lime precipitation.Research is being done to evaluate different BCCW treatment and disposal methods. One waste management option under consideration is reuse of BCCW in utility wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. To investigate this option, a series of laboratory tests were performed in which five different types of BCCW were added to the reaction tank of EPRI's bench-scale wet limestone FGD system. This paper presents the results and conclusions from this study.

Stohs, M.; Owens, D.R. (Radian Corp. (US)); Micheletti, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

State of Industrial Fluidized Bed Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new combustion technique has been developed in the last decade that permits the burning of low quality coal, lignite and other fuels, while maintaining stack emissions within State and Federal limits. Low quality fuels can be burned directly in fluidized beds while taking advantage of low furnace temperatures am chemical activity within the bed to limit S02 am NOx emissions, thereby eliminating the need for stack gas scrubbing equipment. The excellent heat transfer characteristics of the fluidized beds also result in a reduction of total heat transfer surface requirements, thus reducing the size and cost of steam generators. Recent tests on commercial units have proven the concept. This paper reviews the progress that has been trade in the development of fluidized bed combustion boilers, as well as work currently under way in the United States and overseas. Details on the installation at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., am at other locations are presented, am operational results are discussed. Potential application of fluidized bed boilers in industrial plants using lignite and lignite refuse is also examined.

Mesko, J. E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Research on Stability Criterion of Furnace Flame Combustion Based on Image Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes and analyzes the stability criterion of furnace flame combustion based on image processing, which uses the maximum criterion of gray scale difference, the distance criterion of gravity center and mass center in the high temperature ... Keywords: image processing, stability, flame detection, boiler safety

Rongbao Chen, Wuting Fan, Jingci Bian, Fanhui Meng

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Viscosity virtual sensor to control combustion in fossil fuel power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermo-electrical power plants utilize fossil fuel oil to transform the calorific power of fuel into electric power. An optimal combustion in the boiler requires the fuel oil to be in its best conditions. One of fuel's most important properties to consider ... Keywords: Automatic learning, Bayesian networks, Fuel oil, Power plants, Virtual sensors

Pablo H. Ibargengoytia, Miguel Angel Delgadillo, Uriel A. Garca, Alberto Reyes

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

None

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Method and system for controlled combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling combustion in internal combustion engines of both the Diesel or Otto type, which relies on establishing fluid dynamic conditions and structures wherein fuel and air are entrained, mixed and caused to be ignited in the interior of a multiplicity of eddies, and where these structures are caused to sequentially fill the headspace of the cylinders.

Oppenheim, A. K. (Berkeley, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reviews the work performed during the quarter April-June 2003. The main focus of this quarter has been the site preparation (task 1) for the test campaign scheduled in September/October 2003. Task 3 (Techno-economical assessment) has also been initiated while selecting the methodology to be used in the economics analysis and specifying the plants to be compared: In Task 1 (Site Preparation), the process definition and design activities have been completed, the equipment and instruments required have been identified, and the fabrication and installation activities have been initiated, to implement the required modifications on the pilot boiler. As of today, the schedule calls for completion of construction by late-July. System check-down is scheduled for the first two weeks of August. In Task 2 (Combustion and Emissions Performance Optimization), four weeks of testing are planned, two weeks starting second half of August and two weeks starting at the end of September. In Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study), the plants to be evaluated have been specified, including baseline cases (air fired PC boilers with or without CO{sub 2} capture), O{sub 2}-fired cases (with or without flue gas recirculation) and IGCC cases. Power plants ranging from 50 to 500MW have been selected and the methodology to be used has been described, both for performance evaluation and cost assessment. The first calculations will be performed soon and the first trends will be reported in the next quarter. As part of Task 5 (Project Management & Reporting), the subcontract between Babcock&Wilcox and American Air Liquide has been finalized. The subcontract between ISGS and American Air Liquide is in the final stages of completion.

Ovidiu Marin; Fabienne Chatel-Pelage

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit. Summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to develop an advanced coal combustion system for firing beneficiated coal fuels (BCFs) capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas. The High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor system is capable of firing microfine coal-water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system were that it be simple to operate and offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal-fired combustor technology. (VC)

LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.; Beer, J.M.; Toqan, M.A.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to develop an advanced coal combustion system for firing beneficiated coal fuels (BCFs) capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas. The High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor system is capable of firing microfine coal-water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system were that it be simple to operate and offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal-fired combustor technology. (VC)

LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.; Beer, J.M.; Toqan, M.A.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, Version 6. 0. User's manual. Report for November 1984-August 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is a user's manual for the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model. It summarizes user options and software characteristics, and describes both the input data files and procedures for operating the model. It discusses proper formatting of files and creation of job-control language. The model projects for each state the emissions of sulfur oxides, sulfates, and nitrogen oxides from fossil-fuel combustion in industrial boilers. Emissions and costs of boiler generation, including emission-control costs, are projected for the years 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2010, 2020, and 2030.

Hogan, T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Boiler MACT Technical Assistance (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing the changes to Environmental Protection Act process standards. The DOE will offer technical assistance to ensure that major sources burning coal and oil have information on cost-effective, clean energy strategies for compliance, and to promote cleaner, more efficient boiler burning to cut harmful pollution and reduce operational costs. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to finalize the reconsideration process for its Clean Air Act pollution standards National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters (known as Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT)), in Spring 2012. This rule applies to large and small boilers in a wide range of industrial facilities and institutions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will offer technical assistance to ensure that major sources burning coal or oil have information on cost-effective clean energy strategies for compliance, including combined heat and power, and to promote cleaner, more efficient boilers to cut harmful pollution and reduce operational costs.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal.

Robben, Franklin A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Robben, F.A.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES GREGORY LYNG, MOHAMMADREZA ROOFI for traveling wave solutions of an abstract viscous combustion model including both Majda's model and the full-wave) approximation. Notably, our results apply to combustion waves of any type: weak or strong, detonations or defla

Texier, Benjamin - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

336

Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carry-over through the turbine causes corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

Rapier, Pascal M. (Richmond, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carryover through the turbine causing corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

Rapier, P.M.

1979-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Assessment of black liquor recovery boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the paper making industry, pulpwood chips are digested and cooked to provide the pulp going to the refining and paper mills. Black liquor residue, containing the dissolved lignin binder from the chips, with a concentration of 12 to 16% solids, is further concentrated to 62 to 65% solids and mixed with salt cake, Sodium Sulfate (Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The resulting concentrate of black liquor serves both as a fuel for generating steam in the boiler and also as the mother liquid from which other process liquors are recovered and recycled. Because the black liquor fuel contains high alkali concentrations, 18.3% sodium, 3.6% sulfur, an amount typical of midwestern bituminous coal, and measurable amounts of silica, iron oxides and other species, the black liquor boiler experience was reviewed for application to MHD boiler technology.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat recovery boilers are widely used in process plants for recovering energy from various waste gas streams, either from the consideration of process or of economy. Sulfuric, as well as nitric, acid plant heat recovery boilers are examples of the use of heat recovery due primarily to process considerations. On the other hand, cost and payback are main considerations in the case of gas turbine and incineration plants, where large quantities of gases are exhausted at temperatures varying from 800F to 1800F. This gas, when recovered, can result in a large energy savings and steam production. This paper attempts to outline some of the engineering considerations in the design of heat recovery boilers for turbine exhaust applications (combined cycle, cogeneration mode), incineration plants (solid waste, fume) and chemical plants (reformer, sulfuric acid, nitric acid).

Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

purchase? unit(s) Performance Factors Existing What is the capacity of the existing boiler? MBtuhr* What is the thermal efficiency of the existing boiler? % Et New What is the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler December 27, 2012 - 4:30pm Addthis Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain...

342

Boiler Blowdown Heat Recovery Project Reduces Steam System Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produced. Much of this heat can be recovered by routing the blown down liquid through a heat exchanger that preheats the boiler's makeup water. A boiler blowdown heat recovery...

343

Biomass Boiler to Heat Oregon School | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boiler to Heat Oregon School Biomass Boiler to Heat Oregon School April 26, 2011 - 5:29pm Addthis Oregon Governor Kulongoski maneuvers a backhoe to break ground at the Vernonia...

344

Descriptions of Past Research: Boiler Life and Availability Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptions of Past Research: Boiler Life and Availability Improvement Program contains summaries of many past Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Boiler Life and Availability Improvement Program research and development (R&D) efforts.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Maximizing Combustion Efficiency Through Selection of Optimum CO Control Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased emphasis on improved combustion control and the availability of accurate and reliable multi-parameter combustion instrumentation, an analytical technique is needed to supplant the previous incomplete assumptions and misleading guidelines for maintaining maximum boiler efficiency. This paper will present an analytical technique for establishing an optimum value of CO to minimize thermal losses in the combustion process. The optimum value is established by finding that value of excess air which minimizes the combined thermal losses due to the sensible and latent heat losses associated with excess air, and the unburned fuel thermal losses which result from the formation of CO. This technique allows determination of an optimum value for CO for any given burner and resultant CO vs excess air relationship. Values obtained with this technique are generally much higher than the typical values of 100-300 PPM recommended in the current literature. As a result of this technique, boilers can now be evaluated analytically and operated near or at the point of maximum combustion efficiency. Implementation of such a control strategy dictates incorporation of an accurate and reliable in-situ CO monitor to maintain known safe and efficient conditions.

McGowan, G. F.; Ketchum, R. L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal is presently the world's primary fuel for generating electrical power and, being more abundant and less expensive than oil or natural gas, is expected to continue its dominance into the future. Coal, however, is more carbon intensive than natural gas and oil and consequently coal-fired power plants are large point source emitters of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Since CO{sub 2} is a greenhouse gas, which may have an adverse impact on the world's climate/weather patterns, studies have been conducted to determine the feasibility and economic impact of capturing power plant CO{sub 2} emissions for pipeline transport to a sequestration/storage site. The stack gas that exhausts from a modern coal-fired power plant typically contains about 15% CO{sub 2} on a dry volume basis. Although there are numerous processes available for removing CO{sub 2} from gas streams, gas scrubbing with amine solvent is best suited for this application because of the large gas volumes and low CO{sub 2} concentrations involved. Unfortunately the energy required to regenerate the solvent for continued use as a capturing agent is large and imposes a severe energy penalty on the plant. In addition this ''back end'' or post combustion cleanup requires the addition of large vessels, which, in retrofit applications, are difficult to accommodate. As an alternative to post combustion scrubbing, Foster Wheeler (FW) has proposed that the combustion process be accomplished with oxygen rather than air. With all air nitrogen eliminated, a CO{sub 2}-water vapor rich flue gas will be generated. After condensation of the water vapor, a portion of the flue gas will be recirculated back to the boiler to control the combustion temperature and the balance of the CO{sub 2} will be processed for pipeline transport. This proposed oxygen-carbon dioxide (O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}) combustion process eliminates the need for CO{sub 2} removal/separation and reduces the cost of supplying a CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration. FW has developed a conceptual design of an O{sub 2} fired boiler to determine overall plant performance and economics. Five subtasks were conducted: (1) a literature review, (2) a system design and analysis, (3) a low NOx burner design and analysis, (4) a furnace and heat recovery area design analysis, and (5) an economic analysis. The objective of the literature search is to locate any data/information relevant to the Oxygen-Based PC Boiler conceptual design. The objective of the system design and analysis task is to optimize the PC boiler plant by maximizing system efficiency within practical considerations. Simulations of the oxygen-fired plant with CO{sub 2} sequestration were conducted using Aspen Plus and were compared to a reference air-fired 460 MW plant. Flue gas recycle is used in the O{sub 2}-fired PC to control the flame temperature. Parametric runs were made to determine the effect of flame temperature on system efficiency and required waterwall material and thickness. The degree of improvement on system efficiency of various modifications including hot gas recycle, purge gas recycle, flue gas feedwater recuperation, and recycle purge gas expansion were investigated. The selected O{sub 2}-fired design case has a system efficiency of 30.6% compared to the air-fired system efficiency of 36.7%. The design O{sub 2}-fired case requires T91 waterwall material and has a waterwall surface area of only 65% of the air-fired reference case. The objective of the low NOx burner design and analysis task is to optimize the burner design to ensure stable ignition, to provide safe operation, and to minimize pollutant formation. The burners were designed and analyzed using the Fluent CFD computer program. Four burner designs were developed: (1) with no OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (2) with 20% OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (3) with no OFG and 56% flue gas recycle and (4) with 20% OFG and 56% flue gas recycle. A 3-D Fluent simulation was made of a single wall-fired burner and horizontal portion of the furnace from the wall to the center. Without primary gas sw

Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Rivesville multicell fluidized bed boiler. Annual technical progress report. July 1978-June 1979  

SciTech Connect

Design, construction and test program of a 300,000 lb/hr steam generating capacity multicell fluidized bed boiler (MFB), as a pollution free method of burning high-sulfur or highly corrosive coals, is being carried out. The concept involves burning fuels such as coal, in a fluidized bed of limestone particles that react with the sulfur compounds formed during combustion to reduce air pollution. Nitrogen oxide emissions are also reduced at the lower combustion temperatures. The CaSO/sub 4/ produced in the furnace is discharged with the ash or regenerated to CaO for reuse in the fluidized bed. Information is presented on continued operation of the Rivesville MFB steam generating plant in a commercial mode and for determining performance and emission characteristics; studies and tests on flyash characterization and reinjection, fuel feed eductors and needles, air distributor, corrosion-erosion and sulfur capture; engineering studies to improve MFB performance and reliability.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Model of penetration of coal boilers and cogeneration in the paper industry  

SciTech Connect

A model has been developed to forecast the penetration of coal boilers and cogeneration of electricity in the paper industry. Given the demand for energy services (process steam and electricity) by the paper industry, the Penetration Model forecasts the demand for purchased fuel and electricity. The model splits the demand for energy service between energy carriers (coal, fuel oil/natural gas, bark, and spent liquor) on the basis of the installed capacity of 16 types of boilers (combinations of four types of energy carriers and four types of throttle conditions). Investment in new boilers is allocated by an empirical distribution function among the 16 types of boilers on the basis of life cycle cost. In the short run (5 years), the Penetration Model has a small price response. The model has a large price response in the long run (30 years). For constant fuel prices, the model forecasts a 19-percent share for coal and a 65-percent share for residual oil in the year 2000. If the real price of oil and gas doubles by the year 2000, the model forecasts a 68-percent share for coal and a 26-percent share for residual oil.

Reister, D.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Best Practices: The Engineering Approach For Industrial Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plant's boilers represent a large capital investment, as well as a crucial portion of overall plant operations, regardless of the industry our customers are in. It is important to have systems and procedures in place to protect this investment, as well as plant profitability. Boiler Best Practices represent The Engineering Approach for Boilers-a way to examine mechanical, operational and chemical aspects of the systems (pretreatment through condensate) to ensure reliable boiler operations with no surprises.

Blake, N. R.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Combustion 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report is a presentation of work carried out on Phase II of the HIPPS program under DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 from June 1995 to March 2001. The objective of this report is to emphasize the results and achievements of the program and not to archive every detail of the past six years of effort. These details are already available in the twenty-two quarterly reports previously submitted to DOE and in the final report from Phase I. The report is divided into three major foci, indicative of the three operational groupings of the program as it evolved, was restructured, or overtaken by events. In each of these areas, the results exceeded DOE goals and expectations. HIPPS Systems and Cycles (including thermodynamic cycles, power cycle alternatives, baseline plant costs and new opportunities) HITAF Components and Designs (including design of heat exchangers, materials, ash management and combustor design) Testing Program for Radiative and Convective Air Heaters (including the design and construction of the test furnace and the results of the tests) There are several topics that were part of the original program but whose importance was diminished when the contract was significantly modified. The elimination of the subsystem testing and the Phase III demonstration lessened the relevance of subtasks related to these efforts. For example, the cross flow mixing study, the CFD modeling of the convective air heater and the power island analysis are important to a commercial plant design but not to the R&D product contained in this report. These topics are of course, discussed in the quarterly reports under this contract. The DOE goal for the High Performance Power Plant System ( HIPPS ) is high thermodynamic efficiency and significantly reduced emissions. Specifically, the goal is a 300 MWe plant with > 47% (HHV) overall efficiency and {le} 0.1 NSPS emissions. This plant must fire at least 65% coal with the balance being made up by a premium fuel such as natural gas. To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization issues of fabrication and reliability, availability and maintenance. The program that has s

A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Vehculos de Clula de Combustible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de Clula de Combustible Vehculo de Clula de Combustible Honda Clarity FCX Los vehculos de clula de combustible (FCVs)tambin llamados de pila de combustibletienen el...

355

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

Brown, N.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Multifunctional robot to maintain boiler water-cooling tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robot has been developed to maintain boiler water-cooling tubes. This robot has a double tracked moving mechanism, an ash cleaning device, a slag purging device, a tubes' thickness measurement device, a marking device, and a control system. This robot ... Keywords: Boiler maintenance, Boiler water-cooling tube, Climbing robot, Mobile robot

Xueshan Gao; Dianguo Xu; Yan Wang; Huanhuan Pan; Weimin Shen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Materials for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers Mike Santella ORNL 25th Annual Conference ­ For Profit Cost Sharing Consortium #12;2 26-May-2010 Materials for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers Estimated Total Amount of Tubing for a Generic A-USC Boiler Images courtesy of The Babcock & Wilcox Company

358

Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research Finite Transitions #12;Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research;Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research Goal

Vuik, Kees

359

Using HYTECH to Synthesize Control Parameters for a Steam Boiler ?;??  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using HYTECH to Synthesize Control Parameters for a Steam Boiler ?;?? Thomas A. Henzinger 1 Howard model a steam­boiler control system using hybrid au­ tomata. We provide two abstracted linear models of the nonlinear be­ havior of the boiler. For each model, we define and verify a controller that maintains

Henzinger, Thomas A.

360

1 | P a g e Boiler Gold Rush  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 | P a g e Boiler Gold Rush VISION STATEMENT The vision of BGR is twofold: first, help all new by participating in the premiere orientation program in the nation, Boiler Gold Rush. Second, enhance upper leaders for the betterment of the university. PROGRAM GOALS Boiler Gold Rush will provide the following

Ginzel, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification Peter Csaba ()lveczky, Poland Abstract. In this paper an object-oriented algebraic solution of the steam-boiler specification Introduction The steam-boiler control specification problem has been proposed as a challenge for different

?lveczky, Peter Csaba

362

Project Recap Humanitarian Engineering Biodiesel Boiler System for Steam Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Recap Humanitarian Engineering ­ Biodiesel Boiler System for Steam Generator Currently 70 biodiesel boiler system to drive a steam engine generator. This system is to provide electricity the customer needs, a boiler fueled by biodiesel and outputting to a steam engine was decided upon. The system

Demirel, Melik C.

363

Nanotube Boiler 1 Abstract--Controlled copper evaporation at attogram  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanotube Boiler 1 Abstract-- Controlled copper evaporation at attogram level from individual carbon nanotube (CNT) vessels, which we call nanotube boilers, is investigated experimentally, and ionization in these CNT boilers, which can serve as sources for mass transport and deposition in nanofluidic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

Cengarle, María Victoria

365

Using HYTECH to Synthesize Control Parameters for a Steam Boiler? ??  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using HYTECH to Synthesize Control Parameters for a Steam Boiler? ?? Thomas A. Henzinger1 Howard model a steam-boiler control system using hybrid au- tomata. We provide two abstracted linear models of the nonlinear be- havior of the boiler. For each model, we de ne and verify a controller that maintains the safe

Henzinger, Thomas A.

366

Steam boiler control specification problem: A TLA solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam boiler control specification problem: A TLA solution Frank Le?ke and Stephan Merz Institut f of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi­ cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

Merz, Stephan

367

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification.In this paper an object-oriented algebraic solution of the steam-boiler specification problem is presented computations cannot happen. 1 Introduction The steam-boiler control specification problem has been

?lveczky, Peter Csaba

368

Streams of Steam The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Streams of Steam ­ The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study Manfred Broy, Franz Regensburger-tuned con- cepts of FOCUS by its application of the requirements specification of a steam boiler, see [Abr96-studies. In this context, applying FOCUS to the steam boiler case study ([Abr96]) led us to a couple of questions re- #12

Cengarle, María Victoria

369

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

370

Low-Emission Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

many existing burners. UCLSC could be scaled for devices as small as home furnaces and boilers or as large as gas-fired power generators. Contacts Robert Cheng RKCheng@lbl.gov...

371

Cyclone Boiler Reburn NOx Control Improvements via Cyclone Design Improvements and Advanced Air Staging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastman Kodak owns three Babcock & Wilcox coal fired cyclone boilers and one Combustion Engineering pulverized coal boiler located at Kodak Park in Rochester, New York. Duke Energy Generation Services (DEGS) operates and maintains the steam and electric generation equipment for Kodak and has primary responsibility for related capital project development and execution. The Kodak plant is capable of generating approximately 1,900,000 pounds of steam and 130 MWs of electrical power. To achieve the required level of NOx control, Kodak chose The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company's, Natural Gas Reburn technology for the three cyclone boilers. The relatively low capital cost of the system and reasonable cost of natural gas in the mid 1990s made Natural Gas Reburn an economic fit for the RACT requirements of 0.60#s/Mmbtu NOx. The run up in natural gas prices since 2002 has increased the cost of NOx removed from ~ $2000/ton to ~$5000/ton based on fuel expense alone. In an effort to curtail the cost of control, Duke Energy Generations Services and Kodak implemented a series of projects that integrated Cyclone Design Improvements and Advancements in Air Staging along with ESP inlet flue modifications that resulted in decreasing the Natural Gas required for NOx control ~ 40% from baseline levels saving the plant several million dollars per year in fuel expense. Significant improvements in opacity and filterable PM were also realized by these changes.

Morabito, B.; Nee, B.; Goff, V.; Maringo, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Solution Combustion Synthesis Impregnated Layer Combustion Synthesis is a Novel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solution Combustion Synthesis Impregnated Layer Combustion Synthesis is a Novel Methodology Engineering University of Notre Dame University of Notre Dame #12;Outline: Overview of combustion synthesis Reaction system Combustion front analaysis Theoretical model results Conclusions Acknowledgements #12

Mukasyan, Alexander

373

Adaptive Fuzzy PID Control for Boiler Deaerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boiler deaerator temperature control system is a non-linear, time-varying, delay control process. It can not achieve satisfying effect using traditional control algorithm to control deaerator water temperature, the paper proposes an adaptive fuzzy ... Keywords: Deaerator, Adaptive, Fuzzy control, PID control

Lei Jinli

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Digital radiographic systems detect boiler tube cracks  

SciTech Connect

Boiler water wall leaks have been a major cause of steam plant forced outages. But conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques have a poor track record of detecting corrosion fatigue cracking on the inside surface of the cold side of waterwall tubing. EPRI is performing field trials of a prototype direct-digital radiographic system that promises to be a game changer. 8 figs.

Walker, S. [EPRI, Charlotte, NC (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Post-Combustion CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0004274 3H Company will evaluate the feasibility of its "Self-Concentrating Absorbent CO2 Capture Process." The process is based on amines in a non-aqueous solvent which, upon reaction with CO2, separate into two distinct phases: a CO2-rich liquid phase and a dilute lean phase. The proposed process offers several potential advantages. Preliminary experimental data show that the process has the potential of reducing the total regeneration energy by as much as 70 percent. The solvent has high working capacity, thus required solvent volume would be lower than that required in a currently available amine system. This results in lower pumping requirements, lower auxiliary power demands, and reduced equipment size. In addition, since the solvent is non-aqueous, corrosion issues would be reduced. During the three-year project, an engineering design supported by laboratory data and economic justification will be developed to construct and operate a slipstream demonstration facility at an E-ON power plant in the United States as a next stage of commercialization development.

376

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, June--September 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the second year of the program, January-December 2003, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The program has experienced significant delays due to several factors. The budget has also been significantly under spent. Based on recent technical successes and confirmation of process economics, significant future progress is expected. Concepts for integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs) into boilers and process heaters to facilitate oxy-fuel combustion have been investigated. OTM reactor combustion testing was delayed to insufficient reliability of the earlier OTM materials. Substantial improvements to reliability have been identified and testing will recommence early in 2004. Promising OTM material compositions and OTM architectures have been identified that improve the reliability of the ceramic elements. Economic evaluation continued. Information was acquired that quantified the attractiveness of the advanced oxygen-fired boiler. CO{sub 2} capture and compression are still estimated to be much less than $10/ton CO{sub 2}.

John Sirman; Leonard Switzer; Bart van Hassel

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

HYDROGEN ASSISTED DIESEL COMBUSTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study, the effect of hydrogen assisted diesel combustion on conventional and advanced combustion modes was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, (more)

Lilik, Gregory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Biomass Combustion Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combustion Systems Inc Combustion Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass Combustion Systems Inc Address 67 Millbrook St Place Worcester, Massachusetts Zip 01606 Sector Biomass Product Combustion systems for wood fuel Website http://www.biomasscombustion.c Coordinates 42.290195°, -71.799627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.290195,"lon":-71.799627,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

380

Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

Reed, T.B.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Combustion oscillation control  

SciTech Connect

Premixing of fuel and air can avoid high temperatures which produce thermal NOx, but oscillating combustion must be eliminated. Combustion oscillations can also occur in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle turbines. As an alternative to design or operating modifications, METC is investigating active combustion control (ACC) to eliminate oscillations; ACC uses repeated adjustment of some combustion parameter to control the variation in heat release that drives oscillations.

Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

NO reduction in decoupling combustion of biomass and biomass-coal blend  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a form of energy that is CO{sub 2}-neutral. However, NOx emissions in biomass combustion are often more than that of coal on equal heating-value basis. In this study, a technology called decoupling combustion was investigated to demonstrate how it reduces NO emissions in biomass and biomass-coal blend combustion. The decoupling combustion refers to a two-step combustion method, in which fuel pyrolysis and the burning of char and pyrolysis gas are separated and the gas burns out during its passage through the burning-char bed. Tests in a quartz dual-bed reactor demonstrated that, in decoupling combustion, NO emissions from biomass and biomass-coal blends were both less than those in traditional combustion and that NO emission from combustion of blends of biomass and coal decreased with increasing biomass percentage in the blend. Co-firing rice husk and coal in a 10 kW stove manufactured according to the decoupling combustion technology further confirmed that the decoupling combustion technology allows for truly low NO emission as well as high efficiency for burning biomass and biomass-coal blends, even in small-scale stoves and boilers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Li Dong; Shiqiu Gao; Wenli Song; Jinghai Li; Guangwen Xu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Multi-Phase Complex Systems

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Proceedings: Coal Combustion Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the 2007 Coal Combustion workshop was to present a holistic view of the various combustion processes required for minimal emissions, peak performance, and maximum reliability in a coal-fired power plant. The workshop also defined needs for future RD in coal combustion technology.

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this concept offers substantial savings over SCR and is an economically attractive alternative to purchasing NOx credits or installing other conventional technologies. In conjunction with the development of oxygen based low NOx technology, Praxair also worked on developing the economically enhancing oxygen transport membrane (OTM) technology which is ideally suited for integration with combustion systems to achieve further significant cost reductions and efficiency improvements. This OTM oxygen production technology is based on ceramic mixed conductor membranes that operate at high temperatures and can be operated in a pressure driven mode to separate oxygen with infinite selectivity and high flux. An OTM material was selected and characterized. OTM elements were successfully fabricated. A single tube OTM reactor was designed and assembled. Testing of dense OTM elements was conducted with promising oxygen flux results of 100% of target flux. However, based on current natural gas prices and stand-alone air separation processes, ceramic membranes do not offer an economic advantage for this application. Under a different DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement, Praxair is continuing to develop oxygen transport membranes for the Advanced Boiler where the economics appear more attractive.

David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

PCS Nitrogen: Combustion Fan System Optimization Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Chemical Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program case study describes how, in 2003, PCS Nitrogen, Inc., improved the efficiency of the combustion fan on a boiler at the company's chemical fertilizer plant in Augusta, Georgia. The project saved $420,000 and 76,400 million British thermal units (MBtu) per year. In addition, maintenance needs declined, because there is now less stress on the fan motor and bearings and less boiler feed water usage. This project was so successful that the company has implemented more efficiency improvements that should result in energy cost savings of nearly $1 million per year.

Not Available

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Economics and/or political intervention may one day dictate the conversion from oil or natural gas to coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn oil or gas. In recognition of this future possibility the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technical Center (DOE-FETC) supported a program led by ABB Power Plant Laboratories with support from the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University with the goal of demonstrating the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of the overall goal the following specific objectives were targeted: develop a coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical and operational requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; maintain boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb NO{sub 2} per million Btu; achieve combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and determine economic payback periods as a function of key variables.

Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 29, 2002/pp. 11151121 LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF AN ULTRALOW NOx PREMIXED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Office of Industrial Technology of the U.S. Department of Energy for year 2020, a new approach was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology, and the California Institute INVESTIGATION OF AN ULTRALOW NOx PREMIXED COMBUSTION CONCEPT FOR INDUSTRIAL BOILERS DAVID LITTLEJOHN,1 ADRIAN J

Knowles, David William

388

Oxy-fuel Combustion and Integrated Pollutant Removal as Retrofit Technologies for Removing CO2 from Coal Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One third of the US installed capacity is coal-fired, producing 49.7% of net electric generation in 20051. Any approach to curbing CO2 production must consider the installed capacity and provide a mechanism for preserving this resource while meeting CO2 reduction goals. One promising approach to both new generation and retrofit is oxy-fuel combustion. Using oxygen instead of air as the oxidizer in a boiler provides a concentrated CO2 combustion product for processing into a sequestration-ready fluid.... Post-combustion carbon capture and oxy-fuel combustion paired with a compression capture technology such as IPR are both candidates for retrofitting pc combustion plants to meet carbon emission limits. This paper will focus on oxy-fuel combustion as applied to existing coal power plants.

Ochs, T.L.; Oryshchyn, D.B.; Summers, C.A.; Gerdemann, S.J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

390

Recovery Boiler Superheater Ash Corrosion Field Study  

SciTech Connect

With the trend towards increasing the energy efficiency of black liquor recovery boilers operated in North America, there is a need to utilize superheater tubes with increased corrosion resistance that will permit operation at higher temperatures and pressures. In an effort to identify alloys with improved corrosion resistance under more harsh operating conditions, a field exposure was conducted that involved the insertion of an air-cooled probe, containing six candidate alloys, into the superheater section of an operating recovery boiler. A metallographic examination, complete with corrosion scale characterization using EMPA, was conducted after a 1,000 hour exposure period. Based on the results, a ranking of alloys based on corrosion performance was obtained.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Biomass Cofiring in Coal-Fired Boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cofiring biomass-for example, forestry residues such as wood chips-with coal in existing boilers is one of the easiest biomass technologies to implement in a federal facility. The current practice is to substitute biomass for up to 20% of the coal in the boiler. Cofiring has many benefits: it helps to reduce fuel costs as well as the use of landfills, and it curbs emissions of sulfur oxide, nitrogen oxide, and the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels. This Federal Technology Alert was prepared by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program to give federal facility managers the information they need to decide whether they should pursue biomass cofiring at their facilities.

Not Available

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have undertaken a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. Ultrasupercritical (USC...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effect of Operational Transients on Boiler Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is increasingly the case that utility systems demand more flexibility in a unit's ability to respond to dispatch requirements, which can create a conflict between maximizing efficient operation and limiting damage accumulation. A boiler can be operated in various cycling modes and can be subjected to planned and unplanned transients associated with load following, minimum load operation, forced cooling, variable pressure operation, increased ramp rates, increased attemperation, over-temperature operat...

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Impact of Operating Factors on Boiler Availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities strive to achieve higher reliability and lower operation and maintenance (O&M) costs for their fossil-fired power plants, changing plant operating conditions will provide even greater challenges in meeting those objectives. This report summarizes the cause and effect relationships that exist between operating conditions and boiler component reliability. It is an initial step in developing the tools and technology that will enable utilities to meet their objectives in an ever more competitive...

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Boiler Chemical Cleaning Waste Management Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical cleaning to remove tube deposits/oxides that occur during unit operation or scale during unit commissioning from conventional fossil plants and combined cycle plants with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) will result in the generation of a waste solution. The waste contains residual solvent and elevated levels of heavy metals (primarily iron and copper) in addition to rinse and passivation solutions. An earlier manual, Boiler Chemical Cleaning Wastes Management Manual (EPRI ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

E-Alerts: Combustion, engines, and propellants (reciprocation and rotating combustion engines). E-mail newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design, performance, and testing of reciprocating and rotating engines of various configurations for all types of propulsion. Includes internal and external combustion engines; engine exhaust systems; engine air systems components; engine structures; stirling and diesel engines.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Simulating aerosol formation and effects in NOx absorption in oxy-fired boiler gas processing units using Aspen Plus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxy-fired boilers are receiving increasing focus as a potential response to reduced boiler emissions limits and greenhouse gas legislation. Among the challenges in cleaning boiler (more)

Schmidt, David Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 15, April 15 1996--June 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering; Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quote} Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis and Phases II and III on a cost-share basis.

1996-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

Operation, modification, and maintenance of DOE/PETC 700 H. P. combustion test facility. Quarterly activity report, April 2-July 1, 1979, second quarter  

SciTech Connect

The coal-oil mixture (COM) combustion test program of the 700 H.P. Combustion Test Facility has been performed successfully according to schedule. The parametric coal-oil mixture combustion tests with 30 and 40% coal concentrations were completed. Test data are being analyzed; some meaningful results were obtained. The combustor tests with 50% coal concentration have been initiated. The installation of the new 100 H.P., oil-fired, fire tube boiler for COM combustion studies is on schedule and facility shake down tests are scheduled.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Boiler Commercial Boiler Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler October 7, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis What's Covered All Federal purchases of hot water or steam boilers (using either oil or gas) with a rated capacity (Btu/h) of 300,000-10,000,000 must meet or exceed FEMP-designated thermal efficiencies. FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Boilers Table 1 displays the FEMP-designated minimum efficiency requirements for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

402

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

403

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

404

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

405

New Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County New Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County New Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County August 25, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Officials at Sherburne County's Government Center in Minnesota had a problem: the complex's original boilers, installed in 1972, were in desperate need of replacing. The two boilers were inefficient, labor intensive and well past their life expectancy. Any upgrades to the system were put on hold as the county tightened its purse strings amid a tough economy. "We kept asking: 'Can we make these things last one more year?'" says Dave Lucas, Sherburne County's solid waste administrator. However, hopes for a new set of boilers were revived in April after the

406

New Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County New Boilers, Big Savings for Minnesota County August 25, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Officials at Sherburne County's Government Center in Minnesota had a problem: the complex's original boilers, installed in 1972, were in desperate need of replacing. The two boilers were inefficient, labor intensive and well past their life expectancy. Any upgrades to the system were put on hold as the county tightened its purse strings amid a tough economy. "We kept asking: 'Can we make these things last one more year?'" says Dave Lucas, Sherburne County's solid waste administrator. However, hopes for a new set of boilers were revived in April after the

407

Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water treatment is an important aspect of boiler operation which can affect efficiency or result in damage if neglected. Without effective water treatment, scale can form on boiler tubes, reducing heat transfer, and causing a loss of boiler efficiency and availability. Proper control of boiler blowdown is also important to assure clean boiler surfaces without wasting water, heat, and chemicals. Recovering hot condensate for reuse as boiler feedwater is another means of improving system efficiency. Condensate which is contaminated with corrosion products or process chemicals, however, is ill fit for reuse; and steam which leaks from piping, valves, traps and connections cannot be recovered. Effective chemical treatment, in conjunction with mechanical system improvements, can assure that condensate can be safely returned and valuable energy recovered.

Bloom, D.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Oil-fired boiler Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

409

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Oil-fired boiler Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

410

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Oil-fired boiler Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

411

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-water cycles. Deposition in drum boilers has been identified as the area of broadest concern to the industry; therefore, an improved understanding of deposition in drum boilers is expected to represent the greatest source of benefits and value to end users. The overall objective of the modeling described here is to develop a comprehensive, integrated model for deposition process...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Application of Multivariable Control to Oil and Coal Fired Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased visibility provided by advanced measurement and control techniques has shown that control of oil and coal fired boilers is a complex problem involving simultaneous determination of flue gas carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, opacity and temperature levels. A microcomputer-based control system which recognizes the inter-relationship of these variables has produced fuel savings averaging about 3% on coal and oil fired boilers. The system is described and case study data is presented for both coal and oil fired boilers.

Swanson, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Apparatus for dusting off gas by filtration and aspiration cleaning of filter, and application to combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus for dusting off gases by filtration and cleaning of filter by aspiration and application thereof to combustion gases are disclosed. This invention relates to the filtration of dust loaded gases, and, in particular, combustion gases in the hot state. It consists of passing gases to be dusted off from top to bottom over a bed of pulverulent material, in particular, a sand bed and cleaning the upper layer of said bed by aspiration of dusts deposited thereon. This invention is particularly adapted for dusting off combustion gases from boilers or thermal power stations or gases to be supplied to gas turbines.

Merry, J.

1982-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

414

Development of a Combination Boiler Simulator using General Purpose Simulation Tools, ISA01-P1063, paper presented at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology with which a detailed simulation of a typical Combination Boiler (multiple-fuel) was developed for use in training and analysis. The boiler that was simulated is a vintage Riley Traveling Grate Spreader Stoker-fired drum unit that is fired by crushed coal and wood bark. It is controlled by a Digital Control System (DCS) and is installed in a paper-mill powerhouse, which is owned by a major paper-manufacturing corporation. Many of the personnel who have operated this boiler for the last 30 to 40 years are nearing retirement age, and the customer felt it was important to have a tool which could be used to familiarize new personnel with boiler operations, and to provide training for current personnel as they worked their way to Operator status. In addition, it could be used to evaluate system design changes prior to them being implemented on the real system. The customer desired a simulation platform that was open, that is, not dependent on a control vendor or special hardware. It needed to run in real-time to be useful for training, and it was also required that it be on a personal computer platform utilizing the Windows operating system. The simulator was constructed using general-purpose simulation software and graphic user interface (GUI) tools. The simulator system was delivered on a networked three-PC platform, with touch-screens and a special keyboard for emulating the actual DCS keyboard. The resulting simulation includes very detailed mathematical models of the combustion and steam generation processes. The simulator is used to teach startup, shutdown, maneuvering and the proper response to various system upsets. It was also utilized as the platform for testing design changes which significantly modified the over-fire air, coal and bark fuel systems, and a complete revision to the boiler control strategy.

Philip S. Bartells; Joseph S. Gauthier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Combustion characteristics of Douglas Fir planer shavings. Technical progress report No. 4, September 16, 1977--September 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant quantities of wood residue fuels are presently being used in industrial steam generating facilities. Recent studies indicate that substantial additional quantities of wood residue fuels are available for energy generation in the form of steam and/or electricity. A limited data base on the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels has resulted in the installation and operation of inefficient combustion systems for these fuels. This investigation of the combustion characteristics of wood residue fuels was undertaken to provide a data base which could be used to optimize the combustion of such fuels. Optimization of the the combustion process in industrial boilers serves to improve combustion efficiency and to reduce air pollutant emissions generated in the combustion process. This report presents data on the combustion characteristics of Douglas Fir planer shavings. The data were obtained in a pilot scale combustion test facility at Oregon State Univerisity. Other technical reports present data on the combustion characteristics of: Douglas Fir bark, Red Alder sawdust, Red Alder bark, Ponderosa pine bark, Hemlock bark, and Eastern White Pine bark. An executive summary report is also available which compares the combustion characteristics of the various fuel species.

Junge, D.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and local government resources Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy: AstraZeneca - Newark This profiles explains how Astrazeneca's Newark...

417

Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and local government resources Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy: Allergan - Westport This profiles explains how Allergan's Westport facility...

418

Boiler Tune-ups: Improve efficiency, reduce pollution, and save...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boiler Tune-ups: Improve efficiency, reduce pollution, and save money Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

419

Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and local government resources Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy: Boeing Philadelphia This profiles explains how Beoing's Philadelphia plant...

420

Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and local government resources Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy: Cargill Krefeld This profiles explains how Cargill's Krefeld mill saved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boiler types combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and local government resources Profiles in Energy Efficiency Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy: GM Marion & Orion This profiles explains how GM's Marion & Orion facilities...

422

Flame Doctor for Cyclone Boilers: Beta Demonstration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the beta demonstration of the Flame Doctor system as it is applied to cyclone boilers.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Shattering Kraft Recovery Boiler Smelt by a Steam Jet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kraft recovery boiler smelt is shattered into small droplets by an impinging steam jet to prevent smelt-water explosions in the dissolving tank. Inadequate shattering increases (more)

Taranenko, Anton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Factors Affecting the Resistivity of Recovery Boiler Precipitator Ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are commonly used to control particulate emissions from recovery boilers in the kraft pulping process. The electrical resistivity of entrained particulates is (more)

Sretenovic, Ivan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nanostructured Environmental Barrier Coatings for Corrosion Resistance in Recovery Boilers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corrosion of components in a recovery boiler is a major problem faced by the pulp and paper industry. The superheater tubes get severely corroded due (more)

Rao, Shishir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based on Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based On Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Agency...

429

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18%. The performance goal of 70/40 reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18%.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Precision Combustion, Inc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Reliable, Cost Effective Fuel Processors. Abstract: Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) is developing ultra-compact Fuel Processing systems for a range of Fuel Cells and...

431

Low NOx combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Combustion of hydrocarbon liquids and solids is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding a small amount of oxygen into the fuel stream.

Kobayashi, Hisashi (Putnam Valley, NY); Bool, III, Lawrence E. (Aurora, NY)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Low NOx combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Combustion of hydrocarbon liquids and solids is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding a small amount of oxygen into the fuel stream.

Kobayashi; Hisashi (Putnam Valley, NY), Bool, III; Lawrence E. (Aurora, NY)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Closed-loop biomass co-firing in a laboratory reactor and in a full-scale boiler.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-firing tests were conducted in a pilot-scale reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and in a boiler at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar factory at Puunene, Hawaii. Combustion tests were performed in the Sandia Multi-Fuel Combustor using Australian coal, whole fiber cane including tops and leaves processed at three different levels (milled only, milled and leached, and milled followed by leaching and subsequent milling), and fiber cane stripped of its tops and leaves and heavily processed through subsequent milling, leaching, and milling cycles. Testing was performed for pure fuels and for biomass co-firing with the coal at levels of 30% and 70% by mass. The laboratory tests revealed the following information: (1) The biomass fuels convert their native nitrogen into NO more efficiently than coal because of higher volatile content and more reactive nitrogen complexes. (2) Adding coal to whole fiber cane to reduce its tendency to form deposits should not adversely affect NO emissions. ( 3 ) Stripped cane does not offer a NO advantage over whole cane when co-fired with coal. During the field test, Sandia measured 0 2 , C02, CO, SO2, and NO concentrations in the stack and gas velocities near the superheater. Gas concentrations and velocities fluctuated more during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The mean 0 2 concentration was lower and the mean C02 concentration was higher during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. When normalized to a constant exhaust 0 2 concentration, mean CO concentration was higher and mean NO concentration was lower for biomass co-firing than for coal. The SO2 concentration tracked the use of Bunker C fuel oil. When normalized by the amount of boiler energy input, the amounts of NO and SO2 formed were lower during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The difference between NOx trends in the lab and in the field are most likely a result of less effective heat and mass transfer in the boiler. Particles were sampled near the superheater tube using an impaction probe and were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Particle loading appeared higher for biomass co-firing than for coal combustion, especially for the smaller particle diameters. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to detect silicon, aluminum, titanium, iron, calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium concentrations near the superheater. LIBS provided an abundant amount of real-time information. The major constituents of the fuel ash (silicon and aluminum) were also the major measured inorganic constituents of the combustion products. The combustion products were enriched in sodium relative to the fuel ash during all tests, and they were enriched in potassium for the biomass co-firing tests. Alkali metals are enriched because compounds containing these elements are more readily releasable into the combustion products than refractory components that remain in large particles such as silicon, aluminum, and titanium. Relative to the measured deposit chemistry, the combustion flows were enriched in iron, sodium, and potassium, constituents that are known to form fumes laden with fine particles and/or vapors. The LIBS results yield insight into the deposition mechanism: Impaction of larger particles dominates over fume deposition. The present application of LIBS reveals its potential to provide real-time field information on the deposition propensity of different fuels and the effects of different fuels and boiler operating conditions.

Jenkins, Bryan M. (University of California, Davis, CA); Williams, Robert B. (University of California, Davis, CA); Turn, Scott Q. (Hawaii Natural Energy Institute.); Jakeway, Lee A. (Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company); Blevins, Linda Gail

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z