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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whale Cr Tepee Cr Thoma Cr KintlaCr Logg ing Cr Anaconda Cr Bo wmanCr Kintla Cr Cam a s Cr A naco nda

2

Bo Shen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bo Shen Bo Shen China Energy Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2118 (510) 495-2991 BoShen@lbl.gov Dr. Bo...

3

Belarus: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belarus: Energy Resources Belarus: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53,"lon":28,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

U.S. Exports to Belarus of Petroleum Coke (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Exports to Belarus of Petroleum Coke (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2004: 17

5

Lawrence E. (Larry) Boing - Engineering Development and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence E. (Larry) Boing DEPARTMENTS Engineering Analysis Nuclear Systems Analysis Research & Test Reactor Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems...

6

Microsoft Word - BoNT-Stevens.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defining How Botulinum Toxin Binds to the Synaptotagmin Defining How Botulinum Toxin Binds to the Synaptotagmin Receptor and Creating Improved Therapeutics to Block Toxicity Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known, induces a potentially fatal paralytic condition known as "botulism". Botulism can occur when toxin-producing bacteria infect wounds (wound botulism) or the intestinal tract (infant/intestinal botulism), or fol- lowing the ingestion of contaminated food in which toxin has been produced (food-borne botulism). In the USA, infant botulism represents the most common manifestation of the disease, where its prevalence has led to speculation of a link to sudden infant death syndrome. BoNTs are subdivided into seven distinct serotypes (types A through G), and an increasingly large number of subtypes continue to be identified within each serotype, high-

7

Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kintla Cr Lo gging Cr Anaconda Cr B owmanCr Kintla Cr Ca mas Cr Ana conda Cr SFkShortyCrShorty Cr Mc

8

"We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 let spustya [Life after Chernobyl: 16 years later]. 2002.Press. Belarus and Chernobyl: The Second Decade. 1998. Ed.Alexievich, S. 1997. Chernobyl’skaya molitva. Hronika

Kuchinskaya, Olga

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lawrence E. (Larry) Boing - Engineering Development and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experience: Lawrence E. (Larry) Boing has a total of over 30 years experience in the nuclear facility decommissioning field and related fields of work. He has worked in this...

10

Restrictions on the right to freedom of association : Case study of the legal environment of human rights NGOs in Azerbaijan, Belarus and the Russian Federation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper identifies a growing trend of the adoption of restrictive laws regulating establishment and operation of NGOs in Azerbaijan, Belarus and the Russian Federation.… (more)

Remézaitè, Ramutè

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nonstoichiometry in A BO3 compounds similar to PbTiO3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical thermodynamic model of the nonstoichiometry in A BO3 compounds possessing volatile AO species is applied to mass?loss Knudsen effusion experimental (p

James F. Shackelford; Robert L. Holman

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sequence assembly and annotation of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) class IIb region, and in silico detection of sequence polymorphisms in BoLA IIb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cattle are vitally important to American agriculture industry, generating over 24.6 billion pounds of beef (by carcass weight), and 79.5 billion dollars in 2005, and over 27 billion dollars in milk sales in 2004. As of July 2006, the U.S. beef and dairy industry is comprised of 104.5 million head of cattle, 32.4 million of which were processed in 2005. The health of the animals has always been an important concern for breeders, as healthy animals grow faster and are more likely to reach market weight. Animals that exhibit natural resistance to disease do not require chemicals to stimulate normal weight gain, and are less prone to disease related wasting. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a collection of genes, many of which function in antigen processing and presentation. The bovine MHC (BoLA) differs from typical mammalian MHCs in that the class II region was disrupted by a chromosomal inversion into two subregions, designated BoLA IIa and BoLA IIb. BoLA IIb was transposed to a position near the centromere on bovine chromosome 23,while BoLA IIa retains its position in BoLA. Comparative sequence analysis of BoLA IIb with the human MHC revealed the location of the region containing the proximal inversion breakpoint. Gene content, order and orientation of BoLA IIb are consistent with the single inversion hypothesis when compared to the corresponding region of the human class II MHC (HLA class II). BoLA IIb spans approximately 450 kb. The genomic sequence of BoLA IIb was used to detect sequence variation through comparison to other bovine sequences, including data from the bovine genome project, and two regions in the BAC scaffold used to develop the BoLA IIb sequence. Analysis of the bovine genome project sequence revealed a total of 10,408 mismatching bases, 30 out of 231 polymorphic microsatellites, and 15 sequences corresponding to the validated SNP panel generated by the bovine genome sequencing project. The two overlapping regions in the BoLA IIb BAC scaffold were found to have 888 polymorphisms, including a total of 6 out of 42 polymorphic microsatellites indicating that each BAC derived from a different chromosome.

Childers, Christopher P.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

10.2.2013bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 Irreversible thermodynamics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Work from a saline power plant /1 #12;10.2.2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering a saline power plant /2 10.2.2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 a saline power plant /3 #12;10.2.2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500

Zevenhoven, Ron

14

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1] PEtER BoRwEin ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1]. PEtER BoRwEin, TAm bAs eRD bElyi , AnD u bExA ? bos. ?R????? ' ??????d?f gh ???d kl mopRC ?s C?h?f?t.

15

The Use of TaBoRR as a Heavy Oil Upgrader  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary testing has shown that Western Research Institute's (WRI) Tank Bottom Recovery and Remediation (TaBoRR{reg_sign}) technology shows promise for heavy oil upgrading. Approximately 70 to 75 wt% of a Canadian Cold Lake bitumen feed was converted to a partially upgraded overhead product that could be transported directly by pipeline or blended with the parent bitumen to produce transportable crude. TaBoRR{reg_sign} was originally developed to remediate tank bottom wastes by producing a distillate product and solid waste. TaBoRR{reg_sign}'s processing steps include breaking a water-oil emulsion, recovering a light hydrocarbon fraction by distillation in a stripper unit, and pyrolyzing the residua reducing it to additional overhead and a benign coke for disposal. Cold Lake bitumen was tested in WRI's bench-scale equipment to evaluate the potential use of TaBoRR{reg_sign} technology for heavy oil upgrading to produce a stable, partially (or fully) upgraded product that will allow diluent-reduced or diluent-free transportation of bitumen or ultra-heavy crudes to market. Runs were conducted at temperatures of low, intermediate and high severity in the stripper to produce stripper overhead and bottoms. The bottoms from each of these runs were processed further in a 6-inch screw pyrolyzer to produce pyrolyzer overhead for blending with the corresponding stripper overheads. Proceeding in this fashion yielded three partially upgraded crudes. The products from TaBoRR{reg_sign} processing, the parent bitumen, and bitumen blends were subjected to stability and compatibility testing at the National Centre for Upgrading Technology (NCUT). Chemical analyses of the overhead product blends have met pipeline specifications for viscosity and density; however the bromine number does not, which might indicate the need for mild hydrotreating. Storage stability tests showed the blends to be stable. The blends were also soluble and compatible with most other Alberta crudes.

Lee Brecher; Charles Mones

2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by / av: Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a solar thermal unit for water heating) or a condensating or evaporating flow. An energy balance describes systems in regions and buildings", �A Heat Engineering Laboratory report 2006-3. 4.3.2 Val av värmeväxlare and buildings", �A Heat Engineering Laboratory report 2006-3 #12;�bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens

Zevenhoven, Ron

17

Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Monoclinic LiMnBO[subscript 3] as a Li Intercalation Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated the structural stability and electrochemical properties of LiMnBO3 in the hexagonal and monoclinic form with ab initio computations and, for the first time, report electrochemical data on monoclinic ...

Kim, Jae Chul

18

Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Monoclinic LiMnBO[subscript 3] as a Li Intercalation Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated the structural stability and electrochemical properties of LiMnBO[subscript 3] in the hexagonal and monoclinic form with ab initio computations and, for the first time, report electrochemical data on ...

Kim, Jae Chul

19

Structure and optical properties of a noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

A new noncentrosymmetric borate, RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (abbreviated as RSBO), has been grown from Rb{sub 2}O--B{sub 2}O{sub 3}--RbF flux and its crystal structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in space group Ama2 with cell parameters of a=11.128(10) A, b=12.155(15) A, c=6.952(7) A, Z=4. The basic structural units are isolated planar BO{sub 3} groups. Second harmonic generation (SHG) test of the title compound by the Kurtz-Perry method shows that RSBO can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP). Finally, based on the anionic group approximation, the optical properties of the title compound are compared with those of the structure-related apatite-like compounds with the formula 'A{sub 5}(TO{sub n}){sub 3}X'. - Graphical abstract: RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and some other borate NLO compounds, namely Ca{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F RCa{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}O (R=Y or Gd) and Na{sub 3}La{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as the derivatives of apatite. They have similar formula composed of five cations and three anion groups (we call them 5/3 structures). The detailed SHG coefficients and optical properties of the apatite-like NLO crystals were compared and summarized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} was grown from flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as a derivative of the apatite-like structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure and its relationship to the optical properties of RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} are compared with other NLO crystals with apatite-like structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The basic structural units are the planar BO{sub 3} groups in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}.

Xia, M.J. [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, R.K., E-mail: rkli@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

NUREG/CR-6853  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUREG/CR-6853 Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Washington, DC 20555-0001 NUREG/CR-6853 Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model Manuscript Completed: October 2004 Date Published: October 2004 Prepared by C.R. Molenkamp (LLNL), N.E. Bixler, C.W. Morrow (SNL), J.V. Ramsdell, Jr., (PNNL), J.A. Mitchell (NRC) Atmospheric Science Division Sandia National Laboratories Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 Livermore, CA 94550

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bo Shen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

policies, reduction of industrial energy intensity, and the implementation of demand-side management programs. Dr. Shen has over 18 years of experience working in the energy...

22

Organization of the class I region of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) and the characterization of a class I frameshift deletion (BoLA-Adel) prevalent in feral bovids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a genomic region containing genes of immunomodulatory importance. MHC class I genes encode cell-surface glycoproteins that present peptides to circulating T cells, playing a key role in recognition of self and non-self. Studies of MHC loci in vertebrates have examined levels of polymorphism and molecular evolutionary processes generating diversity. The bovine MHC (BoLA) has been associated with disease susceptibility, resistance and progression. To delineate mechanisms by which MHC class I genes evolved to function optimally in a species like cattle, it is necessary to study genomic organization of BoLA to define gene content, and investigate characteristics of expressed class I molecules. This study describes development of a physical map of BoLA class I region derived from screening two BAC libraries, isolating positive clones and confirming gene content, order and chromosomal location through PCR, novel BAC end sequencing techniques, and selected BAC shotgun cloning and/or sequencing and FISH analysis. To date, this is the most complete ordered BAC array encompassing the BoLA class I region from the class III boundary to the extended class I region. Characterization of a frameshift allele exhibiting trans-species polymorphism in Bos and Bison by flow cytometry, real-time RT-PCR, 1D and 2D gel analysis is also described. This frameshift allele encodes an early termination signal within the antigen recognition site (ARS) of exon 3 of the BoLA BSA-Adel class I gene predicting a truncated class I protein that is soluble. An ability to assess MHC diversity in populations and provision of animals with defined MHC haplotypes and genetic content for experimental research is necessary in developing a basis upon which to build functional studies to elucidate associations between haplotype and disease in bovids. The BoLA class I region is immunologically important for disease association studies in an economically important species. This study provides knowledge of gene content and organization within the class I MHC region in cattle, providing a template for more detailed analysis and elucidation of complex disease associations through functional genomics and comparative analysis, as well as evolution of the MHC in bovids to optimize a populationÂ?s immune response.

Ramlachan, Nicole

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The crystal structure of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3}: New single-crystal data for an old problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single crystals of the orthoborate {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were synthesized from Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 2 GPa and 800 {sup o}C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic pseudowollastonite-type structure, space group C2/c, with the lattice parameters a=1128.4(2) pm, b=652.6(2) pm, c=954.0(2) pm, and {beta}=112.8(1){sup o} (R{sub 1}=0.0124 and wR{sub 2}=0.0404 for all data). -- graphical abstract: The first satisfying single-crystal structure determination of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} sheds light on the extensively discussed structure of {pi}-orthoborates. The application of light pressure during the solid state synthesis yielded in high-quality crystals, due to pressure-induced crystallization. Research highlights: {yields} High-quality single crystals of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were prepared via high-pressure-induced crystallization. {yields} At least five different space groups for the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are reported. {yields} {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} is isotypic to the pseudowollastonite-type CaSiO{sub 3}. {yields} Remaining ambiguities regarding the structure of the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are resolved.

Pitscheider, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Oeckler, Oliver [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Improvement of SOFC Electrodes through Catalyst Infiltration & Control of Cr Volatilization from FeCr Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the improvement of SOFC electrodes through catalyst infiltration and control of Cr volatilization from FeCr components.

Visco, S.J.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.; Sholklapper, T.; Lu, C.; De Jonghe, L.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Chromizing of 3Cr Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N) was chromized by the halide-activated pack cementation (HAPC) process. Key process parameters, i.e., coating temperatures and pack compositions, were investigated. Ammonium chloride-activated packs in the 700-1000 C range produced coatings nominally in the 1-8 {micro}m range, as determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Coatings applied in the 900-1000 C temperature range resulted in Cr-rich coatings. The predominant phase in the coating was identified as Cr23C6 by X-ray diffraction. In addition, the presence of chromium nitride, Cr2N, was observed in the coating. The power generation industry is faced with an ever-increasing demand for energy while simultaneously having to reduce carbon emissions. These goals can be facilitated by increasing plant efficiency through the use of higher operating temperatures and pressures. Traditional construction materials, e.g., the ferritic Grade 22 high strength low alloy steel, are limited to operations below {approx} 550 C. Therefore, new materials are required for future plants designed to operate up to 650 C and possibly higher. These new materials need to have improved tensile strength, ductility, toughness, corrosion resistance, and creep properties at elevated temperatures. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the oxidation and creep behavior of various coatings on Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N), a super-bainitic steel developed for superior creep properties. Thin, chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings were used to compensate for the reduced corrosion and oxidation resistance that resulted from the low chromium content of the alloy. However, the aluminized Grade 315 alloys performed less-than-favorably under conditions relevant to fossil boilers, leading to the conclusion that higher chromium contents are required for the formation of corrosion-resistant oxide scales in these environments. The halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) process offers a promising low-cost and versatile alternative to CVD as a means of improving corrosion resistance via formation of a protective Cr-containing coating.

Ravi, Vilupanur [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Harrison, Bradley [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Koch, Jordan [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Ly, Alexander [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Schissler, Andrew [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MASSIE SANTOS BALLON MASSIE SANTOS BALLON The 5th Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute "Genomics of Energy & Environment" User Meeting started off on a provo- cative note: the first speaker, Dennis Hedgecock of the University of Southern California, compared eating an oyster to "kissing the sea on the lips." Given the meeting's focus on genomics for energy and the environment, Hedgecock was quick to note that Pacific oys- ters can annually sequester the amount of carbon equiva- lent to that produced by the African nation of Cameroon during the same period. He said researchers are interested in finding ways to boost the oyster's ability to capture carbon just as biofuels researchers are interested in using the idea of hybrid vigor to boost biomass production in energy crops.

27

CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MASSIE MASSIE SANTOS BALLON The Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting first convened in Santa Fe, New Mexico five years ago. Back then, the conference title was much shorter, and the crowd in attendance much smaller. The 2006 Meeting primarily focused on genome finishing technologies and how new sequencing technologies would impact them. Over the years, the Meeting's focus has moved from simply genome finishing to how next genera- tion sequencing technologies have affected genomics over- all in assembly, finishing, annotation and analysis. Claire Fraser-Liggett sum- marized the current state of genomic research succinctly in her opening keynote of the 5th annual meeting held June 2-4, 2010: "We're not in Kansas anymore, and yet we are." Addressing a record crowd of 250 attendees, Fraser- Liggett discussed current sequencing technologies and applications

28

Halogenodisilanes: Precursors for New Disilane Derivatives Carsten Ackerhans, Peter Bo1ttcher, Peter Mu1ller, Herbert W. Roesky,* Isabel Uson,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halogenodisilanes: Precursors for New Disilane Derivatives Carsten Ackerhans, Peter Bo1ttcher)] were prepared. The tetrachlorodisilanes 2a-e are converted to various functionalized disilanes resulted in the formation of the disilane RSiH2SiH2R [R ) (Me3Si)2CH] 7 and the metathesis with Me3Sn

Müller, Peter

29

Synthesis of nanospherical Fe{sub 3}BO{sub 6} anode material for lithium-ion battery by the rheological phase reaction method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper developed a novel method, the rheological phase reaction method, to synthesize nanospherical Fe{sub 3}BO{sub 6}. The sizes and morphologies of products vary with the calcination temperatures. Spherical particles with a uniform size about 40 nm in a monodisperse state were obtained at 800 deg. C, while the spherical particles with a larger size of 100-500 nm were obtained at 900 deg. C. The electrochemical properties of these Fe{sub 3}BO{sub 6} nanospheres were investigated. Sample synthesized at 800 deg. C delivers a high reversible capacity above 500 mAh g{sup -1}. Sample synthesized at 900 deg. C possesses relatively good cycleability with a capacity retaining of 376 mAh g{sup -1} after 10 cycles. The measurement of electrochemical impedance spectra for the first time indicated that smaller Fe{sub 3}BO{sub 6} nanoparticles intend to give higher impedance of solid-electrolyte interface layer and lower charge-transfer impedance after the first discharge. Additionally, it can be speculated that the increase of resistance charge-transfer is the possible reason for the capacity fading during cycling. - Graphical abstract: Nanospherical Fe{sub 3}BO{sub 6} anode material for lithium-ion battery has been synthesized by the rheological phase reaction method. The electrochemical properties of these Fe{sub 3}BO{sub 6} nanospheres show that sample synthesized at 800 deg. C delivers a high reversible capacity above 500 mAh g{sup -1}, and sample synthesized at 900 deg. C possesses relatively good cycleability with a capacity retaining of 376 mAh g{sup -1} after 10 cycles.

Shi Xixi; Chang Caixian; Xiang Jiangfeng; Xiao Yong [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yuan Liangjie [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)], E-mail: ljyuan@whu.edu.cn; Sun Jutang [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

High-pressure synthesis, crystal structure, and structural relationship of the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}  

SciTech Connect

Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus at 7.5 GPa and 1100 deg. C, representing the first known ytterbium fluoride borate. The compound exhibits isolated BO{sub 3}-groups next to ytterbium cations and fluoride anions, showing a structure closely related to the other known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}. Monoclinic Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} crystallizes in space group C2/c with the lattice parameters a=2028.2(4) pm, b=602.5(2) pm, c=820.4(2) pm, and beta=100.63(3){sup o} (Z=4). Three different ytterbium cations can be identified in the crystal structure, each coordinated by nine fluoride and oxygen anions. None of the five crystallographically independent fluoride ions is coordinated by boron atoms, solely by trigonally-planar arranged ytterbium cations. In close proximity to the above mentioned compounds RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}, Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} can be described via alternating layers with the formal compositions 'YbBO{sub 3}' and 'YbF{sub 3}' in the bc-plane. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure/high-temperature synthesis (multianvil technique) led to the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}, built up from isolated BO{sub 3}-groups. The compound shows structural relations to the known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}.

Haberer, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Emerson: ENERGY STAR Referral (CR289E) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerson: ENERGY STAR Referral (CR289E) Emerson: ENERGY STAR Referral (CR289E) May 6, 2013 DOE referred the matter of Emerson-brand refrigerator, model CR289E, to the U.S....

32

Midea: ENERGY STAR Referral (MWF-08CR) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midea: ENERGY STAR Referral (MWF-08CR) Midea: ENERGY STAR Referral (MWF-08CR) March 4, 2011 DOE referred the matter of Westpointe-brand room air conditioner model MWF-08CR, which...

33

Audit of Department of Energy Support Service Contracting, CR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Support Service Contracting, CR-B-95-06 Audit of Department of Energy Support Service Contracting, CR-B-95-06 Audit of Department of Energy Support Service Contracting, CR-B-95-06...

34

New oxyfluoride glass with high fluorine content and laser patterning of nonlinear optical BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} single crystal line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new oxyfluoride glass of 50BaF{sub 2}-25Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-25B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol. %) with a large fraction of fluorine, i.e., F/(F + O) = 0.4, was prepared using a conventional melt-quenching method in order to synthesize new glass-ceramics containing nonlinear optical oxyfluoride crystals. The refractive index at 632.8 nm and ultra-violet cutoff wavelength of the glass were 1.564 and {approx}200 nm, respectively. Eu{sup 3+} ions in the glass showed a high quantum yield of 88% in the photoluminescence spectrum in the visible region. BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} crystals (size: 50-100 nm) showing second harmonic generations were formed through the crystallization of the glass. Lines consisting of BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} crystals were patterned successfully on the glass surface by laser irradiations (Yb:YVO{sub 4} laser with a wavelength of 1080 nm, laser power of 1.1 W, scanning speed of 8 {mu}m/s). High resolution transmission electron microscope observations combined with a focused ion beam technique indicate that BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} crystals are highly oriented just like a single crystal. The present study proposes that the new oxyfluoride glass and glass-ceramics prepared have a high potential for optical device applications.

Shionozaki, K.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CR-B-02-02.PUB  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CR-B-02-02 CR-B-02-02 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES PROCUREMENT ADMINISTRATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AUGUST 2002 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 August 22, 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING MANGER, CHICAGO OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Rickey R. Hass, Director (Signed) Science, Energy, Technology, and Financial Audits Office of Audit Services Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Procurement Administration at

36

The influence of thallium on the redox reaction CrT /CrS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations on the kinetics and electrocatalysis of the CrT /CrS reaction were carried out. By means of cyclic voltammetry, it was discovered that the addition of thallium-I-chloride not only accelerates the CrT /CrS reaction in HC1 electrolytes catalytically, using graphite electrodes with small amounts of Au, but also raises th hydrogen overvoltage more than lead and bismuth, the heavy metal catalysts already tested in the practical redox cells. Investigations concerning the reaction rate, the influence of chrome ion concentrations, the electrolyte storage time, temperature, and the presence of iron are being conducted.

Cheng, D. Sh.; Hollax, E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Conventional Gasoline Imports from Belarus  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

38

CR-B-02-01.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CR-B-02-01 CR-B-02-01 AUDIT REPORT FIXED-PRICE CONTRACTING FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLEANUP ACTIVITIES OCTOBER 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES October 15, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Phillip L. Holbrook (Signed) Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Fixed-Price Contracting for Department of Energy Cleanup Activities" BACKGROUND As part of its Contract Reform effort, the Department of Energy (Department) acted to increase its use of

39

Hazard Evaluation for 244-CR Vault  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of a hazards identification and evaluation performed on the 244-CR Vault to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities.

GRAMS, W.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining and milling of uranium ore. Nonetheless, the use of leaching fluids to mine uranium contaminatesNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hanford Cr | VIMSS - Virtual Institute for Microbial Stress and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor building HCB (Visit Website) Hanford Chromium Bioremediation Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at Hanford 100H. The objective of...

42

Spin density distribution in CrCl/sub 3/ and CrBr/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect

The magnetization distribution in the layered ionic compounds CrCl/sub 3/ and CrBr/sub 3/ has been studied using polarized neutron diffraction. The results show that in both compounds approx. 20% of the magnetic moment is not located in 3d- like orbitals centered on the chromium ions. This reduction of the 3d moment sets a lower limit (A/sub ..pi..//sup 2/ > .04) on the square of the covalent admixture parameter. The spatial distribution of the delocalized moment has been studied by Fourier techniques which indicate a significant moment density between chromium ions in the chromium layers.

Brown, P.J.; Ziebeck, K.R.A.; Radhakrishna, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Temperature Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of Ni-Cr and Co-Cr Binary Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temperature dependent electrical transport properties viz. electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ni{sub 10}Cr{sub 90} and Co{sub 20}Cr{sub 80} alloys are computed at various temperatures. The electrical resistivity has been calculated according to Faber-Ziman model combined with Ashcroft-Langreth partial structure factors. In the present work, to include the ion-electron interaction, we have used a well tested local model potential. For exchange-correlation effects, five different forms of local field correction functions due to Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru and Utsumi (IU), Farid et al (F) and Sarkar et al (S) are used. The present results due to S function are in good agreement with the experimental data as compared to results obtained using other four functions. The S functions satisfy compressibility sum rule in long wave length limit more accurately as compared to T, IU and F functions, which may be responsible for better agreement of results, obtained using S function. Also, present result confirms the validity of present approach in determining the transport properties of alloys like Ni-Cr and Co-Cr.

Thakore, B. Y.; Khambholja, S. G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Jani, A. R. [Department of Physics, S P University, Vallabh Vidhyanagar, 388 120, Gujarat (India); Suthar, P. H. [Department of Physics, C U Shah Science College, Ahmedabad, 380 014, Gujarat (India); Gajjar, P. N. [Department of Physics, University Schools of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad, 380 009, Gujarat (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

EPRI Conference on 9Cr Materials Fabrication and Joining Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 9Cr Materials Fabrication and Joining Technologies conference represents an international forum to address concerns associated with utility applications of 9 percent chromium (9Cr) steel materials and components. Although these materials were developed in the United States over 20 years ago, and many domestic installations have used this material, a majority of 9Cr applications have been overseas. This conference was designed to share international experience with these steels and to highlight new is...

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Detonation Gun Sprayed Ni-20Cr ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Detonation Gun Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on a Boiler Steel at 900°C. Author(s), Gagandeep Kaushal, Harpreet ...

46

Corrosion Behavior of 21%Cr Ferritic Stainless Steel at Atmospheric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 21%Cr SS and TYPE304 were exposed for 5 years at seashore area in Okinawa, and corrosion resistance of these steels was evaluated from ...

47

SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Government site to perform work shall have Control : SF 6432-CR Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Cost Reimbursement Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release...

48

CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program  

SciTech Connect

Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

Chemical and electrochemical behavior of the Cr(III)/Cr(II) half cell in the NASA Redox Energy Storage System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cr(III) complexes in the NASA Redox Energy Storage System have been isolated and identified as Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup +3/ and Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/ by ion-exchange chromatography and visible spectrophotometry. The cell reactions during charge-discharge cycles have been followed by means of visible spectrophotometry. The spectral bands were resolved into component peaks and concentrations calculated using Beer's Law. During the charge mode Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/ is reduced to Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +/ and during the discharge mode Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +/ is oxidized back to Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/. Both electrode reactions occur via a chloride-bridge inner-sphere reaction pathway. Hysteresis effects can be explained by the slow attainment of equilibrium between Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup +3/ and Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/.

Johnson, D.A.; Reid, M.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CR-L-01-06.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2001 8, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act Audit Report Audit Report No.: CR-L-01-06 We reviewed the Department of Energy's (Department) progress in implementing the Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act (FMFIA) of 1982. The review was made to assist you in determining whether the evaluations of the systems of management, accounting, and administrative controls were carried out in a reasonable and prudent manner by the Department for Fiscal Year 2000. The Department's evaluation of its control systems was examined for compliance with requirements of the FMFIA, the General Accounting Office's "Standards for Internal Control in the Federal Government," Office of Management and Budget Circulars

51

PARS II Change Request (CR) Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title: Phone #: Office/Symbol: Email: CHANGE TYPE: Defect: New Requirement: PRIORITY: PARS II Change Request Form (APR 2011) PARS II Change Request (CR) Form 1 = Prevents the accomplishment of an essential PARS-II capability 3 = Adversely affects the accomplishment of an essential PARS-II capability, but a work-around solution is known 4 = Results in User / Operator inconvenience or annoyance, but does not affect an essential PARS-II capability 5 = Any other effect 1) Detailed description of problem/need. (If possible, provide project #(s) you are working with). PROBLEM/CHANGE DESCRIPTION: 2) Where in system defect is seen or where new functionality is required (i.e., which screen, which report). Screenshots (as separate attachments) are helpful.

52

Magnetic-resonance and thermophysical studies of the magnetic phase diagram for a GdFe{sub 2.1}Ga{sub 0.9}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} single crystal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The antiferromagnetic resonance, heat capacity, magnetic properties, and magnetic phase diagram of a GdFe{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} crystal in which some of the iron ions were substituted by diamagnetic gallium ions have been investigated. It has been found that the Neel temperature upon diamagnetic substitution decreased to 17 K compared to 38 K in the unsubstituted crystal. The effective exchange and anisotropy fields for GdFe{sub 2.1}Ga{sub 0.9}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} have been estimated from the field dependences of magnetization and resonance measurements. The magnetic phase diagram of the crystal has been constructed from magnetic and resonance measurements. In GdFe{sub 2.1}Ga{sub 0.9}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4}, there is no spontaneous reorientation and, in the absence of a magnetic field, the crystal remains an easy-axis one in the entire domain of magnetic ordering. The critical field of the reorientation transition to an induced easy-plane state in a magnetic field along the trigonal axis has been found to increase compared to that in the unsubstituted crystal.

Pankrats, A. I.; Petrakovskii, G. A.; Tugarinov, V. I., E-mail: vit@iph.krasn.ru; Kartashev, A. V.; Temerov, V. L. [Russian Academy of Science, Siberian Branch, Kirensky Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

(Mo,Cr) in HASTELLOY C-22HS Alloy, a  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

debate (with question marks in the phase diagrams) such as ?CrMo4Ni5, ? ... diagram at 500, 620 and 700ºC show the existence of P phase and. OP6 phase[5

54

9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

SF 6432-CR Standard Terms and Conditions for Cost Reimbursement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CR (04-95) Sections II & III SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR ALL COST REIMBURSEMENT CONTRACTS INDEX OF CLAUSES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS...

56

U.S. Imports from Belarus  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

57

Effect of the magnetic phase transition on the charge transport in layered semiconductor ferromagnets TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} crystals were synthesized by solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} compounds crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system with lattice parameters a = 3.538 A, c = 21.962 A, c/a {approx} 6.207, z = 3; a = 3.6999 A, c = 22.6901 A, c/a {approx} 6.133, z = 3; and X-ray densities {rho}{sub x} = 6.705 and 6.209 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Magnetic and electric studies in a temperature range of 77-400 K showed that TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} are semiconductor ferromagnets. Rather large deviations of the experimental effective magnetic moment of TlCrS{sub 2} (3.26 {mu}{sub B}) and TlCrSe{sub 2} (3.05 {mu}{sub B}) from the theoretical one (3.85 {mu}{sub B}) are attributed to two-dimensional magnetic ordering in the paramagnetic region of strongly layered ferromagnets TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2}. The effect of the magnetic phase's transition on the charge transport in TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} is detected.

Veliyev, R. G.; Sadikhov, R. Z.; Kerimova, E. M., E-mail: ekerimova@physics.ab.az; Asadov, Yu. G.; Jabbarov, A. I. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

John Romankiewicz, Bo Shen, Hongyou...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ROI Risk perceptionhigh interest rates Poor verification of energy savings Savings not asset valuerevenue Lack of awareness about opportunities Not priority for enterprisesplit...

59

Itinerant Antiferromagnetism in BaCr2As2  

SciTech Connect

We report single-crystal synthesis, specific-heat and resistivity measurements and electronic structure calculations for BaCr{sub 2}As{sub 2}. This material is a metal with itinerant antiferromagnetism, similar to the parent phases of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors, but differs in magnetic order. Comparison of bare band-structure density of states and the low-temperature specific heat implies a mass renormalization of {approx}2. BaCr{sub 2}As{sub 2} shows stronger transition-metal-pnictogen covalency than the Fe compounds, and in this respect is more similar to BaMn{sub 2}As{sub 2}. This provides an explanation for the observation that Ni and Co doping is effective in the Fe-based superconductors, but Cr or Mn doping is not.

Singh, David J [ORNL; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Finite element modeling of Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 employing the dual-enzyme kinetic model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chromium (VI) (Cr(VI)) contamination of soil and groundwater is considered a major environmental concern. Bioreduction of Cr(VI) to chromium (III) (Cr(III)) can be considered an effective technology in remediating Cr(VI) contaminated sites. Among the ... Keywords: Bioreduction, Cr(VI), Dual-enzyme, Modeling

Md. Akram Hossain; Mahbub Alam; David Yonge; Prashanta Dutta

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Crystal-chemistry of mullite-type aluminoborates Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} and Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9}: A stoichiometry puzzle  

SciTech Connect

Orthorhombic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich aluminoborate is an important ceramic material for which two slightly different compositions have been assumed: Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9} (5Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} (9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The formula Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} (=Al{sub 4.91}B{sub 1.09}O{sub 9}) was derived from results of chemical analyses when crystal structure data were not yet available. Subsequent structural investigations indicated Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9} composition. Nevertheless, Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} was still accepted as the correct stoichiometry assuming that additional B replaces 9% Al. Powder samples of both compositions and ones with excess boron were prepared by solid state reactions between {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} at temperatures above 1100 {sup o}C and single-crystals were grown from flux at 1100 and 1550 {sup o}C. Products were investigated by single-crystal and powder XRD, {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al solid-state MAS-NMR, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy as well as Laser-ablation ICP-MS. No indication of the predicted 9% B{yields}Al substitution was found. LA ICP-MS indicated 12.36(27) wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} corresponding to Al{sub 4.97}B{sub 1.03}O{sub 9}. Hence, the suggested Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33} stoichiometry can be excluded for all synthesized samples. A very low amount of Al vacancies at a five-fold coordinated site are likely, charge balanced by an additional nearby three-fold coordinated B site. All evidences indicate that the title compound should be reported as Al{sub 5-x}B{sub 1+x}O{sub 9} with x<0.038(6), which is close to Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9}. -- Graphical abstract: A chemical composition of Al{sub 18}B{sub 4}O{sub 33}=Al{sub 4.91}B{sub 1.09}O{sub 9}=9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:2B{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been assumed for mullite-type aluminoborate with Al{sub 5}BO{sub 9} structure. However, samples prepared by different routes showed compositions close to 5Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Display Omitted

Fisch, Martin, E-mail: fisch@krist.unibe.c [Mineralogical Crystallography, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Armbruster, Thomas [Mineralogical Crystallography, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Rentsch, Daniel [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Research, Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Libowitzky, Eugen [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Kristallographie, Universitaet Wien - Geozentrum, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Pettke, Thomas [Rock-Water Interaction Group, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

CR-39 track etching and blow up method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a method of etching tracks in CR-39 foil to obtain uniformly sized tracks. The invention comprises a step of electrochemically etching the foil at a low frequency and a ''blow-up'' step of electrochemically etching the foil at a high frequency.

Hankins, D.E.

1985-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Audit Report: CR-B-97-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Audit Report: CR-B-97-02 April 4, 1997 Audit of Department of Energy's Contractor Salary Increase Funds Audit Report: CR-B-97-02 More Documents & Publications Inspection Report:...

65

Audit Report: CR-B-95-06 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-06 Audit Report: CR-B-95-06 June 30, 1995 Audit of Department of Energy Support Service Contracting Audit Report: CR-B-95-06 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0427...

66

Audit Report: CR-FS-97-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-02 Audit Report: CR-FS-97-02 May 1, 1997 Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 1996 Audit Report: CR-FS-97-02 More Documents &...

67

Audit Report: CR-B-02-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report: CR-B-02-02 Audit Report: CR-B-02-02 August 22, 2002 Procurement Administration at Brookhaven National Laboratory In May 1999, the Office of Inspector General evaluated...

68

Audit Report: CR-B-97-03 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CR-B-97-03 May 6, 1997 Followup Audit on the Procurement of Support Services for the Energy Information Administration Audit Report: CR-B-97-03 More Documents & Publications...

69

GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OWN OAKFORD TWENTY-MILE CR EEK CARMICH AELS GOULD KAN ZIGG H ILL CADIZ LEOPOLD MT DAVIS BEARSVILLE AU GU STA FAYETT E C ITY FINK CR EEK HEADSVILLE CAMERON-GARNER TERRA ALTA...

70

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reducer isolated from the Hanford 100H site capable of Iron(study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H area RomyVI)contamination at Hanford ?? Cr(VI) highly soluble, toxic

Chakraborty, Romy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models. For many years, “cold fusion” reactions utilizingproduced via the new “cold fusion” reaction 209 Bi( 52 Cr,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

OEPN200.IndependentStudy 1-4cr. Individualstudiestomeetidentified,studentneeds.Prerequisite:admission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ash handling proce- dures. Restricted to OEPO, OEIM majors. OEPO 103. Power Plant Overview I 5 cr,qualitycontrolandassurance,analyticalprocedures,sampleprepara- tion,andweighingandmeasuringtechniques.Restrictedtomajors. OEPO 102. Coal Handling 2 cr. Safety majors. OEPO 104. Power Plant Overview II 5 cr. Power plant systems, basic water chemistry, fuels

Castillo, Steven P.

73

HRTM 362. Food Service Management 3 cr. Purchasing, cost control, sanitation, nutrition and other managerial con-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experience 1-6 cr. Field experience (internship) for Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Man- agement Program. Hospitality and Tourism Research and Applications 3 cr. An overview of research techniques utilized by today. Prereq- uisites: HRTM 421 and HRTM 422. HRTM 431. Hotel Facilities Management 3 cr. Analysis of systems

Castillo, Steven P.

74

Cr{sub 2}Nb-based alloy development  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes recent progress in developing Cr{sub 2}Nb/Cr(Nb) alloys for structural use in advanced fossil energy conversion systems. Alloy additions were added to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. Two beneficial elements have been identified among all alloying additions added to the alloys. One element is effective in refining the coarse eutectic structure and thus substantially improves the compressive strength and ductility of the alloys. The other element enhances oxidation resistance without sacrificing the ductility. The tensile properties are sensitive to cast defects, which can not be effectively reduced by HIPping at 1450-1580{degrees}C and/or directionally solidifying via a floating zone remelting method.

Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Cr/sup 3 +/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3 +/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3 +/ or Tm/sup 3 +/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility. 4 figs.

Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cr.sup.3+ -doped colquiriite solid state laser material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF.sub.6 :Cr.sup.3+, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr.sup.3+ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slop efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd.sup.3+ or Tm.sup.3+ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility.

Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Chase, Lloyd L. (Livermore, CA); Newkirk, Herbert W. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hydrothermal synthesis and the crystal structure of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent prismatic single crystals of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O are prepared through hydrothermal crystallization. The parameters of the hexagonal unit cell and intensities of 10806 reflections are measured on an Enraf-Nonius CAD4 automated diffractometer. The compound crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system with the unit cell parameters a = 12.745(4) A, c = 5.180(2) A, V = 728.6(4) A{sup 3}, and space group P6{sub 3}. The structure is determined by direct methods and refined using the full-matrix least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms. The refinement of the structure is performed to the final discrepancy factor R{sub 1} = 0.027 for 2889 unique reflections with I > 2 {sigma} (I). In the structure of the borate cancrinite, the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra form a zeolite-like framework in which twelve-membered hexagonal channels are occupied by sodium atoms and BO{sub 3} groups, whereas six-membered channels are filled with sodium and calcium atoms and water molecules. The mean interatomic distances are found to be as follows: (Si-O){sub mean} = 1.614 A and (Al-O){sub mean} = 1.741 A in the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, (Na-O){sub mean} = 2.542 A in the seven-vertex sodium polyhedra, and [(Na,Ca)-O]{sub mean} = 2.589 A in the ditrigonal bipyramids.

Shirinova, A. F. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)], E-mail: afashf@rambler.ru; Khrustalev, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds (Russian Federation); Samedov, H. R. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Chemical Problems (Azerbaijan); Chiragov, M. I. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

Demirbas, Umit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons  

SciTech Connect

The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-0001 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Processing of LaCrO{sub 3} for solid oxide fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objectives of this project is to produce LaCrO{sub 3} for the interconnect in solid oxide fuel cells. The project is divided into three areas: reproducible powder synthesis, sintering of LaCrO{sub 3}-based powders, and co-sintering of LaCrO{sub 3}-based powders with cathode and electrolyte materials. The project has been in place for 3 months; construction is underway for the spray pyrolysis system and studies initiated on the organometallic precursor.

Huebner, W.; Nasrallah, M.M.; Anderson, H.U.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Phase Diagram of CuCrO2 in a Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic phase diagram of CuCrO2 is constructed as a function of magnetic field and anisotropy using a trial spin state built from harmonics of a fundamental ordering wavevector. Whereas the multiferroic phase of CuCrO2 is a modified spin spiral with a 3-sublattice (SL) period, the phase diagram also contains 1-SL, 2-SL, 4-SL, and 5-SL collinear states which may be accessi- ble in the nonstoichiometric compound CuCrO2+ . For small anisotropy, CuCrO2 is predicted to undergo a transition between two modified spiral states with an intervening 3-SL collinear phase.

Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ligand Rearrangement Reactions of Cr(CO)6 in Alcohol Solutions:Experiment and Theory  

SciTech Connect

The ligand rearrangement reaction of Cr(CO)6 is studied in a series of alcohol solutions using ultrafast, infrared spectroscopy and Brownian dynamics simulations.

Shanoski, Jennifer E.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Harris, Charles B.

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Materials Reliability Program: Reevaluation of Stainless Steel Components in NUREG/CR-6674 (MRP-172)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6674, published June 2000, described a probabilistic fracture mechanics evaluation of light water reactor components subject to environmental fatigue effects.

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Alloy Design of 9% Cr Steel for High Efficiency Ultra-Supercritical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Alloy Design of 9% Cr Steel for High Efficiency Ultra- Supercritical Power Plants. Author(s), Fujio Abe. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Fujio Abe.

86

Investigation on Oxidation Resistance of NiCoCrAlY Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Investigation on Oxidation Resistance of NiCoCrAlY Coating Irradiated by High Current Pulsed Electron Beam. Author(s), Xianxiu Mei, Cunxia  ...

87

A29: Microstructure and Properties of Nano-structured 9Cr Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are ... A 9Cr ODS ferritic/martensitic steel was produced by gas atomization and hot ...

88

Al-Cr -2007-1 February 1, 2007 Aluminum and Chromium Leaching ...  

Al-Cr -2007-1 February 1, 2007 Aluminum and Chromium Leaching Workshop Atlanta, GA January 23 – 24, 2007 Crowne Plaza – Airport Feedback Questionnaire

89

Microstructure and 9MeV Au+ Irradiation Effects of 9Cr-ODS(Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A kind of 9Cr-ODS(oxide dispersion strengthened) steel was ... Generation of Bulk Nanocomposites and Supersaturated Solid Solutions by ...

90

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off-gas from a typical gasifier contains large percentagesIOAl-Cr alloys at coal-gasifier This FeS and CaS0 operating

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed that the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of nickel-based alloys in low-temperature hydrogenated water is due to hydrogen embrittlement. The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of chromium on hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys and thus develop a better understanding of the low-temperature SCC phenomenon. The effect of chromium on the hydrogen embrittlement was examined using tensile tests followed by material evaluation via scanning electron microscopy and light optical microscopy. Four alloys were prepared with chromium contents ranging from 6 wt. percent to 35 wt. percent. In the noncharged condition, ductility, as measured by the percent elongation or reduction in area, increased as the alloy chromium content increased. Hydrogen appeared to have only minor effects on the mechanical properties of the low chromium alloys. The addition of hydrogen had a marked effect on the ductility of the higher chromium alloys. In the 26% chromium alloy, the elongation to failure was reduced from 53% to 14% with a change in fracture mode from ductile dimple to intergranular failure. A maximum in embrittlement was observed in the 26% Cr alloy. The maximum in embrittlement coincided with the minimum in stacking-fault energy. It is proposed that the increased hydrogen embrittlement in the high-chromium alloys is due to increased slip planarity caused by the low stacking-fault energy. Slip planarity did not appear to affect the fracture of the noncharged specimens.

Symons, D.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

The band structure-matched and highly spin-polarized Co{sub 2}CrZ/Cu{sub 2}CrAl Heusler alloys interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we present a lattice- and band-matched nonmagnetic L21 Heusler alloy spacer for Co{sub 2}CrZ Heusler alloys where Z=Si or Al. By first principle calculations, we find that the band structure matching is almost perfectly satisfied when they are interfaced with Cu{sub 2}CrAl. Despite the loss of half-metallicity due to interface states, our calculations show that the spin polarization at these band-matched (001) interfaces is higher than 80%. These lattice-matched Co{sub 2}CrZ/Cu{sub 2}CrAl interfaces with excellent band matching and enhanced spin scattering asymmetry are promising for all-metallic current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance device applications.

Ko, V.; Han, G.; Qiu, J. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Feng, Y. P. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Structure determination of thermal-spray materials using synchrotron x-ray microtomography. [Cr[sub 3]C[sub 2]/NiCr thermal-spray coating  

SciTech Connect

The structure of materials prepared using thermal spray methods is difficult to determine using conventional microscopy of porosimetry methods. The difficulties inherent in these approaches can be circumvented using synchrotron computed microtomography(CMT). An example of the use of CMT to produce a high resolution non- destructive image of a thermal-spray coating is Cr[sub 3]C[sub 2]/NiCr is described here to illustrate the power of this technique.

Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Herman, H. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Riggs, W.L. (General Electric Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Aircraft Engines)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Combined electrochemical/surface science investigations of Pt/Cr alloy electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chromium addition improves the performance of carbon-supported Pt electrodes for oxygen reduction in phosphoric acid fuel cells. To clarify the role of chromium and its chemical nature at the electrode surface, we have performed a combined electrochemical/surface science investigation of a series of bulk Pt/sub x/Cr/sub (1-x)/ alloys (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1). In this paper we report the surface characterization of the starting electrodes by XPS, electrochemical results from cyclic voltammetry in 85% phosphoric acid, and post-electrochemical surface characterization. For Cr contents less than 40%, the electrodes were quite stable up to +1.6 V vs DHE. The surface Cr was largely oxidized to Cr/sup +3/ for surfaces at open circuit ad those exposed at potentials < +1.4 V. For intermediate Cr levels, Cr was leached from the surface region by +1.5 V, leaving a porous Pt electrode with increased electrochemical hydrogen adsorption capacity. For Pt/sub 0.2//Cr/sub 0.8/, treatments at +1.4 V and above led to the appearance of Pt/sup 4 +/ and Cr/sup 6 +/ species, apparently stabilized in a porous phosphate overlayer up to 50 A thick. The Pt electrochemical hydrogen adsorption capacity was simultaneously increased by a factor of 15. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Daube, K.A.; Paffett, M.T.; Gottesfeld, S.; Campbell, C.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Neural network based controller for Cr6+-Fe2+ batch reduction process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated pilot plant has been designed and commissioned to carry out online/real-time data acquisition and control for the Cr^6^+-Fe^2^+ reduction process. Simulated data from the Cr^6^+-Fe^2^+ model derived are validated with online data and laboratory ... Keywords: Batch system, Neural Networks, ORP, Redox process

Chew Chun Ming; M. A. Hussain; M. K. Aroua

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SF6432-CR (02-01-12) Cost Reimbursement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2/01/12 2/01/12 Page 1 of 24 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CR (02/01/12) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COST-REIMBURSEMENT CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY IDENTIFIED AS BEING CHANGED, SUPPLEMENTED, OR AMENDED IN WRITING ISSUED BY THE SANDIA CONTRACTING REPRESENTATIVE. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) ALLOWABLE COSTS AND FEE APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS BANKRUPTCY CLAIM OF COSTS INCURRED DEFINITIONS DISPUTES EXCESS FREIGHT CHARGES

97

Mesoporous carbon -Cr2O3 composite as an anode material for lithium ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Mesoporous carbon-Cr2O3 (M-C-Cr2O3) composite was prepared by co-assembly of in-situ formed phenolic resin, chromium precursor, and Pluronic block copolymer under acidic conditions, followed by carbonization at 750oC under Argon. The TEM results confirmed that the Cr2O3 nanoparticles, ranging from 10 to 20 nm, were well dispersed in the matrix of mesoporous carbon. The composite exhibited an initial reversible capacity of 710 mAh g-1 and good cycling stability, which is mainly due to the synergic effects of carbons within the composites, i.e. confining the crystal growth of Cr2O3 during the high temperature treatment step and buffering the volume change of Cr2O3 during the cycling step. This composite material is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Design and performance of a multiterawatt Cr:LiSrAlF[sub 6] laser system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a compact, flash-lamp-pumped Cr:LiSrAlF[sub 6] (Cr:LiSAF) laser system capable of producing femtosecond pulses exhibiting peak powers greater than 2 TW. Chirped pulse amplification in a Cr:LiSAF regenerative amplifier produces 15-mJ pulses at a 5-Hz repetition rate. Further amplification in Cr:LiSAF yields recompressed pulse energies of 280 mJ and a pulse duration of less than 135 fs at a 1.0-Hz repetition rate. We describe the design and performance of this laser as well as the optimization of chirped pulse amplification in flash-lamp-pumped Cr:LiSAF.

Ditmire, T.; Nguyen, H.; Perry, M.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-443, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ni6Cr5MoO18: A compensated half metal predicted from first-principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NiCrO3 is semiconducting. It contains six molecular units in the conventional cell. By substituting one of the six Cr atoms with Mo in the conventional cell

Jing Wang; Ningning Zu; Zhijian Wu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cr-Ga-N materials for negative electrodes in Li rechargeable batteries : structure, synthesis and electrochemical performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrochemical performances of two ternary compounds (Cr2GaN and Cr3GaN) in the Cr-Ga-N system as possible future anode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries were studied. Motivation for this study was dealt in ...

Kim, Miso

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermodynamic Modeling and Experimental Study of the Fe-Cr-Zr System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide applications of zircaloys, stainless steels and their interactions in nuclear reactors require the knowledge on phase stability and thermodynamic property of the Fe-Cr-Zr system. This knowledge is also important to develop new Zr-contained Fe-Cr ferritic steels. This work aims at developing thermodynamic models for describing phase stability and thermodynamic property of the Fe-Cr-Zr system using the Calphad approach coupled with experimental study. Thermodynamic descriptions of the Fe-Cr and Cr-Zr systems were either directly adopted or slightly modified from literature. The Fe-Zr system has been remodeled to accommodate recent ab-initio calculation of formation enthalpies of various Fe-Zr compounds. Reliable ternary experimental data and thermodynamic models were mainly available in the Zr-rich region. Therefore, selected ternary alloys located in the vicinity of the eutectic valley of (Fe,Cr,Zr) and (Fe,Cr)2Zr laves phase in the Fe-rich region have been experimentally investigated in this study. Microstructure has been examined by using scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive Xray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These experimental results, along with the literature data were then used to develop thermodynamic models for phases in the Fe-Cr-Zr system. Calculated phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the ternary system yield satisfactory agreements with available experimental data, which gives the confidence to use these models as building blocks for developing a Zr, Fe and Cr contained multicomponent thermodynamic database for broader applications in nuclear reactors.

Yang, Ying [ORNL; Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels  

SciTech Connect

Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650ºC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Remediation of Cr(VI) by biogenic magnetic nanoparticles: An x-ray magnetic circular dichroism study  

SciTech Connect

Biologically synthesized magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles are studied using x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism following exposure to hexavalent Cr solution. By examining their magnetic state, Cr cations are shown to exist in trivalent form on octahedral sites within the magnetite spinel surface. The possibility of reducing toxic Cr(VI) into a stable, non-toxic form, such as a Cr{sup 3+}-spinel layer, makes biogenic magnetite nanoparticles an attractive candidate for Cr remediation.

Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Cutting, R. S.; van der Laan, G.; Pearce, C. I.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Argonne TTRDC - D3 (Downloadable Dynamometer Database) - 2010 Honda CR-Z  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CR-Z Hybrid CR-Z Hybrid honda crz Front View - 2010 Honda CR-Z Hybrid The Honda CR-Z hybrid builds upon the Insight/Civic Honda hybrid systems with a sporty angle. The vehicle is marketed as a successor to the CRX 2-seat sport compact. It features a 1.5 L (83 kW) engine (larger than the 1.3 L used in the Insight and Civic HEVs) and is offered with both an automatic (push-belt CVT) and a manual transmission. The battery is similar to the Insight pack at 100.8 nominal voltage. The IMA motor is specified at 13 hp. Key Technology Mild hybrid "Honda IMA" hybrid system 1.5 L (83 kW) engine 100.8-Volt Nickel-Metal-Hydride (NiMH) Features 3 operational modes: "Econ," "Normal," and "Sport" Report Testing Summary (pdf) Data Download all data (zip)

105

diff -crN oommf1.1b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -crN oommf1.1b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES. *** oommf1.1b1/ CHANGES Tue Oct 2 12:15:40 2001. --- oommf/CHANGES ...

106

diff -crN oommf-1.0b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -crN oommf-1.0b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES. *** oommf-1.0b1/ CHANGES Tue Jul 27 15:49:21 1999. --- oommf/CHANGES ...

107

Design and performance of the terawatt Cr:LiSrAlF[sub 6] laser system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a compact, flashlamp-pumped Cr:LiSrAlF[sub 6] laser system capable of producing peak powers in excess of one terawatt. The chirped pulse amplification approach has been optimized for amplification of femtosecond pulses in Cr:LiSrAlF[sub 6]. The system includes a Cr:LiSAF regenerative amplifier followed by a Cr:LiSAF power amplifier chain. The regenerative amplifier produces 12 mJ pulses at a 5 Hz repetition rate which are further amplified to energies above 300 mJ at a 0.5 Hz repetition rate. Recompression results in a pulse energy of 150 mJ and pulse duration of under 135 fsec.

Ditmire, T.; Nguyen, H.; Herman, S.; Perry, M.D.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Design and performance of the terawatt Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} laser system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a compact, flashlamp-pumped Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} laser system capable of producing peak powers in excess of one terawatt. The chirped pulse amplification approach has been optimized for amplification of femtosecond pulses in Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6}. The system includes a Cr:LiSAF regenerative amplifier followed by a Cr:LiSAF power amplifier chain. The regenerative amplifier produces 12 mJ pulses at a 5 Hz repetition rate which are further amplified to energies above 300 mJ at a 0.5 Hz repetition rate. Recompression results in a pulse energy of 150 mJ and pulse duration of under 135 fsec.

Ditmire, T.; Nguyen, H.; Herman, S.; Perry, M.D.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potent.ials Encountered in Coal Conversion Systems", NASA TNof Illinois #6 ash and coal char. Figure 1. Cross sectionsof Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys by Coal Char B. A. Gordon and V.

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Inconsistencies between Long-Term Trends in Storminess Derived from the 20CR Reanalysis and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global atmospheric reanalyses have become a common tool for both validation of climate models and diagnostic studies, such as assessing climate variability and long-term trends. Presently, the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR), which assimilates ...

Oliver Krueger; Frederik Schenk; Frauke Feser; Ralf Weisse

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Molecular dynamics simulation of displacement cascades in FeCr alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulation of displacement cascades in Fe­Cr alloys L. Malerba a,*, D. Terentyev by displacement cascades in the relevant material. Molecular dynamics (MD) is well known to be the simulation tool

112

A few-cycle Cr??:YAG laser and optical studies of photonic crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A prismless Cr4+:YAG laser was used to generate 20 fs pulses at 1450 nm with a bandwidth of 190 nm FWHM. Intracavity group velocity dispersion was compensated with double-chirped mirrors. Pulse spectrum was observable from ...

Ripin, Daniel Jacob, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Audit Report: CR-B-02-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-01 Audit Report: CR-B-02-01 October 15, 2001 Fixed-Price Contracting for Department of Energy Cleanup Activities As part of its Contract Reform effort, the Department of Energy...

114

The Thermodynamics of Titanium Formation in 95CrMo Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on the fatigue life of 95CrMo steel which was applied in producing drilling rod. ... Analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) of Fluid Flows in a Four Strand  ...

115

Impurity-Point Defect Interaction in Fe-Cr Alloys: Size Effects versus ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Impurity-Point Defect Interaction in Fe-Cr Alloys: Size Effects versus Magnetic Behaviour by D. Nguyen-Manh, M.Y. Lavrentiev and S.L. ...

116

Clustering and Short-Range Orer in Fe-Cr Alloys: A Monte Carlo Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Clustering and Short-Range Orer in Fe-Cr Alloys: A Monte Carlo Study by Mikhail Lavrentiev, Duc Nguyen-Manh, Sergei Dudarev, Ralf Drautz, ...

117

ISSUES REGARDING FEE STRUCTURE FOR THREE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS, CR-B-01-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CR-B-01-01 CR-B-01-01 AUDIT REPORT ISSUES REGARDING FEE STRUCTURE FOR THREE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS MAY 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 May 9, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION FROM: Phillip L. Holbrook (Signed) Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Issues Regarding Fee Structure for

118

Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Efficient cw lasing in a Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe crystal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous wave lasing in a Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe crystal is obtained for the first time. The Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe crystal pumped by a 1.908-{mu}m thulium fibre laser generated 1.07 W at 2.623 {mu}m with the quantum slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed power equal to 60%. (letters)

Akimov, V A [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kozlovskii, V I; Korostelin, Yu V; Landman, A I; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Skasyrsky, Ya K; Frolov, M P [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Oxidation behavior of arc evaporated Al-Cr-Si-N thin films  

SciTech Connect

The impact of Al and Si on the oxidation behavior of Al-Cr-(Si)-N thin films synthesized by arc evaporation of powder metallurgically prepared Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x} targets with x = Al/(Al + Cr) of 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 and (Al{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 1-z}Si{sub z} targets with Si contents of z = 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 in N{sub 2} atmosphere was studied in detail by means of differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Dynamical measurements in synthetic air (up to 1440 Degree-Sign C) revealed the highest onset temperature of pronounced oxidation for nitride coatings prepared from the Al{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.4}Si{sub 0.2} target. Isothermal TGA at 1100, 1200, 1250, and 1300 Degree-Sign C highlight the pronounced improvement of the oxidation resistance of Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x}N coatings by the addition of Si. The results show that Si promotes the formation of a dense coating morphology as well as a dense oxide scale when exposed to air.

Tritremmel, Christian; Daniel, Rostislav; Mitterer, Christian; Mayrhofer, Paul H.; Lechthaler, Markus; Polcik, Peter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Advanced Hard Coatings, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Application Oriented Coating Development, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); PLANSEE Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbuergerstrasse 23, D-86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Processing of LaCrO{sub 3} for solid oxide fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Missouri-Rolla is performing a 5 year research program dedicated towards the development of LaCrO{sub 3}-based interconnect powders which densify when in contact with anode and cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). During the course of this program the authors investigated compositions within the pseudo-ternary LaCrO{sub 3}-LaMnO{sub 3}-LaCoO{sub 3} system. Their expanded studies on the processing and sintering of LaCrO{sub 3} to make dense interconnects using LaCrO{sub 3}-based oxides at temperatures less than 1,500 C in an air atmosphere and in contact with both anode and cathode oxides. The specific objectives of this research program are to: Develop a novel technique which reproducibly yields LaCrO{sub 3}-based powders with the desired particle characteristics; Fully understand the liquid phase sintering mechanism; Clearly identify the reason why LaCrO{sub 3} does not densify in the presence of electrolyte and cathode materials; Systematically solve this problem through judicious control over the liquid phase; and Incorporate materials developed in this program into planar cells and measure their performance. Results are discussed on porosity and skrinkage, and sintering and melting behaviors.

Huebner, W.; Anderson, H.U.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Leaching Behavior of Cr(III) in Stabilized/Solidified Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching behavior of chromium was studied using batch leaching tests, surface complexation modeling and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. A contaminated soil sample containing 1330 mg-Cr kg{sup -1} and 25 600 mg-Fe kg{sup -1} of dry soil was stabilized/solidified (S/S) with 10% cement, 25% cement, 10% lime and a mixture of 20% flyash and 5% lime. The XANES analysis showed that Cr(III) was the only Cr species in untreated soil and S/S-treated samples. The leachate Cr concentration determined using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was reduced from 5.18 mg l{sup -1} for untreated soil to 0.84 mg l{sup -1} for the sample treated with 25% cement. The Cr leachability in untreated and treated soil samples decreased dramatically as the pH increased from 3 to 5, remained at similar levels in the pH range between 5 and 10.5, and further decreased at pH > 10.5. Modeling results indicated that the release of Cr(III) was controlled by adsorption on iron oxides at pH 10.5.

Jing,C.; Liu, S.; Korfiatis, G.; Meng, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A First-principles Study onA First-principles Study on Fe Substituted CrFe Substituted Cr2323CC66  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

halpy of FeCr22C6. #12;Creep Resistant Steel Steam Power Plant Efficiency ~42 % Goal Efficiency 45 common power plant steels (MTDAT A, SGTE database, 565 °C) [Bhadeshia, 2001] M23C6 in Power Plant Steels by the all-electron full potential linearized a ugmented plane-wave method (FLAPW) within the generalized g

Cambridge, University of

125

r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr100290v |Chem. Rev. XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/CR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%), hydro (15%), and the remaining 3% from renewable energy technologies. Even with aggressive conservation energy, such as pumped hydro and possibly compressed air energy storage (CAES), can be an attractive­000 REVIEW pubs.acs.org/CR Electrochemical Energy Storage for Green Grid Zhenguo Yang,* Jianlu Zhang, Michael

126

NMR Studies of the Vanadium Spin Dynamics and Spin Structure in LiV2O4, CaV2O4, and (LixV1-x)3BO5 (x is almost equal to 0.33, 0.40)  

SciTech Connect

Strong electron correlation is believed to be an essential and unifying factor in diverse properties of condensed matter systems. Ground states that can arise due to electron correlation effects include Mott insulators, heavy fermion, ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism, spin glasses, and high-temperature superconductivity. The electronic systems in transition metal oxide compounds are often highly correlated. In this thesis, the author presents experimental studies on three strongly correlated vanadium oxide compounds: LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4}, (Li{sub x}V{sub 1-x}){sub 3}BO{sub 5}, and CaV{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which have completely different ground states.

Xiaopeng Zong

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Photochemistry of Methyl Bromide on the ?-Cr2O3(0001) Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The photochemical properties of the Cr-terminated ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface were explored using methyl bromide (CH3Br) as a probe molecule. CH3Br adsorbed and desorbed molecularly from the Cr-terminated ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface without detectable thermal decomposition. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) revealed a CH3Br desorption state at 240 K for coverages up to 0.5 ML, followed by more weakly bound molecules desorbing at 175 K for coverages up to 1 ML. Multilayer exposures led to desorption at ~130 K. The CH3Br sticking coefficient was unity at 105 K for coverages up to monolayer saturation, but decreased as the multilayer formed. In contrast, pre-oxidation of the surface (using an oxygen plasma source) led to capping of surface Cr3+ sites and near complete removal of CH3Br TPD states above 150 K. The photochemistry of chemisorbed CH3Br was explored on the Cr-terminated surface using post-irradiation TPD and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). Irradiation of adsorbed CH3Br with broad band light from a Hg arc lamp resulted in both photodesorption and photodecomposition of the parent molecule at a combined cross section of ~10-22 cm2. Parent PSD was indicative of molecular photodesorption, but CH3 was also detected in PSD and Br atoms were left on the surface, both reflective of photo-induced CH3-Br bond dissociation. Use of a 385 nm cut-off filter effectively shut down the photodissociation pathway but not the parent molecule photodesorption process. From these observations it is inferred that d-to-d transitions in ?-Cr2O3, occurring at photon energies <3 eV, are not responsible for photodecomposition of 2 adsorbed CH3Br. It is unclear to what extent band-to-band versus direct CH3Br photolysis play in CH3-Br bond dissociation initiated by more energetic photons.

Henderson, Michael A.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Integrated Investigation on the Production and Fate of Organo-Cr(III) Complexes from Microbial Reduction of Chromate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our objective is to investigate the complexity of chromium biogeocycling. Our results clearly support more complexity. In short, the chromium cycle is not as simple as the conversion between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in inorganic forms. We have obtained more evidence to prove the formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes from microbial reduction of Cr(VI). The complexes are relatively stable due to the slow ligand exchange of Cr(III). However, some microorganisms can consume the organic ligands and release Cr(III), which then precipitates. Efforts are being made to characterize the organo-Cr(III) complexes and investigate their behavior in soil. Progress and efforts are summarized for each task. Task 1. Production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by selected microorganisms A total of eight organisms were screened for production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by culturing in both growth and non growth media containing 4 mg/L of Cr(VI); three were Gram positive and five were Gram negative. The Gram-positive bacteria were Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Rhodococcus sp., and Leafsonia sp., while Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, Pseudomonas putida MK 1 and Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1 were Gram negative. Purifications of the soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes produced by Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1, Rhodococcus sp., and D. vulgaris Hildenborough were carried out. The culture supernatants were lyophilized and extracted first with methanol followed by water. The extracts were then analyzed for soluble Cr. The majority of the Cr(III) was present in the water-soluble fraction for all of the bacteria tested (data not shown), revealing a general phenomenon of soluble Cr(III) production. Cellulomonas sp. ES6 produced the highest amount of soluble Cr(III) (364 ppm) and D. vulgaris Hildenborough produced the least (143 ppm). Seventy eight percent of the soluble Cr(III) produced by Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1 was water soluble, while 45% was water soluble for the Cellulomonas sp. ES6. The water-soluble fractions were further purified by anion exchange chromatography. All soluble Cr(III) was bound to the anion exchange column. The bound organo-Cr(III) was eluted by gradient elution, (0.25M-2M) using ammonium acetate. Preliminary characterization confirmed the nature of organo-Cr(III) complexes. Further characterization of these species by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is in progress. Task 2. Demonstrate that chromate reduction produces organo-Cr(III) complexes with microbial cellular components. In the past year, further research on the formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes has been completed. Formation of soluble complexes with cell free extracts as the organic portion has resulted in the formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes, approximately 27% Cr(III) remained soluble after 14 days. In addition, complexes formed between individual organic components and Cr(III) have been tested for changes in solubility due to changes in pH.

Xun, Luying

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO?(110) Rutile Single Crystals using Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

Ferromagnetic Cr-doped rutile TiO? single crystals were synthesized by high-temperature ion implantation. The associated structural, compositional and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, proton induced x-ray emission, x-ray diffraction, Cr K- and L-shell near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Cr was distributed uniformly to the depth of about 300 nm with an average concentration of ~1 at. %. The samples are semiconducting and ferromagnetic as implanted, with a saturation magnetization of 0.29???B/Cr atom at room temperature. Cr is in a formal oxidation state of +3 throughout the implanted region, and no CrO? is detected.

Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Droubay, Timothy; Heald, Steve M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; McCready, David E.; Chambers, Scott A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Mun, B. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Detection of charge transfer processes in Cr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals  

SciTech Connect

An insulator-to-metal transition is observed in Cr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals upon extended exposure to a high electric field, namely, electroconditioning (EC). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and transport measurements under laser irradiation show anticorrelation between the Cr{sup 3+} EPR signal and the electrical current. This proves that the Cr{sup 3+} ions are responsible for the photocurrent that initiates the EC process. We observe the presence of Cr{sup 3+}/Cr{sup 4+} mixed valencies in the bulk in the conducting state. The EPR characterization of the spectra in the conducting state excludes the possibility of a Cr{sup 3+}-oxygen vacancy complex in the bulk as a result of the EC.

La Mattina, F. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); IBM Research, Zurich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstr. 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland); Bednorz, J. G.; Alvarado, S. F. [IBM Research, Zurich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstr. 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland); Shengelaya, A. [Physics Institute of Tbilisi State University, Chavchavadze 3, GE-0128, Tbilisi (Georgia); Keller, H. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Recovery of Cr(III) from tannery spent chrome liquor for reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper embodies details on the extraction behavior of Cr(III) along with Al(III), Fe(III), Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) from hydrochloric acid media employing the Cyanex 301-toluene system. All of these metals, except Cr(III), Mg(II), and Mn(II), are extracted into the organic phase. This property of the extractant has been used to separate Cr(III) from the binary mixtures. The partition data have been extended onto spent chrome liquor, and this waste has been treated in such a manner so that it becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. The hydrolytic stability and recycling capacity has been reported. Because the concentration of Cr(III) in the waste is much lower than that required for chromium depositions in Cr(III) plating baths, a concentration step using MgO as a precipitating agent has been appended. To summarize, this paper envisages a new approach to tannery waste management that focuses on treating spent chrome liquors using a solvent extraction technique in such a manner that the waste becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. This would not only help abate pollution but also recover the metal in a pure form.

Khwaja, A.R.; Singh, R.; Tandon, S.N.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Phase decomposition in an Fe-40 at.% Cr alloy after isothermal aging and its effect on hardening  

SciTech Connect

The phase decomposition process of an Fe-40 at.% Cr alloy was studied after isothermal aging at 475 and 500 deg. C using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, as well as hardness measurements. High-resolution transmission electron microscope observations showed that the hardening behavior is associated with the formation of the nanometric coherent decomposed Cr-rich and Fe-rich phases with irregular shape and interconnected as expected for a spinodally-decomposed alloy. As the aging progressed, coherent rounded Cr-rich phase precipitates were observed in the Fe-rich phase matrix. The coarsening process of the Cr-rich phase was observed for aging times up to 750 h. Nevertheless, no decrease in hardness with time was observed because of the nanometric size of the Cr-rich phase, less than 10 nm. Aging hardening was higher at 500 deg. C because of the higher decomposition kinetics. - Research Highlights: {yields} Spinodally-decomposed phases showed an interconnected and irregular shape in aged Fe-Cr alloy. {yields} Further aging promoted the formation of nanometric coherent rounded Cr-rich precipitates. {yields} Nanometric Cr-rich phases are responsible for the age hardening. {yields} Coarsening process of these nanometric Cr-rich precipitates caused no decrease in hardness.

Lopez-Hirata, Victor M., E-mail: vlopezhi@prodigy.net.mx; Soriano-Vargas, Orlando; Rosales-Dorantes, Hector J.; Saucedo Munoz, Maribel L.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Belarus - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

134

U.S. Imports from Belarus - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

135

Audit Report: CR-B-02-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CR-B-02-01 CR-B-02-01 Audit Report: CR-B-02-01 October 15, 2001 Fixed-Price Contracting for Department of Energy Cleanup Activities As part of its Contract Reform effort, the Department of Energy (Department) acted to increase its use of fixed-price contracts. This shift was designed to increase the cost-effectiveness of operations. Since October 1994, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) has awarded a number of fixed-price contracts for environmental cleanup activities. In so doing, EM expected significant cost savings when compared to approaches previously employed by management and operating contractors. Accurately estimating those savings is crucial to contracting strategy and project funding decisions, as well as the Department's overall environmental cleanup strategy. The objective of our audit was to determine if the cost

136

Diode-pumped Cr:LiSAF all-solid-state femtosecond oscillator and regenerative amplifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An all-solid-state tunable diode-pumped Cr{sup 3+}:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (Cr:LiSAF) regenerative amplifier, seeded by a tunable diode-pumped Cr:LiSAF femtosecond oscillator, has been demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. The oscillator was tunable over 75 nm and generated pulses as short as 24 fs. As much as 70 mW average output power was obtained with pulses of 40-fs duration. The amplifier produced recompressed pulses of less than 200-fs duration with energies exceeding 1{mu}J at a repetition rate as high as 25 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Optical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

Mellish, R.; Barry, N.P.; Hyde, S.C.W.; Jones, R.; French, P.M.W.; Taylor, J.R. [Femtosecond Optics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College of Science and Technology, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); van der Poel, C.J.; Valster, A. [Philips Optoelectronics Centre, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands)

1995-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Itinerant antiferromagnetism in BaCr2As2: Experimental characterization and electronic structure calculations  

SciTech Connect

We report single crystal synthesis, specific heat and resistivity measurements and electronic structure calculations for BaCr2As2. This material is a metal with itinerant antiferromagnetism, similar to the parent phases of Fe-based high temperature superconductors, but differs in magnetic order. Comparison of bare band structure density of states and the low temperature specific heat implies a mass renormalization of 2. BaCr2As2 shows stronger transition metal - pnictogen covalency than the Fe compounds, and in this respect is more similar to BaMn2As2. This provides an explanation for the observation that Ni and Co doping is effective in the Fe-based superconductors, but Cr or Mn doping is not.

Singh, David J [ORNL; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; VanBebber, L. H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, Veerle [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Audit Report: CR-B-99-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report: CR-B-99-02 Report: CR-B-99-02 Audit Report: CR-B-99-02 September 30, 1999 Management of Unneeded Materials and Chemicals For more than 50 years, the U.S. Department of Energy (Department) and its contractors operated large production facilities and laboratories that acquired and produced directly or as by-products enormous amounts of non-nuclear materials such as sodium, lead, chemicals, and scrap metal. However, a mission change resulting from the end of the Cold War called into question the need for continued stockpiling of these materials. In the past, the Department has conducted reviews that have identified inefficiencies and recommended improvements to the materials management function. The objective of this audit was to determine if the Department efficiently disposed of its unneeded materials.

139

Magnetic and electrical properties of layered magnets Tl(Cr,Mn,Co)Se{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tl(Cr,Mn,Co)Se{sub 2} crystals were synthesized at T {approx} 1050 K. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that TlCrSe{sub 2}, TlMnSe{sub 2}, and TlCoSe{sub 2} compounds crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system with the lattice parameters: a = 3.6999 A, c = 22.6901 A, c/a {approx} 6.133, z = 3, {rho}{sub x} = 6.209 g/cm{sup 3}; a = 6.53 A, c = 23.96 A, c/a {approx} 3.669, z = 8, {rho}{sub x} = 6.71 g/cm{sup 3}; and a = 3.747 A, c = 22.772 A, c/a {approx} 6.077, z = 3, {rho}{sub x} = 7.577 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Magnetic and electrical studies in the temperature range from 80-400 K showed that TlCrSe{sub 2} is a semiconductor ferromagnet, TlMnSe{sub 2} is a semiconductor antiferromagnet, and TlCoSe{sub 2} is a ferrimagnet with a conductivity characteristic of metals. A rather large deviation in the experimental effective magnetic moment for TlCrSe{sub 2} (3.05 {mu}B) from the theoretical value (3.85 {mu}B) is attributed to two-dimensional magnetic ordering in the paramagnetic region of the noticeably layered ferromagnet TlCrSe{sub 2}. In TlCrSe{sub 2}, a correlation between magnetic and electrical properties was detected.

Veliyev, R. G.; Sadikhov, R. Z.; Kerimova, E. M., E-mail: ekerimova@physics.ab.az; Asadov, Yu. G.; Jabbarov, A. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Processing of LaCrO{sub 3} for solid oxide fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Missouri-Rolla is performing a 5 year research program with two primary objectives: (1) developing LaCrO{sub 3}-based interconnect powders which densify when in contact with anode and cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and (2) developing high performance cathodes, anodes and interfaces for use in planar SOFC`s. With regard to the processing and sintering of LaCrO{sub 3}, the specific objectives of this research program are to: (1) develop a non-liquid phase sintered LaCrO{sub 3}-based material sinterable in air; (2) improve and control the properties requisite of LaCrO{sub 3} utilizing a B-site acceptor dopant; (3) optimize and control the processing conditions associated with LaCrO{sub 3}; and (4) incorporate materials developed in this program into planar cells and measure their performance. With regard to developing high performance materials for use in planar SOFC`s, the specific objectives of this research program over the last year have been to: (1) fabricate single cells with controlled microstructures for operation at 1,000 C; (2) gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in improving cell performance via electrochemical and impedance techniques; and (3) developing processing {leftrightarrow} microstructure {leftrightarrow} property relations of electrodes and their corresponding interfacial reactions. This report is divided into two primary sections: (1) LaCrO{sub 3} sintering studies and (2) SOFC performance studies. Results from these studies are presented in the following sections.

Huebner, W.; Anderson, H.U.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Cr-W Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cr alloys containing 0-30%W by weight were investigated for use in elevated temperature applications. The alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A pseudocyclic oxidation test was employed to study scale formation at 1000ºC in dry air. The scale was predominantly chromia and spalled upon cooling. Alloying with aluminum up to 8 weight percent reduced the spalling drastically. Furthermore, aluminizing the surface of the Cr-W alloys completely stopped the spalling.

Dogan, O.N.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Oxygen-17 NMR Shifts Caused by Cr{Sup ++} in Aqueous Solutions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Cr{sup ++} in solution produces a paramagnetic shift in the NMR absorption of O{sup 17} in ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, as well as the expected paramagnetic shift for O{sup 17} in H{sub 2}O. As the concentration of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} increases, the shift in the H{sub 2}O{sup 17} absorption is diminished, and eventually changes sign. The effects are ascribed to preferential replacement by ClO{sub 4}{sup -} of water molecules from the axial positions in the first coordination sphere about Cr{sup ++}.

Jackson, J. A.; Lemons, J. F.; Taube, H.

1962-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

143

Substitution of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for austentic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current program to develop a high-strength ferritic-martensitic steel. The alloy is essentially Fe-9% Cr-1% Mo with small additions of V and Nb and is known as modifed 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Its elevated-temperature properties and design allowable stresses match those of type 304 stainless steel for temperatures up to 600/sup 0/C and exceed those of other ferritic steels by factors of 2 to 3. The improved strength of this alloy permits its use in place of stainless steels for many applications.

Sikka, V. K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Low-energy structure of 61Mn populated following $\\beta$ decay of 61Cr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\beta$ decay of the $^{61}$Cr$_{37}$ ground state has been studied. A new half-life of 233 +/- 11 ms has been deduced, and seven delayed $\\gamma$ rays have been assigned to the daughter, $^{61}$Mn$_{36}$. The low-energy level structure of $^{61}$Mn$_{36}$ is similar to that of the less neutron-rich $^{57,59}$Mn nuclei. The odd-A $_{25}$Mn isotopes follow the systematic trend in the yrast states of the even-even, Z + 1 $_{26}$Fe isotopes, and not that of the Z - 1 $_{24}$Cr isotopes, where a possible onset of collectivity has been suggested to occur already at N = 36.

Crawford, H L; Berryman, J S; Broda, R; Fornal, B; Hoffman, C R; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Lenzi, S M; Pereira, J; Stoker, J B; Tabor, S L; Walters, W B; Wang, X; Zhu, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Low-energy structure of 61Mn populated following $?$ decay of 61Cr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\beta$ decay of the $^{61}$Cr$_{37}$ ground state has been studied. A new half-life of 233 +/- 11 ms has been deduced, and seven delayed $\\gamma$ rays have been assigned to the daughter, $^{61}$Mn$_{36}$. The low-energy level structure of $^{61}$Mn$_{36}$ is similar to that of the less neutron-rich $^{57,59}$Mn nuclei. The odd-A $_{25}$Mn isotopes follow the systematic trend in the yrast states of the even-even, Z + 1 $_{26}$Fe isotopes, and not that of the Z - 1 $_{24}$Cr isotopes, where a possible onset of collectivity has been suggested to occur already at N = 36.

H. L. Crawford; P. F. Mantica; J. S. Berryman; R. Broda; B. Fornal; C. R. Hoffman; N. Hoteling; R. V. F. Janssens; S. M. Lenzi; J. Pereira; J. B. Stoker; S. L. Tabor; W. B. Walters; X. Wang; S. Zhu

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Comparison of SEM and Optical Analysis of DT Neutron Tracks in CR-39 Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CR-39 detectors were exposed to DT neutrons generated by a Thermo Fisher model A290 neutron generator. Afterwards, the etched tracks were examined both optically and by SEM. The purpose of the analysis was to compare the two techniques and to determine whether additional information on track geometry could be obtained by SEM analysis. The use of these techniques to examine triple tracks, diagnostic of ?9.6 MeV neutrons, observed in CR-39 used in Pd/D codeposition experiments will also be discussed.

Mosier-Boss, P A; Carbonelle, P; Morey, M S; Tinsley, J R; Hurley, J P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al., for F82H reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAF/M) steel. These previous results combined with our data suggest a complex new 'catalytic' mechanism whereby H interacts with the steady state population of defects and the embryonic cavities so as to accelerated cavity (void) growth in both Fe(Cr) and under special conditions in ODS steels.

Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

OEPB 207. Residential Air Conditioning Systems 6 cr. (4+4P) Air conditioning system design and maintenance including evaporative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction surveying, footings, foundation form work, framing, sheathing, insula- tion. Basic electrical methods. Prerequisite: working as a plumber's apprentice. OEBT 102. Introduction to Construction II 2 cr. Prerequisite: working as a plumber's apprentice. OEBT 104. Woodworking Skills I 3 cr. (1+4P) Use and care

Castillo, Steven P.

149

Audit of Department of Energy Support Service Contracting, CR-B-95-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL AUDIT OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SUPPORT SERVICE CONTRACTING Report Number: Capital Regional Audit Office Date of Issue: Germantown, MD 20874 REPORT NO. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RELEASE DATE OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL CR-B-95-06 JUNE 30, 1995 _________________________________________________________________ _______________________ AUDIT OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SUPPORT SERVICE CONTRACTING

150

OEIM 210. Industrial Mechanics III 4 cr. Air compressors, sliding surface bearings, boiler maintenance, boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OEIM 210. Industrial Mechanics III 4 cr. Air compressors, sliding surface bearings, boiler maintenance, boiler tube repairs, basic arc and gas welding, measurement tools, gauge glass maintenance, heat by employer and instructor on boiler inspection and cleaning, centrifugal pumps, basic rigging, piping

Castillo, Steven P.

151

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show vacancy activation energy. Thermal expansion coefficients as function of temperature are displayed in Fig

152

Comparison of SEM and Optical Analysis of DT Neutron Tracks in CR-39 Detectors  

SciTech Connect

A solid state nuclear track detector, CR-39, was exposed to DT neutrons. After etching, the resultant tracks were analyzed using both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In this communication, both methods of analyzing DT neutron tracks are discussed.

P.A. Mosier-Boss, L.P.G. Forsley, P. Carbonnelle, M.S. Morey, J.R. Tinsley, J. P. Hurley, F.E. Gordon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Microstructure and Mechanical Property of Cu-40%Zn-0.5%Cr Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yield stress of extruded P/M Cu-40Zn-0.5Cr brass alloy at 773 K was 514.6 MPa, high value of 54.7% of the conventional P/M Cu60-Zn40 brass alloy at same ...

154

Investigation of Modified Ni-Cr-Mn Base Alloys for SOFC Interconnect Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two Ni-Cr-W-Mn base alloys based on Haynes 230 were developed and evaluated against criteria relevant to SOFC interconnect applications, which included oxidation behavior under SOFC operating conditions, scale electrical conductivity, and thermal expansion. It was found that, similar to the ferritic stainless steel Crofer22 APU, additions of Mn led to the formation of a unique scale that was comprised of a M3O4 (M=Mn, Cr, Ni, …) spinel-rich top layer and Cr2O3-rich sub-layer. The modified alloys demonstrated reasonable oxidation resistance under SOFC operating conditions, though the Mn additions increased the scale growth rate and thus sacrificed to some extent the oxidation resistance of the base alloy (Haynes 230). The formation of a spinel-rich top layer improved the scale conductivity, especially during the early stages of oxidation, but the higher scale growth rate resulted in a higher rate of increase in the area-specific electrical resistance. Due to their FCC crystal structure, the Ni-Cr-W-Mn base alloys demonstrated a CTE that was higher than that of anode-supported cells and candidate ferritic stainless steels such as Crofer22 APU.

Yang, Z Gary; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Xia, Gordon

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The field emission properties of graphene aggregates films deposited on Fe-Cr-Ni alloy substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The graphene aggregates films were fabricated directly on Fe-Cr-Ni alloy substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system (MPCVD). The source gas was a mixture of H2 and CH4 with flow rates of 100 sccm and 12 sccm, ...

Zhanling Lu; Wanjie Wang; Xiaotian Ma; Ning Yao; Lan Zhang; Binglin Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g-1) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The Cr(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E.Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; Long, P.E.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g{sup -1}) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The CR(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Peterson, J.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Firestone, M.; Long, P.E.; Resch, C.T.; Cantrell, K.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Rare-earth chromium gallides RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} (RE=Tb-Tm)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ternary rare-earth-metal chromium gallides RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} (RE=Tb-Tm) have been prepared by reactions of the elements at 1000 Degree-Sign C in the presence of excess gallium used as a self-flux. Their structures are derived by inserting Cr atoms into a quarter of the empty Ga{sub 6} octahedral clusters found in the parent binary gallides REGa{sub 3} (AuCu{sub 3}-type), although single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies suggest that complex superstructures may be adopted. An ideal ordered Y{sub 4}PdGa{sub 12}-type structure was successfully refined for a crystal of Dy{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} (Pearson symbol cI34, space group Im3{sup Macron }m, Z=2, a=8.572(1) A). Magnetic measurements on single-crystal samples reveal ferromagnetic or possibly ferrimagnetic ordering for the Tb, Dy, and Er members (T{sub C}=22, 15, and 2.8 K, respectively) and antiferromagnetic ordering for the Ho member (T{sub N}=7.5 K). Band structure calculations on a hypothetical 'Y{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12}' model suggest that the Cr atoms carry no local magnetic moment. - Graphical abstract: RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} is derived by inserting Cr atoms into empty Ga{sub 6} octahedral clusters present in the parent binary gallides REGa{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE{sub 4}MGa{sub 12} (previously known for M=Fe, Ni, Pd, Pt, Ag) has been extended to M=Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} compounds show predominantly ferromagnetic ordering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Band structure calculations suggest that Cr atoms carry no local magnetic moment.

Slater, Brianna R.; Bie, Haiying; Stoyko, Stanislav S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Bauer, Eric D.; Thompson, Joe D. [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)] [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fate of Cu, Cr, and As during combustion of impregnated wood with and without peat additive  

SciTech Connect

The EU Directive on incineration of waste regulates the harmful emissions of particles and twelve toxic elements, including copper, chromium, and arsenic. Using a 15 kW pellets-fueled grate burner, experiments were performed to determine the fate of copper, chromium, and arsenic during combustion of chromate copper arsenate (CCA) preservative wood. The fate and speciation of copper, chromium, and arsenic were determined from analysis of the flue gas particles and the bottom ash using SEM-EDS, XRD, XPS, and ICP-AES. Chemical equilibrium model calculations were performed to interpret the experimental findings. The results revealed that about 5% copper, 15% chromium, and 60% arsenic were volatilized during combustion of pure CCA-wood, which is lower than predicted volatilization from the individual arsenic, chromium, and copper oxides. This is explained by the formation of more stable refractory complex oxide phases for which the stability trends and patterns are presented. When co-combusted with peat, an additional stabilization of these phases was obtained and thus a small but noteworthy decrease in volatilization of all three elements was observed. The major identified phases for all fuels were CuCrO{sub 2}(s), (Fe,Mg,Cu)(Cr,Fe,Al)O{sub 4}(s), Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s), and Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}(s). Arsenic was also identified in the fine particles as KH{sub 2}AsO{sub 4}(s) and As{sub 2}O{sub 3}). A strong indication of hexavalent chromium in the form of K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} or as a solid solution between K{sub 3}Na(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2} and K{sub 3}Na(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} was found in the fine particles. Good qualitative agreement was observed between experimental data and chemical equilibrium model calculations. 38 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Karin Lundholm; Dan Bostroem; Anders Nordin; Andrei Shchukarev [Umeaa University, Umeaa (Sweden). Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel [Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Zhiyue Xu Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Absence of long-range chemical ordering in equimolar FeCoCrNi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equimolar FeCoCrNi alloys have been the topic of recent research as 'high-entropy alloys,' where the name is derived from the high configurational entropy of mixing for a random solid solution. Despite their name, no systematic study of ordering in this alloy system has been performed to date. Here, we present results from anomalous x-ray scattering and neutron scattering on quenched and annealed samples. An alloy of FeNi{sub 3} was prepared in the same manner to act as a control. Evidence of long-range chemical ordering is clearly observed in the annealed FeNi{sub 3} sample from both experimental techniques. The FeCoCrNi sample given the same heat treatment lacks long-range chemical order.

Lucas, M. S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UTC Inc., 1270 North Fairfield Road, Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Wilks, G. B.; Senkov, O. N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Mauger, L.; Munoz, J. A. [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory 138-78, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Michel, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Horwath, J.; Semiatin, S. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Karapetrova, E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

162

High-reflectivity Cr/Sc multilayer condenser for compact soft x-ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condenser is a critical component in compact water-window x-ray microscopes as it influences the exposure time via its efficiency and the resolution via its numerical aperture. Normal-incidence multilayer mirrors can reach large geometrical collection efficiencies and match the numerical aperture of the zone plate but require advanced processing for high total reflectivity. In the present article we demonstrate large-diameter normal-incidence spherical Cr/Sc multilayer condensers with high and uniform reflectivity. Dc-magnetron sputtering was used to deposit 300 bilayers of Cr/Sc with a predetermined d-spacing matching the {lambda}=3.374 nm operating wavelength on spherical substrates. The mirrors show a uniform reflectivity of {approx}3% over the full 58 mm diameter condenser area. With these mirrors an improvement in exposure time by a factor of 10 was achieved, thereby improving the performance of the compact x-ray microscope significantly.

Stollberg, H.; Yulin, S.; Takman, P. A. C.; Hertz, H. M. [Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fraunhofer-Institut fur Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 7, 07745 Jena (Germany); Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fragmentation studies of 158 A GeV Pb ions using CR39 nuclear track detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six stacks of CR39 nuclear track detectors with different targets were exposed to a lead ion beam of 158 A GeV at the CERN-SPS, at normal incidence, in order to study the fragmentation properties of ultra-relativistic lead nuclei. Measurements of the total, break-up and pick-up charge-changing cross sections of 158 A GeV Pb ions have been made for the first time.

Dekhissi, H; Giorgini, M; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Patrizii, L; Popa, V; Serra, P; Togo, V

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The energy distribution of beta CrB for the specific stellar abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The comparison of the observed and computed energy distributions of beta CrB has shown that a model with the specific chemical composition of the star can account for the visual enery distribution, while it is still unable to reproduce ultraviolet observations shortward of 1700 A. Furthermore, the predicted absorption of strong Fe II and Mg II UV lines is much larger than the observed one.

F. Castelli

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Corrosion Behavior of NiCrFe Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect

The corrosion behavior of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) is investigated in hydrogenated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics are observed to be parabolic, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 0.055 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. A combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, are used to identify the oxide phases present (i.e., spinel) and to characterize their morphology and thickness. Two oxide layers are identified: an outer, ferrite-rich layer and an inner, chromite-rich layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling and target factor analysis is applied to determine spinel stoichiometry; the inner layer is (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the outer layer is (Ni{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.85}Cr{sub 0.15}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. The distribution of trivalent iron and chromium cations in the inner and outer oxide layers is essentially the same as that found previously in stainless steel corrosion oxides, thus confirming their invariant nature as solvi in the immiscible spinel binary Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (or NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Although oxidation occurred non-selectively, excess quantities of nickel(II) oxide were not found. Instead, the excess nickel was accounted for as recrystallized nickel metal in the inner layer, as additional nickel ferrite in the outer layer, formed by pickup of iron ions from the aqueous phase, and by selective release to the aqueous phase.

SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of scission of the carbonate ester bond in CR-39 by the hydroxide ion through basic hydro- lysis of ester-39 detectors during etching in NaOH/ethanol has also shown that sodium car- bonate is present

Yu, K.N.

167

HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

Cost, R.C.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

In situ long-term reductive bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater using hydrogen release compound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 H Area of the DOE Hanford Facility, Quantum EngineeringCr-immobilization research site at Hanford 100-H area. Wellexperiment was conducted at the Hanford Site (Washington), a

Faybishenko, B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 100H site in Hanford, WA Romy Chakraborty 1 , Eoin Lcontaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004.Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the

Chakraborty, Romy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high strength, high toughness Cr-W-V ferritic steel composition suitable for fast induced-radioactivity (FIRD) decay after irradiation in a fusion reactor comprises 2.5-3.5 wt % Cr, 2. This invention was made with Government support under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and the Government has certain rights in this invention.

Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Myelin Activates FAK/Akt/NF-kB Pathways and Provokes CR3-Dependent Inflammatory Response in Murine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Myelin Activates FAK/Akt/NF-kB Pathways and Provokes CR3-Dependent Inflammatory Response in Murine is through activation of FAK/PI3K/Akt/NF-kB signaling pathways and CR3 contributes to myelin-induced PI3K/Akt/NF-kB) are not able to activate NF-kB signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a crucial role

Fan, Jianqing

172

Assessment of the mechanical performance of the Westinghouse BWR control rod CR 99 at high depletion levels  

SciTech Connect

A long-term program assessing the mechanical performance of the Westinghouse BWR control rod CR 99 at high depletion levels has been performed. The scope of the program has mainly been based on the operation of four CR 99 Generation 2 control rods in demanding positions during 6 and 7 cycles in the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL) and on the detailed visual inspections and blade wing thickness measurements that were performed after the rods were discharged. By correlating statistically the blade wing thickness measurements to the appearance of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), the probability of IASCC appearance as function of the blade wing swelling was estimated. In order to correlate the IASCC probability of a CR 99 to its depletion, the {sup 10}B depletion of the studied rods was calculated in detail on a local level with the stochastic Monte Carlo code MCNP in combination with the Westinghouse nodal code system PHOENIX4/POLCA7. Using this information coupled to the blade wing measurement data, a finite element model describing the blade wing swelling of an arbitrary CR 99 design as function of {sup 10}B depletion could then be generated. In the final step, these relationships were used to quantify the probability of IASCC appearance as function of the {sup 10}B depletion of the CR 99 Generations 2 and 3. Applying this detailed mapping of the CR 99 behavior at high depletion levels and using an on-line core monitoring system with explicit {sup 10}B depletion tracking capabilities will enable a reliable prediction of the probability for IASCC appearance, thus enhancing the optimized design and the sound operation of the CR 99 control rod. Another important outcome of the program was that it was clearly shown that no significant amount of boron leakage did occur through any of the detected IASCC cracks, despite the very high depletion levels achieved. (authors)

Seltborg, P.; Jinnestrand, M. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE-721 63 Vaesteraas (Sweden)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

CHARACTERIZATION OF PRESOLAR MATERIAL IN THE CR CHONDRITE NORTHWEST AFRICA 852  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the inventory of presolar silicate, oxide, and silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the CR2 chondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 852. Thirty-one O-anomalous grains were detected: 24 were identified as silicates ({approx}78 ppm); the remaining 7 are Al-rich oxides ({approx}38 ppm). NWA 852 is the first C2 chondrite containing O-anomalous presolar dust in concentrations comparable to other more primitive meteorites. Eight presolar SiC grains have been found, representing the highest abundance ({approx}160 ppm) observed so far in primitive meteorites. {sup 15}N-enriched matter is also present, although very heterogeneously distributed. Twenty-six of the O-anomalous grains are enriched in {sup 17}O, originating from the outflows of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We calculate a silicate/oxide abundance ratio of {approx}2, which indicates a higher degree of aqueous alteration than observed for other presolar-grain-rich meteorites. NWA 852 thus stands between the presolar-grain-rich CR3 chondrites (MET 00426, QUE 99177) and CR2 chondrites with low presolar grain abundances (Renazzo, NWA 530). We calculate an initial presolar silicate abundance of {approx}800 ppm for NWA 852, if silicate destruction by aqueous alteration is taken into account. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigation of one presolar Al-rich grain of an AGB star origin revealed that the grain mainly consists of a single crystal of hibonite with slightly varying orientations. A distinct subgrain (d < 100 nm) with a Ca/Ti ratio of {approx}1 is located in the central region, most likely indicating a perovskite-like phase. Our data suggest this phase to be a primary condensate and not an alteration product.

Leitner, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 3060, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Vollmer, C. [Institut fuer Mineralogie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Zipfel, J., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum Senckenberg, Sektion Meteoritenforschung, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)  

SciTech Connect

We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kerber, Florian [European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Chromium Grain-boundary Segregation and Effect of Ion Beam Cleaning on Fe-Ni-Cr Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The grain boundaries play important role to control the mechanical strength of ternary alloys. From spacecrafts to naval vessels to nuclear reactors, stress corrosion cracking, brittleness, oxidation mostly originates at the grain boundaries and cause long term structural stability problems in most of the metallic structures [1]. Fe-Ni-Cr based ternary metal alloys have been widely studied for more than fifty years [2, 3]. Despite of vast amount of research, chromium diffusion in stainless steel or other Ni-Fe-Cr based ternary alloys is still an open scientific problem with challenges in structural stability and corrosion resistance [4]. Particularly, austenite Fe-Ni-Cr is looked upon favorably in space and jet engine industry for their improved resistance to stress corrosion cracking [5]. In solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), Ni-alloys are frequently used as interconnects and seals [6]. In this communication, simultaneous energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping is utilized to study chemical and structural aspects of chromium segregation in Fe-Ni-Cr alloy. A focused Ga-ion beam is also utilized to study the effect of ion beam cleaning on EBSD image quality (IQ) and inverse pole figure (IPF) maps of Fe-Ni-Cr alloy.

Saraf, Laxmikant V.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ionizing-Radiation-Induced Color Centers in YAG, Nd:YAG, and Cr:Nd:YAG: Developing and Analyzing a Radiation-Hard Laser Gain Medium .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This report presents results from a series of experiments in which YAG samples (undoped, as well as doped with Nd and Cr3+) were exposed to… (more)

Glebov, Boris L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels  

SciTech Connect

Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Hoelzer, David T [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Klueh, Ronald L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Aqueous chemical growth of alpha-Fe2O3-alpha-Cr203 nanocompositethin films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are reporting here on the inexpensive fabrication and optical properties of an iron(III) oxide chromium(III) oxide nanocomposite thin film of corundum crystal structure. Its novel and unique-designed architecture consists of uniformed, well-defined and oriented nanorods of Hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) of 50 nm in diameter and 500nm in length and homogeneously distributed nonaggregated monodisperse spherical nanoparticles of Eskolaite (alpha-Cr2O3) of 250 nm in diameter. This alpha-Fe2O3 alpha-Cr2O3 nanocomposite thin film is obtained by growing, directly onto transparent polycrystalline conducting substrate, an oriented layer of hematite nanorods and growing subsequently, the eskolaite layer. The synthesis is carried out by a template-free, low-temperature, multilayer thin film coating process using aqueous solution of metal salts as precursors. Almost 100 percent of the light is absorbed by the composite film between 300 and 525 nm and 40 percent at 800 nm which yields great expectations as photoanode materials for photovoltaic cells and photocatalytic devices.

Vayssieres, Lionel; Guo, Jinghua; Nordgren, Joseph

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Relationships between processing, microstructure, and properties of a Co-Cr-Mo alloy  

SciTech Connect

STELLITE alloy No. 21 was produced via rapid solidification processing (RSP) in a variety of particulate morphologies (coarse and fine powder, flakes, fibers, and ribbons). The various RSP forms showed similar, fine microstructures with only a slight difference in the scale of the microstructural features. These RSP particulates were consolidated by extrusion, dynamic compaction, and rapid omnidirectional compaction (ROC) at two processing temperatures (1077/sup 0/C and 1121/sup 0/C). Dynamic compaction proved to be unacceptable for this alloy because of non-uniform porosity and the inability to develop a metallurgical bond between particulates. A plot of elongation versus yield strength depicted two yield strength/ductility relationships for the Co-Cr-Mo type alloys. As-ROC'd samples had a low yield strength/ductility relationship. Atomized powder size also affected the strength/ductility relationships of the extruded products. Decreasing powder size increased ductility without effecting yield strength. Processing temperature did not affect the yield strength/ductility relationship. Electrochemical polarization tests were not successful in delineating fine differences between the various types of Co-Cr-Mo alloy while immersion-pitting temperature tests were capable of distinguishing between samples processed from fine and coarse powders. These materials proved susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in boiling 30% MgCl/sub 2/.

Anand, V.; Hickl, A.J.; Kumar, P.; Boeck, B.A.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

Vladimir Gorokhovsky

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ab initio study on noncompensated CrO codoping of GaN for enhanced solar energy conversion  

SciTech Connect

We describe a novel photocatalyst obtained by codoping GaN with CrO, according to a new "noncompensated" codoping concept based on first-principles calculations. The approach enables controllable narrowing of the GaN band gap with significantly enhanced carrier mobility and photocatalytic activity in the visible light region and thus offers immense potential for application in solar energy conversion, water splitting, and a variety of solar-assisted photocatalysis. Our calculations indicate that the formation energy for the cation doping is greatly reduced by noncompensated codoping with an anion. Although Cr doping alone can split the band gap with the formation of an intermediate band, the mobility is low due to carrier trapping by the localized states. The first-principles calculations also demonstrate that CrO codoping of GaN shifts the Fermi level into the conduction band resulting in high carrier density and mobility.

Pan, Hui [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications  

SciTech Connect

The project described in this report dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. These reactor vessels can approach ship weights of about 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3 to 8 inches. They are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo alloy steels, containing 1.25 to 12% chromium and 1 to 2% molybdenum. The goal of this project was to develop Fe-Cr-W(V) steels that can perform similar duties, in terms of strength at high temperatures, but will weigh less and thereby save energy.

Jawad, Mann; Sikka, Vinod K.

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

Processing of LaCrO{sub 3} for solid oxide fuel cell applications. April 1994--April 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 5-yr program has the objectives of developing LaCrO{sub 3}-based interconnect powders which densify when in contact with anode and cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells and developing high- performance cathodes, anodes, and interfaces for planar SOFCs. This report is divided into LaCrO{sub 3} sintering studies and SOFC performance studies. Major achievements during the past year included: Developing processing skills for fabricating single cells, incorporating a Pt reference electrode into the electrolyte for separating electrode effects, developing processing-microstructure- property relations for a number of anodes, and developing experimental techniques for measuring cell performance.

Huebner, W.; Anderson, H.U.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effects of Cr-Mo Infiltration Source Structure on the Thickness of Alloy Layer by Double Glow Plasma Surface Metallurgy Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To strengthen the growth characteristics of layer on Q235 steel, a new source structure of Cr-Mo infiltration was proposed by plasma surface metallurgy technology. Comparative experiments were carried out on source polar of scrubbing brush structure ... Keywords: Surface alloying, Cr-Mo infiltrated, Plasma surface metallurgy technology, Thickness of layer

Jinyong Xu; Jingchun Zhang; Yajuan Liu; Cheng Gao

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Audit Report: CR-B-98-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Audit Report: CR-B-98-02 November 14, 1997 Audit of Management of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory The Department's national laboratories, since their establishment, have been permitted to conduct a limited amount of discretionary research activities. The Department's Defense Program laboratories, such as the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, generate funding for Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) programs by charging their total laboratory operating and capital equipment budgets a flat surcharge of up to 6 percent. The ceiling was mandated by the Congress in authorization legislation. This audit was performed to determine whether the LDRD program at Lawrence Livermore was managed in accordance with applicable laws and

186

Audit Report: CR-B-98-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Audit Report: CR-B-98-01 October 8, 1997 Audit of the Internal Control Structure of the Department of Energy's Working Capital Fund The Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development of the Committee on Appropriations, in its report dated July 16, 1996, approved the implementation of a Working Capital Fund (Fund) at the U.S. Department of Energy. The Subcommittee also directed the Office of Inspector General to conduct periodic audits of the Fund. This audit was conducted to determine if the Department established an effective system of controls over the Fund. Our specific objectives were to determine if internal controls were sufficient to ensure that appropriate costs were allocated in a reasonable and unbiased manner and in a way that was consistent with the expectations

187

Audit Report: CR-B-98-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Audit Report: CR-B-98-01 October 8, 1997 Audit of the Internal Control Structure of the Department of Energy's Working Capital Fund The Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development of the Committee on Appropriations, in its report dated July 16, 1996, approved the implementation of a Working Capital Fund (Fund) at the U.S. Department of Energy. The Subcommittee also directed the Office of Inspector General to conduct periodic audits of the Fund. This audit was conducted to determine if the Department established an effective system of controls over the Fund. Our specific objectives were to determine if internal controls were sufficient to ensure that appropriate costs were allocated in a reasonable and unbiased manner and in a way that was consistent with the expectations

188

Audit Report: CR-B-97-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Audit Report: CR-B-97-01 October 22, 1997 Audit of Department of Energy's Warehouse Space The downsizing of Department of Energy (Department) facilities as a result of the end of the Cold War may have a negative impact on many communities that were heavily dependent on Departmental operations for economic stability. To lessen the negative effects on these communities, the Department has encouraged the formation of local community reuse organizations. These organizations determine and sponsor economic development initiatives to offset the local consequences of the Department's downsizing. The Department provided financial assistance to these organizations through grants and cooperative agreements. We initiated this audit to determine whether economic development grants and

189

The influence of temperature on the color of TiO{sub 2}:Cr pigments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TiO{sub 2}:Cr brown pigments were prepared via a polymeric precursor derived from the Pechini method. The pigments were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-vis spectroscopy, and colorimetry. The increase of the calcination temperature from 700 to 1000 deg. C led to a decrease in the L* values, corresponding to darkening of the pigments. The pigments obtained in this work are darker than those produced by a solid-state reaction method reported before. The change in the pigment color is due to the anatase-rutile phase transition, which leads to a shift in the charge transfer bond (Ti{sup 4+} {r_reversible} O{sup 2-}) due to a change in the crystal field around the chromophore ions. Moreover, the oxidation state of chromium was observed to change, and this also alters the color of the pigments.

Gomes Vieira, Fagner Ticiano; Silva Melo, Danniely [LACOM, Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, Campus I, CEP:58059 900, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Jackson Guedes de Lima, Severino [LSR, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Longo, Elson [CMDMC-LIEC, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos Alberto [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Silva Junior, Wilson [Icra Produtos para Ceramica, Mogi Guacu, SP (Brazil); Gouveia de Souza, Antonio [LACOM, Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, Campus I, CEP:58059 900, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Garcia dos Santos, Ieda Maria [LACOM, Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, Campus I, CEP:58059 900, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)], E-mail: ieda@quimica.ufpb.br

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

190

L-shell photoabsorption spectroscopy for solid metals: Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation measurements of near-threshold and broad-range (400--1500 eV) absolute photoabsorption cross sections were made for five transition metals with {plus minus}10% overall uncertainties. Fine structure details of 2p-3d autoionizing resonances are shown with better than 1.0 eV resolution for solid metals: Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu. Fine structure similar to what we measured can be produced using a multi-configuration Dirac Fock (MCDF) model if a statistical distribution is assumed for the initial atomic states. Calculations were performed in intermediate coupling with configuration interactions by Mau H. Chen. The results are compared with other experimental work and theoretical methodologies. 18 refs., 7 figs.

Del Grande, N.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen Release from Irradiated Vanadium Alloy V-4Cr-4Ti  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present work is an attempt to obtain data concerning the influence of neutron and ? irradiation upon hydrogen retention in V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy. The experiments on in-pile loading of vanadium alloy specimens at the neutron flux density 1014 n/cm2s, hydrogen pressure of 80 Pa, and temperatures of 563, 613, and 773 K were carried out using the IVG.1M reactor of the Kazakhstan National Nuclear Center. A preliminary set of loading/degassing experiments with non-irradiated material has been carried out to obtain data on hydrogen interaction with vanadium alloy. The, data presented in this work are related both to non-irradiated and irradiated samples.

Klepikov, A. Kh.; Romanenko, O. G.; Chikhray, E. V.; Tazhibaeva, I. L.; Shestakov, V. P.; Longhurst, Glen Reed

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interferometric measurement of melt depth in silicon using femtosecond infrared Cr:forsterite laser  

SciTech Connect

Interferometric microscopy technique combined with high power infrared Cr:forsterite laser system was applied to investigate femtosecond laser induced melting of silicon. Optically polished wafer of single crystalline silicon of 400 {mu}m thickness was irradiated with 100 fs pump pulses at second harmonic wavelength of 620 nm. We used infrared probe pulses at main wavelength of 1240 nm, whose photon energy was less than the band gap width E{sub g} = 1.12eV of silicon, and the penetration depth of probe essentially exceeded the sample thickness. Unlike many previous experiments with Ti:sapphire lasers it allowed us to probe the heated area from the rear side of the sample and obtain the data on melt depth after laser irradiation.

Ashitkov, Sergey I.; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V.; Agranat, Mikhail B. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Bose-Einstein condensation of triplons in Ba3Cr2O8  

SciTech Connect

By performing heat capacity, magnetocaloric effect, torque magnetometry and force magnetometry measurements up to 33 T, we have mapped out the T-H phase diagram of the S = 1/2 spin dimer compound Ba{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8}. We found evidence for field-induced magnetic order between H{sub cl} = 12.52(2) T and H{sub c2} = 23.65(5) T, with the maximum transition temperature T{sub c} {approx} 2.7 K at H {approx} 18 T. The lower transition can likely be described by Bose-Einstein condensation of triplons theory, and this is consistent with the absence of any magnetization plateaus in our magnetic torque and force measurements. In contrast, the nature of the upper phase transition appears to be quite different as our measurements suggest that this transition is actually first order.

Jaime, Marcelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kohama, Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aczel, A [MCMASTER UNIV; Ninios, K [UNIV OF FL; Chan, H [UNIV OF FL; Balicas, L [NHMFL; Dabkowska, H [MCMASTER UNIV; Like, G [MCMASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system  

SciTech Connect

NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

Teng, Zhenke [ORNL; Zhang, F [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Liu, Chain T [Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Huang, Shenyan [ORNL; Chou, Y.T. [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Tien, R [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Chang, Y A [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Sliding wear, toughness and microstructural relationships in high strength Fe/Cr/C experimental steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hardness has been believed to be the major parameter influencing wear resistance of materials. Recently, it was suggested that combinations of high strength and toughness may lead to optimum wear resistance. It is known that the martensite transformation can be exploited to provide a variety of strength-toughness combinations. Small additions of Mn or Ni to the Fe/4Cr/.3C martensitic alloys have been shown to increase toughness while maintaining strength via increasing the volume fraction of retained austenite. An investigation of the relationships between microstructure, toughness, and sliding wear resistance for these experimental alloys is reported. Comparative studies were performed on several industrial alloys to provide a practical basis for comparison of these medium carbon experimental steels.

Salesky, W.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys  

SciTech Connect

The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Palacio, H.A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11 B1096APP La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

diff -crN oommf11b2/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ppm.tcl oommf ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -crN oommf11b2/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ppm.tcl oommf/app/mmdisp/scripts/ avf2ppm.tcl *** oommf11b2/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ppm.tcl Wed ...

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Impact of Weld Metal Creep Strength on the Overall Creep Strength of 9% Cr Steel Weldments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, three joints of a X11CrMoWVNb9-1-1 (P911) pipe were welded with three filler metals by conventional arc welding. The filler metals varied in creep strength level, so that one overmatched, one undermatched, ...

Mayr, Peter

199

Cyclic nanoindentation studies on CrN thin films prepared by RF sputtering on Zr-based metallic glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclic nanoindentation tests were carried out to study the influence of the chromium nitride thin films on the mechanical properties of Zr-based metallic glass. Chromium nitride thin coatings have been deposited on Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} metallic glass substrate by RF sputtering. The deposition process was done at room temperature under nitrogen reactive gas using a metallic chromium target. The CrN films have a thickness of 300 nm. Several cyclic nanoindentation measurements were conducted on CrN films and Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} metallic glass substrate samples at various loading rate values. We have found that the coated metallic glass sample shows high mechanical properties such as hardness and reduced elastic modulus. Cyclic nanoindentation results show a hardening behaviour for these CrN coatings. Moreover, the CrN coated on Zr-based metallic glass was found to have a high value of resistance to crack propagation, as being analysed through the SEM pictures of the residual Vickers indentation impressions.

Jellad, A.; Benameur, T. [Laboratoire de Genie Mecanique LGM-MA05, ENIM, Av. Ibn El Jazzar, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Labdi, S. [Laboratoire d'etudes des Milieux Nanometriques, UEVE, Bd F. Mitterand, 91025 Evry Cedex (France)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Influence of alloy content and a cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr ferritic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect

The cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can be significantly reduced by using interconnects made from ferritic stainless steels. In fact, several alloys have been developed specifically for this application (Crofer 22APU and Hitachi ZMG323). However, these steels lack environmental stability in SOFC environments, and as a result, degrade the performance of the SOFC. A steel interconnect can contribute to performance degradation through: (i) Cr poisoning of electrochemically active sites within the cathode; (ii) formation of non-conductive oxides, such as SiO2 or Al2O3 from residual or minor alloying elements, at the base metal-oxide scale interface; and/or (iii) excessive oxide scale growth, which may also retard electrical conductivity. Consequently, there has been considerable attention on developing coatings to protect steel interconnects in SOFC environments and controlling trace elements during alloy production. Recently, we have reported on the development of a Cerium surface treatment that improves the oxidation behavior of a variety alloys, including Crofer 22APU [1-5]. Initial results indicated that the treatment may improve the performance of Crofer 22APU for SOFC application by: (i) retarding scale growth resulting in a thinner oxide scale; and (ii) suppressing the formation of a deleterious continuous SiO2 layer that can form at the metal-oxide scale interface in materials with high residual Si content [5]. Crofer 22 APU contains Fe-22Cr-0.5Mn-0.1Ti (weight percent). Depending on current market prices and the purity of raw materials utilized for ingot production, Cr can contribute upwards of 90 percent of the raw materials cost. The present research was undertaken to determine the influence of Cr content and minor element additions, especially Ti, on the effectiveness of the Ce surface treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on the behavior of low Cr alloys.

Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microstructural evolution during solution treatment of Co-Cr-Mo-C biocompatible alloys  

SciTech Connect

Three different Co-Cr-Mo-C alloys conforming to ASTM F75 standard were poured in an industrial environment and subjected to a conventional solution treatment at 1225 Degree-Sign C for several time intervals. The microstructural changes and transformations were studied in each case in order to evaluate the way in which treatment time influences the secondary phase fraction and clarify the microstructural changes that could occur. To assess how treatment time affects microstructure, optical microscopy and image analyzer software, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry analysis were employed. The main phases detected in the as-cast state were: {sigma}-phase, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The latter presented two different morphologies, blocky type and lamellar type. Despite being considered the most detrimental feature to mechanical properties, {sigma}-phase and lamellar carbides dissolution took place in the early stages of solution treatment. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides featured two different behaviors. In the alloy obtained by melting an appropriate quantity of alloyed commercial materials, a decrease in size, spheroidization and transformation into M{sub 6}C carbides were simultaneously observed. In the commercial ASTM F75 alloy, in turn, despite being the same phase, only a marked decrease in precipitates size was noticed. These different behaviors could be ascribed to the initial presence of other phases in the alloy obtained from alloyed materials, such as {sigma}-phase and 'pearlitic' carbides, or to the initial precipitate size which was much larger in the first than in the commercial ASTM F75 alloy studied. M{sub 6}C carbides dissolved directly in the matrix as they could not be detected in samples solution-treated for 15 min. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys were poured under an industrial environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformation of existing phases followed during conventional solution treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In as-cast/treated samples, phases were identified by color metallography, SEM and EDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M{sub 23}C{sub 6} {yields} M{sub 6}C transformation was corroborated by SEM and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbide spheroidization was also detected prior a noticeably carbide size decreasing.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fornaro, O. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palacio, H. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11, B1096APP, La Plata (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina,Slovenia. Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nature of =~SiOCrO(2)CI And (=~SiO)(2)CrO(2) Sites Prepared By Grafting CrO(2)CI(2) Onto Silica  

SciTech Connect

The room-temperature reaction between chromyl chloride and Sylopol 952 silicas pretreated at 200, 450, and 800 C was investigated using IR, XANES, and EXAFS spectroscopy, as well as by DFT modeling. On the silicas pretreated at 200 and 450 C, the structurally uniform sites formed by the reaction with one surface hydroxyl group are described as {triple_bond}SiOCrO{sub 2}Cl. Unreacted silanols persist on these silicas even in the presence of excess CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, and on the silica pretreated at 200 C some participate in hydrogen bonding with the grafted monochlorochromate sites. On the silica pretreated at 800 C, both {triple_bond}SiOCrO{sub 2}Cl and ({triple_bond}SiO){sub 2}CrO{sub 2} sites are formed. The latter are produced despite the absence of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyl pairs on the support. The origin of the chromate sites is proposed to be the reaction between CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and hydroxyl-substituted siloxane 2-rings. These rings are likely formed at 800 C by condensation between a pair of vicinal silanols in which one of the silanols is also a member of a geminal pair.

Demmelmaier, C.A.; White, R.E.; Bokhoven, J.A.van; Scott, S.L.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb Welds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nickel based alloys are often welded with argon/hydrogen shielding gas mixtures to minimize oxidation and improve weld quality. However, shielding gas mixtures with {ge} 1% hydrogen additions can result in hydrogen concentrations greater than 5 wt. ppm in the weld metal and reduce ductility via hydrogen embrittlement. For the conditions investigated, the degree of hydrogen embrittlement is highly variable between 5 and 14 wt. ppm. investigation of hydrogen embrittlement of EN82H GTAW welds via tensile testing, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy shows that this variability is due to the inhomogeneous microstructure of the welds, the presence of recrystallized grains, and complex residual plastic strains. Specifically, research indicates that high residual strains and hydrogen trapping lower the ductility of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb weld metal when dissolved hydrogen concentrations are greater than 5 wt. ppm. The inhomogeneous microstructure contains columnar dendritic, cellular dendritic, and recrystallized grains. The decreased tensile ductility observed in embrittled samples is recovered by post weld heat treatments that decrease the bulk hydrogen concentration below 5 wt. ppm.

G.A. Young; C.K. Battige; N. Liwis; M.A. Penik; J. Kikel; A.J. Silvia; C.K. McDonald

2001-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modeling solar thermochemical splitting of CO2 using metal oxide and a CR5.  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional, multi-physics computational model based on the finite-element method is developed for simulating the process of solar thermochemical splitting of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using ferrites (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/FeO) and a counter-rotating-ring receiver/recuperator or CR5, in which carbon monoxide (CO) is produced from gaseous CO{sub 2}. The model takes into account heat transfer, gas-phase flow and multiple-species diffusion in open channels and through pores of the porous reactant layer, and redox chemical reactions at the gas/solid interfaces. Results (temperature distribution, velocity field, and species concentration contours) computed using the model in a case study are presented to illustrate model utility. The model is then employed to examine the effects of injection rates of CO{sub 2} and argon neutral gas, respectively, on CO production rate and the extent of the product-species crossover.

Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Chen, Ken Shuang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Overview of a Welding Development Program for a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), located at the Idaho National Laboratory, coordinates and integrates management and disposal of U.S. Department of Energy-owned spent nuclear fuel. These management functions include using the DOE standardized canister for packaging, storage, treatment, transport, and long-term disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Nuclear criticality must be prevented in the postulated event where a waste package is breached and water (neutron moderator) is introduced into the waste package. Criticality control will be implemented by using a new, weldable, corrosion-resistant, neutron-absorbing material to fabricate the welded structural inserts (fuel baskets) that will be placed in the standardized canister. The new alloy is based on the Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system with a gadolinium addition. Gadolinium was chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element because of its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This paper describes a weld development program to qualify this new material for American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) welding procedures, develop data to extend the present ASME Code Case (unwelded) for welded construction, and understand the weldability and microstructural factors inherent to this alloy.

W. L. Hurt; R. E. Mizia; D. E. Clark

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Recent progress in nanostructured multiferroic Bi{sub 2}FeCrO{sub 6} thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the latest progress on the growth and characterization of Bi{sub 2}FeCrO{sub 6} (BFCO), a recently discovered multiferroic system. BFCO thin films and nanostructures exhibit exceptional multiferroic properties at room temperature. The growth of pure BFCO thin films on STO substrates is possible only in a narrow window of deposition parameters (i.e., Oxygen pressure pO{sub 2}=1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mbar and around a substrate temperature T{sub S}=680 Degree-Sign C). The epitaxial growth stabilizes the metastable single phase of this material and promotes the Fe/Cr cation ordering in both thin films and nanostructures. This cationic ordering which is responsible for good magnetic properties of BFCO is also at the origin of pronounced photovoltaic (PV) properties observed in the epitaxial films grown on STO substrates. The results indicate that the ferroelectric polarization plays a dominant role in the observed PV effect. - Graphical abstract: (Top) Crystal structure of BFCO thin films deposited on (1 1 1)-oriented SrTiO3:Nb substrates and direct evidence of the presence of cationic ordering Fe/Cr in the films. (Bottom) Control of the crystal orientation and the shape of the epitaxial nanostructures by the orientation of the niobium-doped STO substrates. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth optimization of Bi{sub 2}FeCrO{sub 6} (BFCO) thin films and nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ordered BFCO single phase have been stabilized by epitaxial strain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arbitrary patterns of heteroepitaxial multiferroic BFCO nanostructures have been fabricated by PLD combined with nanostenciling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental characterizations revealed the excellent multiferroic character of BFCO thin films and nanostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unprecedentedly high power conversion efficiency for ferroelectrics was observed in 125 nm-thick highly ordered BFCO films.Graphical abstract legend.

Nechache, Riad, E-mail: Nechache@emt.inrs.ca [NAST Center and Department of Chemical Science and Technology, University of Rome Tor Vergata Via della Ricerca Sceintifica 1, 00133 Rome Italy (Italy); Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3x 1S2 (Canada); Rosei, Federico, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3x 1S2 (Canada)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Experimental measurement of the persistence of permeability reduction in porous media treated with xanthan/Cr(III) gel systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a series of long-term experiments that was conducted to determine the persistence of flow resistance in unconsolidated sandpacks treated with xanthum/Cr(III) gels. Gels were prepared with 2,000 ppm xanthum and Cr(III) concentrations from 25 to 200 ppm. These systems exhibit various degrees of swelling or syneresis. The experiments were conducted by first allowing a gel to set up in a sandpack and then continuously flushing the sandpack with brine for up to 4 months at a constant pressure drop of 13.3 psi/ft. Flow rate was monitored to calculate permeability changes with time. Flow experiments indicated that the measurement of swelling and syneresis in bulk-gel tests is not a good predictor of gel response in unconsolidated sandpacks. Excellent permeability reduction was obtained in sandpacks when gels that exhibited 35% to 60% reduction in volume in bulk tests owing to syneresis were used. Gels were most effective at retaining flow resistance in the range of 35 to 75 ppm Cr(III), where the sandpacks regained {lt} 0.1% of their original 4,000 md permeability during the experiments. These observations were supported by experiments in which the pH of the injected brine was varied between 3.0 and 6.5. The swelling tests on the bulk gel indicated that permeability would decrease as pH increased and would increase as pH decreased.

Eggert, R.W. Jr.; Willhite, G.P.; Green, D.W. (Univ. of Kansas (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cr(VI) adsorption on functionalized amorphous and mesoporous silica from aqueous and non-aqueous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoporous silica (SBA-15) and amorphous silica (SG) have been chemically modified with 2-mercaptopyridine using the homogeneous route. This synthetic route involved the reaction of 2-mercaptopyridine with 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane prior to immobilization on the support. The resulting material has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen gas sorption, FT-IR and MAS NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The solid was employed as a Cr(VI) adsorbent from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, metal concentration and solvent polarity) has been studied using the batch technique. The results indicate that under the optimum conditions, the maximum adsorption value for Cr(VI) was 1.83 {+-} 0.03 mmol/g for MP-SBA-15, whereas the adsorption capacity of the MP-SG was 0.86 {+-} 0.02 mmol/g. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically SBA-15 and SG with 2-mercaptopyridine and to use the resulting modified silicas as effective adsorbents for Cr(VI)

Perez-Quintanilla, Damian [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: damian.perez@urjc.es; Hierro, Isabel del [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Fajardo, Mariano [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Sierra, Isabel [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: isabel.sierra@urjc.es

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Comparison of Crevice Corrosion of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal and Crystalline Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy  

SciTech Connect

The crevice corrosion behaviors of an Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloy (SAM1651) and a Ni-Cr-Mo crystalline alloy (C-22) were studied in 4M NaCl at 100 C with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential tests. The corrosion damage morphologies, corrosion products and the compositions of corroded surfaces of these two alloys were studied with optical 3D reconstruction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). It was found that the Fe-based bulk metallic glass (amorphous alloy) SAM1651 had a more positive breakdown potential and repassivation potential than crystalline alloy C-22 in cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests and required a more positive oxidizing potential to initiate crevice corrosion in constant potential test. Once crevice corrosion initiated, the corrosion propagation of C-22 was more localized near the crevice border compared to SAM1651, and SAM1651 repassivated more readily than C-22. The EDS results indicated that the corrosion products of both alloys contained high amount of O and were enriched in Mo and Cr. The AES results indicated that a Cr-rich oxide passive film was formed on the surfaces of both alloys, and both alloys were corroded congruently.

Shan, X; Ha, H; Payer, J H

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reactions of Ethylidene on a Model Chromia Surface: 1 1-Dichloroethane on Stoichiometric alpha-Cr2O3 (1012)  

SciTech Connect

The reaction of CH{sub 3}CHCl{sub 2} over the nearly-stoichiometric {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (10{sub {bar 1}} > 2) surface produces an ethylidene intermediate that yields primarily gas phase CH{sub 2}{double_bond}CH{sub 2} and surface chlorine adatoms; however, trace amounts of HC{triple_bond}CH, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 3}, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}CH{double_bond}CHCH{sub 3} are also observed. A rate-limiting intramolecular isomerization (2,1-hydrogen shift) in the surface ethylidene species produces gas phase CH{sub 2}{double_bond}CH{sub 2}. The chlorine freed from the dissociation of CH{sub 3}CHCl{sub 2} binds at the five-coordinate surface Cr{sup 3+} sites on the stoichiometric surface, completing the octahedral coordination sphere, and inhibits the surface chemistry by simple site blocking. No surface carbon deposition is observed from the thermal reaction of 1,1-dichloroethane under the conditions of this study, demonstrating that the ethylidene intermediate is not a primary coke forming intermediate over (10{sub {bar 1}} > 2) facets of {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} under the conditions of this study.

J Brooks; T Chen; D Mullins; D Cox

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

The BoW Project Dror G. Feitelson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the reference, links to full text copies of the reference that are stored externally, and internal links among­line bibliographic repository. The repository itself will be created and maintained by its users. Thus it will have and well­known, but was all but non­existent just a few years ago. 1 #12; 2 Background 2.1 The Info

Feitelson, Dror

214

ComBo : a visualization tool for comparative genomic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propelled by advances in sequencing technology, the advent of the genomic era brings the challenge of managing and interpreting massive amount of genomic data. A number of single-genome browsers have been developed for ...

Yu, Tamara H. (Tamara Hui)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

GRANTS AWARDED WITH BO KAGSTROM AS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

°agstr¨om Address: Department of Computing Science and High Performance Computing Center North (HPC2N) Ume for Dense Matrix Computations on Memory-Tiered High Performance Computing Systems. 1 050 000 SEK. · 2001 for Scalable High Performance Computer Systems. 4 550 000 SEK. NGSSC Grants · 1998-01-01 ­ 2004-12-31: NGSSC

Kågström, Bo

216

Properties of molecular beam epitaxy grown Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} films (transition metals: Mn, Cr)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic and crystallographic structures, as well as the magnetic properties, of Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} (transition metals: Mn, Cr) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied. Relative changes of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr ratios derived from the XPS lines, as well as x-ray reflectivity, indicate mixing of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr layers. Valency transitions from Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} were observed in both systems for most studied stoichiometries. A transition to a magnetically ordered phase was observed at 15 K, 40 K, and 62 K for selected films in the Eu-Mn system, and at 50 K for the film with a Eu/Cr ratio of 0.5.

Balin, K. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice, 40-007 (Poland); Center for Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Nowak, A. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice, 40-007 (Poland); Laboratoire de Physique de l'Etat Condense, University du Maine, Le Mans Cedex, 72085 (France); Gibaud, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Etat Condense, University du Maine, Le Mans Cedex, 72085 (France); Szade, J. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice, 40-007 (Poland); Celinski, Z. [Center for Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

J.L. Liscum-Powell, S.D. Pautz, C.R. Drumm, W.C. Fan, W.J. Bohnhoff...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of the Ceptre Code to Cable SGEMP Problems J.L. Liscum-Powell, * S.D. Pautz, * C.R. Drumm, * W.C. Fan, * W.J. Bohnhoff, * L.J. Lorence * * Sandia National Laboratories,...

218

A Conceptual model of coupled biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes affected by in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction in groundwater at Hanford 100H Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site B.Faybishenko, P.E.Long,Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slowHRC TM ), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Materials Reliability Program: Re-Evaluation of Results in NUREG/CR-6674 for Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Components (MRP-74)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the outcome of a project to review the analysis performed in Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report NUREG/CR-6674, and presents a re-evaluation of the carbon and low-alloy steel components described in that report. The re-evaluation showed that the use of more realistic, yet conservative, assumptions results in probabilities of crack initiation and leakage that are significantly less than stated in NUREG/CR-6674.

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

Giant magnetoresistive structures based on CrO{sub 2} with epitaxial RuO{sub 2} as the spacer layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epitaxial ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2})/chromium dioxide(CrO{sub 2}) thin film heterostructures have been grown on (100)-TiO{sub 2} substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Both current-in-plane (CIP) and current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistive stacks were fabricated with either Co or another epitaxial CrO{sub 2} layer as the top electrode. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier, which forms naturally on CrO{sub 2} surfaces, is no longer present after the RuO{sub 2} deposition, resulting in a highly conductive interface that has a resistance at least four orders of magnitude lower. However, only very limited magnetoresistance (MR) was observed. Such low MR is due to the appearance of a chemically and magnetically disordered layer at the CrO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 2} interfaces when Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is transformed into rutile structures during its intermixing with RuO{sub 2}.

Miao, G.X.; Gupta, A.; Sims, H.; Butler, W.H.; Ghosh, S.; Xiao Gang [Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High-energy emission from pulsars in polar-cap models with CR-induced cascades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a subclass of polar-cap models based on electromagnetic cascades induced by curvature radiation (CR) we calculate broad-band high-energy spectra of pulsed emission expected for classical and millisecond pulsars. The spectra are a combination of curvature and synchrotron components. The spectrum of curvature component breaks at 150MeV, and neither its slope nor level below this energy are compatible with phase-averaged spectra of pulsed X-ray emission inferred from observations. Spectral properties in the combined energy range of ROSAT and ASCA (0.1 - 10 keV) depend upon the location of cyclotron turnover energy epsilon_ct=\\hbar{e B \\over m_e c} /sin(psi) in the synchrotron component. Unlike in outer-gap models, the available range of pitch angles psi is rather narrow and confined to low values. For classical pulsars, a gradual turnover begins already at 1MeV, and the level of the synchrotron spectrum decreases. At 10keV the curvature component eventually takes over, but with photon index alpha = 2/3, in disagreement with observations. For millisecond pulsars, the X-ray spectra are dominated by synchrotron component with alpha \\simeq 1.5, and a sharp turnover into alpha \\simeq -1 at epsilon_ct \\sim 100eV. Relations of pulsed luminosity L_X to spin-down luminosity \\edot are presented for classical and millisecond pulsars. We conclude that spectral properties and fluxes of pulsed non-thermal X-ray emission of some objects, like the Crab or the millisecond pulsar B1821-24, pose a challenge to the subclass of polar-cap models based on curvature and synchrotron radiation alone.

B. Rudak; J. Dyks

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.  

SciTech Connect

Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

The effect of f[subscript O2] on the partitioning and valence of V and Cr in garnet/melt pairs and the relation to terrestrial mantle V and Cr content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chromium and vanadium are stable in multiple valence states in natural systems, and their distribution between garnet and silicate melt is not well understood. Here, the partitioning and valence state of V and Cr in experimental garnet/melt pairs have been studied at 1.8-3.0 GPa, with variable oxygen fugacity between IW-1.66 and the Ru-RuO{sub 2} (IW+9.36) buffer. In addition, the valence state of V and Cr has been measured in several high-pressure (majoritic garnet up to 20 GPa) experimental garnets, some natural megacrystic garnets from the western United States, and a suite of mantle garnets from South Africa. The results show that Cr remains in trivalent in garnet across a wide range of oxygen fugacities. Vanadium, on the other hand, exhibits variable valence state from 2.5 to 3.7 in the garnets and from 3.0 to 4.0 in the glasses. The valence state of V is always greater in the glass than in the garnet. Moreover, the garnet/melt partition coefficient, D(V), is highest when V is trivalent, at the most reduced conditions investigated (IW-1.66 to FMQ). The V{sup 2.5+} measured in high P-T experimental garnets is consistent with the reduced nature of those metal-bearing systems. The low V valence state measured in natural megacrystic garnets is consistent with f{sub O{sub 2}} close to the IW buffer, overlapping the range of f{sub O{sub 2}} measured independently by Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} techniques on similar samples. However, the valence state of V measured in a suite of mantle garnets from South Africa is constant across a 3 log f{sub O{sub 2}} unit range (FMQ-1.8 to FMQ-4.5), suggesting that the valence state of V is controlled by the crystal chemistry of the garnets rather than f{sub O{sub 2}} variations. The compatibility of V and Cr in garnets and other deep mantle silicates indicates that the depletion of these elements in the Earth's primitive upper mantle could be due to partitioning into lower mantle phases as well as into metal.

Righter, K.; Sutton, S.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Schmidt, G.; Yang, H.; Berthet, S.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.; Downs, R.T.; Malavergne, V. (Paris); (NASA-JSC); (UC); (Ariz)

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

Very heavily electron-doped CrSi2 as a high performance high temperature thermoelectric material  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the thermoelectric behavior, using first principles and Boltzmann transport calculations, of very heavily electron-doped CrSi2 and find that at temperatures of 1250 K and electron dopings of $1-4 \\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-3}$, thermopowers as large or larger in magnitude than 200 $\\mathrm{\\mu}$V/K may be found. Such high thermopowers at such high carrier concentrations are extremely rare, and suggest that good thermolectric performance (i.e. ZT) may be found in these ranges of temperature and doping.

Parker, David S [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Influence of intergranular exchange coupling on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of Co{sup +} irradiation on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media. Increasing irradiation levels reduce the saturation magnetization and effective anisotropy, which decrease the intrinsic magnetization precession frequency. Furthermore, increasing intergranular exchange coupling results in a qualitative change in the behavior of the magnetic material from a collection of individual grains to a homogeneous thin film, as evidenced in both the switching behavior and dynamics. The frequency change cannot be explained by single crystal macrospin modeling, and can only be reproduced by the inclusion of the dipolar effects and anisotropy distribution inherent in a granular medium.

Brandt, R.; Schmidt, H. [School of Engineering, University of California-Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Tibus, S. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Springer, F. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Fassbender, J. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Rohrmann, H. [OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); Albrecht, M. [Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft DG-1108 to evolutionary and advanced reactor designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the seismic design of evolutionary and advanced nuclear reactor power plants, there are definite financial advantages in the application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108. NUREG/CR-6661, 'Benchmark Program for the Evaluation of Methods to Analyze Non-Classically Damped Coupled Systems', was by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the USNRC, and Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is the proposed revision to the current Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.92, Revision 1, 'Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is available at http://members.cox.net/apolloconsulting, which also provides a link to the USNRC ADAMS site to search for NUREG/CR-6661 in text file or image file. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 removes unnecessary conservatism in the modal combinations for closely spaced modes in seismic response spectrum analysis. Its application will be very helpful in coupled seismic analysis for structures and heavy equipment to reduce seismic responses and in piping system seismic design. In the NUREG/CR-6661 benchmark program, which investigated coupled seismic analysis of structures and equipment or piping systems with different damping values, three of the four participants applied the complex mode solution method to handle different damping values for structures, equipment, and piping systems. The fourth participant applied the classical normal mode method with equivalent weighted damping values to handle differences in structural, equipment, and piping system damping values. Coupled analysis will reduce the equipment responses when equipment, or piping system and structure are in or close to resonance. However, this reduction in responses occurs only if the realistic DG-1108 modal response combination method is applied, because closely spaced modes will be produced when structure and equipment or piping systems are in or close to resonance. Otherwise, the conservatism in the current Regulatory Guide 1.92, Revision 1, will overshadow the advantage of coupled analysis. All four participants applied the realistic modal combination method of DG-1108. Consequently, more realistic and reduced responses were obtained. (authors)

Chang 'Apollo', Chen [Apollo Consulting, Inc., Surprise, AZ 85374-4605 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hydrogen production using fusion energy and thermochemical cycles. [Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/-FeO, CrCl/sub 3/-CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/-UCl/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical cycles for the production of synthetic fuels would be especially suited for operation in conjunction with controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors because of the very high temperature energy which such reactors could supply. Furthermore, fusion energy when developed is considered to be an inexhaustable supply of energy. Several high-temperature two-step thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen are examined. A thermodynamic analysis of the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO, CrCl/sub 3/--CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/--UCl/sub 3/ pairs reveals the feasibility of the process. A more detailed process analysis is given for the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO system using steam as the heat transfer medium for decomposing the higher valent metal oxide for oxygen production, and hydrolysing the lower oxide for hydrogen production. The steam could be heated to high temperatures by refractory materials absorbing the 14-MeV neutrons in the blanket region of a fusion reactor. Process heat transfer and recovery could be accomplished by regenerative reactors. Proposed operating conditions, the energy balance and the efficiency of the water decomposition process are presented. With a fusion blanket temperature of 2500/sup 0/K, thermal efficiencies for hydrogen production of 74.4% may be obtained.

Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Role of Triple Phonon Excitations on Large Angle Quasi-elastic Scattering of {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the large angle quasi-elastic scattering of {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb system in terms of the full-order coupled-channels formalism. We especially investigate the role of single, double and triple phonon excitations on quasi-elastic scattering cross section as well as quasi-elastic barrier distribution of this system for which the experimental data have been measured. It is shown that the triple phonon excitations both in {sup 54}Cr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei seem to be needed by the present coupled-channels calculations in order to reproduce the experimental data of quasi-elastic cross section and barrier distribution for the {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb system. We also show that the standard value of the surface diffuseness parameter for the nuclear potential a = 0.63 fm, is preferred by the experimental quasi-elastic scattering data for this system.

Zamrun, Muhammad F. [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jurusan Fisika FMIPA, Universitas Haluoleo, Kendari, Sulawesi Tenggara 93232 (Indonesia); Kasim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Efficient pulsed Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe laser continuously tunable in the spectral range from 2.26 to 3.61 {mu}m  

SciTech Connect

The efficient lasing of a Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe single crystal pumped by 1.94-{mu}m, 300-{mu}s pulses from a Tm:YAP laser was obtained. The Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe laser with a nonselective resonator emitted up to 17 mJ at a wavelength of {approx}2.65 {mu}m with the quantum slope efficiency of 63% with respect to the absorbed pump energy. The absorption coefficient of the Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe crystal at the laser wavelength did not exceed 0.045 cm{sup -1}. By using a resonator with a dispersion prism, the laser wavelength was continuously tuned in the spectral range from 2.26 to 3.61 {mu}m. (lasers)

Akimov, V A [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kozlovskii, V I; Korostelin, Yu V; Landman, A I; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Skasyrskii, Ya K; Frolov, M P [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Performance of LiAlloy/Ag(2)CrO(4) Couples in Molten CsBr-LiBr-KBr Eutectic  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of Li-alloy/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} systems was studied over a temperature range of 250 C to 300 C, for possible use as a power source for geothermal borehole applications. Single cells were discharged at current densities of 15.8 and 32.6 mA/cm{sup 2} using Li-Si and Li-Al anodes. When tested in 5-cell batteries, the Li-Si/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} system exhibited thermal runaway. Thermal analytical tests showed that the Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cathode reacted exothermically with the electrolyte on activation. Consequently, this system would not be practical for the envisioned geothermal borehole applications.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

231

Materials Reliability Program, Re-Evaluation of Results in NUREG/CR-6674 for Carbon and Low Alloy Steel Components (MRP-74, Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the outcome of a project to review the analysis performed in Nuclear Regulatory Commission report NUREG/CR-6674 and presents a re-evaluation of the carbon and low-alloy steel components described in that report. The re-evaluation showed that the use of more realistic, yet conservative, assumptions results in probabilities of crack initiation and leakage that are significantly less than stated in NUREG/CR-6674. However, after several reviews by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC),...

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

Sprachen, Einstellungen und nationale Selbstidentifikation : zum Problem der Identitätsfindung in der Republik Belarus´.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mit dem Zerfall der UdSSR sind neue, souveräne Staaten entstanden, über deren Nationsbildung sowohl in den SNG - Staaten als auch im Westen wenig bekannt… (more)

Schröder, Britta L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

BlobCR: Virtual disk based checkpoint-restart for HPC applications on IaaS clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parallel Distrib. Comput. 73 (2013) 698-711 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect J. Parallel Distrib. Comput. journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jpdc BlobCR: Virtual disk based checkpoint-restart for HPC applications on IaaS clouds Bogdan Nicolae a,∗ , Franck Cappello b,c a IBM Research, Ireland b INRIA Saclay, France c University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 9 August 2012 Received in revised form 28 December 2012 Accepted 22 January 2013 Available online 1 February 2013 Keywords: IaaS clouds High performance computing Checkpoint-restart Fault tolerance Virtual disk snapshots Rollback of filesystem changes a b s t r a c t Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud computing is gaining significant interest in industry and academia as an alternative platform for running HPC applications.

234

Oxidation pretreatment to reduce corrosion of 20%Cr-25%Ni-Nb stainless steel. II. Surface morphology and oxide characterization  

SciTech Connect

Improved corrosion behavior of 20%Cr-25%Ni-Nb steel resulting from a low pressure oxidation pretreatment in CO/sub 2/ has been related to changes in elemental composition and distribution in the oxide scale. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, electron microprobe, and X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to investigate the properties of the oxide scale formed on both untreated and pretreated specimens when oxidized at 823 K and 923 K in a CO/sub 2/-1%CO atmosphere. A sputter ion plating technique has been used to separate the oxide from the metal and the incorporation of chromium and silicon at the metal-oxide interface has been investigated at grain centers and grain boundaries by depth profiling. The improvement in oxide adhesion and oxidation rates, using data from Parts I and II of this study, is assessed in terms of oxide formation by solid-state displacement reactions.

Tempest, P.A.; Wild, R.K.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

NUREG/CR-6695 PNNL-13375 Hydrologic Uncertainty Assessment for Decommissioning Sites: Hypothetical Test Case Applications Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report uses hypothetical decommissioning test cases to illustrate an uncertainty assessment methodology for dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses for NRC-licensed facilities. This methodology was presented previously in NUREG/CR-6656. The hypothetical test case source term and scenarios are based on an actual decommissioning case and the physical setting is based on the site of a field experiment carried out for the NRC in Arizona. The emphasis in the test case was on parameter uncertainty. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases for estimating

P. D. Meyer; R. Y. Taira

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Essays on International Trade and Firm Business Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TJK UKR UZB Albania Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Bosnia andof Country Albania Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Bosnia andLatvia Armenia Lithuania Azerbaijan Macedonia, FYR Belarus

Nakhoda, Aadil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Essays on International Trade and Firm Business Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azerbaijan Belarus Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria CroatiaAzerbaijan Belarus Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria CroatiaBelarus Moldova Bosnia and Herzegovina Montenegro Bulgaria

Nakhoda, Aadil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

LONG-TERM OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF TWO LMXBs: UW CrB (=MS 1603+260) AND V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115)  

SciTech Connect

We present new optical photometry of two low-mass X-ray binary stars, UW CrB (MS 1603+260) and V1408 Aql (4U 1957+115). UW CrB is an eclipsing binary and we refine its eclipse ephemeris and measure an upper limit to the rate of change of its orbital period, | P-dot | < 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} (unitless). The light curve of UW CrB shows optical counterparts of type I X-ray bursts. We tabulate the times, orbital phases, and fluences of 33 bursts and show that the optical flux in the bursts comes primarily from the accretion disk, not from the secondary star. The new observations are consistent with a model in which the accretion disk in UW CrB is asymmetric and precesses in the prograde direction with a period of {approx}5.5 days. The light curve of V1408 Aql has a low-amplitude modulation at its 9.33 hr orbital period. The modulation remained a nearly pure sine curve in the new data as it was in 1984 and 2008, but its mean amplitude was lower, 18% against 23% in the earlier data. A model in which the orbital modulation is caused by the varying aspect of the heated face of the secondary star continues to give an excellent fit to the light curve. We derive a much improved orbital ephemeris for the system.

Mason, Paul A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Robinson, Edward L.; Bayless, Amanda J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hakala, Pasi J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FIN-21500 Piikkioe, University of Turku (Finland)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cr-free Fe-based metal oxide catalysts for high temperature water gas shift reaction of fuel processor using LPG  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to identify the most suitable chromium-free iron-based catalysts for the HTS (high temperature shift) reaction of a fuel processor using LPG. Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in the commercial HTS catalyst has been regarded as hazardous material. We selected Ni and Co as the substitution for chromium in the Fe-based HTS catalyst and investigated the HTS activities of these Crfree catalysts at LPG reformate condition. Cr-free Fe-based catalysts which contain Ni, Zn, or Co instead of Cr were prepared by coprecipitation method and the performance of the catalysts in HTS was evaluated under gas mixture conditions (42% H2, 10% CO, 37% H2O, 8% CO2, and 3% CH4; R (reduction factor): about 1.2) similar to the gases from steam reforming of LPG (100% conversion at steam/carbon ratio = 3), which is higher than R (under 1) of typically studied LNG reformate condition. Among the prepared Cr-free Febased catalysts, the 5 wt%-Co/Fe/20 wt%-Ni and 5 wt%-Zn/Fe/20 wt%-Ni catalysts showed good catalytic activity under this reaction condition simulating LPG reformate gas.

lee, Joon Y.; Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kwan Young; Wang, Yong

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Compositional analysis and depth profiling of thin film CrO{sub 2} by heavy ion ERDA and standard RBS: a comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin film has generated considerable interest in applied research due to the wide variety of its technological applications. It has been extensively investigated in recent years, attracting the attention of researchers working on spintronic heterostructures and in the magnetic recording industry. However, its synthesis is usually a difficult task due to its metastable nature and various synthesis techniques are being investigated. In this work a polycrystalline thin film of CrO{sub 2} was prepared by electron beam vaporization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} onto a Si substrate. The polycrystalline structure was confirmed through XRD analysis. The stoichiometry and elemental depth distribution of the deposited film were measured by ion beam nuclear analytical techniques heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), which both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Moreover, the analysis carried out highlights the importance of complementary usage of the two techniques to obtain a more complete description of elemental content and depth distribution in thin films. - Graphical abstract: Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of CrO{sub 2} have been grown by e-beam evaporation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target in vacuum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition was determined by heavy ion-ERDA and RBS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HI-ERDA and RBS provided information on the light and heavy elements, respectively.

Khamlich, S., E-mail: skhamlich@gmail.com [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); The African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa); Msimanga, M., E-mail: mandla@tlabs.ac.za [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); iThemba LABS Gauteng, Private Bag 11, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, C.P.U.T., P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); McCrindle, R. [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Maaza, M. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); The African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Application of the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC Fire PRA Methodology to a DOE Facility  

SciTech Connect

The application NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology to DOE facility presented several challenges. This paper documents the process and discusses several insights gained during development of the fire PRA. A brief review of the tasks performed is provided with particular focus on the following: • Tasks 5 and 14: Fire-induced risk model and fire risk quantification. A key lesson learned was to begin model development and quantification as early as possible in the project using screening values and simplified modeling if necessary. • Tasks 3 and 9: Fire PRA cable selection and detailed circuit failure analysis. In retrospect, it would have been beneficial to perform the model development and quantification in 2 phases with detailed circuit analysis applied during phase 2. This would have allowed for development of a robust model and quantification earlier in the project and would have provided insights into where to focus the detailed circuit analysis efforts. • Tasks 8 and 11: Scoping fire modeling and detailed fire modeling. More focus should be placed on detailed fire modeling and less focus on scoping fire modeling. This was the approach taken for the fire PRA. • Task 14: Fire risk quantification. Typically, multiple safe shutdown (SSD) components fail during a given fire scenario. Therefore dependent failure analysis is critical to obtaining a meaningful fire risk quantification. Dependent failure analysis for the fire PRA presented several challenges which will be discussed in the full paper.

Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Richard Yorg; Heather Lucek; Jim Bouchard; Ray Jukkola; Duan Phan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welding Evaluation Activities on a Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy for Nuclear Waste Packages  

SciTech Connect

The current waste package design for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada, USA, employs gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in fabricating the waste packages. While GTAW is widely used in industry for many applications, it requires multiple weld passes. By comparison, single-pass welding methods inherently use lower heat input than multi-pass welding methods which results in lower levels of weld distortion and also narrower regions of residual stresses at the weld TWI Ltd. has developed a Reduced Pressure Electron Beam (RPEB) welding process which allows EB welding in a reduced pressure environment ({le} 1 mbar). As it is a single-pass welding technique, use of RPEB welding could (1) achieve a comparable or better materials performance and (2) lead to potential cost savings in the waste package manufacturing as compared to GTAW. Results will be presented on the initial evaluation of the RPEB welding on a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (a candidate alloy for the Yucca Mountain waste packages) in the areas of (a) design and manufacturing simplifications, (b) material performance and (c) weld reliability.

Wong, F; Punshon, C; Dorsch, T; Fielding, P; Richard, D; Yang, N; Hill, M; DeWald, A; Rebak, R; Day, S; Wong, L; Torres, S; McGregor, M; Hackel, L; Chen, H-L; Rankin, J

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effect of Oxygen on the Crack Growth Behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti at 600C  

SciTech Connect

Exploratory experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of oxygen on the crack growth response of V-4Cr-4Ti at 600C under constant load. Tests were run in gettered argon, argon containing 2000 ppm oxygen, and laboratory air using fatigue pre-cracked compact tension specimens. Crack growth was measured primarily by post-test fracture surface examination, but also by in-test compliance measurements. Crack growth rates measured in air and gettered argon were about 2-3x10-3 mm/h at a stress intensity factor of about 40 MPavm. The crack growth rate in argon with 2000 ppm oxygen was about 7x10-2 mm/h at the same stress intensity level. The crack growth rates were very sensitive to the stress intensity factor. Over a limited range of stress intensity values the crack growth rate in argon plus 2000 ppm oxygen appears to be power-law dependent on stress intensity with an exponent of about 8.9. The fracture mode in air and gettered argon was transgranular cleavage with 20 to 30% intergranular fracture. In the oxygenated argon environment crack growth occurred predominantly by transgranular cleavage.

Kurtz, Richard J.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nanocrystallization of amorphous M-Si thin film composites (M=Cr, Mn) and their thermoelectric properties  

SciTech Connect

We report on electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power of Cr-Si and Mn-Si composite films at temperatures from 300 K to 1000 K. The films were deposited on unheated Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates by magnetron sputtering from composite targets. The as-deposited films have amorphous structure. We use annealing with in-situ transport properties measurements to transform the films into nanocrystalline state with continuous monitoring their state. Nanocrystallization is considered as a promising way to improve thermoelectric efficiency, primarily due to reduction of lattice thermal conductivity {kappa}. Among variety of methods for fabrication of NC materials, crystallization from amorphous state has features which are crucially important with respect to their electronic transport properties: since the crystallites and their interfaces are formed in this method via solid state reaction, the NC samples are dense and the interfaces are clean. This removes additional factors affecting properties of a nanocrystalline composite, such as contamination of nanocrystal interfaces by elements from environment or nanocrystal lattice distortion during nanocrystallization. Depending on the initial film composition, the films are transformed during annealing into single phase or multi-phase nanocrystalline composites with average grain size of 10 nm to 20 nm. We study the crystallization kinetics, stability of amorphous and nanocrystalline state and relation between electronic transport properties and structural state of the composites.

Burkov, A. T.; Novikov, S. V.; Schumann, J. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Sankt-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

Revealing the inner circumstellar disk of the T Tauri star S CrA N using the VLTI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: We investigate the structure of the circumstellar disk of the T Tauri star S CrA N and test whether the observations agree with the standard picture proposed for Herbig Ae stars. Methods: Our observations were carried out with the VLTI/AMBER instrument in the H and K bands with the low spectral resolution mode. For the interpretation of our near-infrared AMBER and archival mid-infrared MIDI visibilities, we employed both geometric and temperature-gradient models. Results: To characterize the disk size, we first fitted geometric models consisting of a stellar point source, a ring-shaped disk, and a halo structure to the visibilities. In the H and K bands, we measured ring-fit radii of 0.73 +- 0.03 mas (corresponding to 0.095 +- 0.018 AU for a distance of 130 pc) and 0.85 +- 0.07 mas (0.111 +- 0.026 AU), respectively. This K-band radius is approximately two times larger than the dust sublimation radius of ~0.05 AU expected for a dust sublimation temperature of 1500 K and gray dust opacities, but approxima...

Vural, J; Kraus, S; Weigelt, G; Driebe, T; Benisty, M; Dugué, M; Massi, F; Monin, J -L; Vannier, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Aging Studies of Sr-doped LaCrO3/YSZ/Pt Cells for an Electrochemical NOx Sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stability and NO{sub x} sensing performance of electrochemical cells of the structure Sr-doped LaCrO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC)/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Pt are being investigated for use in NO{sub x} aftertreatment systems in diesel vehicles. Among the requirements for NO{sub x} sensor materials in these systems are stability and long lifetime (up to ten years) in the exhaust environment. In this study, cell aging effects were explored following extended exposure to a test environment of 10% O{sub 2} at operating temperatures of 600-700 C. The data show that aging results in changes in particle morphology, chemical composition and interfacial structure, Impedance spectroscopy indicated an initial increase in the cell resistance during the early stages of aging, which is correlated to densification of the Pt electrode. Also, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated formation of SrZrO{sub 2} solid state reaction product in the LSC, a process which is of finite duration. Subsequently, the overall cell resistance decreases with aging time due, in part, to roughening of YSZ-LSC interface, which improves interface adherence and enhances charge transfer kinetics at the O{sub 2}/YSZ/LSC triple phase boundary. This study constitutes a first step in the development of a basic understanding of aging phenomena in solid state electrochemical systems with application not only to sensors, but also to fuel cells, membranes, and electrolyzers.

Song, S; Martin, L P; Glass, R S; Murray, E P; Visser, J H; Soltis, R E; Novak, R F; Kubinski, D J

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

Specification of CuCrZr Alloy Properties after Various Thermo-Mechanical Treatments and Design Allowables including Neutron Irradiation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy is a promising heat sink and functional material for various applica- tions in ITER, for example the first wall, blanket electrical attachment, divertor, and heating systems. Three types of thermo-mechanical treatment were identified as most promising for the various applica- tions in ITER: solution annealing, cold working and ageing; solution annealing and ageing; solution annealing and ageing at non-optimal condition due to specific manufacturing processes for engineer- ing-scale components. The available data for these three types of treatments were assessed and mini- mum tensile properties were determined based on recommendation of Structural Design Criteria for the ITER In-vessel Components. The available data for these heat treatments were analyzed for assess- ment of neutron irradiation effect. Using the definitions of the ITER Structural Design Criteria the design allowable stress intensity values are proposed for CuCrZr alloy after various heat treatments.

Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kalinin, G. M. [RDIPE, P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow, Russia; Fabritsiev, Sergei A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin-cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr8}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight CrIII paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

Vaknin, D. [Ames Laboratory; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Demmel, F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Nojiri, H [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; Martin, Catalin [Florida State University; Chiorescu, Irinel [Florida State University; Qiu, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Luban, M. [Ames Laboratory; Kogerler, P. [Ames Laboratory; Fielden, J. [Ames Laboratory; Engelhardt, L [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina; Rainey, C [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Applicability of Loss of Offsite Power (LOSP) Events in NUREG/CR-6890 for Entergy Nuclear South (ENS) Plants LOSP Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Significant differences have been identified in loss of offsite power (LOSP or LOOP) event description, category, duration, and applicability between the LOSP events used in NUREG/CR-6890 and ENS'LOSP packages, which were based on EPRI LOSP reports with plant-specific applicability analysis. Thus it is appropriate to reconcile the LOSP data listed in the subject NUREG and EPRI reports. A cross comparison showed that 62 LOSP events in NUREG/CR-6890 were not included in the EPRI reports while 4 events in EPRI reports were missing in the NUREG. Among the 62 events missing in EPRI reports, the majority were applicable to shutdown conditions, which could be classified as category IV events in EPRI reports if included. Detailed reviews of LERs concluded that some events did not result in total loss of offsite power. Some LOSP events were caused by subsequent component failures after a turbine/plant trip, which have been modeled specifically in most ENS plant PRA models. Moreover, ENS has modeled (or is going to model) the partial loss of offsite power events with partial LOSP initiating events. While the direct use of NUREG/CR-6890 results in SPAR models may be appropriate, its direct use in ENS' plant PRA models may not be appropriate because of modeling details in ENS' plant-specific PRA models. Therefore, this paper lists all the differences between the data in NUREG/CR-6890 and EPRI reports and evaluates the applicability of the LOSP events to ENS plant-specific PRA models. The refined LOSP data will characterize the LOSP risk in a more realistic fashion. (authors)

Li, Yunlong; Yilmaz, Fatma; Bedell, Loys [Entergy Nuclear South (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

WELDED TRANSITION JOINT BETWEEN 2-1/4% Cr 1% Mo STEEL AND TYPE 316 STAINLESS STEEL. SODIUM COMPONENTS DESIGN PROJECT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM-FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

A steam generator, wherein the boiler, steam drum, and superheater are integrated into one single unit, requires the welding of a transition joint between the 2 1/4% Cr-1% Mo steel of the steam drum and the type 316 stainless steel of the superheater. A practicable procedure was developed for the welding of this transition joint and the properties of the weld were evaluated by mechanical testing and metallurgical evaluation. After evaluating the technical aspects of the project and their relation to the fabrication of the generator, it was considered desirable to overlay the welding edge of the 2 1/4% Cr-1% Mo steel with a suitable austenitic weld metul which would subsequently be welded to the type 316 stainless steel of the superheater. Austenitic stainless steel and high-nickel alloy weld metals were evaluated for the overlay; whereas only austenitic stainless steel weld metals were evaluated for the final weld joining the components. It was concluded that type 309 stainless steel weld metal deposited automatically by the submergedarc process is completely satisfactory for cladding the 2 1/4% Cr-1% Mo base metal and for making the final transition weld joining the steam drum and superheater sections of the generator. Supplementary mechanical tests, metallographic examinations, and hardness surveys further attested to the adequacy of the quality of the transition joint resulting from the procedures developed by this program. A detailed fabrication and thermal treatment specification is included for the welding of a transition joint between

1960-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Oxidation pretreatment to reduce corrosion of 20%Cr-25%Ni-Nb stainless steel. I. Weight gain and oxide thickness measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The improvement in corrosion resistance afforded by a low-pressure selective oxidation pretreatment on 20%Cr-25%Ni-Nb steel is assessed in terms of weight gain and oxide thickness measurements. Both can and sheet specimens were oxidized in a simulated CAGR CO/sub 2/ environment at 823, 923, and 1073 K, and gravimetric gross weight-gain measurements were supplemented by spinel and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide thickness measurements determined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The increased protection provided by the pretreatment resulted in a reduction in gross weigh gain of 3-4 times at 823 K, two and three times at 923 K, and a somewhat smaller improvement at higher temperatures. The improvement stemmed from the high proportion of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ selectively formed in the preoxide layer itself. Thermally induced lattice strains in the oxide scale have been assessed from measurements of lattice expansion by XRD.

Tempest, P.A.; Wild, R.K.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450 C and 600 C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 hours. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Survey of welding processes for field fabrication of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel pressure vessels. [128 references  

SciTech Connect

Any evaluation of fabrication methods for massive pressure vessels must consider several welding processes with potential for heavy-section applications. These include submerged-arc and shielded metal-arc, narrow-joint modifications of inert-gas metal-arc and inert-gas tungsten-arc processes, electroslag, and electron beam. The advantage and disadvantages of each are discussed. Electroslag welding can be dropped from consideration for joining of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel because welds made with this method do not provide the required mechanical properties in the welded and stress relieved condition. The extension of electron-beam welding to sections as thick as 4 or 8 inches (100 or 200 mm) is too recent a development to permit full evaluation. The manual shielded metal-arc and submerged-arc welding processes have both been employed, often together, for field fabrication of large vessels. They have the historical advantage of successful application but present other disadvantages that make them otherwise less attractive. The manual shielded metal-arc process can be used for all-position welding. It is however, a slow and expensive technique for joining heavy sections, requires large amounts of skilled labor that is in critically short supply, and introduces a high incidence of weld repairs. Automatic submerged-arc welding has been employed in many critical applications and for welding in the flat position is free of most of the criticism that can be leveled at the shielded metal-arc process. Specialized techniques have been developed for horizontal and vertical position welding but, used in this manner, the applications are limited and the cost advantage of the process is lost.

Grotke, G.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Computational Modeling of Uranium Corrosion and the role of Impurities(Fe, Cr, Al, C and Si)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

My talk will focus on our recent computational modeling results of uranium corrosion and the impact of impurities on uranium corrosion, which occurs primarily through hydriding Uranium hydriding is one of the most important processes that has received considerable attention over many years. Although significant number of experimental and modeling studies have been carried out concerning thermo chemistry, diffusion kinetics and mechanisms of U-hydriding, very little is known about the electronic structure and electronic features that govern the U-hydriding process. Our modeling efforts focus the electronic feature that controls the activation barrier and thus the rate of hydriding. Our recent efforts have been focused on the role of impurities such as Fe, Cr, Si, C, Al and so on. Moreover the role of impurities and the role of the product UH{sub 3} on hydriding rating have not been fully understood. Condon's diffusion model was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental reaction rates. From the slopes of the Arrhenius plot the activation energy was calculated as 6.35 kcal/mole. Bloch and Mintz have discussed two models, one, which considers hydrogen diffusion through a protective UH{sub 3} product layer, and the second where hydride growth occurs at the hydride-metal interface. These authors obtained two-dimensional fits of experimental data to the pressure-temperature reactions. Powell et al. have studied U-hydriding in ultrahigh vacuum and obtained the linear rate data over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. They found reversible hydrogen sorption on the UH{sub 3} reaction product from kinetic effects at 21 C. This demonstrates restarting of the hydriding process in the presence of UH{sub 3} reaction product. DeMint and Leckey have shown that Si impurities dramatically accelerate the U-hydriding rates. We report our recent results of relativistic computations that vary from complete active space multi-configuration interaction (CAS-MCSCF) followed by multi-reference configuration interaction (MRSDCI) computations that included up to 60 million configurations for modeling of uranium-hydriding with cluster models will be presented. Our computed potential energy surface for the insertion of a U site into H{sub 2} reveals that pure U site has to surpass a barrier of 20.9 kcal/mole for the U-hydriding. Once the barrier is surpassed a stable product is formed which is 22.4 kcal/mole more stable than the reactants. We have also developed a computational model to study the role of the UH{sub 3} product and other impurities such as Fe, Cr, Si, C, Al, etc., on the uranium hydriding reaction. Our model reveals that the product UH{sub 3} is highly ionic and thus U transfers electron density to the three hydrogens resulting in a U{sup +3} state. U{sup +3} is shown to insert into H{sub 2} spontaneously thus demonstrating the U-site in the product UH{sub 3} binds to H{sub 2} spontaneously forming a complex in which H{sub 2} is separated far enough so as to cause liberation of H atoms in the presence of U. Our computed potential energy surfaces reveal a 21 kcal/mole activation energy barrier for pure U reaction with H{sub 2}. However, the presence of the product UH{sub 3} catalyzes the U-hydriding. We have also modeled the presence of Si impurities for the U-hydriding reaction to show that the activation barrier is lowered by the presence of Si. However carbon impurity does not influence the hydriding process. Our computations reveal an electron donor-acceptor model for the U-hydriding, where H{sub 2} exchanges electronic density from its occupied 1{sigma}{sub g} orbital to the U(6d {sigma}) orbital and back donation from the U(6d {pi}) orbital back to H{sub 2} 1{sigma}{sub u} antibonding orbital. As seen from the figures shown below our recent works show that elemental impurities such as Al do not have impact on hydriding, elements such as Fe and Cr have small impact while the elemental carbon inhibits corrosion through the formation of ionic uranium carbide species.

Balasubramanian, K; Sikehaus, W; Balazs, B; Mclean II, W

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

11554_cover_CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC 2005 Annual Report National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 05 NERSC 2005 Annual Report National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory / 1 Cyclotron Road / Berkeley CA / 94720 LBNL-60296 The Year in Perspective 2 Research News 4 The Heat Is On 5 Burning Questions 9 Combustion Up Close 11 Hailstones in Hell 13 A Perfect Liquid 15 Whispers from Underground 18 Breaking Up Is Hard to Calculate 20 Talent Scouting 23 Surface Charge 25 Magnetic Disks in Space 26 Proteins in Motion 30 NERSC Users Honored 34 The NERSC Center 35 Science-Driven Computing 36 DOE Greenbook Published 36 NERSC's Five-Year Plan 36 DOE Review of NERSC 37 Organizational Changes 38 Science-Driven Systems 40 Two New Clusters: Jacquard and Bassi 40 New Visual Analytics Server:

257

NUREG/CR-6399  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

399 399 ORNL- 6886 Results of Charpy V-Notch Impact Testing of Structural Steel Specimens Irradiated at - 30°C to 1 x 10l6 neutrons/cm2 in a Commercial Reactor Cavity Manuscript Completed June 1996 Date Published: April 1997 Prepared by S. K Iskander, R. E. Stoller Oak Ridge National Laboratory Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6285 M. Vassilaros, NRC Project Manager Prepared for Division of Engineering Technology Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 NRC Job Code L1098 Abstract A capsule containing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and mini-tensile specimens was irradiated at - 30°C (- 85°F) in the cavity of a commercial nuclear power plant to a fluence of 1

258

UCRL-CR--10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-10 -10 4934 DE91 000814 PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY OF ACTIVATED CARBONFIBERS ' Ko Kuriyama Mo S. ,Dresselhaus MIT ...... ' Cambridge, Massachusetts ' MASTEB ,_ ' _Yii:i" ' £31STRIBUTION OFIT_"IIS DoCUMEt"JT IS L I?',_'-:'_ , I)IS('I,AIMI,',R Work pt`rforlnt`(I iiil(|t`r lilt' llll._illl'_-'_Of lilt' I J,,H, I)t, pllrl- mt`ni of i,_nt`r_)' I),_' l,=lwrt`n_'t` I,Ivi.,rmort` Ntllhrn=ll l,ld_or=_- Ior,_'mldc,r _'onlrzlct mlml}t`r W-74(15-1,1N(;.4X, 'l'hi,_ doc'mm..||l t_'=l.,_ prt`p=lrt`d =Is ==_l=lt'v,,,|ml o1' work _ptm._(!rvd I_)' IIn =lp, t`|lC')' 01' lht` (ll|ilt`(l ,_tiHl's (;|_vt`rnn|t`nt. Nvilht, r lht` I Inilt`d ,Sl=dL, s (;o_'t`rl|u|el|l mir Iht` t ll|i_'t`r_lt.,,'of ('lllifl)r,fl_l mrr lilLY o1"II,.,Ir v|lll_l_|)'t`t`_, I|mkt`_ _lll)' ,_'_mrr_lnl); exprt`_ or i|npllt`d, or _l_sl|i|lt`_ _|,ly lel_=lllhd)lilly i_r r¢'sl)(m- _ihilll)'

259

20844_JGI_20110308_CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

model system for long-term observation and process-oriented studies of OMZ phenotypes. Production and Partial Characterization of a Novel Thermostable Xylanase by Newly Isolated...

260

Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

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261

The impacts of cation stoichiometry and substrate surface quality on nucleation, structure, defect formation, and intermixing in complex oxide heteroepitaxy LaCrO3 on SrTiO3(001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our ability to design and fabricate electronic devices with reproducible properties using complex oxides is critically dependent on our ability to controllably synthesize these materials in thin-film form. Structure-property relationships are intimately tied to film and interface composition Here we report on the effect of cation stoichiometry on structural quality and defect formation in LaCrO3 heteroepitaxial films prepared using molecular beam epitaxy. We calculate from first principles the regions of stability of various candidate defects as a function of Cr and O chemical potential, along with the predicted effects of these defects on structural parameters. We show that epitaxial LaCrO3 films readily nucleate and remain coherently strained on SrTiO3(001) over a wide range of La-to-Cr atom ratios, but that La-rich films are of considerably lower structural quality than stoichiometric and Cr-rich films. Cation imbalances are accompanied by anti-site defect formation, as deduced by comparing experimental trends in the c lattice parameter with those from first-principles calculations. Cation mixing occurs at the interface for all La-to-Cr ratios investigated, and is not quenched by deposition on SrTiO3(001) at ambient temperature. Indiffused La atoms occupy Sr sites, most likely facilitated by Sr vacancy formation in STO resulting from high-temperature oxygen annealing required to prepare the substrate. Intermixing is effectively quenched by using molecular beam epitaxy to deposit LaCrO3 at ambient temperature on defect free Si(001). However, analogous pulsed laser deposition on Si is accompanied by cation mixing.

Qiao, Liang [ORNL; Zhang, K. H. L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Bowden, Mark E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Varga, Tamas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Colby, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Du, Yingge [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kabius, Bernd [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Sushko, Peter V [University College, London; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL; Chambers, S. A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Argon-ion-pumped and diode-pumped all-solid-state femtosecond Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} regenerative amplifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tunable femtosecond solid-state amplifier system that uses only 3 W of 488-nm argon-ion pump power has been demonstrated to deliver microjoule pulses at repetition rates up to 20 kHz, with a maximum pulse energy of 14 {mu}J obtained at 5 kHz. An all-solid-state, tunable, diode-pumped Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} regenerative amplifier has been demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, that amplifies femtosecond pulses to energies exceeding 1 {mu}J at up to a 16-kHz repetition rate.

Hyde, S.C.W.; Barry, N.P.; Mellish, R.; French, P.M.W.; Taylor, J.R. [Femtosecond Optics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College of Science and Technology, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); van der Poel, C.J.; Valster, A. [Philips Optoelectronics Centre, Prof. Holstlann 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands)

1995-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

(Ca/Sr)Au{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}: Stacking variants of the CrB-FeB series  

SciTech Connect

The structural chemistry of binary 1:1 alkaline earth metallides A{sup II}M (M=p-block or late transition element) is dominated by planar M zig-zag chains, which are stacked in different orientations (CrB (c) to FeB (h) type) and with variable stacking distances (types I and II). As a case study of the electronic influences, the substitution of Au against Cd in the respective Ca and Sr aurides was examined by means of experimental, crystallographic and computational methods. Starting from CaAu, up to 11% of Au can be substituted by Cd without a change in the CrB structure type (orthorhombic, space group Cmcm, a=398.2(1), b=1122.6(6), c=460.9(2)pm, Z=4, R1=0.0303). Starting from SrAu (stacking sequence (hc){sub 2}(h{sub 2}c){sub 2}), depending on the proportion of the Cd substitution a successive change to structures with increased hexagonality is observed: In SrAu{sub 0.93}Cd{sub 0.07} (monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/m, a=621.3(4), b=472.4(2), c=1216.1(9)pm, beta=96.97(5){sup 0}, Z=6, R1=0.0467) the stacking sequence is h{sub 2c}, i.e. the hexagonality is 66.67%. A slightly more increased Cd content in SrAu{sub 0.78}Cd{sub 0.22} (orthorhombic, space group Pnma, a=3243.3(8), b=474.17(8), c=626.20(9)pm, Z=16, R1=0.0682) drives the hexagonality to 75%, with a (h{sub 3}c){sub 2} stacking sequence known from several rare earth nickel compounds. Further Cd substitution is not possible. However, in the Cd-rich section of the two series, where the CsCl/beta-brass structure type occurs for both alkaline earth elements, a small Au substitution, as determined from powder data by Rietveld refinements, is possible. The substitution limit and the stability ranges of the CsCl and the CrB type can be rationalized from the calculated band structures. Geometrical and electronic criteria are used to compare and discuss the stability ranges in a structural map. - SrAu{sub 0.93}Cd{sub 0.97}, one of the stacking sequences of the CrB/FeB structure type series found in the quasibinary section SrAu-SrCd.

Harms, Wiebke; Duerr, Ines; Daub, Michael [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Roehr, Caroline, E-mail: caroline@ruby.chemie.uni-freiburg.d [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2  

SciTech Connect

Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of 2.25Cr-1Mo Alloy for Containment of LiCl/KCl Eutectic during the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of uranium from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiner vessels containing a LiCl/KCl eutectic salt has been on-going for 14 and 12 years, respectively, during the pyrometallurgical processing of used nuclear fuel. Although austenitic stainless steels are typically utilized for LiCl/KCl salt systems, the presence of cadmium in the Mk-IV electrorefiner dictates an alternate material. A 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy (ASME SA-387) was chosen due to the absence of nickel in the alloy which has a considerable solubility in cadmium. Using the transition metal impurities (iron, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, and manganese) in the electrorefined uranium products, an algorithm was developed to derive values for the contribution of the transition metals from the various input sources. Weight loss and corrosion rate data for the Mk-V electrorefiner vessel were then generated based on the transition metal impurities in the uranium products. To date, the corrosion rate of the 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy in LiCl/KCl eutectic is outstanding assuming uniform (i.e. non-localized) conditions.

B.R. Westphal; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; D. Vaden; T.A. Johnson; J.C. Wass

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Relationship Between Grain Boundary Structure and Radiation Induced Segregation in a Neutron Irradiated 9 wt. % Cr Model Ferritic/Martensitic Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs but has only been demonstrated in ion irradiated specimens. A 9 wt. % Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of neutron radiation environment on the RIS-GB structure dependence. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Brandon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Chichester, Heather J.M. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A CR-hydro-NEI Model of Multi-wavelength Emission from the Vela Jr. Supernova Remnant (SNR RX J0852.0-4622)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based largely on energy budget considerations and the observed cosmic-ray (CR) ionic composition, supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves are the most likely sources of CR ions with energies at least up to the "knee" near 3 PeV. Shocks in young shell-type TeV-bright SNRs are surely producing TeV particles, but the emission could be dominated by ions producing neutral pion-decay emission or electrons producing inverse-Compton gamma-rays. Unambiguously identifying the GeV-TeV emission process in a particular SNR will not only help pin down the origin of CRs, it will add significantly to our understanding of the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism and improve our understanding of supernovae and the impact SNRs have on the circumstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the Vela Jr. SNR, an example of TeV-bright non-thermal SNRs. We perform hydrodynamic simulations coupled with non-linear DSA and non-equilibrium ionization near the forward shock (FS) to confront currently available multi-wavelength data....

Lee, Shiu-Hang; Ellison, Donald C; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Patnaude, Daniel J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Structurally-driven metal-insulator transition in Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} (0{<=}x<0.14): A single crystal X-ray diffraction study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlation between structure and transport properties are investigated in high-quality single-crystals of Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} with 013.5% and the system behaves as an insulator. Such a large, sharp metal-insulator transition and tuneable transition temperature may have potential applications in electronic devices. -- Graphical abstract: The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by Cr doping, and is closely related to the distortion of structure. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by doping Cr into Ca{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystal. {yields} Detailed single crystal structural analysis provided important insight into this structurally-driven metal-insulator transition. {yields} Negative Volume Thermal Expansion (NVTE) was observed with increasing temperature.

Qi, T.F., E-mail: tqi2@uky.ed [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Ge, M. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Korneta, O.B. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Parkin, S. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); De Long, L.E.; Cao, G. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Partially disordered state and spin-lattice coupling in an S=3/2 triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ag2CrO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 2} is an S = 3/2 frustrated triangular lattice antiferromagnet without an orbital degree of freedom. With decreasing temperature, a four-sublattice spin state develops. However, a long-range partially disordered state with five sublattices abruptly appears at T{sub N} = 24 K, accompanied by a structural distortion, and persists at least down to 2 K. The spin-lattice coupling stabilizes the anomalous state, which is expected to appear only in limited ranges of further-neighbor interactions and temperature. It was found that the spin-lattice coupling is a common feature in triangular lattice antiferromagnets with multiple-sublattice spin states, since the triangular lattice is elastic.

Matsuda, Masaaki [ORNL; Yoshida, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan; De la cruz, Clarina [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A small angle neutron scattering investigation of the kinetics of phase separation in an Fe-27. 5 at. % Cr-5. 6 at. % Ni alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The small angle neutron scattering has been investigated in situ at 450{degree} and 500{degree}C for a polycrystalline, duplex Fe-27.5 at. % Cr-5.6 at. % Ni steel. A broad diffuse maximum in the scattering function is the signature of the {alpha}{prime}-phase formation, and this maximum is superimposed on a strong, temperature-dependent component due to critical magnetic scattering. The time dependence of the shift in the peak intensity position to lower scattering vectors and the increase in peak intensity obey power law scaling behavior. Furthermore, the structure function exhibits dynamical scaling, after about three hours annealing. It is suggested that this behavior could be utilized to predict the microstructure, and hence some of the properties, after significantly longer annealing times. 21 refs., 3 figs.

Epperson, J.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Rainey, V.S.; Windsor, C.G. (UKAEA Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell (UK). Materials Physics and Metallurgy Div.); Hawick, K.A. (Edinburgh Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Chen, H. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

"We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of existing nuclear power plants]. Unpublished paper.chief engineer of a mobile nuclear power plant to radiationoccurred at a nuclear power plant near the small Ukrainian

Kuchinskaya, Olga

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

"We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are not only external—radionuclides are also consumed withcovered with short-lived radionuclides immediately followingwith long-living radionuclides, including most notably

Kuchinskaya, Olga

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ICDERS July 27-31, 2009 Minsk, Belarus Correspondence to: Jean-Marc.Pascaud@bourges.univ-orleans.fr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are known [2], [3] (pressure Po, temperature To) or may be calculated [3] in a rich or a lean mixture with the perfect gas law. Hence : P = rT The experiments [2] have been performed in a closed cylindrical vessel symmetry of the studied geometry, the tank may be likened to a rectangular surface with dimensions 20.5 cm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

274

Radiation exposure of human populations in villages in Russia and Belarus affected by fallout from the Chernobyl reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A quarter of a century has elapsed since the catastrophe at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl. The radioactive fallout affected all the European countries… (more)

Bernhardsson, Christian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

"We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of the Chernobyl fallout. The analysis is based onmost of the radioactive fallout generated by the Chernobylnot mention radioactive fallout on most of the country at

Kuchinskaya, Olga

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

"We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

external radiation exposure and internal accumulation ofinternal accumulation), or it might (incorrectly) refer to external radiation exposure.radiation exposure should not be forgotten. Patients, for example, can be checked for their internal

Kuchinskaya, Olga

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

"We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiophobia’(fear of radiation), and their fear was notblamed on radiophobia (fear of radiation), stress followinganxiety and radiophobia (fear of radiation). Methodological

Kuchinskaya, Olga

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Acceleration of ordering transformation of a new Fe{sub 2}(Mn,Cr)Si Heusler-alloy film by very high frequency plasma irradiation process during radio frequency sputter deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Heusler alloy, Fe{sub 2}(Mn,Cr)Si, that is likely to have high spin polarization (P) and high damping constant ({alpha}) was proposed to obtain high magneto-resistance ratio and low spin torque noise in a magnetic read head with a current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magneto-resistance (GMR) multilayer. A very high frequency (VHF) plasma irradiation process during radio frequency (RF) sputter deposition was investigated to form the highly ordered structure of the Heusler alloy film with low thermal treatment temperature. The main results are as follows: (1) P and magnetic moment of Fe{sub 2}(Mn{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5})Si with an L2{sub 1} structure were estimated at 0.99 and 2.49 {mu}{sub B}/f.u., respectively, and {alpha} was also estimated to be larger compared with the case of Co{sub 2}MnSi, according to density of states (DOS) calculations. (2) The ordering (at least B2 structure) temperature of Fe{sub 2}(Mn{sub 0.6}Cr{sub 0.4})Si film decreased from 500 to 300 deg. C by using the VHF plasma irradiation process with optimized condition. (3) The surface roughness of Fe{sub 2}(Mn{sub 0.6}Cr{sub 0.4})Si film also reduced from 1.7 to 0.5 nm by using the VHF plasma irradiation process. It is found that the Fe{sub 2}(Mn,Cr)Si Heusler alloy and the VHF plasma irradiation process with optimized condition seems to be applicable for fabrication of high-performance magnetic read head with CPP-GMR device.

Yoshimura, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Egawa, G.; Saito, H. [Center for Geo-environmental Science, Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Akita, 010-8502 (Japan); Ishida, S. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, 890-8580 (Japan)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Influence of a Cerium Surface Treatment on the Oxidation Behavior of Cr2O3-Forming Alloys (title on slides varies: Oxidation Behavior of Cerium Surface Treated Chromia Forming Alloys)  

SciTech Connect

Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This temperature will require the construction of boiler and turbine components from austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys. Many of the alloys being considered for use are primarily Cr2O3 forming alloys [1-4]. It is well known that the addition of a small amount of reactive elements, such as the rare earths elements Ce, La, and Y, can significantly improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of both iron- and nickel- base alloys. A list of the benefits of the reactive element effect include: (i) slowing scale growth, (ii) enhancing scale adhesion; and (iii) stabilizing Cr2O3 formation at lower Cr levels. The incorporation of the reactive element can be made in the melt or through a surface infusion or surface coating. Surface modifications allow for the concentration of the reactive element at the surface where it can provide the most benefit. This paper will detail a Ce surface treatment developed at NETL that improves the high temperature oxidation resistance of Cr2O3 forming alloys. The treatment consists of painting, dip coating, or spraying the alloy surface with a slurry containing CeO2 and a halide activator followed by a thermal treatment in a mild (x10-3 Torr) vacuum. During treatment the CeO2 reacts with the alloy to for a thin CrCeO3-type scale on the alloy surface. Upon subsequent oxidation, scale growth occurs at a reduced rate on alloys in the surface treated condition compared to those in the untreated condition.

Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, G.R.; Adler, T.A.; Jablonski, P.D.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Efficient Pump Control for an Offshore Oil Processing System Yang, Zhenyu; Soleiman, Kian ; Lhndorf, Bo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficient Pump Control for an Offshore Oil Processing System Yang, Zhenyu; Soleiman, Kian. (2012). Energy Efficient Pump Control for an Offshore Oil Processing System: IFAC Workshop - Automatic of a pump system for an offshore oil processing system is investigated. The seawater is lifted up by a pump

Yang, Zhenyu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Time-Varying BRDFs Bo Sun, Student Member, IEEE Computer Society, Kalyan Sunkavalli,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-world materials change with time, causing their bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs of a wide range of time-varying phenomena, which include the drying of various types of paints (watercolor effects such as paint drying and dust accumulation to arbitrary surfaces and novel materials. Index Terms

Belhumeur, Peter N.

282

The Garching-Bonn Deep Survey (GaBoDS) Wide-Field-Imaging Reduction Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce our publicly available Wide-Field-Imaging reduction pipeline THELI. The procedures applied for the efficient pre-reduction and astrometric calibration are presented. A special emphasis is put on the methods applied to the photometric calibration. As a test case the reduction of optical data from the ESO Deep Public Survey including the WFI-GOODS data is described. The end-products of this project are now available via the ESO archive Advanced Data Products section.

H. Hildebrandt; T. Erben; M. Schirmer; J. P. Dietrich; P. Schneider

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

The BoPen : a tangible pointer tracked in six degrees of freedom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I designed and implemented an optical system for freehand interactions in six degrees of freedom. A single camera captures a pen's location and orientation, including roll, tilt, x, y, and z by reading ...

Taub, Daniel Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Applying coal mining technology: The search continues at BoM  

SciTech Connect

The Twin Cities US Bureau of Mines Research Center might not be located smack in the middle of a coal field, but many of their research projects are. Situated on the Minneapolis side of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, the facility has more than 150 full- and part-time staff members. Funding of more than $7 million (1986) is divided largely between the Mining Technology program and the Health and Safety Technology programs. When a surface miner invests in a 170-ton haul truck, the last thing anyone wants is for it to go up in flames. Though fire is thought to be primarily an underground problem, Bureau statistics show that it is a serious threat to surface mines as well. And the principal fire hazard in surface mines in large mobile equipment: haul trucks, dozers, front-end loaders, etc.

Mason, R.H.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by / av: Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volume. This is further illustrated in Fig. 2.2. 2.2 Balance equations 2.2.1 Mass balances Important: Ron Zevenhoven 2-1 2. Systemgränser, balansekvationer System boundaries, balance equations 2.1 System is referred to as the surroundings or the environment ­ see Fig. 2.1. Engineering systems can be divided

Zevenhoven, Ron

286

bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by / av: Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to as control volume. This is further illustrated in Fig. 2.2. 2.2 Balance equations 2.2.1 Mass balances: Ron Zevenhoven 2-1 2. Systemgränser, balansekvationer System boundaries, balance equations 2.1 System is referred to as the surroundings or the environment ­ see Fig. 2.1. Engineering systems can be divided

Zevenhoven, Ron

287

bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by/av: Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data for viscosity of several gases, liquids and oils.3 For gases the viscosity increases rate V can be found, as well as fluid layer thickness d: With the given data this gives: vy,max = 1 och den volymetriska flödeshastigheten V kan hittas samt fluidskiktets tjocklek d: Med given data fås

Zevenhoven, Ron

288

bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by / av: Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of internal energy U for open systems, especially if chemical conversions take place that give different, mixtures) composed of one or several chemical species during energy conversion processes depends strongly: Ron Zevenhoven 3-1 3. Energy conversion, balances, efficiency, equilibrium - An introduction

Zevenhoven, Ron

289

bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by / av: Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 shows two widely used HEs, being "shell-and-tube" HEs as used at power plants, refineries and chemical for industrial or residential heating purposes using district heating systems. While the conversion of fuel by degrading the chemical energy in fuels to heat at the temperature of the ambient environment. Unfortunately

Zevenhoven, Ron

290

bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by / av: Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

70% produced by combustion of fossil fuels (coal, fuel oil, natural gas, peat) plus ~ 15% from-to-power conversion is avoided will drive the developments. Nevertheless, fossil fuel combustion with carbon dioxide but it can be converted from one form into an 1 Note that many formulations of these Laws can be found

Zevenhoven, Ron

291

Joint Voltage and Modulation Scaling for Energy Harvesting Sensor Networks Bo Zhang Robert Simon Hakan Aydin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@, bv2152@, luca@cs., kinget@ee., johnkym@ee., gil@ee.]columbia.edu ABSTRACT Energy Harvesting Active-low-power ultra- wideband (UWB) communications and in organic semiconductor- based energy harvesting materials with a UWB Transceiver and an energy harvest- ing module (EHM) that allows demonstrating energy harvesting

Aydin, Hakan

292

High temperature oxidation and NaCl-induced accelerated corrosion of hot-dip aluminized 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behaviors of high temperature corrosion on hot-dip aluminized on 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steels when catalyzed by NaCl and cyclic heating environment were studied experimentally. The corrosion behavior and morphological development were investigated by weight gain kinetics, metallographs, depths of attack, metal losses, and X-ray analyses. The results of 310SS deposited with salt mixtures show that weight gain kinetics in simple oxidation reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law after 3 hr, while the kinetics with salt deposits display multi-stage growth rates. NaCl is the main corrosive specie in high-temperature corrosion involving mixtures of NaCl/Na2SO4 and is responsible for the formation of internal attack. Uniform internal attack is the typical morphology of NaCl-induced hot corrosion, while the extent of intergranular attack is more pronounced as the content of Na2SO4 in the mixture is increased. The thermal-cycling test results of 310SS deposited NaCl and coated 7wt%Si/93wt%Al show that the aluminized layers have good corrosion resistance during the first four cycles of testing, while degradation occurs after testing for five cycles. The reason for degradation of aluminized layers is attributed to the formation of interconnecting voids caused by aluminum inward diffusion, chloridation/oxidation cyclic reactions and the penetration of molten NaCl through the voids into the alloy substrate. The 9Cr-1Mo steels coated with 7wt%Si/93wt%Al oxidized at 750, 850, and 950°C in static air show that oxidation kinetics followed a parabolic rate law at 750 and 850 °C. The cracks propagated through the FexAly layer due to the growth of brittle FeAl2 and Fe2Al5 at 750 and 850°C. The voids condensed in the interface of intermetallics and substrate are attributed to the Kirkendall effect. At 950°C, the fast growing aluminide layer has a different expansion coefficient than oxide scale, leading to scale cracking, oxygen penetration, and internal oxidized, evidenced by a rapid mass gain.

Tsaur, Charng-Cheng

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Structural and magnetic properties in the quantum S=1/2 dimer systems Ba3(Cr1-xVx)2O8 with site disorder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a comprehensive study of the DC susceptibility, specific heat, neutron diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on the polycrystalline Ba3(Cr1-xVx)2O8 samples, where x=0, 0.06, 0.15, and 0.53. A Jahn-Teller structure transition occurs for x=0, 0.06, and 0.15 samples and the transition temperature is reduced upon vanadium substitution from 70(2) K at x=0 to 60(2) K at x=0.06 and 0.15. The structure becomes less distorted as x increases and such transition disappears at x=0.53. The observed magnetic excitation spectrum indicates that the singlet ground state remains unaltered and spin gap energy =1.3(1) meV is identical within the instrument resolution for all x. In addition, the dispersion bandwidth W decreases with increase of x. At x=0.53, W is reduced to 1.4(1) meV from 2.0(1) meV at x=0.

Hong, Tao [ORNL; Zhu, L. Y. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ke, X. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Qiu, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technol/University of Maryland, College Park; Nambu, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; Yoshizawa, H. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Zhu, M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL; Savici, Andrei T [ORNL; Gai, Zheng [ORNL; Zhou, H. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Materials research and evaluation for geothermal corrosion environments. Progress report, December 15, 1974--December 15, 1975. [Ni Co Cr Mo alloy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bent beam and self-stressed specimens have been employed and shown to give results consistent with other types of specimens as reported in the literature. All tests have been conducted in the standard NACE, H/sub 2/S environment for initial screening and then in a 20 percent NaCl modified NACE solution. Among the higher strength corrosion resistant alloys, K Monel at 135 ksi yield strength did not fail in either environment at temperatures up to 425/sup 0/F stressed at the yield strength. Age hardenable A286 failed at 325/sup 0/F when stressed to the 190 ksi yield strength, but did not fail when stressed to an overaged yield strength of 135 ksi. A new NiCoCrMo age hardenable alloy heat treated to 220 ksi yield strength and stressed to this value did not fail in either environment at temperatures up to 420/sup 0/F. Also, this material was substantially ''brighter'' after the tests than either the K-Monel or A286.

Troiano, A.R.; Hehemann, R.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Single Variable and Multivariate Analysis of Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectra for Prediction of Rb, Sr, Cr, Ba, and V in Igneous Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) will be employed by the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity to obtain UV, VIS, and VNIR atomic emission spectra of surface rocks and soils. LIBS quantitative analysis is complicated by chemical matrix effects related to abundances of neutral and ionized species in the resultant plasma, collisional interactions within plasma, laser-to-sample coupling efficiency, and self-absorption. Atmospheric composition and pressure also influence the intensity of LIBS plasma. These chemical matrix effects influence the ratio of intensity or area of a given emission line to the abundance of the element producing that line. To compensate for these complications, multivariate techniques, specifically partial least-squares regression (PLS), have been utilized to predict major element compositions (>1 wt.% oxide) of rocks, PLS methods regress one or multiple response variables (elemental concentrations) against multiple explanatory variables (intensity at each pixel of the spectrometers). Because PLS utilizes all available explanatory variable and eliminates multicollinearity, it generally performs better than univariate methods for prediction of major elements. However, peaks arising from emissions from trace elements may be masked by peaks of higher intensities from major elements. Thus in PLS regression, wherein a correlation coefficient is determined for each elemental concentration at each spectrometer pixel, trace elements may show high correlation with more intense lines resulting from optical emissions of other elements. This could result in error in predictions of trace element concentrations. Here, results of simple linear regression (SLR) and multivariate PLS-2 regression for determination of trace Rb, Sr, Cr, Ba, and V in igneous rock samples are compared. This study focuses on comparisons using only line intensities rather than peak areas to highlight differences between SLR and PLS.

Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Speicher, Elly A [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Dyar, Melinda D [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Carmosino, Marco L [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Role of Al on the Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Absorption/Desorption by Some Ternary Pd-M-Al Alloys where M=Rh, Ni, Pt, Cr, Ag.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solution of hydrogen and hydride formation in FCC substitutional solid solution Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys have been examined. In contrast to some other Pd ternary alloys, a linear relation does not obtain between the H capacity and x for the Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys investigated here where the H capacity of the alloys is estimated from the H content of the steeply rising part of the isotherms in the hydride phase regions. A linear increase of the dilute phase H solubility with x for these Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys does, however, obtain for these alloys. Although Pd-Rh binary alloys have broader plateaux than does Pd itself, small amounts of Al substituted into Pd0.85Rh0.15 or Pd0.80Rh0.20 alloys can reduce or eliminate the two phase regions, the plateaux; there is, however, not much effect on the dilute phase solubilities. For example, small amounts of Al substituted into the Pd0.85Rh0.15 or Pd0.80Rh0.20 alloys eliminate the plateaux. On the other hand, alloying Pd with Al to form binary alloys with Xal equals 0.015 or 0.030 does not eliminate the plateaux which are present in these binary alloys up to Xal equals 0.075 (298 K). Small amounts of Al substitution do not have such a dramatic effect on the plateau widths of the Pd0.90Ni0.10 and Pd0.80Ni0.20 alloys and similarly substitution of Al into Pd-Cr and Pd-Ag alloys does not introduce any anomalous effects into the isotherms.

Shanahan, K.L.

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

The study of stress application and corrosion cracking on Ni?16 Cr?9 Fe (Alloy 600) C-ring samples by polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic strains associated with stress corrosion cracks have been investigated in stressed C-rings of Ni-16 Cr-9 Fe (Alloy 600) boiler tubing. Polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction was used to measure deviatoric strain tensors and the distribution of dislocations near cracks that had been propagated in electrochemically accelerated corrosion tests. An associated investigation of the C-ring-induced strains prior to corrosion showed significant tensile strain in the stress axis direction by the torsional closure of the alloy tube section in the C-ring test. Significant grain lattice rotation and pronounced plastic strain at some grain boundaries were noted. Stress-corrosion-cracking-generated intergranular cracks were produced in two Alloy 600 specimens after 6 h and 18 h tests. The diffraction patterns and resultant strain tensors were mapped around the cracked area to a 1 {mu}m spatial resolution. The strain tensor transverse to the crack growth direction showed tensile strain at the intergranular region just ahead of the crack tip for both specimens. Both cracks were found to follow grain boundary pathways that had the lowest angle of misorientation. Dislocation distributions within each grain were qualitatively obtained from the shapes of the diffraction spots and the effect of 'hard' and 'soft' grains on the crack pathway was explored for both 6 h and 18 h specimens. The Schmid factor of one of the grains adjacent to the crack at the 6 h and 18 h initiation sites was found to be the lowest, compared to Schmid factors calculated for surface grains away from the initiation site, and also along the crack path into the bulk.

Chao, Jing; Fuller, Marina L.Suominen; McIntyre, N. Stewart; Carcea, Anatolie G.; Newman, Roger C.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi (Toronto); (UWO); (LBNL)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

18246_Primer_Winter09_CR:CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nearly 2,000 microbes Nearly 2,000 microbes have been sequenced out of the estimated nonillion (10 30 ) in, on and around the Earth. And while the information is significantly impacting almost all aspects of microbiology, said DOE JGI Phylogenomics Program Head and University of California, Davis professor Jonathan Eisen, it is bypassing the ribosomal RNA Tree of Life, which allows researchers to track and understand how organ- isms are related to each other. "We've done a very poor job of sampling across the tree in microbial studies," said Eisen. "If you look at phylogenetic diversity in the bacterial king- dom, most of the available genomes come from just 3 of the 40 major phyla. The same trend holds for archaea, eukaryotes and viruses. The solution is to use the tree to guide us, going through phylo-

299

WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2011: Warning about the dangers of tobacco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this group: Albania, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso,not required/not applicable. Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium — VAndorra 5 Armenia Austria Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium Bosnia

WHO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The European tobacco control report 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accessed 23 November Azerbaijan Belarus Most recent dataEyvazov, Azad Gajiev, Azerbaijan; Paul van den Meerssche,States (CIS): Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia,

World Health Organization

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WHO REPORT ON THE GLOBAL TOBACCO EPIDEMIC, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not required/not applicable. Azerbaijan Belgium |||||||| IAndorra Armenia Austria Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium BosniaAndorra Armenia Austria Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium Bosnia

WHO World Health Organization

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Legislating for smoke-free workplaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the WHO European Region: Azerbaijan (1992), Belgium (1994),Andorra Armenia Austria Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium BosniaAndorra Armenia Austria Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium Bosnia

World Health Organization

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Tunnel at the End of the Light: Privatization, Business Networks, and Economic Transformation in Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

post-Communist countries, only Azerbaijan, Kazakh- stan, andVacuum Albania Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Bosnia Bulgariafound in Russia either. Azerbaijan, Belarus, Tajikistan,

Cohen, Stephen S.; Schwartz, Andrew; Zysman, John

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2011: Warning about the dangers of tobacco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Belarus Belgium — V Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria CroatiaBelarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina 6 Bulgaria Croatiacountry, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Republika

WHO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

WHO European Country Profiles on Tobacco Control 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia DrBelarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria CroatiaEUR/03/5041305 Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina

World Health Organization

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

International reserves management and the current account  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barbados Belarus Bosnia & Herzegovina Botswana China CostaBelarus Bolivia Bosnia & Herzegovina Brazil Bulgaria CapeBelize Benin Bolivia Bosnia & Herzegovina Botswana Brazil

Aizenman, Joshua

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

BES_ESnet_Cover_CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network Requirements Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted September 22 and 23, 2010 ESnet Energy Sciences Network 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name,

308

2nd FY 2008 CR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... shall be available for rehabilitation and restoration of Federal lands; and `(5 ... for `Department of the Interior--Bureau of Land Management--Wildland ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

309

Microsoft Word - CR.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vadose Zone Plume John M. Zachara 1 , Calvin C. Ainsworth 1 , Gordon E. Brown Jr. 2 , and Jeffrey G. Catalano 2 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 2 Stanford...

310

10897_JGI_Progress_CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Report 2002-2005 Progress Report 2002-2005 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY JOINT GENOME INSTITUTE JGI's Mission To develop and exploit new sequencing and other high-throughput, genome-scale, and computational technologies as a means for discovering and charac- terizing the basic principles and relationships underly- ing the organization, function, and evolution of living systems. What is Sequencing? Just as computer software is rendered in long strings of 0s and 1s, the "software" of life is represented by a string of four chemicals, abbreviated as A, T, C, and G. To understand the software of either a computer or a living organism, we must know the order, or sequence, of these informative bits. JGI PROGRESS REPORT 2002-2005 * TABLE OF CONTENTS table of contents Director's Perspective

311

Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High Temperature Strenth and Creep-Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation-Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metals. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815EC (1500EC) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential invention disclosures were not pursued. One objective of this project was to improve the high temperature creep resistance of the recently developed 803 alloy, while another was to have a wrought modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance and corrosion resistance than the commonly used alloy 800H. The project was intended to use the established expertise at ORNL to design specific microalloying element additions to appropriately tailor the microstructure during aging or creep so that fine, stable carbides develop for strength. If possible, oxidation/corrosion resistance at high temperatures would also be enhanced. Optimum processing was to be developed for plate and tube products.

Maziasz, PJ

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Contract WEC 3. 2. 3 study to optimize Cr-Mo steels to resist hydrogen and temper embrittlement. Quarterly report No. 9, second annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of commercial 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo steels has been investigated, using H/sub 2/S as the primary environment. After it was found that low strength steels, which had been given a post weld heat treatment, were immune to the test techniques developed, the effect of strength level was studied to establish a lower limit for embrittlement. Similar tests on the peak hardness zone in the heat affected zone of a weld showed that the crack preferred to move to the far heat affected zone where the strength level was below the lower limit established above. It is suggested that residual stresses may account for the anomaly, although other factors such as structural change could be important. In order to assess the low strengh steels, the environment was changed to include saturated water vapor in the H/sub 2/S. It was found that the low strength steels could be readily tested in this environment, thus providing a means of ranking Cr-Mo steels for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. Tests on one steel were included to show that the variability in the data using the H/sub 2/S + H/sub 2/O environment was small enough to make the screening test results significant.

Shaw, B.J.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 90oC and 5M CaCl2 at 105oC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been identified that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022), based on measurements of breakdown potential and corrosion rate in seawater. Both chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) provide corrosion resistance, boron (B) enables glass formation, and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). Amorphous Fe{sub 48.0}Cr{sub 15.0}Mo{sub 14.0}B{sub 6.0}C{sub 15.0}Y{sub 2.0} (SAM1651) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR) of less than 80 Kelvin per second, due to the addition of yttrium. The low CCR enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous material in practical materials processes. While the yttrium enables a low CCR to be achieved, it makes the material relatively difficult to atomize, due to increases in melt viscosity. Consequently, the powders produced thus far have had irregular shape, which had made pneumatic conveyance during thermal spray deposition difficult.

Farmer, J C; Day, S D; Lian, T; Saw, C K; Hailey, P D; Blue, C A; Peters, W; Payer, J H; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Branagan, D J; Buffa, E J; Aprigliano, L

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

International reserves management and the current account  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albania Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Bangladesh BarbadosAlgeria Angola Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Bolivia Bosnia &

Aizenman, Joshua

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia,Europe Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Chemical Exergy of Canola Biomass Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LS Karpushenkova Chemical Faculty, Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus Thermodynamic properties of canola biomass components: seeds ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

WEC 3. 2. 3 study to optimize Cr-Mo steels to resist hydrogen and temper embrittlement. Quarterly report No. 9. Second annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of commercial 2 1/4Cr - 1Mo steels has been investigated, using H/sub 2/S as the primary environment. After it was found that low strength steels, which had been given a post weld heat treatment, were immune to the test techniques developed, the effect of strength level was studied to establish a lower limit for embrittlement. Similar tests on the peak hardness zone in the heat affected zone of a weld showed that the crack preferred to move to the far heat affected zone where the strength level was below the lower limit established above. It is suggested that residual stresses may account for the anomaly, although other factors such as structural change could be important. In order to assess the low strength steels, the environment was changed to include saturated water vapor in the H/sub 2/S.

Shaw, B.J.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Enhancement of spin-asymmetry by L2{sub 1}-ordering in Co{sub 2}MnSi/Cr/Co{sub 2}MnSi current-perpendicular-to-plane magnetoresistance devices  

SciTech Connect

Co{sub 2}MnSi/Cr/Co{sub 2}MnSi (001)-fully epitaxial current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) devices were fabricated via an UHV magnetron sputtering system. The relationship between the degree of chemical ordering in Co{sub 2}MnSi (CMS) and the CPP-GMR characteristics was investigated systematically against the annealing temperature of the devices. X-ray diffraction profiles and reflection high-energy electron diffraction images indicated that annealing improved L2{sub 1}-ordering. The MR ratio also increased upon annealing and the maximum MR ratio of 5.2% and {delta}RA of 6.5 m{omega} {mu}m{sup 2} were achieved by annealing at 400 deg. C. These results indicate that promoting the degree of L2{sub 1}-ordering in CMS enhances the bulk and/or interface spin-asymmetry coefficients.

Sakuraba, Y.; Iwase, T.; Saito, K.; Mitani, S.; Takanashi, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

319

e-Fungi: a data resource for comparative analysis of fungal genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ic ho de rm a re es ei G ib be re lla ze ae Ch ae to m iu m gl o bo su m M ag na po rth e gr is ea Ne ur os po ra cr as sa En ce ph al ito zo o n cu n ic u li p450 RVT_1 Fungal_trans Helicase_C Pkinase p450 RVT_1 Fungal_trans Helicase_C Pkinase...

Hedeler, Cornelia; Wong, Han Min; Cornell, Michael J; Alam, Intikhab; Soanes, Darren M; Rattray, Magnus; Hubbard, Simon J; Talbot, Nicholas J; Oliver, Stephen G; Paton, Norman W

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Ethnohistoric Notes on the Ancient Tibetan Kingdom of sPo bo and its influence on the Eastern Himalayas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.The first pilgrim’s guide to the sacred land was written by the rnyingma pa gter ston Rig 'dzin 'Ja 'tshon snying po (1585-1656). According tohim, anyone entering Padma bkod would obtain a vajra-body and dissolvewithin the rays of a rainbow. And, anyone who... migrated from Bhutan and Mon yul to Padmabkod at the end of the 18th century. But neither this nor Chos rje gling pa´srelative success with the Klo pa could liberate the Tibetan pilgrims fromthis local threat. The many travellers who headed for Padma bkod...

Lazcano, Santiago

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Synthesis of bulk FeHfBO soft magnetic materials and its loss characterization at megahertz frequency  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic core materials with low loss, high saturation magnetization, large permeability, and operating frequency above 1 MHz are in high demands for the next generation of miniaturized power electronics. Amorphous FeHfB ribbons with thickness around 20 {mu}m have been fabricated through melt-spinning. Different heat treatments were performed on the FeHfB ribbons, and the relations among heat treatments, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been explored. Properties such as coercivity (H{sub c}) of 2.0 Oe and saturation magnetic flux density (B{sub S}) of 1.2 T have been achieved in samples with exchange coupling. The losses can be minimized by balancing the hysteretic and eddy current losses and can be further reduced with additional magnetic field annealing. At 5 MHz with peak magnetic flux density of 20 mT, the materials show core losses comparable to the best ferrites, but with higher permeability value of about 200 and superior saturation induction of more than 1 T.

Zhou Yang; Kou Xiaoming; Warsi Muhammad, Asif; Lin Shuo; Harris, Brendan S.; Parsons, Paul E.; Xiao, John Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Mu Mingkai; Lee, Fred C. [Center for Power Electronics System, Virginia Polytechnic and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States); Zhu Hao [Spectrum Magnetics LLC, Wilmington, Delaware 19804 (United States)

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Improving Write Operations in MLC Phase Change Memory Lei Jiang , Bo Zhao, Youtao Zhang Jun Yang Bruce R. Childers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

latencies than SLC PCM. Qureshi et al. modeled MLC PCM access, and proposed write cancellation (WC) [6 PCM usually adopts iterative program-and-verify (P&V) to achieve precise resistance control [4, 7, 9]. How- ever, we observed that most cells can be reliably written in a modest number of iterations

Childers, Bruce

323

Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 90oCElectrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was prepared as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stability was found to be comparable to that of high-performance nickel-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. This material also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. This material and its parent alloy maintained corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature, and remained in the amorphous state during exposure to relatively high neutron doses.

Farmer, J C; Haslam, J; Day, S D; Lian, T; Saw, C K; Hailey, P D; Choi, J S; Rebak, R B; Yang, N; Payer, J H; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Branagan, D J; Buffa, E J; Aprigliano, L F

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Microsoft Word - SHE 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sherwood, Washington Sherwood, Washington Page 5-1 5.0 Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site 5.1 Compliance Summary The Sherwood, Washington, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on June 19 and 20, 2012. The tailings impoundment, dam, and diversion channel were in good condition. The dam inspection and associated piezometer water level measurements verified that the tailings embankment is functioning as designed. A missing perimeter sign will be replaced in 2013. Groundwater monitoring, performed as a best management practice, verified that constituent concentrations continue to be less than State of Washington water quality criteria. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 5.2 Compliance Requirements

325

Microsoft Word - GUN 2005 CR.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UMTRCA Title I Annual Report UMTRCA Title I Annual Report December 2005 Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site 8.1 Compliance Summary The Gunnison Disposal Site, inspected on June 21, 2005, was in excellent condition. Six perimeter sign and the entrance sign were missing and bullets had damaged several others. All former erosion areas were stable. Areas reseeded in 2004 along the former Chance Gulch haul road require further monitoring, and therefore, the BLM right-of-way permit is still active. Revegetation of reseeded areas on Tenderfoot Mountain haul road is completed (determined to meet BLM Wildlife Mitigation Plan criteria for closure). No cause for a follow-up or contingency inspection was identified. 8.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Gunnison, Colorado,

326

NUREG/CR-6150 EGG-2720  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

150 150 EGG-2720 VOl. 2 SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 ~ Code Manual Damage Progression Model Theory Manuscript Completed: October 1993 Date Published: June 1995 Edited by K. L . Davis Contributing Authors C. M. Allison, G. A. Bema, T . C. Cheng, E. W. Coryell, K. L. Davis, D. L. Hagrman, D. T Hagrman, J. K. Hohorst, S . Paik, A. S. Shieh, L. J. Siefken Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company Idaho F a l l s , ID 83415 Prepared for Division of Systems Technology OEce of Nuclear Regulatory Research U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 NRC Job Code W6095 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account o f work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor

327

Microsoft Word - BLU 2012 CR.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 UMTRCA Title II Sites Annual Report 2012 UMTRCA Title II Sites Annual Report November 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico Page 1-1 1.0 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site 1.1 Compliance Summary The Bluewater, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II Disposal Site was inspected on August 21, 2012. Several shallow depressions on the main tailings disposal cell cover had standing water at the time of the inspection; the cover is being evaluated to determine if additional monitoring or cover enhancement is necessary. No maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Uranium concentrations at an alluvium point-of-compliance (POC) monitoring well continue to exceed the alternate concentration limit (ACL). Two new alluvium monitoring wells were

328

Microsoft Word - MAW 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maybell West, Colorado Maybell West, Colorado Page 4-1 4.0 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site 4.1 Compliance Summary The Maybell West, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 2, 2012. The disposal cell, ancillary cell, and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in good condition and functioning as designed. The entrance sign was missing and was replaced. Deep-rooted plants growing on the disposal cell and noxious weeds present on the site were treated with herbicide. No maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 4.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Maybell West site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Maybell West (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal

329

Microsoft Word - GUN 2006 CR.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UMTRCA Title I Annual Report UMTRCA Title I Annual Report December 2006 Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site 8.1 Compliance Summary The Gunnison Disposal Site, inspected on May 30 and 31, 2006, was in excellent condition. The disposal cell, its cover, and associated drainage features are performing as designed. Several missing or illegible perimeter signs and the entrance sign were replaced. All former erosion areas continue to be stable. The BLM agreed to terminate the right-of-way permit for the reseeded areas along the former reclaimed Chance Gulch haul road based on successful revegetation (determined to meet BLM Wildlife Mitigation Plan criteria for closure). No cause for a follow- up or contingency inspection was identified. 8.2 Compliance Requirements

330

Microsoft Word - SBS 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shirley Basin South, Wyoming Shirley Basin South, Wyoming Page 6-1 6.0 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site 6.1 Compliance Summary The Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was in excellent condition when it was inspected on June 28, 2012. No maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Groundwater monitoring indicated that the radium-228 concentration continues to exceed the alternate concentration limit (ACL) at a downgradient well between the disposal cell and the site boundary, and radium-226 continues to exceed the ACL in a downgradient well next to the site boundary. The causes of these elevated concentrations continue to be evaluated. 6.2 Compliance Requirements

331

16843_Primer_Summer09:CR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 projects were 70 projects were selected for the 2010 Com- munity Sequencing Program (CSP) portfolio. They involve organisms from regions as far north as the Arctic and south to New Zealand. They include proposals to study microbial contaminants in alcohol that could impact biofuel production, microbial communities in the guts of insects from an area geography scholar Jared Diamond once described as "the nearest approach to life on another planet" and a novel bacterial isolate that could be used to remove heavy metal contaminants from fresh- water streams. "The information we generate from these projects promises to improve the clean, renew- able energy pathways being developed now as well as lend researchers more insight into the global carbon cycle, options for bioremediation, and biogeo-

332

17784_Tour_Brochure_CR:Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome of an organism contains all of genome of an organism contains all of its genetic material or DNA, molecules made up of four bases known as A, C, T and G. When scientists sequence the genome, it's like taking apart a puzzle someone else completed to figure out what each section is made up of, and then re-assemble the information so that scientists can understand the big picture. The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute has been headquartered in Walnut Creek, California since 1999, sequencing plants, microbes and communities of microbes called metagenomes that are related to the DOE mission areas of bioenergy, the carbon cycle and biogeochemistry. A fifth of the sequencing projects done worldwide is done right here in Walnut Creek. JOINT GENOME INSTITUTE sequencing the world of possibilities

333

Microsoft Word - BAR 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar, New Mexico L-Bar, New Mexico Page 3-1 3.0 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site 3.1 Compliance Summary The L-Bar, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 22, 2012. The tailings impoundment was in excellent condition. Erosion and vegetation measurements to monitor the condition of the impoundment cover indicate that no erosion is occurring, and foliar cover of the vegetation has increased since the 2011 inspection. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 3.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the L-Bar site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy L-Bar, New Mexico, (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site, Seboyeta, New Mexico (DOE-LM/GJ709-2004,

334

(YSr)(MnAlCr)O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Different Cooling Structure on Surface Crack of HSLA Steel Plate by ... of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic Material Used for Tower Type Solar ...

335

CR3 Update: Recycling of Strategic Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2012 ... Education and Certifications, Expand Education and Certifications .... However, some other industrially significant metals indicate higher ...

336

NUREG/CR-6708 Surface Complexation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O n December 30, 1958, an acci- dent occurred in the Los Alam- os plutonium-processing facili- ty, where plutonium was chemically separated, or "recovered," from various compounds. In this facility, plutonium compounds were dissolved and mixed in a large tank with chemical reagents to concentrate

337

Microsoft Word - EDG 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Section 2.3.1 Follow-up Inspections Section 3.5 Section 2.3.2 Routine Maintenance and Emergency Measures Section 3.6 Section 2.3.3 Environmental Monitoring Section 3.7 Section...

338

The Gains from Privatization in Transition Economies: Is "Change of Ownership" Enough?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia; 1991: Croatia, Macedonia, Slovenia; 1992: Armenia, Azerbaijan) Belarus, Moldova, Russia, Ukraine Caucasus (6) Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia Central Asia (7) Kazakhstan: Croatia, Macedonia, Slovenia. 1992: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz

339

Statement of Limited Warranty Z125-4753-09 08/2006 Part 1 General Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquired the Machine" is replaced by: 1) "the laws of Austria" in Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus this heading: In Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Hungary

340

North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Arménie Azerbaijan ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Azerbaïdjan Belarus 1 079 1 079 1 079 2 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Arménie Azerbaijan ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Azerbaïdjan Belarus 507 507 507 557 557 Total Europe Armenia ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Arménie Azerbaijan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Transition in Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys and Updated Data and Correlations to Quantify the Effect of Aqueous Hydrogen on Primary Water SCC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alloys 600 and X-750 have been shown to exhibit a maximum in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility, when testing is conducted over a range of aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) levels. Contact electric resistance (CER) and corrosion coupon testing using nickel specimens has shown that the maximum in SCC susceptibility occurs in proximity to the nickel-nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition. The measured location of the Ni/NiO transition has been shown to vary with temperature, from 25 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 360 C to 4 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 288 C. New CER measurements show that the Ni/NiO transition is located at 2 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 260 C. An updated correlation of the phase transition is provided. The present work also reports CER testing conducted using an Alloy 600 specimen at 316 C. A large change in resistance occurred between 5 and 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}, similar to the results obtained at 316 C using a nickel specimen. This result adds confidence in applying the Ni/NiO transition measurements to Ni-Cr-Fe alloys. The understanding of the importance of the Ni/NiO transition to PWSCC has been used previously to quantify H{sub 2} effects on SCC growth rate (SCCGR). Specifically, the difference in the electrochemical potential (EcP) of the specimen or component from the Ni/NiO transition (i.e., EcP{sub Ni/NiO}-EcP) has been used as a correlating parameter. In the present work, these SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations, which were based on SCCGR data obtained at relatively high test temperatures (338 and 360 C), are evaluated via SCCGR tests at a reduced temperature (316 C). The 316 C data are in good agreement with the predictions, implying that the SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations extrapolate well to reduced temperatures. The SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations have been revised to reflect the updated Ni/NiO phase transition correlation. New data are presented for EN82H weld metal (also known as Alloy 82) at 338 C. Similar to other nickel alloys, SCC of EN82H is a function of the aqueous H{sub 2} level, with the SCCGR exhibiting a maximum near the Ni/NiO transition. For example, the SCCGR at 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} is {approx} 81 x higher than at 60 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} condition is near the Ni/NiO transition (located at {approx} 14 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 338 C), while 60 scc/kg H{sub 2} is well into the nickel metal regime. A hydrogen-SCCGR correlation is provided for EN82H. The data and understanding obtained from the present work show that SCC can be mitigated by adjusting the aqueous H{sub 2} level. For example, SCCGR is typically minimized at relatively high aqueous H{sub 2} levels, that are well into the nickel metal regime (i.e., far from the Ni/NiO transition).

Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

ASSESSING GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS IN THE TRANSITION ECONOMIES USING A HYBRID ENERGY-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the following countries: · Albania · Afghanistan · Armenia · Azerbaijan · Belarus · Bosnia · Croatia · Egypt

344

Two Line Subject Title One Line Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, China, Georgia, Hong Kong, India, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Macau, Moldova, Pakistan, Russia, Taiwan, Tajikistan,...

345

EXHIBIT B  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cuba, Estonia, Georgia, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Libya, Lithuania, Macao, Moldova, Mongolia, Myanmar...

346

Foreign Users | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, China, Georgia, Hong Kong, India, Iraq, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Libya, Macau, Moldova, North Korea, Pakistan, Russia, Taiwan,...

347

(NiCrW and NiCrMo) in Molten  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodic Behavior of Silicon (?) in BaF2-CaF2 –SiO2 Melts ... Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Uranium Chloride in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic.

348

Long-Term Corrosion Tests of Prototypical SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R H; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P D; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

??e¦ia e e ¡et ??? oa¦0 to 3i5¦ontinBoB5 Pie¦eFi5e Hinea ¢tiTiUation ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Simplicial Subdivision,?·l k ?????? ? ransactions onvd ircuits ... Ordered Sets: A Polyhedral Approach,%²q h atC? ematicalG? ro?? ram-.

350

Influence of the presence of pre-existing thermal [var epsilon]-martensite on the formation of stress-induced [var epsilon]-martensite and on the shape memory effect of a Fe-Mn-Cr-Si-Ni shape memory alloy  

SciTech Connect

At present, many investigations are done on Fe-Mn-based shape memory alloys because of their particularly good one-way type shape memory effect and their low cost. With addition of Cr and Ni, it is possible to reach a good corrosion resistance, which confers to this type of alloys a commercial significance. The shape memory effect is associated with the formation of stress-induced [var epsilon]-martensite by deformation of an austenitic ([gamma]) sample. The reversion by heating of the [var epsilon]-martensite provides the shape memory effect. It is generally admitted that the presence of thermal [var epsilon]-martensite before deformation has a negative influence on the formation of the stress-induced martensite and on the shape memory effect. The authors' purpose is to evaluate the real influence of the pre-existing thermal [var epsilon]-martensite on the formation of the stress-induced [var epsilon]-martensite, its recovery and on the shape memory effect.

Federzoni, L.; Guenin, G. (G.E.M.P.P.M., Villeurbanne (France))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling and analysis of the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network : an assessment of its properties, plasticity, and role in adaptive evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BO. Comparative genome sequencing of Escherichia coli allowsBO. 2006. Comparative genome sequencing of Escherichia coliRF, Rothberg JM. 2005. Genome sequencing in microfabricated

Joyce, Andrew Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effect of Al+B4C Agglomerate Size on Mechanical Properties of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Bo Yao, Travis J. Patterson, Yongho Sohn, Matthew Shaeffer, Cory Smith, Mark van den Bergh, Kyu Cho. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Bo Yao. Abstract ...

353

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bo Shen Clear All Filters 2012 Romankiewicz, John, Bo Shen, Hongyou Lu, and Lynn K. Price. Addressing the effectiveness of industrial energy efficiency incentives in overcoming...

354

Microsoft Word - SNOPUD_Youngs_Cr_Hydro_CX_+_Checklist.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2010 18, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Hall Customer Service Engineer - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Interconnection of Snohomish County Public Utility District No.1 (SNOPUD) Young's Creek Hydro Small Generation Budget Information: WO# 00231295, Task 01 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area including, but not limited to, switchyard rock grounding upgrades, secondary containment projects, paving projects, seismic upgrading, tower modifications, changing insulators, and replacement of poles, circuit breakers, conductors,

355

UMore Ph IA CR Report 7-8-10.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHASE IA ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND PHASE IA ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY SURVEY FOR THE UMORE PARK RESEARCH WIND TURBINE PROJECT, DAKOTA COUNTY, MINNESOTA SHPO File No. Pending Client No. Pending The 106 Group Project No. 10-18 Submitted to: Barr Engineering Company 4700 West 77th Street Minneapolis, MN 55435-4803 Submitted by: The 106 Group Ltd. The Dacotah Building 370 Selby Avenue St. Paul, MN 55102 Principal Investigators: AnneKetz, M.A., RPA Greg Mathis, M.C.R.P. Report Authors: Mark Doperalski, B.S. Miranda Van Vleet, M.H.P July 2010 UMore Park Wind Turbine Project Phase IA Archaeological and Architectural History Survey Page i MANAGEMENT SUMMARY During May of 2010, The 106 Group Ltd. (106 Group) conducted a Phase IA archaeological and architectural history survey for the University of Minnesota Outreach, Research, and

356

cr_14229_JGI_Primer_Fall07 :Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGI Community Sequencing JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP) is contributing to an ambi- tious international effort to decode the genome of Eucalyptus, one of the world's most valuable fiber and paper-producing trees-with the goal to maximize its poten- tial in the burgeoning bioenergy market and for capturing excess atmospheric carbon. The scientific effort to characterize the Eucalyptus genome, uniting some two dozen institutions worldwide, is led by Alexander Myburg of the University of Pretoria (South Africa), with co-leads Dario Grattapaglia, of EMBRAPA and Catholic University of Brasília (Brazil), and Jerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory-JGI's Laboratory Science Program lead. The 600-million-nucleotide tree genome was selected as one of JGI's CSP FY2008 major allocations.

357

cv15866_JGI_PR_CR:JGI Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E E J G I - p o w e r i n g a s u s t a i n a b l e f u t u r e w i t h t h e s c i e n c e w e n e e d f o r b i o f u e l s , e n v i r o n m e n t a l c l e a n u p , a n d c a r b o n c a p t u r e . 2 0 0 8 P r o g r e s s R e p o r t J o i n t G e n o m e I n s t i t u t e U . S . D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y T h e c o v e r d e p i c t s v a r i o u s D O E m i s s i o n - r e l e v a n t g e n o m e s e q u e n c i n g t a r g e t s o f t h e D O E J o i n t G e n o m e I n s t i t u t e . D O E J G I M i s s i o n T h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y J o i n t G e n o m e I n s t i - t u t e , s u p p o r t e d b y t h e D O E O f f i c e o f S c i e n c e , u n i t e s t h e e x p e r t i s e o f f i v e n a t i o n a l l a b o r a t o r i e s - L a w r e n c e B e r k e l e y , L a w r e n c e L i v e r m o r e , L o s A l a m o s , O a k R i d g e , a n d P a c i f i c N o r t h w e s t - a l o n g w i t h t h e H u d s o n A l p h a I n s t i t u t e f o r B i o t e c h n o l o g y t o a d v a n c e g e n o m i c s i n s u p p o r t o f t h e D O E m i s s i o n s r e l a t e d t o b i o e n e r g y , c a r b o n c y c l i n g , a n d b i o g e o c h e m i s t r y . J G I , l o c a t e d i n W a l n u t C r e e k , C a l i f o r n i a , p r o v i d e s i n t e g r a t e d

358

Microsoft Word - EDG 2008 CR-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II Sites Annual Report II Sites Annual Report November 2008 Edgemont, South Dakota Page 2-1 2.0 Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site 2.1 Compliance Summary The Edgemont, South Dakota, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II Disposal Site was inspected on June 10, 2008, and was in good condition. A new entrance signpost was installed during the inspection to replace the broken post. Cattle continue to graze on site under a license agreement. The presence of cattle may be affecting range conditions on and off the cell, and may be causing minor erosional features in the southeast portion of the site. Neither the range condition nor the erosion is currently affecting the integrity or stability of the disposal cell. However, the grazing plan will be modified to prohibit grazing during critical

359

Microsoft Word - GUN 2007 CR-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Gunnison, Colorado Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site 8.1 Compliance Summary The Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site, inspected on May 21, 2007, is in excellent condition. One perimeter sign was missing and will be replaced in 2008. Six riprap test areas on the cell apron and diversion ditches were visually inspected and photographed; no apparent rock degradation was noted when compared to previous photos. Significant rainfall caused minor rill erosion at two new locations on site; all areas of erosion appear to be stable. No cause for a follow-up or contingency inspection was identified. 8.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site are specified in

360

Fuel Economy of the 2013 Honda CR-Z  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of This Page 4 cyl, 1.5 L Auto(AV-S7) Regular Gasoline Compare Side-by-Side Hybrid EPA Fuel Economy Miles per Gallon Personalize Regular Gasoline 37 Combined 36 City 39 Highway...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Isothermal Bainite Transformation of Cr5 Steel under Pulsed Current ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The pulsed current and pulsed magnetic field had been applied ... Solubility in the CaO-SiO2-FeOt Based Welding Flux System Containing NaF.

362

15510_Primer_Fall08_CR:15510 Primer Fall08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waters contain no light, no organic matter for food, and no geothermal activity or other energy sources. In addition, the lake's crushing pressure of nearly 400 atmospheres causes...

363

102 Characterisation and Modeling CuCrZr Electrode Degradation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

005 Calcium Phosphates for Drug Carrier: Adsorption and Release Kinetics of Drugs ... 058 Properties Optimization of Refractory Mineral Resources in China.

364

'"cr--'"0-0-i="030C3Q.~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and heavy met- als (www.epa.gov/glnpo/aoc/grandcal.html). Like much of nearshore southern Lake Michigan

Lovley, Derek

365

Behaviour of NiCr Coatings under Different Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... The significance of biofuels and other chlorine–containing fuels in electricity and steam production is growing rapidly. Biomass waste and high ...

366

Audit of Controls Over the ADP Support Services Contract, CR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ombudsman FOIA Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work...

367

COURSE DESCRIPTION Course Title: Regional Silviculture --FOR 4165 (2 cr.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.M. Burns and B. H. Honkala, Tech. Coord.) U.S.D.A. - Forest Service, Agric. Hdbk. 654 AVAILABLE ON WEB

Slatton, Clint

368

Structure and Properties of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened 18Cr Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are potential materials for application in nuclear reactors and gas turbines due to improved high ...

369

Synthesis of Cr-doped Titania Nanotubes and Their Enhanced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Synthesis and Structural Analysis of Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for Optical Applications · Complex Crystallization Dynamics in Amorphous Germanium ...

370

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was a uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado. The techniques tested included: 1) the use of downhole was a uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado. This report is one in a series of reports documenting. The field site used for the study was the uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado (Davis and Curtis

371

50522.5Mg-0.25Cr  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 57   Standard specifications for alloy 5052...� Extruded � B 221 Extruded, seamless � B 241 Condenser � B 234 Condenser with integral fins � B 404 Welded � B 313, B 547 Rivet wire and rod � B 316 Foil 4004 �...

372

Interlayer Magnetic Coupling in an Fe/Cr Superlattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... What gives rise to the giant magnetoresistance effect? ... small changes in magnetic field.2 Fert coined the term “Giant Magnetoresistance” ...

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Effects from Cr Concentration on Stability against Inter-diffusion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... L38: A Theoretical Model of Corrosion Rate Distribution in Liquid LBE Flow Loop at ...

374

Doktorandske dny '11 Ustav informatiky AV CR, v. v. i.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copula-Based Estimation of Distribution Algorithms 6 Radim Demut: Different Measures of Reliability in Regression 13 Tom´as Dzetkulic: Incremental Computation of Succinct Abstractions for Hybrid Systems 19 Jana F¨urstov´a: Competing Risks of CML-Related Death and Death from Other Causes 20 Martin Hor´acek: Traditional Measures

Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

375

On elements of prime order in Cr_2(Q)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the plane Cremona group over the field of rational numbers does not contain elements of prime order $\\ge 11$. Also we prove that there is only one conjugacy class of elements of order 7 represented by an automorphism of a 2-dimensional torus constructed by J.-P. Serre.

Dolgachev, Igor V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nano Precipitates in High Carbon Bearing Steel 100Cr6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) of Fluid Flows in a Four Strand Delta-shaped Tundish Operating Under Isothermal and Non-isothermal ...

377

UMore Ph IA CR Report 7-8-10.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

associated with construction of the wind turbine, 34.5 kV interconnect line, meteorologic tower, and associated roads and laydown areas, which encompasses approximately 33.25 acres...

378

9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application ...  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; ... and tempering steps without subsequent hot ...

379

Remarkable Oxidation Resistance of Nanocrystalline Fe-Cr Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Raman Singh, Prabhakar Singh. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Raman Singh. Abstract Scope, The paper will present a review of the fundamentals of ...

380

Understanding Phase Stability of FeCr Alloys through Synergistic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiscale materials modelling is emerging as a next step in research and development .... and the Residual Stresses after Straightening of 100-Meter Rail.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bo belarus cr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Tensile Mechanical Properties and Brittle Effect of Austempered Cr ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy · Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

382

Thermodynamic Investigations in the Ternary Al-Ti-Cr System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of ...

383

Microsoft Word - SPK 2007 CR-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Spook, Wyoming Spook, Wyoming Page 18-1 18.0 Spook, Wyoming, Disposal Site 18.1 Compliance Summary The Spook, Wyoming, Disposal Site, inspected on June 12, 2007, was in excellent condition. Minor erosion occurring at several locations displayed little change from the previous year. The old water supply well on the site had a new power supply and buried pipeline to an offsite location indicating use of the well by a local rancher under the perpetual access agreement. No cause for a follow-up or contingency inspection was identified. 18.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site are specified in the Long- Term Surveillance Plan [LTSP] for the Spook, Wyoming, Disposal Site (DOE/AL/350215.000,

384

Microsoft PowerPoint - CR_draft.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

g g q g and Research 2011 Yearly Review Meeting y g Project DE-FE0001790 j Title: Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO2 Injection, Greene County, j , y, Missouri Missouri State University Missouri State University Presenter: Dr. Charles Rovey Department of Geography, Geology, and Planning February 23, 2011 Project Participants Project Participants * Charles Rovey (PI) Charles Rovey (PI) * Doug Gouzie (PI) i h i i i ( ) * Rich Biagioni (PI) - David Butcher (RA) - Nathan Diaz (RA) - Nelson Rono (RA) Introduction Introduction * Background: Background: Follow up on a previous sequestration project: City Utilities (CU) Shallow Sequestration Program Greene County Missouri (CU) Shallow Sequestration Program, Greene County, Missouri.

385

14128_JGI_CR_07:2007 JGI Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JOINT JOINT GENOME INSTITUTE PROGRESS REPORT 2007 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY On the cover: The eucalyptus tree was selected in 2007 for se- quencing by the JGI. The microbial community in the termite hindgut of Nasutitermes corniger was the subject of a study published in the November 22, 2007 edition of the journal, Nature. JGI Mission The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, supported by the DOE Office of Science, unites the expertise of five national laboratories-Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest - along with the Stanford Human Genome Center to advance genomics in support of the DOE mis- sions related to clean energy generation and environmental char- acterization and cleanup. JGI's Walnut Creek, CA, Production

386

18691_Letter_from_Director_CR1.indd  

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which control the current fl owing through the light. Berkeley Lab developed the ballast in the 1970s with the lighting industry. A 2001 study found that electronic ballasts...

387

Property:NumberOfPrograms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ 6 + Argentina + 12 + Armenia + 6 + Aruba + 3 + Australia + 5 + Austria + 2 + Azerbaijan + 2 + B Bahamas + 6 + Bahrain + 2 + Bangladesh + 27 + Barbados + 9 + Belarus + 0 +...

388

Property:NumberOfDOELabPrograms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ 1 + Argentina + 1 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 1 + Australia + 2 + Austria + 0 + Azerbaijan + 0 + B Bahamas + 1 + Bahrain + 0 + Bangladesh + 1 + Barbados + 1 + Belarus + 0 +...

389

The Right to Life with Dignity: Economic and Social Rights Respect in the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain BangladeshSlovenia Tunisia Mongolia Azerbaijan Austria Estonia LatviaCentral Asia Albania Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Bosnia and

Kolp, Felicity Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsLand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0 + Australia + 0 + Austria + 0 + Azerbaijan + 0 + B Bahamas + 0 + Bahrain + 0 + Bangladesh + 0 + Barbados + 0 + Belarus + 0 +...

391

Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPrograms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0 + Australia + 0 + Austria + 0 + Azerbaijan + 0 + B Bahamas + 0 + Bahrain + 0 + Bangladesh + 0 + Barbados + 0 + Belarus + 0 +...

392

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

393

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Data Center Efficiency...  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

394

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Green Energy Compass  

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395

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Autodesk Green Building...  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

396

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tariff Analysis Project  

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397

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Demand Response Quick...  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

398

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Macromodel for Assessing...  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

399

Bugs, Drugs & Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

27 such countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus,independent states, such as Azerbaijan, the Republic of49 avian influenza 126 Azerbaijan 114 B bacille Calmette–

WHO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Theory of Human Development: A Cross-Cultural Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan Egypt Moldova Iran Azerbaijan Zimbabwe Developed FarAlbania Belarus Nigeria Azerbaijan Egypt Yugosl. ChinaORTHODOX EASTERN EUROPE Azerbaijan PROTESTANT WESTERN ZONE

Welzel, Christian; Inglehart, Ronald; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ZIP  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

402

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

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Tools Listed Alphabetically Tools by Platform Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India...

403

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Degree Day Forecasts  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

404

The Theory of Human Development: A Cross-Cultural Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ex- Yugoslavia Middle East Bosnia-Herzegovina Albania IranBangladesh, Bosnia- Herzegovina, Colombia, Croatia, CzechBangladesh, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria,

Welzel, Christian; Inglehart, Ronald; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Legislating for smoke-free workplaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Belarus (2000), Bosnia and Herzegovina (1993), Croatia (Belgium (1994), Bosnia and Herzegovina (1993), Croatia (are Belgium (1996), Bosnia and Herzegovina (1993), Croatia (

World Health Organization

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HVAC Solution  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

407

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SIMBAD Building and...  

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408

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HVAC Residential Load...  

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409

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HVAC 1 Toolkit  

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410

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Trainer for...  

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411

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FASER  

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412

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HEAT2  

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413

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Delphin  

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414

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: WaterAide  

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415

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DPClima  

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416

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: VISION4  

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417

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SunPosition  

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418

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PocketControls  

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419

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FRAME4  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

420

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: RESFEN  

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421

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PsyCalc  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

422

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SunPath  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

423

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: IPSE  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

424

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PEAR  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

425

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Roanakh  

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426

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AGI32  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

427

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SPARK  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

428

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EnergyAide  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

429

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: foAudits  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

430

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: OptoMizer  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

431

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SUNDI  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

432

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: LoopDA  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

433

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AAMASKY  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

434

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PVSYST  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

435

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: COMcheck  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

436

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SMILE  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

437

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SolArch  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

438

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: LESODIAL  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

439

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CAMEL  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

440

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EBS  

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441

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PRISM  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

442

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: solacalc  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

443

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TREAT  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

444

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SunAngle  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

445

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EZDOE  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

446

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: eQUEST  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

447

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: NewQUICK  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

448

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EnergyPro  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

449

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: tsbi3  

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450

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BuildingAdvice  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

451

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Daylight  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

452

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Window  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

453

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DAYSIM  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

454

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FRESA  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

455

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EnergyPeriscope  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

456

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: eDNA  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

457

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: COMSOL  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

458

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Physibel  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

459

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: MHEA  

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460

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CELLAR  

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461

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ManagingEnergy  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

462

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: MotorMaster+  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

463

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EcoDesigner  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

464

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: RadTherm  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

465

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ecasys  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

466

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Benchmata  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

467

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ShadowFX  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

468

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TAS  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

469

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: MOIST  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

470

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SUNDAY  

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471

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PYTHON  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

472

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

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473

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: COMFIE  

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474

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CompuLyte  

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475

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BV2  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

476

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AnTherm  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

477

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: USai  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

478

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: flixo  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

479

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: RESEM  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

480

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TAPS  

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481

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: REScheck  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

482

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PHOENICS  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

483

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: STE  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

484

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Umberto  

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485

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Visual  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

486

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EnerCAD  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

487

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SBEM  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

488

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HAP  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

489

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FENSIZE  

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490

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DOLPHIN  

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491

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ADELINE  

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492

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TRNSYS  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

493

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EQUER  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

494

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FLOVENT  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

495

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ParaSol  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

496

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DUCTSIZE  

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497

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BEES  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

498

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DONKEY  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

499

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AWDABPT  

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Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

500

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ECOTECT  

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