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1

CMC/ BMC Utility Products | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CMC/ BMC Utility Products CMC/ BMC Utility Products Jump to: navigation, search Name CMC/ BMC Utility Products Address 3501 Symmes Road Place Hamilton, Ohio Zip 45015 Sector Services, Solar, Wind energy Product Installation; Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing Phone number 513-860-4455 Website http://www.cmclugs.com Coordinates 39.3443592°, -84.5062904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3443592,"lon":-84.5062904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: Tarun R. Naik, Director investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

3

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc of sufficient strength to withstand handling, transfer and long term exposure. The final phase (4) was designed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

4

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coalCenter for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

5

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST by blending these selected conventional and clean coal ashes. Using these sixdifferent ash samples, eleven of 0 and60 percent by high-sulfurcoal ashes (Class F and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

6

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the coal ash derived from SOx control technology. Up to 80% of CCA was blended with ground portland cement: blended cement, clean coal ash, sulfate resistance, time of setting #12;3 Zichao Wu is Structural EngineerCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

7

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) in the range of 0 to 60Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

8

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Test results indicated that all the blends with coal ash had lower expansion than the control mixtureCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

9

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixtures were developed using blends of wood FA and Class C coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA improved performance of wood FA to a significant extentCenter for By-Products Utilization GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

10

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rapid identification of buried utilities, blended coal ash, and non-spec./off-spec. aggregates and fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

11

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

12

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Management & Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs), Tampa, Florida, Jan. 27-30, 2003. Department of Civil-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM concrete mixtures can be made with up to blends of 20% ponded-ash and 5% Class F fly ash. #12;Introduction

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

13

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-lime fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 20%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans. #12;4 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely used source of energy ash. In 1992, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

14

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Class C fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 10 %) portland cement in the blend. Keywords; freezing and thawing durability; strength; sulfate resistance. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely amounts of coal combustion products (CCPs), which include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

15

* Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 in the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds. * Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division division

16

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 5 Economics of Soybean Production, Marketing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 5 Economics of Soybean Production, Marketing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology He

17

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 19 Soy Protein Products, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 19 Soy Protein Products, Processing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nu

18

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive new soybean reference book, a volume from the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds, disseminates key soybean oilseed information. Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry P

19

T-556: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow 6: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow T-556: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow February 14, 2011 - 7:07am Addthis PROBLEM: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow PLATFORM: BMC Performance Affected software versions: BMC Performance Analysis for Servers 7.4.00 - 7.5.10 BMC Performance Analyzer for Servers 7.4.00 - 7.5.10 BMC Performance Assurance for Servers 7.4.00 - 7.5.10 BMC Performance Assurance for Virtual Servers 7.4.00 - 7.5.10 ABSTRACT: Stack-based buffer overflow in BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon for in Performance Analysis for Servers, Performance Assurance for Servers, and Performance Assurance for Virtual Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; Performance Analyzer and Performance Predictor for Servers 7.4.00 through

20

BMC Genomics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU): rapid annotation of viral genomes using a closely related reference genome

Vasily Tcherepanov; Angelika Ehlers; Chris Upton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in Soil Stabilization Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Background CAEEC is a cooperation among industry, government, and the research community to work together to solve CCB- related problems and promote the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable utilization and disposal of CCBs. Objectives To improve the technical and economic aspects of coal combustion by-product (CCB) management. Description CARRC tasks fall into three general categories: Member-prioritized research tasks, Technical and administrative tasks, and Special projects that support CARRC objectives and strengthen and increase the availability of sound technical data for CARRC use.

22

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 10 Meal Nutrition and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 10 Meal Nutrition and Utilization Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Meal Nutrition and Utilization,

23

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coAl utilizAtion By-Product Processing PlAnt (withdrAwn) Project Description The University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF) of Lexington, Kentucky, in partnership...

24

Carbon dioxide utilization and seaweed production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dioxide utilization and seaweed production dioxide utilization and seaweed production V.R.P.Sinha World Bank Project Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute, Mymensingh, Bangladesh e-mails; vrpsinha@ mymensingh.net, vidyut_s@hotmail.com Lowell Fraley L.D. Fraley & Associates, LLC, P.O. Box 1525, Sugarland, TX 77487, USA, e-mail idf@hia.net BS Chowdhry ISS Consultants, Inc. 13111 Westheimer, Suite 303, Houston, Texas 77077, USA, e-mail bsc@issci.com Abstract: Stronger growth in many plants stimulated by increased CO 2 concentration should lead to greater biological productivity with an expected increase in the photosynthetic storage of carbon. Thus, the biosphere will serve as a sink for CO 2 , though it will also act as a source too, because of respiration. Normally net photosynthesis dominates in summer and

25

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and UtilizationChapter 20 Soybean Oil Products Utilization: Shortenings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 20 Soybean Oil Products Utilization: Shortenings Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 20 Soybean Oil Products Util

26

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in...

27

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

28

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 9 Oil Nutrition and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 9 Oil Nutrition and Utilization Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Oil Nutrition and Utilization from ...

29

Energetics of compost production and utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments during the past decade have led to a fairly clear delineation of the role of composting in municipal solid waste (MSW) management. However, before that role can be accepted and implemented on a practical scale, certain important environmental and economic factors must be resolved. Of the economic factors, the energetics of composting in waste management is in urgent need of further elaboration and exploration. This need prompted an attempt on the part of the authors of this paper to resolve basic questions regarding the energetics involved in the production and utilization of compost from urban solid waste and municipal sludges, and peripherally, the applicability of these findings to the management of other wastes (e.g., agricultural). Progress made in pursuing this attempt is described in the present paper.

Diaz, L.F.; Golueke, C.G.; Savage, G.M.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Center for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Utilization Geopolymer Concrete (GPC) · Proposed by Devidovits (1994) is an upcoming technology-friendly and sustainable. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Geopolymer Concrete (cont'd) · Industrial byCenter for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with Industrial and Post-Consumer By

Saldin, Dilano

32

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 10 Degumming and Lecithin Production and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 10 Degumming and Lecithin Production and Utilization Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Degumming and Lecit

35

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 7 Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 7 Lipids Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing Press

36

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 6 Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 6 Processing Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Processing from ...

37

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 4 Agronomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 4 Agronomy Processing eChapters Processing Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Agronomy from

38

An Update on Ethanol Production and Utilization in Thailand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thailand has continued to promote domestic biofuel utilization. Production and consumption of biofuel in Thailand have continued to increase at a fast rate due to aggressive policies of the Thai government in reducing foreign oil import and increasing domestic renewable energy utilization. This paper focuses on ethanol production and consumption, and the use of gasohol in Thailand. The paper is an update on the previous paper--Biofuel Infrastructure Development and Utilization in Thailand--in August 2008.

Bloyd, Cary N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Program II.G Hydrogen Production and Delivery Biological Melis - University of California, Berkeley G G G G G Introduction The goal of the research is to generate green...

40

NETL: CCPI - Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant - Project Brief PDF-78KB University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Ghent, Kentucky PROJECT FACT SHEET Advanced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effectively utilizing project, product and process knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving project management, product development and engineering processes is for many companies crucial to survive in a fast changing environment. However, these activities are rarely integrated well due to the diversity of stakeholders with individual ... Keywords: CMMI, KM, PLM, Process improvement, Project management

Christof Ebert; Jozef De Man

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Proceedings of the alcohol fuel production and utilization conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conference was held to provide farmers, businesses, industries, and specialty groups with the best available information on current and projected activities related to the production and utilization of biomass for alcohol fuels. All aspects of the alcohol fuel production and utilization process were discussed. From biomass sources, through conversion processes to end-use products and applications were topics discussed by numerous experts. Other experts took this basic information and put it together into total systems. Speakers presented overviews on alcohol fuel related activities on state, regional, and national levels. Finally, commercialization incentives, funding sources, environmental considerations, research developments, safety considerations, and regulatory requirements were discussed as factors which must be addressed when considering the production and utilization of alcohol fuels. Separate abstracts have been prepared for items within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Wireless Product Applications for Utilities: Technical Services for Power Utilities in Wireless Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless technology applications are abundant, with products and services ranging from two-way paging to Personal Communications Services (PCS) to low cost satellite data transmission. With this in mind, utilities are encouraged to develop relationships and business arrangements with telecommunication companies--relationships that can benefit both industries. These arrangements promise to streamline utility operations and, in selected cases, create new businesses and provide sources of revenue for utilit...

1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Utilization of solar thermal sources for thermochemical hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of high temperature solar heat for the production of electricity and/or fuels is a popular concept. However, since solar concentrator systems are expensive and solar radiation intermittent, practical utilization requires processes that exhibit high conversion efficiencies and also incorporate energy storage. The production of hydrogen fulfills the requirement for energy storage and can fulfill the requirement for efficient heat utilization if thermochemical cycles are developed where the temperature and heat requirements of the process match the heat delivery characteristics of the solar receiver system. Cycles based on solid sulfate decomposition reactions may lead to efficient utilization of solar heat at practical temperatures. Higher temperature cycles involving oxide decomposition may also become feasible.

Bowman, M.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 21 Soybean Production and Processing in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 21 Soybean Production and Processing in Brazil Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutritio

46

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 1 Origin, Distribution, and Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 1 Origin, Distribution, and Production Processing eChapters Processing AOCS 35D7CAD9E2530C870576D2DF20F011A4 Press Downloadable pdf of Ch

47

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 2 Breeding, Genetics, and Production of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 2 Breeding, Genetics, and Production of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrit

48

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research within its Office of Science and Technology. Research pertaining to IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB) is conducted within the By-Product Utilization Team of...

49

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Characterization Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products Peter A. Hesbach 1 *, Alexander S. P. Abel 2 Ann G. Kim 3 , and Steven C. Lamey 4 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 USA; 2 NETL Site Support Contractor, Parsons, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 USA; 3 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Post-Doctoral Fellow, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 USA; 4 retired, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV USA (* author for correspondence, phone: 304-285-4443, fax: 304-285-4487, e-mail: peter.hesbach@netl.doe.gov) KEYWORDS: leaching methods, ash characterization, coal utilization by-products

51

UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Low NO{sub x} combustion practices are critical for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from power plants. These low NO{sub x} combustion practices, however, generate high residual carbon contents in the fly ash produced. These high carbon contents threaten utilization of this combustion by-product. This research has successfully developed a separation technology to render fly ash into useful, quality-controlled materials. This technology offers great flexibility and has been shown to be applicable to all of the fly ashes tested (more than 10). The separated materials can be utilized in traditional fly ash applications, such as cement and concrete, as well as in nontraditional applications such as plastic fillers, metal matrix composites, refractories, and carbon adsorbents. Technologies to use beneficiated fly ash in these applications are being successfully developed. In the future, we will continue to refine the separation and utilization technologies to expand the utilization of fly ash. The disposal of more than 31 million tons of fly ash per year is an important environmental issue. With continued development, it will be possible to increase economic, energy and environmental benefits by re-directing more of this fly ash into useful materials.

J.Y. Hwang; X. Huang; M.G. McKimpson; R.E. Tieder; A.M. Hein; J.M. Gillis; D.C. Popko; K.L. Paxton; Z. Li; X. Liu; X. Song; R.I. Kramer

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Load management strategies for electric utilities: a production cost simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the development and application of a simulation model for analyzing strategies for managing the residential loads of electric utilities. The basic components of the model are (1) a production-cost model, which simulates daily operation of an electric power system; (2) a load model, which disaggregates system loads into appliance loads and other loads; and (3) a comparison model, which compares the production costs and energy consumption needed to meet a particular load profile to the corresponding costs and energy consumption required for another load profile. The profiles in each pair define alternative ways of meeting the same demand. A method for disaggregating load profiles into appliance components is discussed and several alternative strategies for residential load management for a typical northeastern electric utility are formulated. The method is based on an analysis of the composition of electric loads for a number of classes of residential customers in the model utility system. The effect of alternative load management strategies on the entire residential loadcurve is determined by predicting the effects of these strategies on the specific appliance components of the loadcurve. The results of using the model to analyze alternative strategies for residential load management suggest that load management strategies in the residential sector, if adopted by utilities whose operating and load characteristics are similar to those of the system modeled here, must take into account a wide variety of appliances to achieve significant changes in the total load profile. Moreover, the results also suggest that it is not easy to reduce costs significantly through new strategies for managing residential loads only and that, to be worthwhile, cost-reducing strategies will have to encompass many kinds of appliances.

Blair, P.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

54

Geothermal source potential and utilization for alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of using a potential geothermal source to drive a fuel grade alcohol plant. Test data from the well at the site indicated that the water temperature at approximately 8500 feet should approach 275/sup 0/F. However, no flow data was available, and so the volume of hot water that can be expected from a well at this site is unknown. Using the available data, numerous fuel alcohol production processes and various heat utilization schemes were investigated to determine the most cost effective system for using the geothermal resource. The study found the direct application of hot water for alcohol production based on atmospheric processes using low pressure steam to be most cost effective. The geothermal flow rates were determined for various sizes of alcohol production facility using 275/sup 0/F water, 235/sup 0/F maximum processing temperature, 31,000 and 53,000 Btu per gallon energy requirements, and appropriate process approach temperatures. It was determined that a 3 million gpy alcohol plant is the largest facility that can practically be powered by the flow from one large geothermal well. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared, operating costs were calculated, the economic feasibility of the propsed project was examined, and a sensitivity analysis was performed.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station.

John Groppo; Thomas Robl

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

BMC Surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Increased incidence of postoperative infections during prophylaxis with cephalothin compared to doxycycline in intestinal surgery

Biomed Central; Per E Akselsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Since 1993, Federal Regulations have treated the four major large-volume CUB's -- fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts -- as solid wastes that do not warrant regulation as hazardous wastes under Subtitle C of RCRA, as long as these CUB’s were not co-managed with other waste materials. On May 22, 2000, EPA published a final Regulatory Determination [PDF-320KB] that retained the hazardous waste exemption for coal utilization by-products. EPA has concluded that fossil fuel combustion wastes do not warrant regulation as hazardous under Subtitle C of RCRA and is retaining the hazardous waste exemption for these wastes. However, the Agency has determined that national non-hazardous waste regulations under RCRA Subtitle D are needed for coal combustion wastes disposed in surface impoundments and landfills and used as minefilling. EPA also concluded beneficial uses of these wastes, other than for minefilling, pose no significant risk and no additional national regulations are needed. This determination affects more than 110 million tons of fossil fuel combustion wastes that are generated each year, virtually all from burning coal.

58

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 7 The Economics of Malaysian Palm Oil Production, Marketing and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 7 The Economics of Malaysian Palm Oil Production, Marketing and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology H

59

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 10 Minor Constituents and Phytochemicals of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 10 Minor Constituents and Phytochemicals of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition -

60

A Multi-Product Risk-Averse Newsvendor with Exponential Utility ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 14, 2011 ... A Multi-Product Risk-Averse Newsvendor with Exponential Utility Function ... Using a numerical study, we examine convergence rates of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 13 Soybean Oil Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 13 Soybean Oil Modification Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

62

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 12 Soybean Oil Purification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 12 Soybean Oil Purification Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

63

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 8 Soybean Proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 8 Soybean Proteins Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing

64

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 9 Soybean Carbohydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 9 Soybean Carbohydrates Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Proce

65

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 11 Oil Recovery from Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 11 Oil Recovery from Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

66

Maximum Utility Product Pricing Models and Algorithms Based on ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 15, 2007 ... Let Cj be the set of customer segments who buy Product j, i.e.,. Cj = {i : ?ij = 1} and let Mj be the total number of customers buying Product j, i.e.,.

67

Synthetic Fuel Production Utilizing CO2 Recycling as an Alternative ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... which incorporates energy from nuclear, solar, wind and hydropower sources. Widespread implementation of synfuel production will enable a greater reliance...

68

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bed Solids Waste Gasifier," Forest Products Journal, Vol.BASIS IV. SUMMARY APPENDIX A - Gasifier Liquefaction Design1 - Modified Lurgi Gasifier with Liquefaction Reactor 2 -

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Utilization Potential of Advanced SO2 Control By Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results of literature surveys and preliminary market assessments, this report evaluates potential applications for advanced SO2 control by-products. Investigators formed their evaluations by comparing the marketability of these by-products with that of coal ash and wet scrubber sludge.

1987-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Reducing Power Production Costs by Utilizing Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke. It is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance, and is generally less reactive than coal. Therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the comb...

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

NETL: Utilization Projects - Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material In pursuit of developing value added products from sulfite-rich scrubber material, e.g., low-density panels, carpet underlayment, siding, pre-cast building material, lumber panels, particle and wafer type boards, the following four experimental tasks are proposed: A comprehensive characterization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials produced by power plant generation. Specifically, the mercury, selenium, arsenic, boron, and organic content will be monitored The sulfite-rich scrubber material will be combined with cheap but renewable agricultural byproducts like micronized core fibers and/or micronized wheat straw, and the composites will be formulated by exploiting the natural polymers of the byproducts. The conditions under which structural composites can be formulated using injection molding and compressive molding will be evaluated.

72

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. Phase 1 was completed successfully, but the project did not continue on to Phase 2 due to withdrawal of CEMEX from the project. Attempts at replacing CEMEX were not successful. Problematic to the continuation of the project was its location in the Ohio Valley which is oversupplied and has low prices for fly ash and the change in CEMEX priorities due to merger and acquisitions. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Utility and performance relative to consumer product energy efficiency standards. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of the relative utility and performance of nine major household consumer products covered by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act is summarized. The objective was to define the terms utility and performance, to recommend methods for quantifying these two concepts, and to recommend an approach for dealing with utility and performance issues in the energy efficiency standards program. The definitions developed are: performance of a consumer product is the objective measure of how well, with the expected level of consumer input (following the manufacturer's instructions for installation and operation), the product does its intended job; and utility of a consumer product is a subjective measure, based on the consumer's perception, of the capability of the product to satisfy human needs. Quantification is based on test procedures and consumer survey methods which are largely already in use by industry. Utility and performance issues are important in product classification for prescribing energy efficiency standards. The recommended approach to utility and performance issues and classification is: prior to setting standards, evaluate utility and performance issues in the most quantitative way allowed by resources and schedules in order to develop classification guidelines. This approach requires no changes in existing Department of Energy test procedures.

Coggins, J.L.

1979-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station. The market study for the products of the processing plant (Subtask 1.6), conducted by Cemex, is reported herein. The study incorporated simplifying assumptions and focused only on pozzolan and ultra fine fly ash (UFFA). It found that the market for pozzolan in the Ghent area was oversupplied, with resultant poor pricing structure. Reachable export markets for the Ghent pozzolan market were mostly locally served with the exception of Florida. It was concluded that a beneficiated material for that market may be at a long term disadvantage. The market for the UFFA was more complex as this material would compete with other beneficiated ash and potential metakaolin and silica fume as well. The study concluded that this market represented about 100,000 tons of sales per year and, although lucrative, represented a widely dispersed niche market.

Andrew Jackura; John Groppo; Thomas Robl

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Results and Analysis of EPRI Utility Survey on Experiences of Composite Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the results and analysis of a North American utility survey on the experience of polymer-based / composite products and apparatus used in transmission class (69 - 765 kV) substations. The survey addresses many topics that are of general interest to utilities such as: Standards (internal or industry) that may have been used to purchase these apparatus. Laboratory and field trial investigations undertaken by utilities to determine whether the apparatus was suitable for thei...

2004-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 11 Industry Trade and Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 11 Industry Trade and Economics Processing eChapters Processing Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Industry Trade and Economics, from the book ...

79

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 2 Botany and Plant Breeding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 2 Botany and Plant Breeding Processing eChapters Processing 40BC278D38AF1341D981451DC4C99406 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Botany an

80

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 6 Measurement and Maintenance of Soybean Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 6 Measurement and Maintenance of Soybean Quality Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 7 Canola Oil Composition and Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 7 Canola Oil Composition and Properties Processing eChapters Processing Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Canola Oil Composition and Properties from

82

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 8 Meal Nutrient Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 8 Meal Nutrient Composition Processing eChapters Processing 3915C7717C575B3A3E7B822402B32741 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Meal Nutr

83

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 16 Bioenergy and Biofuels from Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 16 Bioenergy and Biofuels from Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bio

84

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 1 The History of the Soybean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 1 The History of the Soybean Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

85

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 14 Food Use of Whole Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 14 Food Use of Whole Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

86

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products: Consortium Byproducts Recycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) The mission of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing. The overall goals of CBRC are to: Increase the overall national rate of byproduct use by to ~ 50 % by 2010 Increase the number of “allowable” byproduct uses under state regulations by ~ 25% Double of the current rate of FGD byproduct use CBRC is a unique partnership that integrates the electric power industry, State and Federal regulatory agencies, and academia to form a strong, cohesive consortium to guide the national and regional research priorities of the CBRC. CBRC is managed by the West Virginia Water Research Institute at West Virginia University and is administered by regional centers at the University of Kentucky (Eastern Region), Southern Illinois University (Midwest Region) and the University of North Dakota (Western Region). Primary funding for CBRC is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL).

87

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models for energy policy analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models developed for energy policy analysis. The models use the same principles (life cycle cost minimization, least operating cost dispatching, and incorporation of outages and reserve margin) as comprehensive utility capacity planning tools, but are faster and simpler. The models were not designed for detailed utility capacity planning, but they can be used to accurately project trends on a regional level. Because they use the same principles as comprehensive utility capacity expansion planning tools, the models are more realistic than utility modules used in present policy analysis tools. They can be used to help forecast the effects energy policy options will have on future utility power generation capacity expansion trends and to help formulate a sound national energy strategy. The models make renewable energy source competition realistic by giving proper value to intermittent renewable and energy storage technologies, and by competing renewables against each other as well as against conventional technologies.

Aronson, E.; Edenburn, M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 5 Seed Morphology, Composition, and Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 5 Seed Morphology, Composition, and Quality Processing eChapters Processing 83B4C7E58AA96C2A03AC640770A86BC2 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Cha

91

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 2 Composition of Soybeans and Soybean Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 2 Composition of Soybeans and Soybean Products Processing eChapters Processing 488238FD38C3A08C06DF239C252D6FA5 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of

92

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 3 Genetic Engineering Approaches for Trait Development in Brassica Oilseed Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 3 Genetic Engineering Approaches for Trait Development in Brassica Oilseed Species Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of

93

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products Current Regulations Governing Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products Products Current Regulations Governing Coal Combustion By-Products - Database of State Regulations Database of State Regulations Affecting Disposal and Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products A Summary Provided by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the American Coal Ash Association Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) are generated when coal is used to generate electricity and power industrial processes. Tens of millions of tons of these materials are produced each year. Many uses of these byproducts are possible, but currently most of them wind up in landfills. Previous work at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified regulatory issues as one factor preventing more widespread reuse of CCBs. CCBs are generally regulated by state authorities, and the various states have developed widely differing rules. This web site was developed as one way to help CCB generators, users, and regulators share information across state boundaries.

94

WATER AND BY-PRODUCT ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy, November 17-19, 2003, Washington, DC A DOE R&D RESPONSE TO EMERGING COAL BY-PRODUCT AND WATER ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT While the regulation and control of air emissions will continue to be of primary concern to the electric-utility industry over the next several decades, other environmental-related issues may also impact the operation of existing and new coal-based power systems. Coal by-products are one such issue. Coal-fired power plants generate nearly 118 million tons of fly ash, flue gas

95

Market potential of electrolytic hydrogen production in three northeastern utilities' service territories. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study develops a method for exploring the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen. The service areas of three northeastern utilities - Public Service Electric and Gas, Niagara Mohawk, and Northeast Utilities - are examined, and results reported on the effort to locate specialty hydrogen users, determine patterns of hydrogen utilization, and assess the possibility of satisfying this hydrogen demand by electrolytic hydrogen from advanced electrolyzers. Hydrogen users were sought in six major product categories: chemicals, pharmaceuticals, oils, metals, electronics and float glass. Identification of users through appropriate standard industrial classification codes served as a basis for locating possible users in each of the service areas. Mailed questionnaires sought information on hydrogen demand, characteristics of hydrogen use, present hydrogen supply costs, and factors that would influence the purchase of an electrolyzer. In the three utility service areas examined, electrolytic hydrogen can be expected to have limited success competing with merchant hydrogen. Specific hydrogen users may be found whose location with respect to the source of merchant hydrogen may put electrolytic hydrogen at an economic advantage. Reduction in electrolyzer plant costs may be necessary to expand the possibilities for electrolysis. Annual power requirements for current potential demand for electrolytic hydrogen in three utilities was estimated at 140 x 10/sup 6/ kWh, which could expand to 240 x 10/sup 6/ kWh in ten years.

Fein, E.; Edwards, K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ULTRACLEAN FUELS PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: ADVANCES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

Fox, E.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

Natural Oil Production from Microorganisms: Bioprocess and Microbe Engineering for Total Carbon Utilization in Biofuel Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: MIT is using carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen generated from electricity to produce natural oils that can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels. MIT has designed a 2-stage biofuel production system. In the first stage, hydrogen and CO2 are fed to a microorganism capable of converting these feedstocks to a 2-carbon compound called acetate. In the second stage, acetate is delivered to a different microorganism that can use the acetate to grow and produce oil. The oil can be removed from the reactor tank and chemically converted to various hydrocarbons. The electricity for the process could be supplied from novel means currently in development, or more proven methods such as the combustion of municipal waste, which would also generate the required CO2 and enhance the overall efficiency of MITs biofuel-production system.

None

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels be used annually by 2022, which allows continued

99

Utilization of Sorghum in El Salvador: Grain, Flour and End-Product Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is limited information on the utilization of sorghum for human consumption in El Salvador. Increased wheat prices have driven the baking industry to seek alternative cereals for manufacturing of their products. The white color and bland taste characteristics of Salvadorian sorghum is ideal for use as a partial substitute of wheat (up to 50 percent) or alone in baked goods and a wide variety of foods. Further information on the grain quality, milling characteristics and impact on end-product was assessed to make better use of the available grain. Three different varieties of improved and local cultivars (RCV, Native and ZAM 912) were evaluated for their grain, flour and end-product quality. Grain hardness, color and composition of the grains varied from hard to intermediate to soft. Burr, hammer and roller milling were used for sorghum flour production. Impact of grain characteristics and milling quality was evaluated through the flours produced and their end-product quality. Grain hardness significantly affects flour and final product characteristics. Harder grain, RCV, produced flours more difficult to cook and with a grittier texture than those produced from Native cultivars (floury endosperm). Cupcakes produced from harder grain flours had lower volume and harder texture than cupcakes made from the Native varieties. ZAM 912 was an intermediate hard sorghum variety and produced the darkest flour and darkest cupcakes due to its pericarp hue. Appropriate use of this grains flour can be used in baked products with a darker hue (e.g. chocolate pastries). Harder grain flours can be utilized in coarse crumb products (e.g. cookies, horchata, and atole). Hammer mills produced the coarsest particles for all the varieties evaluated. Burr mills produced flour with similar cooking and end-product texture qualities as the roller mill. However, burr mills are not suitable for production of large quantities of whole sorghum flour. Nevertheless, they are more affordable for small entrepreneurs. Cultivars analyzed produce quality flour that can be used in an array of baked foods, i.e. ethnic beverages, porridges, cookies, flour mixes, tortillas, sweet breads. Whole sorghum flour substitution as low as 25 percent in wheat-based foods can represent significant cost savings for its users.

Pinilla, Luz Eliana

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and UtilizationChapter 3 Physical Properties of Soybeans and Soybean Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 3 Physical Properties of Soybeans and Soybean Products Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Physical Properties

102

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 3 Harvesting, Storing, and Post-Harvest Management of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 3 Harvesting, Storing, and Post-Harvest Management of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology H

103

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 18 Nutritional Properties and Feeding Values of Soybeans and Their Coproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 18 Nutritional Properties and Feeding Values of Soybeans and Their Coproducts Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science

104

Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the price of fossil fuel has increased, petroleum resources have been restricted and the environmental effects have been of great concern. Biofuel has been considered to be a good solution because it is a clean, non-pollutant and a renewable energy. Biodiesel is one alternative energy that plays a major role in the energy industry. So, the development of biofuel process is more interesting. Jatropha curcas L. is considered as an alternative energy source in order to help solve the energy crisis. The purpose of this research is to investigate the optimum condition of Jatropha seed extraction via a screw press and its by-product utilization by a pyrolysis method for achieving the maximum mass conversion and energy recovery. In this study, Jatropha seeds were first extracted by a screw press with different discharge aperture sizes, namely, number 4 (4.0 mm), 8 (7.0 mm), and 10 (10.5 mm). The by-product obtained from a screw press was then performed pyrolysis runs at the operating temperatures of 400, 500, and 600 degrees C. Results revealed that the optimum condition was achieved when using discharge aperture number 8 (7.0 mm) for a screw press and performing the pyrolysis of the by- product at 500 degrees C. The mass conversion efficiency of 35.8% refined oil, 21.8% bio-char, 14.6% bio-oil, and 11.7% syn-gas were obtained. Therefore, the utilization of by-product using a pyrolysis can enhance the effectiveness of Jatropha oil extraction with only 16% mass losses occurred. In addition, the gross heating values of the products were observed as 39.6 MJ/kg for the refined oil, 35.1 MJ/kg for the bio-oil, 27.5 MJ/kg for the bio-char, and 2.1 MJ/kg for the syn-gas. Due to a high mass conversion efficiency and energy content of Jatropha products, Jatropha has the potential to serve as an alternative energy source.

Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB) to cool process syngas. The gas enters satisfies all 3 design criteria. · Correlations relating our experimental results to a waste heat boiler

Demirel, Melik C.

106

Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

Singh, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ammonia Production and Utilization in a Hybrid LNT+SCR System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hybrid LNT+SCR system is used to control NOx from a light-duty diesel engine with in-cylinder regeneration controls. A diesel oxidation catalyst and diesel particulate filter are upstream of the LNT and SCR catalysts. Ultraviolet (UV) adsorption spectroscopy performed directly in the exhaust path downstream of the LNT and SCR catalysts is used to characterize NH3 production and utilization in the system. Extractive exhaust samples are analyzed with FTIR and magnetic sector mass spectrometry (H2) as well. Furthermore, standard gas analyzers are used to complete the characterization of exhaust chemistry. NH3 formation increases strongly with extended regeneration (or over regeneration ) of the LNT, but the amount of NOx reduction occurring over the SCR catalyst is limited by the amount of NH3 produced as well as the amount of NOx available downstream of the LNT. Control of lean-rich cycling parameters enables control of the ratio of NOx reduction between the LNT and SCR catalysts. During lean-rich cycling, fuel penalties are similar for either LNT dominant or LNT with supplemental SCR NOx reduction. However, stored NH3 after multiple lean-rich cycles can enable continued NOx reduction by the SCR after lean-rich cycling stops; thus, requirements for active regeneration of the LNT+SCR system can be modified during transient operation.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Some economic implications of the utilization of alcohol for the production of energy  

SciTech Connect

The production rate of ethanol per unit of land was examined for different crops and the order of magnitude of the costs was calculated. Alcohol production programs in Brazil, Thailand and Sudan are described.

Bennett, M.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Productivity measurement using capital asset valuation to adjust for variations in utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although a great deal of empirical research on productivity measurement has taken place in the last decade, one issue remaining particularly controversial and decisive is the manner by which one adjusts the productivity ...

Berndt, Ernst R.

110

Xylose utilizing Zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium  

SciTech Connect

Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Viitanen, Paul V; Stieglitz, Barry

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Xylose utilizing zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Stieglitz, Barry; Viitanen, Paul V

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

Transforming commercial aerospace supply chain management practices by utilizing Toyota production system principles, practices, and methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines The Toyota Motor Corporation's core precepts, management principles, supply chain architecture, product development methods, leveraged practice of supplier partnerships and procurement practices, all ...

Patneaude, Steven M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Transforming commercial aerospace supply chain management practices by utilizing Toyota production system principles, practices, and methodologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines The Toyota Motor Corporation's core precepts, management principles, supply chain architecture, product development methods, leveraged practice of supplier partnerships and procurement practices, (more)

Patneaude, Steven M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: CL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility disposal impoundment in the southeastern United States. The study was part of a multiyear effort by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group (USWAG) and individual utility companies, to characterize utility comanagement practices and collect and analyze a comprehensive set of data pertinent to the environmental effects of those pra...

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

115

Market Potential of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production in Three Northeastern Utilities' Service Territories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis can be potentially cheaper than bottled industrial hydrogen. But in the Northeast, expensive electrolyzers, costly electricity, high interest rates, and excess hydrogen production capacity at existing plants make electrolytic hydrogen less attractive than bottled hydrogen.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Case studies in DSM : utilizing the Design Structure Matrix to improve New Product Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a project that applies the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) in support of the Manufacturing Excellence (MX) program at Cisco Systems, Inc to reduce the cycle time of new product development initiatives ...

Go, Julie W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in studies on the production of reducing sugars and other products by Clostridium thermocellum on cellulosic biomass is reported. The rate of reducing sugar production using corn residue was found to be equal if not greater than on solka floc. Current work is being devoted towards elucidating discrepancies between reducing sugar analysis and high pressure liquid chromatography sugar analysis in order to permit accurate material balances to be completed. Studies are reported in further characterizing the plasmics of C. thermocellum and in the development of protoplasts of the same microorganism. A process and economic analysis for the production of 200 x 10/sup 6/ pounds (90 x 10/sup 6/ kilograms) per year of soluble reducing sugars from corn stover cellulose, using enzymes derived from Clostridium thermocellum was designed. Acrylic acid was produced in resting cell preparation of Clostridium propionicum from both ..beta..-alanine and from propionic acid. Results from the conversion of corn stover hydrolyzates to lactic acid, a precursor to acrylic acid, show that up to 70% of the sugars produced are converted to lactic acid. Efforts are proceeding to improve the conversion yield and carry out the overall conversion of corn stover to acrylic acid in the same fermentor. Results on the production of acetone and butanol by Clostridium acetobutylicum demonstrated the capability of the strain to produce mixed solvents in concentration and conversion similar to that achieved in industrial processes. Various studies on the production of acetic acid by Clostridium thermoaceticum are also reported.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millions of tons of waste by-products from Texas coal burning plants are produced each year. Two common byproducts are the fuel ashes and calcium sulfate (gypsum). Fuel ashes result from the burning of coal. Gypsum is a byproduct of the air purification system, called Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD). Abatement of these waste products is a growing concern, not only for the industry, but the environment as well. It is possible to produce a gypsum brick unit that can meet the engineering properties required by the Americans Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) standards by using these by-products. This can be accomplished at a cost less than the least expensive common fired clay brick that is used in construction operations. The gypsum brick can be manufactured using established methods that are currently in operation.

Berryman, Charles Wayne

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Environmental impacts of the production and utilization of carbonaceous fuels: a brief overview  

SciTech Connect

The projected increased future use of fossil fuels over the next several decades will intensify many of the current environmental concerns. These concerns include the following: contamination of water resources; consequences of various solid and liquid waste disposal alternatives; atmospheric input of organic emissions, SO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, particulates, smog forming products, and associated acid rains; increased global atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations; and, spills of crude and synthetic oils and their refined products. The development of oil shale, coal, tar sands, and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) resources will have regional impacts related to the distribution of the resources.

Stuermer, D.H.; Tompkins, M.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1999 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual report begins with an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including guiding principles and their strategic plan followed by the Chairman's report providing the year's highlights. Annex reports included are: the final report for Task 11, Integrated Systems; task updates for Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Task 13, Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Task 14, Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and Task 15, Photobiological Production of Hydrogen; and a feature article by Karsten Wurr titled 'Large-Scale Industrial Uses of Hydrogen: Final Development Report'.

Elam, Carolyn C. (National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO (US)) (ed.)

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

Elam, Carolyn C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)] (ed.)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1999 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The annual report begins with an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including guiding principles and their strategic plan followed by the Chairman's report providing the year's highlights. Annex reports included are: the final report for Task 11, Integrated Systems; task updates for Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Task 13, Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Task 14, Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and Task 15, Photobiological Production of Hydrogen; and a feature article by Karsten Wurr titled 'Large-Scale Industrial Uses of Hydrogen: Final Development Report'.

Elam, Carolyn C. (National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO (US)) (ed.)

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Utilization of coal mine methane for methanol and SCP production. Topical report, May 5, 1995--March 4, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of utilizing a biological process to reduce methane emissions from coal mines and to produce valuable single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol as a product has been demonstrated. The quantities of coal mine methane from vent gas, gob wells, premining wells and abandoned mines have been determined in order to define the potential for utilizing mine gases as a resource. It is estimated that 300 MMCFD of methane is produced in the United States at a typical concentration of 0.2-0.6 percent in ventilation air. Of this total, almost 20 percent is produced from the four Jim Walter Resources (JWR) mines, which are located in very gassy coal seams. Worldwide vent gas production is estimated at 1 BCFD. Gob gas methane production in the U.S. is estimated to be 38 MMCFD. Very little gob gas is produced outside the U.S. In addition, it is estimated that abandoned mines may generate as much as 90 MMCFD of methane. In order to make a significant impact on coal mine methane emissions, technology which is able to utilize dilute vent gases as a resource must be developed. Purification of the methane from the vent gases would be very expensive and impractical. Therefore, the process application must be able to use a dilute methane stream. Biological conversion of this dilute methane (as well as the more concentrated gob gases) to produce single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol has been demonstrated in the Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) laboratories. SCP is used as an animal feed supplement, which commands a high price, about $0.11 per pound.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Economic Impacts of Expanded Woody Biomass Utilization on the Bioenergy and Forest Products Industries in Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decentralised production of electricity, heat and cooling, and biofuels, thus supporting the diversification demonstrated impact, involving multipliers such as associations of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers to biofuels are expected to support the implementation of the RES Directive and the proposed revised Fuel

Florida, University of

126

Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-year (1994-98) project on using blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) and biosolids in agriculture, horticulture, and land reclamation was undertaken to assess agronomic value, environmental safety, and potential economic use of these materials.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Economic analysis for utilization of geothermal energy by North Dakota Concrete Products Co.  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota Concrete Products Company uses a steam curing process that accelerates the concrete curing so that 28-day strength is obtained within 24 hours. The cost of energy required to accomplish this is significant, amounting to approximately $80,000 in 1980. The present boilers are oil fired. Recently, fuel oil prices have increased substantially. Further, supply shortages in the past have threatened plant production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the economic feasibility of using deep formation warm water as an alternative energy source. A water-to-water heat pump system to replace the existing boiler system was investigated. TPI, Inc. economic and engineering findings for this particular potential geothermal application are disclosed. The operating cost savings of the geothermal system over the operating costs of the existing oilfired system would be insufficient to provide an acceptable rate of return on the investment at todays cost of money.

Zink, L.L.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EPRI Products Can Help Utilities with Leakage Issues for Diesel Generators and Other Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This notification is intended to make members aware of several EPRI products that help prevent problems with fluid leakage on diesel generators and other plant systems to improve component reliability. These reports are focused on fluid joints, and solutions to help plant personnel better maintain systems and reduce component failures due to leaks and increase overall station reliability. This information contained in this update could be useful to members of your organization responsible for the mainten...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Geothermal source potential and utilization for methane generation and alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating a geothermally heated anaerobic digester with a fuel alcohol plant and cattle feedlot. Thin stillage produced from the alcohol production process and manure collected from the cattle feedlot would be digested in anaerobic digesters to produce biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide, and residue. The energy requirements to maintain proper digester temperatures would be provided by geothermal water. The biogas produced in the digesters would be burned in a boiler to produce low-pressure steam which would be used in the alcohol production process. The alcohol plant would be sized so that the distiller's grains byproduct resulting from the alcohol production would be adequate to supply the daily cattle feed requirements. A portion of the digester residue would substitute for alfalfa hay in the cattle feedlot ration. The major design criterion for the integrated facilty was the production of adequate distiller's grain to supply the daily requirements of 1700 head of cattle. It was determined that, for a ration of 7 pounds of distiller's grain per head per day, a 1 million gpy alcohol facility would be required. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared for the proposed project, operating costs were calculated for a facility based on a corn feedstock, the economic feasibility of the proposed project was examined by calculating its simple payback, and an analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity of the project's economic viability to variations in feedstock costs and alcohol and distiller's grain prices.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Business Plan for Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBP) -- Biosolids Blends in Horticultural Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a marketing plan for coal combustion by-products (CCBP)-biosolids blends which summarizes the business opportunity (potential demand for CCBP-biosolids blends) and defines conditions necessary to seize and execute the opportunity identified. The plan places a hypothetical business in a specific location (Austell, GA) to make the cost-profit analysis as realistic as possible. It should be remembered, however, that the marketing plan for a business venture is not "the business." This h...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Technical background paper for utility and performance relative to consumer-product energy-efficiency standards (for proposed energy-efficiency standards)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an investigation of the relative utility and performance of nine major household consumer products covered by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. The objective of the investigation was to define the terms utility and performance, to recommend methods for quantifying these two concepts, and to recommend an approach for dealing with utility and performance issues in the energy-efficiency-standards program. Performance of a consumer product is the objective measure of how well, with the expected level of consumer input, the product does its intended job; and utility of a consumer product is a subjective measure, based on the consumer's perception, of the capability of the product to satisfy human needs. Quantification is based on test procedures and consumer-survey methods already largely in use by industry. Utility and performance issues are important in product classification for prescribing energy-efficiency standards. The recommended approach to classification is: prior to setting standards, evaluate utility and performance issues in the most-quantitative way allowed by resources and schedules in order to develop classification guidelines. This approach to utility and performance issues and classification requires no changes in existing Department of Energy test procedures.

Coggins, J.L.

1979-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government and commercial sectors - Update 1998  

SciTech Connect

The following conclusions are drawn from the information presented in this report: (1) Joint efforts by industry and government focused on meeting RTC recommendations for reduction/removal of barriers have met with some success. The most notable of these are the changes in regulations related to CCB utilization by individual states. Regionally or nationally consistent state regulation of CCB utilization would further reduce regulatory barriers. (2) Technology changes will continue to be driven by the CAAA, and emission control technologies are expected to continue to impact the type and properties of CCBs generated. As a result, continued RD and D will be needed to learn how to utilize new and changing CCBs in environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically advantageous ways. Clean coal technology CCBs offer a new challenge because of the high volumes expected to be generated and the different characteristics of these CCBs compared to those of conventional CCBs. (3) Industry and government have developed the RD and D infrastructure to address the technical aspects of developing and testing new CCB utilization applications, but this work as well as constant quality control/quality assurance testing needs to be continued to address both industry wide issues and issues related to specific materials, regions, or users. (4) Concerns raised by environmental groups and the public will continue to provide environmental and technical challenges to the CCB industry. It is anticipated that the use of CCBs in mining applications, agriculture, structural fills, and other land applications will continue to be controversial and will require case-by-case technical and environmental information to be developed. The best use of this information will be in the development of generic regulations specifically addressing the use of CCBs in these different types of CCB applications. (5) The development of federal procurement guidelines under Executive Order 12873 titled ''Federal Acquisition, Recycling and Waste Prevention,'' in October 1993 was a positive step toward getting CCBs accepted in the marketplace. Industry needs to continue to work with EPA to develop additional procurement guidelines for products containing CCBs--and to take advantage of existing guidelines to encourage the use of CCBs in high-profile projects. (6) Accelerated progress toward increased utilization of CCBs can be made only if there is an increased financial commitment and technical effort by industry and government. The framework for this has been set by the successful cooperation of industry and government under DOE leadership. Cooperation should continue, with DOE fulfilling its lead role established in the RTC. It is clear that the RTC recommendations continue to have validity with respect to increasing CCB utilization and continue to provide guidance to industry and government agencies.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Sondreal, E.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science &

135

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 1 Soybeans vs. Other Vegetable Oils as a Source of Edible Oil Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 1 Soybeans vs. Other Vegetable Oils as a Source of Edible Oil Products eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Soybeans vs. Ot

136

European legislation in the United Kingdom: a threat to coal-fired power station product utilization?  

SciTech Connect

The author considers that the European Union has not taken the approach adopted in the USA where environmental regulators are keen to promote the use of coal-fired power station ash by-product and recycled materials. The United Kingdom has seen, with some dismay, the effects EU legislation is having on the ash industry. This article outlines only some of the problems being tackled. The Waste Framework Directive is difficult to interpret and fails to define critical aspects of the problem. This directive is discussed at some length in the article. A total of nine directives effect the operation of coal-fired power plant. Many are imprecise and open to interpretation and cause a deal of frustration, delays and confusion to the ash supplier and contractor. This is causing markets to suffer.

Sear, K.A. [Quality Ash Association (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: HA Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, utilities comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility-owned impoundment in the midwestern United States (HA site). The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline hydroxides can be used as a preservation method for on-farm storage of broiler mortalities. This method creates two by-products: alkaline preserved whole broiler carcasses, which can be rendered into an Alkaline Poultry By-Product Meal (APBPM) and residual alkaline effluent, which can be used as a soil amendment. In experiment 1 APBPM was added to a broiler diet and evaluated for apparent metabolizable energy (AME). In experiment 2 AME was used to formulate balanced diets with 0 to 5% APBPM. Effects on broiler performance, organ morphology, tibia sheer strength and moisture content were evaluated in both experiments. Experiment 1 determined that the optimum additive concentration for the APBPM was 5%. The AME trials showed no significant difference between the control group and treatment group (5% APBPM) when comparing body weight and feed consumption, however a significant difference was observed when comparing excreta moisture. Experiment 2 evaluated the parameters of feed consumption, feed conversion, and body weight when fed an APBPM. The feed conversion for the 5% treatment in trial 1 was significantly lower compared to control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups. Feed consumption per bird for trial 1 was significantly higher in the control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups compared to the 5% treatment group. The percentage of organ weight was larger in treatment groups compared to control groups indicating an enlargement of organ weight as a percentage of body weight. The residual alkaline effluent was applied to coastal bermudagrass plots in amounts of 0 to 9354 L/ha with four replications per treatment each year for 1999 and 2000. Dry matter yield, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptakes were evaluated. In 1999 maximum yields were at the 5612 L/ha rate but there was no yield response to effluent rate in 2000. Effluent rate had only small effects on N and P uptake since all treatments were balanced for these nutrients. The potassium uptakes showed a significant increase as the effluent rate increased. The residual KOH effluent can be applied to Coastal bermudagrasses as a source of K as well as N and P.

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

Parkinson, W. J. (William Jerry),

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Utilization of melting techniques for borehole wall stabilization. [Applied to geothermal well production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program on the Subterrene concept based on excavation by melting has been completed. Theoretical and experimental studies were made for a broad range of applications. Most recently, a study of Subterrene deep geothermal well production systems predicted that, compared to rotary-drilled wells, significant cost savings are possible, e.g., 2 and 4 million dollars for 10-km-deep wells and geothermal gradients of 25 and 40 K/km, respectively. It was also concluded that for most wells the rate of penetration of the melting bits should be increased several times over that attained in the Subterrene tests. Subterrene melting penetration tests showed that borehole glass liners can be formed in a wide variety of materials and structural characterization tests showed that tuff glass cylinders can be many times stronger in compression than the parent material. Also, the tests showed that the rock-glass liner permeability decreases rapidly with confining pressure. New melting devices are conceivable that could line rotary-drilled boreholes with rock glass or other materials with resultant improvements in well costs. With emphasis on borehole liners, an overview of Subterrene program results, data on rock-glass liners, and suggestions on how molten materials might be applied to the borehole wall as part of a rotary drilling operation are presented.

Altseimer, J.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Utilization of high sulfur coal in carbon fiber production. Final report, April 1993--August 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PYROGRAF-III{trademark} is a highly graphitic vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) produced by the chemical vapor deposition of carbon on metallic catalysts in the temperature range of 1000{degrees}C. This is entirely different from commercial carbon fiber, which is made by first forming a filament and then graphitizing it in a high temperature oven. For PYROGRAF-III{trademark} small amounts of sulfur in the form of hydrogen sulfide are added to the process to enhance the yield. This method of supplying the necessary sulfur is both expensive and hazardous since hydrogen sulfide is flammable, toxic, and corrosive. To supply the sulfur more economically and safely, high sulfur coal was proposed as a replacement for the hydrogen sulfide gas. Applied Sciences, Inc. is the sole producer of this material in pound quantities. The primary objective of research grant OCDO-922-8 was to demonstrate that Ohio`s high sulfur coal can replace the expensive, toxic hydrogen sulfide in the production of vapor grown carbon fiber as well as become a partial or complete source of carbon. The secondary objective was to analyze the exhaust for the release of harmful sulfur compounds and to project the economic potential of the use of coal.

Burton, D.J.; Guth, J.R.

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

Value Added Products from Hemicellulose Utilization in Dry Mill Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Iowa Corn Promotion Board is the principal contracting entity for this grant funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with New Jersey Institute of Technology, KiwiChem, Pacific Northwest National Lab and Idaho National Lab to conduct research for this project. KiwiChem conducted the economic engineering assessment of a dry-mill ethanol plant. New Jersey Institute of Technology conducted work on incorporating the organic acids into polymers. Pacific Northwest National Lab conducted work in hydrolysis of hemicellulose, fermentation and chemical catalysis of sugars to value-added chemicals. Idaho National Lab engineered an organism to ferment a specific organic acid. Dyadic, an enzme company, was a collaborator which provided in-kind support for the project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board collaborated with the Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Minnesota Corn Merchandising Council in providing cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate the hydrolysis, the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project had two primary goals: (1) to hydrolyze the hemicellulose fraction of the distillers grain (DG) coproduct coming from the dry-mill ethanol plants and (2) convert the sugars derived from the hemicellulose into value-added co-products via fermentation and chemical catalysis.

Rodney Williamson, ICPB; John Magnuson, PNNL; David Reed, INL; Marco Baez, Dyadic; Marion Bradford, ICPB

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Plutonium: The first 50 years. United States plutonium production, acquisition, and utilization from 1944 through 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report contains important newly declassified information regarding the US production, acquisition, and removals of plutonium. This new information, when combined with previously declassified data, has allowed the DOE to issue, for the first time, a truly comprehensive report on the total DOE plutonium inventory. At the December 7, 1993, Openness Press Conference, the DOE declassified the plutonium inventories at eight locations totaling 33.5 metric tons (MT). This report declassifies the remainder of the DOE plutonium inventory. Newly declassified in this report is the quantity of plutonium at the Pantex Site, near Amarillo, Texas, and in the US nuclear weapons stockpile of 66.1 MT, which, when added to the previously released inventory of 33.5 MT, yields a total plutonium inventory of 99.5 MT. This report will document the sources which built up the plutonium inventory as well as the transactions which have removed plutonium from that inventory. This report identifies four sources that add plutonium to the DOE/DoD inventory, and seven types of transactions which remove plutonium from the DOE/DoD inventory. This report also discusses the nuclear material control and accountability system which records all nuclear material transactions, compares records with inventory and calculates material balances, and analyzes differences to verify that nuclear materials are in quantities as reported. The DOE believes that this report will aid in discussions in plutonium storage, safety, and security with stakeholders as well as encourage other nations to declassify and release similar data. These data will also be available for formulating policies with respect to disposition of excess nuclear materials. The information in this report is based on the evaluation of available records. The information contained in this report may be updated or revised in the future should additional or more detailed data become available.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers at pulp mills, steam power plants, and other thermal power generating facilities. Since wood distribution, unit weight, cement pozzolanic activity, water requirement, and autoclave expansion. Properties. Results of particle size distribution are reported in Table 2. As-received moisture content of wood fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

148

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information about fundamentals and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion, and compiling an overview the biological, chemical, physical, and thermodynamic fundamentals. KEYWORDS Composting; anaerobic digestion, anaerobic digesters, and composting facilities (Palmisano and Barlaz, 1996). In this paper, landfills

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

149

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and durability of concrete made with high volume fly ash blended cements", Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag blast furnace slag, fly ash, and silica fume. These mineral additives not only yield concrete additives are: reduced early strength, increased water demand of concrete mixtures, and reduced freezing

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

150

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, pipes, and structures for confinements of solid and liquid wastes containing hazardous materials, etc, and special care in mixing, handling, and placing. It is now well established that a very dense homogeneous-quality concrete (HQC), roller compacted concrete, high-volume fly ash concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

151

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Such structures include bridge decks, pavements, ocean piers, offshore platforms, pipes, and structures, special chemical admixtures, and special care in mixing, handling, placing, and early curing. Ultra-performance concrete, high-durability concrete (HDC), roller compacted concrete, high-volume fly ash concrete, fiber

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

152

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean-coal large amounts of conventional or clean-coal ashes, as well as the blended ashes. #12;4 Based) and coal ash blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) up to 60 percent. On the basis of results obtained

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

153

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.I. has recently established a technology of using a gypsum-containing cementitious material from coal of the cement in concrete mixtures could be replaced with the gypsum wallboard-Class C fly ash blend

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

154

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of approximately 25% and 35% were used. The effect of source of wood FA was noticeably different on the performance of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA-grade concrete can be made using wood FA and/or its blends with Class C coal FA as a replacement of cement

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

155

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, it was concluded that durable structural-grade concrete could be manufactured using 50% blend of wood and coal fly ash as a replacement of cement. #12;Keywords: Coal fly ash, compressive strength, concrete, density

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

156

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is defined as the ash derived from thermal power plants using clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control SOx and NOx. FGD material is generally obtained by combustion of high-sulfur coal. Ponded ash incorporate up to 22 % FGD material and a blend of 34 % FGD material and 6 % coarse Class F ash; (2) FGD

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

157

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compressive strength) with wood ash or its blends with coal fly ash (up to 40 %) as partial replacement of cement; and (4) good quality bricks/blocks/paving stones with wood ash or its blends with coal fly ash-entrained structural-grade concrete up to 28-day compressive strength of 50 MPa with wood or its blends (up to 40

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

158

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000 Presented and published at the CANMET/ACI International Seminar on High-Volume Fly Ash Blended, in USA, coal fly ashes are the most commonly used in the manufacture of cement-based materials to improve

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

159

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean-coal large amounts of conventional or clean-coal ashes, as well as the blended ashes. Based on the results blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) up to 60 percent. On the basis of results obtained

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

160

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry such as portland cement, ASTM Class C fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), blends of cement

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MPa. Future research efforts should be directed towards use of high-lime fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 20%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete; strength; freezing 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans. #12;4 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely used source of energy

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

162

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clay bricks. Based upon previous test data collected from other sources of coal ash, wood ash, and combined coal and wood ash, the Prince Albert ash could be used as a partial replacement of aggregates and of the Prince Albert ash in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

163

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% and 45%), and two mixtures with blends of Class F fly ash and clean-coal ash (34% clean-coal ash with 17-grade concrete. Mixtures containing 44% clean-coal ash, blended with 17% Class F fly ash, also met specified CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

164

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modifications in the project milestone plan may be desirable. The primary task completed for the fourth quarter

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

165

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysisofrecursivestochastic algorithms IEEE Trona. Aulo. Control AC-22 551-75 MscKay D J and Miller K D 1990Analyea of

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

166

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sorbent used. This process uses a sodium-based sorbent such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

167

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, preparación de NaOH Carbonatos y sulfatos Extracción del carbonato de sodio de la trona Preparación de

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

168

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installed at a boiler was composed of a circulating fluidized bed boiler. The boiler was designed to operate AFBC BOILER Introduction This project was conducted for the developme

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

169

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimental data to investigate phosphogypsume use in light brick by Artificial Neural Networks 589 M

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

170

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of setting. Samadi et al.13 studied the influence of phosphogypsum (PG) on the times of setting and soundness of Phosphogypsum in Concrete. Cement and Concrete Research, Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 1419-1425, 1999. 14. Brooks, J. J

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

171

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and final times of setting. #12;5 Samadi et al. [8] studied the influence of phosphogypsum (PG) on the times, 1996, pp. 56-62. 8. Samadi, M. M., Hadad, R. H., and Akour, A. M., "Potential Use of Phosphogypsum

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

172

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-burning power plant. As a developing country, China's economic growth is expected to continue rapidly in this country is mostly generated by coal-fired electric power plants. These plants produce huge amounts of ash (slag) produced from coal-fired power plants increases yearly along with the development and huge demand

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

173

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP test method. The test investigated leaching potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test techniques characteristics of fly ash, spray dryer material, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach data, except for barium

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

174

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regeneration. To date our faculty has led research funded by the NIH, NSF, HHMI, the VA and many private

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

175

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP test method. The test data showed potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test techniques. For comparison, leach tests of fly ash, spray dryer material, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach data, except for barium, showed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

176

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP test method. The test) investigated leaching potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test techniques) evaluated leachate characteristics of fly ash, spray dryer material, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

177

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluated leachate characteristics of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP. Traeger27 investigated leaching potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test/slag. The TCLP leach data, except for barium, showed elemental concentration at or below their corresponding DWS

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

178

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government & commercial sectors - update 1998,7/99,3268845  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION/DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS BY GOVERNMENT AND COMMERCIAL SECTORS - UPDATE 1998 EERC Topical Report DE-FC21-93MC-30097--79 Submitted by: Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett Everett A. Sondreal Edward N. Steadman Kurt E. Eylands Bruce A. Dockter Energy & Environmental Research Center PO Box 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 99-EERC-07-08 July 1999 i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

179

Utility Scale Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Scale Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Utility Scale Solar Inc Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94301 Product California-based PV tracker maker. References Utility...

180

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: FC Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities typically comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement practices at an impoundment at a power plant located in the south-central United States. The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, December 1, 1978-February 28, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing progress of a coordinated research program aimed at optimizing the biodegradation of cellulosic biomass to ethanol and chemical feedstocks is summarized. Growth requirements and genetic manipulations of clostridium thermocellum for selection of high cellulose producers are reported. The enzymatic activity of the cellulase produced by these organisms was studied. The soluble sugars produced from hydrolysis were analyzed. Increasing the tolerance of C. thermocellum to ethanol during liquid fuel production, increasing the rate of product formation, and directing the catabolism to selectively achieve high ethanol concentrations with respect to other products were studied. Alternative substrates for C. thermocellum were evaluated. Studies on the utilization of xylose were performed. Single stage fermentation of cellulose using mixed cultures of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum were studied. The study of the production of chemical feedstocks focused on acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, acetic acid, and lactic acid.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Utilization of geothermal energy for methane production for J. A. Albertson Land and Cattle Company. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of an integrated system to utilize a geothermal resource for a bioconversion plant. This integrated facility would use the manure from approximately 30,000 head of feedlot cattle as a feedstock for an anaerobic digestion plant. The findings on engineering design, geological assessment, environmental, economic, and institutional requirements of the proposed project are summarized. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume By-Products: CY Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the CY site. This is one of 14 sites investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Characterization and utilization of hydrotreated products produced from the Whiterocks (Utah) tar sand bitumen-derived liquid  

SciTech Connect

The bitumen-derived liquid produced in a 4-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor from the mined and crushed ore from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit has been hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor. The purpose was to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variable. A sulfided nickel-molybendum on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in all experiments. Moderately severe operating conditions were employed; that is, high reaction temperature (617--680 K) high reactor pressure (11.0--17.1 MPa) and low liquid feed rate (0.18--0.77 HSV); to achieve the desired reduction in heteroatom content. Detailed chemical structures of the bitumen-derived liquid feedstock and the hydrotreated total liquid products were determined by high resolution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses. The compounds identified in the native bitumen included isoprenoids; bicyclic, tricycle, and tetracyclic terpenoids; steranes; hopanes; and perhydro-{beta}-carotenes. In addition, normal and branched alkanes and alkenes and partially dehydrogenated hydroaromatics were identified in the bitumen-derived liquid. The dominant pyrolysis reactions were: (1) the dealkylation of long alkyl side chains to form {alpha} - and isoolefins; and (2) the cleavage of alkyl chains linking aromatic and hydroaromatic clusters. Olefinic bonds were not observed in the hydrotreated product and monoaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant aromatic species. The properties of the jet fuel fractions from the hydrotreated products met most of the jet fuel specifications. The cetane indices indicated these fractions would be suitable for use as diesel fuels.

Tsai, C.H.; Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Oblad, A.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, September 1-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on the accumulation of glucose during the fermentation of cellulose by Clostridium thermocellum are discussed. Production of ethanol and its relationship to growth rate in C. thermocellum is reported. Different biomasses were tested for ethanol yields. These included exploded poplar, sugar cane, bagasse, corn cobs, sweet gum, rice straw, and wheat straw. Thermophilic bacteria were tested to determine relationship of temperature to yield of ethanol. A preliminary report on isolating plaque forming emits derived from C. thermocellum is presented as well as the utilization of carbohydrates in nutrition. A cellulose enzyme is being purified from C. thermocellum. The production of chemical feedstocks by fermentation is reported. Acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, and acetic acid, produced by C. propionicum, C. acetobutylicum, and C. thermoaceticum, are discussed. (DC)

Wang, D.I.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

Doyle, T.A.

1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

190

Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

Doyle, T.A.

1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Production and Utilization of CO3- Produced by a Corona Discharge in Air for Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization is a multistep ionization process used in mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The formation of product ions depends upon interactions with the analyte and the reactant ion species formed in the ionization source. The predominant reactant ion observed in a point-to-plane corona discharge in air occurs at m/z 60. There have been multiple references in the literature to the identity of this ion with some disagreement. It was postulated to be either CO3- or N2O2-. The identity of this ion is important as it is a key to the ionization of analytes. It was determined here to be CO3- through the use of 18O labeled oxygen. Further confirmation was provided through MS/MS studies. The ionization of nitroglycerine (NG) with CO3- produced the adduct NGCO3-. This was compared to ionization with NO3- and Cl- reactant ions that also formed adducts with NG. The fragmentation patterns of these three adducts provides insight into the charge distribution and indicates that CO3- has a relatively high electron affinity similar to that of nitrate.

Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Solar photoproduction of hydrogen. IEA technical report of the IEA Agreement of the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Program and represents the result of subtask C, Annex 10 - Photoproduction of Hydrogen. The concept of using solar energy to drive the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen has been examined, from the standpoints of potential and ideal efficiencies, measurement of (and how to calculate) solar hydrogen production efficiencies, a survey of the state-of-the-art, and a technological assessment of various solar hydrogen options. The analysis demonstrates that the ideal limit of the conversion efficiency for 1 sun irradiance is {approximately}31% for a single photosystem scheme and {approximately}42% for a dual photosystem scheme. However, practical considerations indicate that real efficiencies will not likely exceed {approximately}10% and {approximately}16% for single and dual photosystem schemes, respectively. Four types of solar photochemical hydrogen systems have been identified: photochemical systems, semiconductor systems, photobiological systems, and hybrid and other systems. A survey of the state-of-the-art of these four types is presented. The four types (and their subtypes) have also been examined in a technological assessment, where each has been examined as to efficiency, potential for improvement, and long-term functionality. Four solar hydrogen systems have been selected as showing sufficient promise for further research and development: (1) Photovoltaic cells plus an electrolyzer; (2) Photoelectrochemical cells with one or more semiconductor electrodes; (3) Photobiological systems; and (4) Photodegradation systems. The following recommendations were presented for consideration of the IEA: (1) Define and measure solar hydrogen conversion efficiencies as the ratio of the rate of generation of Gibbs energy of dry hydrogen gas (with appropriate corrections for any bias power) to the incident solar power (solar irradiance times the irradiated area); (2) Expand support for pilot-plant studies of the PV cells plus electrolyzer option with a view to improving the overall efficiency and long-term stability of the system. Consideration should be given, at an appropriate time, to a full-scale installation as part of a solar hydrogen-based model community; (3) Accelerate support, at a more fundamental level for the development of photoelectrochemical cells, with a view to improving efficiency, long-term performance and multi-cell systems for non-biased solar water splitting; (4) Maintain and increase support for fundamental photobiological research with the aim of improving long-term stability, increasing efficiencies and engineering genetic changes to allow operation at normal solar irradiances; and (5) Initiate a research program to examine the feasibility of coupling hydrogen evolution to the photodegradation of waste or polluting organic substances.

Bolton, J.R. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (CA) N6A 5B7

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

194

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A study of the utility of heat collectors in reducing the response time of automatic fire sprinklers located in production modules of Building 707  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several of the ten production Modules in Building 707 at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant recently underwent an alteration which can adversely affect the performance of the installed automatic fire sprinkler systems. The Modules have an approximate floor to ceiling height of 17.5 ft. The alterations involved removing the drop ceilings in the Modules which had been at a height of 12 ft above the floor. The sprinkler systems were originally installed with the sprinkler heads located below the drop ceiling in accordance with the nationally recognized NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Automatic Sprinkler Systems. The ceiling removal affects the sprinkler`s response time and also violates NFPA 13. The scope of this study included evaluation of the feasibility of utilizing heat collectors to reduce the delays in sprinkler response created by the removal of the drop ceilings. The study also includes evaluation of substituting quick response sprinklers for the standard sprinklers currently in place, in combination with a heat collector.

Shanley, J.H. Jr.; Budnick, E.K. Jr. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Wheaton, MD (United States)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Available Technologies: Production of Bacterial ...  

IB-2013-014. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Fig. 1: Illustration of a BMC with protein (green and yellow) sequestered within. Biotechnology ; Carbon capture and ...

197

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into the Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates primarily focused to improve the existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation site validate all software updates prior to release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

198

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates focused to improve existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation validate any software update prior to its release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

199

Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

Benemann, J.R.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Antitrust/Competition Commercial Damages Environmental Litigation and Regulation Forensic Economics Intellectual Property International Arbitration International Trade Product Liability Regulatory Finance and Accounting Risk Management Securities Tax Util  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development Overview Distributed Energy Resources (DER) are manifold: · PV · Wind, fuel cells, micro Safety / Reliability Maintained Cost Effective to Society / TRC Bill Savings to Participants Possible Cross Subsidization Issue / Disruption to Utility Model

Greer, Julia R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Utilization ROLE OF COAL COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Products Utilization ROLE OF COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;ROLE OF COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC., U.S.A. SYNOPSIS Over one hundred million tonnes of coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

202

Gas Production Tax (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Tax (Texas) Gas Production Tax (Texas) Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Local...

203

BMC Infectious Diseases BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article A sensitive one-step real-time PCR for detection of avian influenza viruses using a MGB probe and an internal positive control

Livia Di Trani; Barbara Bedini; Isabella Donatelli; Laura Campitelli; Maria Aless; Ra De Marco; Mauro Delogu; Canio Buonavoglia; Gabriele Vaccari; Open Access

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

BMC Evolutionary Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Unveiling an ancient biological invasion: molecular analysis of an old European alien, the crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata)

Emiliano Trucchi; Valerio Sbordoni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

BMC Clinical Pathology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Tissue eosinophilia: a morphologic marker for assessing stromal invasion in laryngeal squamous neoplasms

Mahmoud Said; Sam Wiseman; Jun Yang; Sadir Alrawi; Wade Douglas; Richard Cheney; Wesley Hicks; Nestor Rigual; Thom Loree; Gregory Spiegel; Dongfeng Tan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

BMC Medical Genomics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Candidate pathways and genes for prostate cancer: a meta-analysis of gene expression data

Ivan P Gorlov; Jinyoung Byun; Olga Y Gorlova; Ana M Aparicio; Eleni Efstathiou; Christopher J Logothetis Open Access; Ana M Aparicio; Eleni Efstathiou; Christopher J Logothetis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

BioMed Central BMC Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with helicase c domain 1 innate immune response, regulation of apoptosis, response to virus SRV_04819_a

208

BMC Surgery BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Fistulotomy and drainage of deep postanal space abscess in the treatment of posterior horseshoe fistula

Resit Inceoglu; Rasim Gencosmanoglu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

BMC Clinical Pharmacology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Pharmacokinetics of recombinant human growth hormone administered by cool.click 2, a new needle-free device, compared with subcutaneous administration using a conventional syringe and needle

Chris Brearley; Anthony Priestley; James Leighton-scott; Michel Christen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

BMC Nursing BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Experience of unpleasant sensations in the mouth after injection of saline from prefilled syringes

Ulf E Kongsgaard; Anders Andersen; Marina ien; Inger-ann Y Oswald; Laila I Bruun; Laila I Bruun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

BMC Cell Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Aggresomes do not represent a general cellular response to protein misfolding in mammalian cells

Simon Beaudoin; Kevin Goggin; Cyntia Bissonnette; Catherine Grenier; Xavier Roucou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

BMC Medical Ethics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Ahmed S Al-m; Mohammed A Al-shafaee; Mohammed H Al-azri; Ibrahim S Al-zakwani; Mushtaq Khan; Ahmed M Al-waily; Syed Rizvi; Open Access

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

BMC Developmental Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article A link of Ca2+ to cAMP oscillations in Dictyostelium: the calmodulin antagonist W-7 potentiates cAMP relay and transiently inhibits the acidic Ca2+-store

Dieter Malchow; Daniel F Lusche; Christina Schlatterer; Christina Schlatterer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

BMC Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Genistein inhibits radiation-induced activation of NF-?B in prostate cancer cells promoting apoptosis and G2 /M cell cycle arrest

Julian J Raffoul; Yu Wang; Omer Kucuk; Jeffrey D Forman; Fazlul H Sarkar; Gilda G Hillman; Jeffrey D Forman; Fazlul H Sarkar; Gilda G Hillman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

BMC Plant Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Identification of amino acid residues involved in substrate specificity of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases using a bioinformatics-guided approach

Kimberly M Mayer; John Shanklin; Kimberly M Mayer; John Shanklin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

BMC Evolutionary Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Identifying concerted evolution and gene conversion in mammalian gene pairs lasting over 100 million years

Andrew R Carson; Stephen W Scherer; Andrew R Carson; Stephen W Scherer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

BMC Structural Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Sequence and structural features of carbohydrate binding in proteins and assessment of predictability using a neural network

Adeel Malik; Ar Ahmad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

BMC Evolutionary Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Both selective and neutral processes drive GC content evolution in the human genome

Uberto Pozzoli; Giorgia Menozzi; Matteo Fumagalli; Matteo Cereda; Giacomo P Comi; Rachele Cagliani; Nereo Bresolin; Manuela Sironi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

BMC Public Health BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Analysis of latent tuberculosis and mycobacterium avium infection data using mixture models

Jos I Villate; Berta Ibez; Valentn Cabriada; Jos I Pijon; Jorge Taboada; Arantza Urkaregi; Open Access

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

BMC Bioinformatics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partial correlation analysis indicates causal relationships between GC-content, exon density and recombination rate in the human genome

Jan Freudenberg; Mingyi Wang; Yaning Yang; Wentian Li; Wentian Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

BMC Ecology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article The impact of phages on interspecific competition in experimental populations of bacteria

Michael A Brockhurst; Andrew Fenton; Barrie Roulston; Michael A Brockhurst; Andrew Fenton; Barrie Roulston; Paul B Rainey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

BMC Cell Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Shared as well as distinct roles of EHD proteins revealed by biochemical and functional comparisons in mammalian cells and C. elegans

Manju George; Guoguang Ying; Mark A Rainey; Aharon Solomon; Pankit T Parikh; Qingshen Gao; Vimla B; Hamid B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

BMC Pulmonary Medicine BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Hospital acquired pneumonia with high-risk bacteria is associated with increased pulmonary matrix metalloproteinase activity

Bernhard Schaaf; Cornelia Liebau; Volkhard Kurowski; Daniel Droemann; Klaus Dalhoff; Open Access; Daniel Droemann; Klaus Dalhoff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

BMC Pediatrics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Bone and body composition analyzed by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) in clinical and nutritional evaluation of young patients with Cystic Fibrosis: a cross-sectional study

Vincenzina Lucidi; Carla Bizzarri; Federico Alghisi; Sergio Bella; Beatrice Russo; Graziamaria Ubertini

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

BMC Pediatrics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Screening rules for growth to detect celiac disease: A case-control simulation study

Paula Van Dommelen; Floor K Grote; Wilma Oostdijk; Sabine Mpf De; Muinck Keizer-schrama; Bart Boersma; Gerard M Damen; Ra G Csizmadia; Paul H Verkerk; Jan M Wit; Stef Van Buuren; Open Access

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

BMC Endocrine Disorders BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Accuracy of self-reported height measurements in parents and its effect on mid-parental target height calculation

Ieva Braziuniene; Thomas A Wilson; Andrew H Lane; Andrew H Lane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

BMC Pediatrics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article The diagnostic work up of growth failure in secondary health care; An evaluation of consensus guidelines

Floor K Grote; Wilma Oostdijk; Sabine Mpf; De Muinck Keizer-schrama; Paula Van Dommelen; Stef Van Buuren; Friedo W Dekker; Arnoldus G Ketel; Henriette A Moll; Jan M Wit Open Access

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

BMC Surgery BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Rooh- Allah Yegane; Mohammad Bashashati; Reza Bashtar; Mina Ahmadi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

BMC Genomics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article What can you do with 0.1 genome coverage? A case study based on a genome survey of the scuttle fly Megaselia scalaris (Phoridae)

David A Rasmussen; Mohamed Af Noor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

BMC Medical Education BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article The research rotation: competency-based structured and novel approach to research training of internal medicine residents

Balavenkatesh Kanna; Changchun Deng; Savil N Erickson; Jose A Valerio; Vihren Dimitrov; Anita Soni; Open Access

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

BMC Medical Ethics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article An eight-year follow-up national study of medical school and general hospital ethics committees in Japan

Akira Akabayashi; Brian T Slingsby; Noriko Nagao; Ichiro Kai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

BMC Medical Education BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

Steinar Hunskaar; Jarle Breivik; Maje Siebke; Karin Tmmers; Kristian Figenschau; John-bjarne Hansen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

BMC Medical Education BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Life satisfaction and resilience in medical school a six-year longitudinal, nationwide and comparative study

Kari Kjeldstadli; Reidar Tyssen; Arnstein Finset; Erlend Hem; Tore Gude; Nina T Gronvold; Oivind Ekeberg; Per Vaglum

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

BMC Medicine BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Gender perspective in medicine: a vital part of medical scientific rationality. A useful model for comprehending structures and hierarchies within medical science

Gunilla Risberg; Katarina Hamberg; Eva E Johansson; Eva E Johansson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

BMC Medicine BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article The effect of acetaminophen (four grams a day for three consecutive days) on hepatic tests in alcoholic patients a multicenter randomized study

Jt Slattery; Rc Dart

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

BMC Public Health BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Helasoja et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Ville Helasoja; Eero Lahelma; Ritva Prttl; Janina Petkeviciene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

BMC Psychiatry BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Accentuation of suicides but not homicides with rising latitudes of Greenland in the sunny months

Karin S Bjrkstn; Daniel F Kripke; Peter Bjerregaard; Open Access

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

BMC Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase gene and susceptibility to breast cancer in a Chinese population: a case-control analysis

Xiangjun Zhai; Jun Gao; Zhibin Hu; Jinhai Tang; Jianwei Qin; Shui Wang; Xuechen Wang; Guangfu Jin; Jiyong Liu; Wenshen Chen; Feng Chen; Xinru Wang; Qingyi Wei; Hongbing Shen; Qingyi Wei; Hongbing Shen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

PPL Electric Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers heating and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, June 1-August 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies concerning the cellobiose properties of Clostridium thermocellum were started to determine if the cellulose degradation end products can be enhanced for glucose (with a subsequent decrease in cellobiose). Implications of preliminary studies indicate that the cells or the enzyme(s) responsible for converting cellobiose to glucose can be manipulated environmentally and genetically to increase the final yield of glucose. The second area of effort is to the production of chemical feedstocks. Three fermentations have been identified for exploration. Preliminary reports on acrylic acid acetone/butanol, and acetic acid production by C. propionicum, C. acetobutylicum, and C. thermoaceticum, respectively, are included. (DMC)

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Multiple-Case Analysis of Nocturnal Radiation-Fog Development in the Central Valley of California Utilizing the GOES Nighttime Fog Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation fog in the Central Valley of California has received very little attention in terms of climatological research. This study uses the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) nighttime fog product to develop a sequence of ...

S. Jeffrey Underwood; Gary P. Ellrod; Aaron L. Kuhnert

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Public Utilities (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities (Florida) Utilities (Florida) Public Utilities (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Florida Public Service Commission Chapter 366 of the Florida Statutes governs the operation of public utilities, and includes a section pertaining to cogeneration and small power production (366.051). This section establishes the state's support for incorporating cogenerators and small power producers into the grid, and directs the Public Service Commission to establish regulations and

244

Direct use geothermal energy utilization for ethanol production and commercial mushroom growing at Brady's Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Technical feasibility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is concerned with the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating two geothermally cascaded facilities, a bio-mass fuel ethanol production facility and a mushroom growing facility, where Geothermal Food Processors presently operates the world's largest direct-use geothermal vegetable dehydration facility. A review and analysis of the data generated from the various project tasks indicates that existing, state-of-the-art, ethanol production and mushroom growing technologies can be successfully adapted to include the use of geothermal energy. Additionally, a carefully performed assessment of the geothermal reservoir indicates that this resource is capable of supporting the yearly production of 10 million gallons of fuel ethanol and 1.5 million pounds of mushrooms, in addition to the demands of the dehydration plant. Further, data indicates that the two facilities can be logistically supported from existing agricultural and commerce sources located within economical distances from the geothermal source.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: LS Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry has historically comanaged low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products as a cost-effective means of disposal. This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the LS site. This is one of 14 sites investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and ...

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

The outcome of our research can be utilized by metal foam manufacturers to improve their product. An example of this is Recemat International, a producer of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of different biofuels can be produced, including Fisher-Tropsch liquids (FTL), dimethyl ether (DME that would be used for biofuel production. These fuels include Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL), methanol such as dimethyl ether (DME) or Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL) made from lignocellulosic biomass. A relatively

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

247

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, December 1, 1976--February 28, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The microbial degradation of cellulosic biomass has focused on the use of a thermophilic (55 to 60/sup 0/C), anaerobic microorganism, Clostridium thermocellum. When this organism is grown with a crystalline cellulose, the cellulases produced are mainly extracellular. This same organism when grown on solka floc, high specific growth rates are exhibited as well as the ability to produce high concentrations of soluble reducing sugars. The rate of soluble sugar production appears to be growth associated. Studies on acrylic acid production are focused on two organisms: Peptostreptococcus elsdenii and Clostridium propionicum. An economic analysis on the acetone/butanol fermentation has been completed. The results show that continuous operation can reduce significantly the production cost compared to batch operation with the cost of raw material being major fractions for both processes. An increase in solvent concentration will effect substantial cost reduction. The production of acetic acid by Clostridium thermoaceticum has been shown to occur rapidly by this organism. Acetic acid concentration between 15 to 20 gm/liter have been achieved, corresponding to 86 percent of the theoretical maximum yield.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php

249

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: AP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power companies typically comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement practices at an impoundment at a power plant located in the southwestern United States. The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: MO Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the MO site. The MO site is one of 14 investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

Screening Study for Utilizing Feedstocks Grown on CRP Lands in a Biomass to Ethanol Production Facility: Final Subcontract Report; July 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Feasibility study for a cellulosic ethanol plant using grasses grown on Conservation Reserve Program lands in three counties of South Dakota, with several subcomponent appendices. In 1994, there were over 1.8 million acres of CRP lands in South Dakota. This represented approximately 5 percent of the total U.S. cropland enrolled in the CRP. Nearly 200,000 acres of CRP lands were concentrated in three northeastern South Dakota counties: Brown, Marshall and Day. Most of the acreage was planted in Brohm Grass and Western Switchgrass. Technology under development at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and at other institutions, is directed towards the economical production of fuel-grade ethanol from these grasses. The objective of this study is to identify and evaluate a site in northeastern South Dakota which would have the greatest potential for long-term operation of a financially attractive biomass-to-ethanol production facility. The effort shall focus on ethanol marketing issues which would provide for long-term viability of the facility, feedstock production and delivery systems (and possible alternatives), and preliminary engineering considerations for the facility, as well as developing financial pro-formas for a proposed biomass-to-ethanol production facility in northeastern South Dakota. This Final Report summarizes what was learned in the tasks of this project, pulling out the most important aspects of each of the tasks done as part of this study. For greater detail on each area it is advised that the reader refer to the entire reports which are included as appendixes.

American Coalition for Ethanol; Wu, L.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Screening Study for Utilizing Feedstocks Grown on CRP Lands in a Biomass to Ethanol Production Facility: Final Subcontract Report; July 1998  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility study for a cellulosic ethanol plant using grasses grown on Conservation Reserve Program lands in three counties of South Dakota, with several subcomponent appendices. In 1994, there were over 1.8 million acres of CRP lands in South Dakota. This represented approximately 5 percent of the total U.S. cropland enrolled in the CRP. Nearly 200,000 acres of CRP lands were concentrated in three northeastern South Dakota counties: Brown, Marshall and Day. Most of the acreage was planted in Brohm Grass and Western Switchgrass. Technology under development at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and at other institutions, is directed towards the economical production of fuel-grade ethanol from these grasses. The objective of this study is to identify and evaluate a site in northeastern South Dakota which would have the greatest potential for long-term operation of a financially attractive biomass-to-ethanol production facility. The effort shall focus on ethanol marketing issues which would provide for long-term viability of the facility, feedstock production and delivery systems (and possible alternatives), and preliminary engineering considerations for the facility, as well as developing financial pro-formas for a proposed biomass-to-ethanol production facility in northeastern South Dakota. This Final Report summarizes what was learned in the tasks of this project, pulling out the most important aspects of each of the tasks done as part of this study. For greater detail on each area it is advised that the reader refer to the entire reports which are included as appendixes.

American Coalition for Ethanol; Wu, L.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

254

Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Utilities Electric Utility Rates The Utilities Gateway houses OpenEI's free, community-editable utility rate repository. OpenEI users may browse, edit and add new electric utility rates to OpenEI's repository. EIA provides the authoritative list of utility companies in the United States, and thus OpenEI limits utility rates to companies listed by EIA. 43,031 rates have been contributed for 3,832 EIA-recognized utility companies. Browse rates by zip code Browse rates by utility name Create or edit a rate Number of Utility Companies by State Click on a state to view summaries for that state. See a list of all U.S. utility companies and aliases Utility Rate Database Description The Utility Rate Database (URDB) is a free storehouse of rate structure

255

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, June 1, 1977--August 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on the microbial degradation of cellulose biomass continues to be centered around Clostridium thermocellum. The effect of surfactants on growth and cellulase production by C. thermocellum was investigated. The effect of pH on growth and reducing sugar accumulation rate of Clostridium thermocellum on solka floc was evaluated. Activity of extracellular cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was examined using TNP--CMC and Avicel as substrates. The pH optima are 5 and 4.5, respectively. Hydrolysis of either substrate is not inhibited by cellobiose, xylose, or glucose. The enzyme appears to be quite stable under reaction conditions at 60/sup 0/C. Thus far, regulation studies indicate that CMCase formation is not repressed by cellobiose. The search for plasmids in C. thermocellum was continued. The presence of plasmids was confirmed by cesium chloride ethidium bromide gradient centrifugation and electron microscopy. Two plasmids were detected, one with an approximate molecular weight of 1 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. Studies on the fermentation of lactic acid to propionic acid showed the pathway in C. propionicum to be simpler than in M. elsdenii and hence more amenable to manipulation for acrylate production. Using Lactobacillius delbrueckii, it was possible to convert glucose, cellobiose, and cellulose hydrolysates to lactic acid rapidly and quantitatively. Fermentations of C. acetobutylicum growing in soluble media were performed. Detailed studies of Clostridium thermoaceticum have shown that pH is the primary limiting factor in the production of acetic acid. pH-controlled fermentations indicated accumulations of over 30 gm/l of acetic acid.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, March 1, 1977--May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The degradation of cellulosic biomass continues to focus on the anaerobic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. When grown on crystalline cellulose (MN300) in batch culture, there is an initial rapid accumulation of reducing sugars but the sugars are rapidly metabolized in later times during the fermentation. When grown on Solka floc with periodic addition of the substrate, there is a continual accumulation of reducing sugars (xylose, glucose, and cellobiose) as well as ethanol and acetic acid during the entire course of the fermentation. In the presence of surfactant in the growth medium, there is an increased appearance of extracellular cellulases. A chemically defined medium is being developed for growth Cl. thermocellum in order to study the enzyme regulations. Lastly, a trinitrophenyl-carboxylmethyl cellulose substrate for determining cellulose activity appears to be a promising and rapid assay. Progress in the genetic manipulations has been cautious but promising. Preliminary evidence leads to optimistic projection on the presence of plasmids and bacteriophage in Cl. thermocellum. The production of chemical feedstocks continues to focus on acrylic acid, acetone/butanol and acetic acid. Studies with cell free extracts of Clostridium propionicum have shown the production and accumulation of acrylic acid from lactic acid. The use of electron acceptor in cell-free systems has shown effective prevention on the reduction of acrylic acid to propionic acid. Medium development and strain selection using available acetone/butanol producing Cl. acetobutylicum have been initiated. There is every indication that these strains are capable to produce mixed solvents close to the theoretical maximum yield. An accurate and rapid method for quantifying acetic acid was developed. This technique is being used to examine the pertinent parameters on the production of acetic acid by Clostridium thermoaceticum.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Utility Regulation (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation (Indiana) Regulation (Indiana) Utility Regulation (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission enforces regulations in this legislation that apply to all individuals, corporations, companies, and partnerships that may own, operate, manage, or control any equipment for the production, transmission, delivery, or furnishing of heat, light,

259

PRELIMINARY DESIGN AND COST ESTIMATE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CENTRAL STATION POWER FROM AN AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR UTILIZING THORIUM-URANIUM-233  

SciTech Connect

The design and economics of the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor as basically under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. The reactor system utilizes thorium-U-233 fuel. Conditions accompanying reactor systems generating up to l080 mw of net electrical energy are covered. The study indicates that a generating station, with a net thermal efficiency of 28.l%, might be constructed for approximately 0/kw and 0/kw at the l80 mw and l080 mw electrical levels, respectively. These values result in capital expenses of approximately 4.72 and 2.86 milis/kwh. A major part of fuel cost is the expense of chemical processing. It is therefore advantageous 10 schedule fuel through a relatively large processing system since fixed charges are insensitive to chemical plant size. By handling fuel through a plant large enough for processing 200 kg of thorium per day, total fuel costa of about 1 mill/kwh result. This cost for fuel processing appears applicable to generating stations up to abeut 540 mw in size, decreasing to about 0.6 mills/kwh at the l080 mw level. Operating and maintenance expense, including heavy water cost on a lease basis, varies between l.34 and 0.89 mills/kwh for l80 and l080 megawatts respectively. If the purchase of heavy water is required, 0.3 to 0.4 mills/kwh must be added. It is concluded that the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor may produce electrical power competitive with conventional generating systems when the remaining technical problems are solved. It is felt ihat the research and development now programed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will solve these problems and affect costs favorably. (auth)

Carson, H.G.; Landrum, L.H. eds.

1955-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Technical and economic assessment of processes for the production of butanol and acetone. Phase two: analysis of research advances. Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The initial objective of this work was to develop a methodology for analyzing the impact of technological advances as a tool to help establish priorities for R and D options in the field of biocatalysis. As an example of a biocatalyzed process, butanol/acetone fermentation (ABE process) was selected as the specific topic of study. A base case model characterizing the technology and economics associated with the ABE process was developed in the previous first phase of study. The project objectives were broadened in this second phase of work to provide parametric estimates of the economic and energy impacts of a variety of research advances in the hydrolysis, fermentation and purification sections of the process. The research advances analyzed in this study were based on a comprehensive literature review. The six process options analyzed were: continuous ABE fermentaton; vacuum ABE fermentation; Baelene solvent extraction; HRI's Lignol process; improved prehydrolysis/dual enzyme hydrolysis; and improved microorganism tolerance to butanol toxicity. Of the six options analyzed, only improved microorganism tolerance to butanol toxicity had a significant positive effect on energy efficiency and economics. This particular process option reduced the base case production cost (including 10% DCF return) by 20% and energy consumption by 16%. Figures and tables.

None

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

BMC Nuclear Medicine BioMed Central BMC 1 2001, Nuclear Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Re-HEDP: pharmacokinetic characterization, clinical and dosimetric evaluation in osseous metastatic patients with two levels of radiopharmaceutical dose

Eduardo Savio; Javier Gaudiano; Ana M Robles; Henia Balter; Andrea Paolino; Andrea Lpez; Juan C Hermida; Eugenia De Marco; Eduardo Osinaga

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

BMC Pulmonary Medicine BioMed Central BMC 2001, Pulmonary Medicine 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exertional dyspnea as initial manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis A case report and literature review

Beatrice Neidhart; Robert Kosek; Lucas M Bachmann; Claudia Stey; Claudia Stey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

BMC Biology BioMed Central Editorial BMC Biology turns five  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Moylan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Elizabeth C Moylan; Matt J Hodgkinson; Maria Kowalczuk; Scott C Edmunds; Penelope A Webb; Maria Kowalczuk; Scott C Edmunds; Penelope A Webb

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Gas Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Utilities (Maine) Gas Utilities (Maine) Gas Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Public Utilities Commission Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one customer when any portion

266

Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribes tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West mini-grid sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribes wind resources.

Hualapai Tribal Nation

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Industry/Utility Partnerships: Formula for Success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry/utility partnerships are created when both parties work productively toward common goals. American industry faces tough global competition and to be successful must create and operate modern production facilities. Cost and energy efficient electrotechnologies play a critical role in their competitiveness. Utilities can play a central role in industrial competitiveness, not only by providing competitively priced and reliable power, but also by helping their customers to identify and implement the most appropriate technologies. When the correct environment is created, both win. Industry reduces costs and produces high quality products. The utility gains customer loyalty and achieves business success.

Smith, W. R.; Spriggs, H. D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become an extremely popular subject when discussing conservation and energy saving techniques. One of the key factors which effect conservation is the utility viewpoint on PURPA and cogeneration rule making. These topics are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition to utilities and industry, third party owner/operation is also a viable option to cogeneration. These options are also discussed as to their impact on the utility and the potential of these ownership arrangements.

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The directory of United States coal & technology export resources. Profiles of domestic US corporations, associations and public entities, nationwide, which offer products or services suitable for export, relating to coal and its utilization  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of available U.S. coal and coal related resources to potential purchasers of those resources abroad. The directory lists business entities within the US which offer coal related resources, products and services for sale on the international market. Each listing is intended to describe the particular business niche or range of product and/or services offered by a particular company. The listing provides addresses, telephones, and telex/fax for key staff in each company committed to the facilitation of international trade. The content of each listing has been formulated especially for this directory and reflects data current as of the date of this edition. The directory listings are divided into four primary classifications: coal resources; technology resources; support services; and financing and resource packaging. The first three of which are subdivided as follows: Coal Resources -- coal derivatives, coal exporters, and coal mining; Technology Resources -- advanced utilization, architects and engineers, boiler equipment, emissions control and waste disposal systems, facility construction, mining equipment, power generation systems, technical publications, and transport equipment; Support Services -- coal transport, facility operations, freight forwarders, sampling services and equipment, and technical consultants. Listings for the directory were solicited on the basis of this industry breakdown. Each of the four sections of this directory begins with a matrix illustrating which companies fall within the particular subclassifications specific to that main classification. A general alphabetical index of companies and an index by product/service classification are provided following the last section of the directory.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Utilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine whether municipalization would be a beneficial option for many California cities. Source: Bay Area Economic Forum. Establishing a Tribal Utility Authority Handbook Provides an introduction to electric utility operation and general guidance for the steps required to form a tribal utility authority. Funded by an economic development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development to the Ak-Chin Indian Community and its tribal utility authority, Ak-Chin Energy Services. Source: Leonard S. Gold, Utility Strategies Consulting Group,

271

Leveraging Utility Assets in Wireless Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have a lot of attractive assets--hard, soft, and intangible, which can be shared for profit with the telecommunications industry. Specifically, PCS providers are a very attractive source of revenue for utilities. This report, which is a companion piece to other EPRI reports on wireless technologies and products, reviews how utilities can position themselves to derive revenue from the intrinsic value of their assets.

1997-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Production of Materials with Superior Properties Utilizing ...  

UT-B IDs 200401490, 200501531, 200701867, 200802085, 200902312, 201002455, 201102675 07.2012 Technology Summary Processing materials in a magnetic ...

273

GRAPHITE PRODUCTION UTILIZING URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE CATALYST  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>The graphitizing of a mixture composed of furfuryl alcohol binder and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate hardener and the subsequent curing, baking, and graphitizing with pressure being initially applied prior to curing are described. The pressure step may be carried out by extrusion, methyl cellulose being added to the mixture before the completion of extrusion. Uranium oxide may be added to the graphitizable mixture prior to the heating and pressure steps. The graphitizable mixture may consist of discrete layers of different compositions. (AEC)

Sheinberg, H.; Armstrong, J.R.; Schell, D.H.

1964-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Distillers Grains: Production, Properties, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, distillers dried grains with solubles (known as DDGS) has become a major feed ingredient in North America, and its use is increasing globally. This book provides a comprehensive summary of the research conducted to determine

275

Energy Utilization in Fermentation Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel ethanol industry has put into practice several techniques for minimizing energy requirements for ethanol manufacture. Thermal energy usage in fermentation grain ethanol plants has been reduced from the prior practice of 80,900 Btu per gallon ethanol to current demonstrated practice of 49,700 Btu per gallon. Future, state-of-the-art improvements are expected to reduce usage further to 37,000 Btu per gallon or less. The total energy input is projected at 52,000 Btu per gallon after adding in the electrical power. Energy savings have been achieved primarily by flash vapor reuse, pressure cascading of distillation units, and use of more efficient byproduct drying methods. These energy saving techniques should also be useful in other commercial processing applications.

Easley, C. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Electrolytic production of hydrogen utilizing photovoltaic cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has the potential to serve as both an energy storage means and an energy carrier in renewable energy systems. When renewable energy sources such as solar or wind power are used to produce electrical power, the output can vary depending on weather conditions. By using renewable sources to produce hydrogen, a fuel which can be stored and transported, a reliable and continuously available energy supply with a predictable long-term average output is created. Electrolysis is one method of converting renewable energy into hydrogen fuel. In this experiment we examine the use of an electrolyzer based on polymer-electrolyte membrane technology to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen is vented to the atmosphere and the hydrogen is stored in a small pressure vessel.

Daugherty, M.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

FEMP Utility Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Services Utility Services Karen Thomas & Deb Beattie  SPONSORED BY THE FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM  Overview  UESC Project Support  Agency / Utility Partnerships  Renewable Project Support  Design Assistance  Agency Energy Implementation Plans * * * * * * UESC Project Support Education UESC Workshops Agency Briefings Utility Briefings On-site team training Communications Web site Enabling documents * Case studies UESC Project Support Direct Project Assistance Project facilitation Advise & Consult In depth Contract development Technical Proposal review Performance Verification Agency / Utility Partnerships Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Strategic Partnering Meeting Renewable Projects  Resource Screening: - PV - Solar Hot Water

278

Northern Nevada Joint Utility Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect

After approximately eight months of formation discussion between a number of western utilities, a group of five companies defined a project scope, schedule and budget for assessing the prospects for electric power production using Nevada geothermal resources.

Richards, R.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Utility Brownfields Resource Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a program designed to assist utilities wishing to participate in local Brownfields redevelopment projects. EPRI developed this Brownfields guide to educate utility economic and real estate development personnel in identifying, screening, and supporting Brownfields projects.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solar Utility SpA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name Solar Utility SpA Place Italy Sector Solar Product Italy-based solar PV project developer. References Solar Utility SpA1 LinkedIn Connections...

282

Concept:Utility Companies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Companies Utility Companies Jump to: navigation, search Description of concept "Utility Companies"RDF feed [[Category:Utility Companies]] [[EiaUtilityId::+]] Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pages of concept "Utility Companies" Showing 200 pages belonging to that concept. (previous 200) (next 200) 4 4-County Electric Power Assn A A & N Electric Coop A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) AEP Generating Company AEP Texas Central Company AEP Texas North Company AES Eastern Energy LP AGC Division of APG Inc AP Holdings LLC AP Holdings LLC (New York) APN Starfirst, L.P. APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) APN Starfirst, L.P. (Texas) APNA Energy ARCO Products Co-Watson Accent Energy Holdings, LLC Accent Energy Holdings, LLC (New York)

283

Utility Wind Interest Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Interest Group Wind Interest Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Utility Wind Interest Group Place Reston, Virginia Zip VI 20195 Sector Wind energy Product The Utility Wind Interest Group (UWIG) is a non-profit corporation whose mission is to accelerate the appropriate integration of wind power into the electric system. References Utility Wind Interest Group[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Wind Interest Group is a company located in Reston, Virginia . References ↑ "Utility Wind Interest Group" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Wind_Interest_Group&oldid=352690" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

284

Definition: Electric utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utility utility Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric utility A corporation, agency, or other legal entity that owns and/or operates facilities for the generation, transmission, distribution or sale of electricity primarily for use by the public. Also known as a power provider.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An electric utility is an electric power company that engages in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity for sale generally in a regulated market. The electrical utility industry is a major provider of energy in most countries. It is indispensable to factories, commercial establishments, homes, and even most recreational facilities. Lack of electricity causes not only inconvenience, but also economic loss due to reduced industrial production. Utility in the terms of power system,

285

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

286

OpenEI Community - Utility+Utility Access Map  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Utility Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id  Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id.  From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id#comments

287

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Name Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns...

288

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are initiating business plans that enable them to play a more integral role in the solar power value chain. This report summarizes research completed to identify and track utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. EPRI and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort to evaluate the expanding range of utility activities in acquiring solar energy, including photovoltaic (PV) asset ownership. Throughout 2011, USBMs have been ca...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

292

Recovery Act: Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material Background Worldwide carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from human activity have...

293

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to:...

294

Conceptual Process Plant Utility Schemes with Hybrid Energy System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of Alternative energy Production from sun and wind power with storage can become an integral part of a process plant utility. This will facilitate reduced...

295

ENERGY AND UTILITIES ORNL-2219 Microorganisms Having Enhanced ...  

increases the ethanol cost due to both ethanol production rate and total ... ENERGY AND UTILITIES ... (Related Compositions and Methods of Use) ORNL-2219 Contact:

296

PPL Electric Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers heating and cooling equipment, motors, insulation,...

297

Utility+Utility Access Map | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: Category:Utility CompaniesEiaUtilityId::15248...

298

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization in stress conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Strains of xylose utilizing Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization and ethanol production during fermentation in stress conditions were obtained using an adaptation method. The adaptation involved continuously growing xylose utilizing Zymomonas in media containing high sugars, acetic acid, ammonia, and ethanol.

Caimi, Perry G; Emptage, Mark; Li, Xu; Viitanen, Paul V; Chou, Yat-Chen; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wind Energy Production Tax Credit (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Tax Credit (Iowa) Wind Energy Production Tax Credit (Iowa) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government MunicipalPublic Utility Rural...

302

Tempest in a teapot: utility advertising  

SciTech Connect

Utility sales programs represent a form of organizational slack. It is an expense that can be traded off in times of administrative stress, providing a satisfactory payment to the consumer while maintaining the integrity of the present institutional arrangement. Because it is a trade-off commodity, regulatory control of utility advertising will remain a ''tempest in a teapot.'' Marketing programs are an integral part of the selling process in the modern corporation, and severe restrictions on advertising must be temporary in nature. Court cases have pointed out that utility companies need to inform the consumer about the use of the product and to promote demand for the product. These actions will be considered legally reasonable no matter what the final disposition of current environmental regulations and energy restrictions. In fact, as acceptable social solutions develop for environmental and energy supply problems, the pressure on utility advertising can be expected to fall proportionately. However, the utility still represents the largest industrial concern in most locales. The utility advertising program makes the company even more visible. When there is public dissatisfaction with the more complex parts of the utility delivery system, the raucous voice of outrage will emerge from this tempestuous teapot.

Ciscel, D.H.

1976-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute  Investor-Owned Electric Companies  Membership includes  200 US companies,  More than 65 international affiliates and  170 associates  US members  Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and  Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and  Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda Significant Industry Trends Utility Infrastructure Investments Generation and Fuel Landscape

304

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

305

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort, initiated in 2011, to define, track, and evaluate the expanding range of regulated utility solar energy acquisition activities. This report provides a high-level overview of the conceptual framework by which EPRI-SEPA are classifying regulated utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. It then provides five case studies detailing existing ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

307

Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Cowpea and Utilization of Cross-Species Platforms in Legume Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Platforms in Legume Genomics A Dissertation submitted inSpecies Platforms in Legume Genomics by Sayan Das Doctor ofrich space of cowpea. BMC Genomics 9:107. Trudgill DL, Bala

Das, Sayan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Industry: Utility Roles and Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper identifies the factors that influence industrial firms' decisions to invest in energy efficiency and notes how the emerging wave of electric utility 'demand-side' planning and marketing can help industry control costs of production and also improve utility operations. The external and internal influences on electric utility demand-side management are identified, along with typical objectives of utility marketing programs. The concept of 'strategic marketing' is also introduced. Finally, a summary of selected electric utility experiences with industrial programs is provided, along with emerging trends in utility marketing.

Limaye, D. R.; Davis, T. D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

310

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

311

CO2 Utilization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon dioxide (CO2) use and reuse efforts focus on the conversion of CO2 to useable products and fuels that will reduce CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. These include: Enhanced Oil/Gas Recovery - Injecting CO2 into depleting oil or gas bearing fields to maximize the amount of CO2 that could be stored as well as maximize hydrocarbon production. CO2 as Feedstock - Use CO2 as a feedstock to produce chemicals (including fuels and polymers) and find applications for the end products. Non-Geologic Storage of CO2 - Use CO2 from an effluent stream to immobilize the CO2 permanently by producing stable solid material that are either useful products with economic value or a low cost produced material.

312

utilities | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utilities utilities Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system interconnect regions (ASCC, FRCC, HICC, MRO, NPCC, RFC, SERC, SPP, TRE, WECC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory (LCI) forms (both xls and xml). A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included. Source US Life Cycle Inventory Database Date Released May 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords ASCC FRCC HICC interconnect region LCI life cycle inventory MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE unit process US utilities WECC Data application/zip icon interconnect_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 6.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

313

Coal Utilization Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

314

Utility Stack Opacity Troubleshooting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have become increasingly concerned about stack plume visibility, and some have been cited for excess plume opacity. This troubleshooting guide enables utilities to characterize plume opacity problems at full-scale utility sites and evaluate possible solutions.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

UGI Utilities Electric Division | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Electric Division Utilities Electric Division Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UGI Utilities Electric Division Name UGI Utilities Electric Division Address 2525 North 12th Street, Suite 360 Place Reading, Pennsylvania Zip 19605 Sector Services Product Green Power Marketer Website http://www.ugi.com/electric/in Coordinates 40.3746587°, -75.9149578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3746587,"lon":-75.9149578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Green Utility Srl | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Srl Utility Srl Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Utility Srl Place Rome, Italy Zip 153 Product Italian PV project developer established by Solon, GESENU and Green Utility management. Coordinates 41.90311°, 12.49576° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.90311,"lon":12.49576,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

EERC Center for Biomass Utilization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center for Biomass Utilization Center for Biomass Utilization Jump to: navigation, search Name EERC Center for Biomass Utilization Place Grand Forks, North Dakota Sector Biofuels, Biomass Product The mission of CBU is to develop technologies for, and promote the use of, biomass for production of biopower, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts as well as mitigate the technical challenges associated with biomass utilisation. References EERC Center for Biomass Utilization[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization is a company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota . References ↑ "EERC Center for Biomass Utilization" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=EERC_Center_for_Biomass_Utilization&oldid=344557

318

Utility spot pricing, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the present spot pricing study carried out for SCE and PG&E is to develop the concepts which wculd lead to an experimental design for spot pricing in the two utilities. The report suggests a set of experiments ...

Schweppe, Fred C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Utility Baghouse Survey 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted comprehensive surveys of utility baghouse installations in 1981, 1991, and 2005 to summarize the state of the technology. The current survey focuses on nine selected pulse-jet baghouses to provide a better understanding of the design, performance, and operation of recent installations.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Advanced fossil energy utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This special issue of Fuel is a selection of papers presented at the symposium Advanced Fossil Energy Utilization co-sponsored by the Fuels and Petrochemicals Division and Research and New Technology Committee in the 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring National Meeting Tampa, FL, on April 2630, 2009.

Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Spivey, J.; Pennline, H.; Granite, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Utilization of farm-produced biogas  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of biogas for production of heat and electricity is discussed on basis of tests of various types of components. The necessary conversions and readjustments of boilers and four types of engines (motor-generators) are reported. The amount of available energy and suitable generator size is related to herd size and mode of operation. 13 refs.

Persson, S.P.E.; Bartlett, H.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Alternate Energy Production, Cogeneration, and Small Hydro Facilities (Indiana) Eligibility Utility...

325

Utility Line Inspections and Audits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility Line Inspections and Audits provides utility engineers with a concise reference for the pros, cons, and how to related to performing various line inspections and audits.

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

utility | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utility utility Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 11:14 Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! API developer OpenEI update utility Utility Companies utility rate Utility Rates version 1 version 2 version 3 web service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next generation web service for the utility rate database is finally here! I encourage you to check out the V2 Utility Rates API at http://en.openei.org/services/doc/rest/util_rates Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 11 January, 2013 - 14:21 Swinerton Renewable Energy Awarded Contract to Construct and Operate 250 MWac K Road Moapa Solar Plant Marketwire OpenEI Renewable Energy Solar Swinerton utility Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

327

pine (mail utility info)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pine (mail utility info) pine (mail utility info) Basics, FAQ, etc, On our UNIX machines, module load pine The line module load pine should ALSO be in the file ~/.rc/user_modules (The pine module also includes pico) pine usage with IMAP4 (UNIX) Moving pine email files into IMAP4 LBNL UNIX info on pine links to Pine Information Center Pine 4.2.1/Solaris: Forwarding as attachment; the following procedure has proved successful for at least some users: Check the option "enable-full-header-cmd". To get to this option, 1. M (Main Menu) 2. S (Setup) "Choose a setup task from the menu below :" 3. C (Configure) 4. Scroll down to "Advanced Command Preferences", and press "X" to set "enable-full-header-cmd". It looks like this: ================================================================

328

PDSF Utilization Graphs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Graphs Utilization Graphs This page contains a series of graphs that use data from the PDSF batch scheduler (SGE) to show the utilization of the cluster over the past 24 hours. The graphs were generated with RRDTool and are updated approximately every 15 minutes. This graph shows the aggregate cluster CPU availablity and usage according to sgeload: 24 hour rolling usage graph (click to see long term averages) This graph shows the number of jobs being run by each group: Rolling 24 Running Jobs by Group (click to see long term averages) This is the same graph as above weighted by the clockspeed (GHz) of the node used for the job: Rolling 24 Running Jobs by Group (click to see long term averages) This graph show the number of pending jobs by group: Rolling 24 Pending Jobs

329

BMC Health Services Research BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Patients ' satisfaction and opinions of their experiences during admission in a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan a cross sectional study

Sardar Zakariya Imam; Khezar Shahzada Syed; Syed Ahad Ali; Syed Umer Ali; Kiran Fatima; Marium Gill; Muhammad Ovais Hassan; Saad Hasan Hashmi; Maham T Siddiqi; Hadi Muhammad Khan; Omar Farooq Jameel; Maham T Siddiqi; Hadi Muhammad Khan; Omar Farooq Jameel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

BMC Molecular Biology BioMed Central Methodology article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: Helicases play essential roles in many cellular processes including replication, transcription and translation. Most helicases translocate along one strand of the duplex while displacing the complementary strand (of either DNA or RNA). Thus, helicases have directionality. They move along nucleic acids in either the 3' ? 5 ' or 5' ? 3 ' direction. The directionality of helicases with low activity or of those that cannot initiate duplex unwinding from a substrate that contains only one single-stranded overhang region is difficult to determine. Results: An improved assay to determine helicase directionality was developed that uses a substrate containing biotinylated oligonucleotides. As a proof of concept, it was shown that the substrates substantially improve helicase activity and directionality determination for several DNA helicases in comparison to more traditional substrates. In addition, a universal substrate that can be used to determine the directionality of both 3' ? 5 ' and 5' ? 3 ' helicases was developed. Conclusion: It is shown here that the use of a biotin-streptavidin complex as a helicase substrate improves helicase activity and the determination of helicase directionality. The method described

Jae-ho Shin; Zvi Kelman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

BMC Molecular Biology BioMed Central Methodology article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction: description of a RIN-based algorithm for accurate data normalization

Re Ho-pun-cheung; Caroline Bascoul-mollevi; Eric Assenat; Florence Boissire-michot; Dominic Cellier; Marc Ychou; Evelyne Lopez-crapez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

BMC Genetics BioMed Central Methodology article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A minimally invasive method of piscine tissue collection and an analysis of long-term field-storage conditions for samples

James J Campanella; John V Smalley Open Access; James J Campanella; John V Smalley

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

BMC Evolutionary Biology BioMed Central Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative genetic analysis of life-history traits of Caenorhabditis elegans in stressful environments

Simon C Harvey; Alison Shorto; Mark E Viney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

BMC Systems Biology BioMed Central Correspondence A framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Laurence Loewe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

BMC Health Services Research BioMed Central Study protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Randomised controlled trial of a psychiatric consultation model for treatment of common mental disorder in the occupational health setting

Christina M Van Der Feltz-cornelis; A Ac Meeuwissen; Fransina J De Jong; Rob Hoedeman; Iman Elfeddali; Open Access

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Although the monopolistic structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to industry. Electric utilities face increased competition, both from other utilities and from industrial self-generation. The paper discusses competition for industrial customers and innovative pricing trends that have evolved nationally to meet the growing competition for industrial sales. Cogeneration activities and the emerging concepts of wheeling power are also discussed. Specifics of industry evaluation and reaction to utility pricing are presented. Also enumerated are examples of the response various utilities throughout the United States have made to the needs of their industrial customers through innovative rate design. Industry/utility cooperation can result in benefits to industry, to the electric utility and to all other ratepayers. This discussion includes examples of successful cooperation between industry and utilities.

Ross, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Utility downsizings pose a dilemma for regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A utility's job-generating potential is critical to most local economies. At the same time, however, high utility employment levels maintain an upward pressure on rates, an effect that does not escape regulators' notice, especially during an economic slowdown. More than on regulator has been heard to say that hard-hit ratepayers should not be called on to support what some may seen as a bloated utility workforce scaled to better times. To complicate things even more, popular cost-cutting goals that include improving productivity and relying more on conservation could mean fewer jobs, at least at the utility. What's more, utility rates play a significant role in how local industries and businesses respond to an economic slowdown. This interplay of economic forces has complicated the ratemaking process. The size of a utility's workforce is an issue of growing significance in rate hearings. Forecasts for test-period salary and wage expenses are less reliable. Early retirement plans promise future savings for ratepayers, but at a cost today.

Cross, P.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: Demand-side management This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

OpenEI - US utilities  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Utility Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/899 This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (Utilities" title="http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities">http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011.

340

Pollution Prevention Procedure and Case Studies for Utility Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are working to eliminate or minimize the production of waste in all of their operations. This report presents a six-step process for pollution prevention and seven case studies demonstrating successful application of the process to eight utility wastes, including oily absorbents, municipal wastes, paint solvents, waste paint, blast grit, wood waste, unused chemicals, and unknown drum contents. The procedures for each waste are applicable to any utility site.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Program on Technology Innovation: Distributed Photovoltaic Power Applications for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging PV technology brings significant opportunities for many stakeholders including electric utilities, electric customers, energy-service providers and PV equipment vendors. The opportunities for utilities range from owning and deploying various PV generation resources and related products to incentivizing other owners to install PV systems and technology that provide benefits to the power system. This technical update describes PV power system concepts that utilities may want to consider as they pl...

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass utilization is one solution to our nations addiction to oil and fossil fuels. What is needed now is applied fundamental research that will cause economic technology development for the utilization of the diverse biomass resources in the United States. This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) applied fundamental research project contributes to the development of economical biomass utilization for energy, transportation fuels, and marketable chemicals using biorefinery methods that include thermochemical and fermentation processes. The fundamental and basic applied research supports the broad scientific objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program, especially in the area of developing alternative renewable biofuels, sustainable bioenergy, technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental remediation. Its deliverables include 1) identifying and understanding environmental consequences of energy production from biomass, including the impacts on greenhouse gas production, carbon emission abatement, and utilization of waste biomass residues and 2) developing biology-based solutions that address DOE and national needs related to waste cleanup, hydrogen production from renewable biomass, biological and chemical processes for energy and fuel production, and environmental stewardship. This project serves the public purpose of encouraging good environmental stewardship by developing biomass-refining technologies that can dramatically increase domestic energy production to counter current trends of rising dependence upon petroleum imports. Decreasing the nations reliance on foreign oil and energy will enhance national security, the economy of rural communities, and future competitiveness. Although renewable energy has many forms, such as wind and solar, biomass is the only renewable energy source that can be governed through agricultural methods and that has an energy density that can realistically compete with, or even replace, petroleum and other fossil fuels in the near future. It is a primary domestic, sustainable, renewable energy resource that can supply liquid transportation fuels, chemicals, and energy that are currently produced from fossil sources, and it is a sustainable resource for a hydrogen-based economy in the future.

Zygarlicke, C.J.; Schmidt, D.D.; Olson, E.S.; Leroux, K.M.; Wocken, C.A.; Aulich, T.A.; WIlliams, K.D.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version 8.0.20100628 July 14, 2010 1.5.1 2.8 Igor Pedan,

344

2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top Green Utilities See All Rankings x Renewable Energy Sales Total Customer Participants...

345

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility v8020130510.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Extraction Utility Release Notes PARS II CPP...

346

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.aceee.org/research-report/u111 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carrots-utilities-providing-financial Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Cost Recovery/Allocation This report examines state experiences with shareholder financial incentives that encourage investor-owned utilities to provide energy

347

Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PVrate uses 15-minute or hourly data on building load and system production, as well as energy and demand charge information from a utility tariff sheet (usually available either...

348

Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority Place Cape May Court House, New Jersey Zip 8210 Product The CMCMUA was created to design, construct and operate efficient wastewater treatment facilities. References Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority is a company located in Cape May Court House, New Jersey . References ↑ "Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cap_May_County_Municipal_Utilities_Authority&oldid=343207"

349

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Industry Recruitment/Support Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Program Grant Program Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal gasification. The statute also supports the development of projects using renewable energy sources as well

351

Utility Data Collection Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Collection Service Data Collection Service Federal-Utility Partnership Working Group 4 May 2006 Paul Kelley, Chief of Operations, 78 th CES, Robins AFB David Dykes, Industrial Segment Mgr, Federal, GPC Topics  Background  Commodities Metered  Data Collection  Cost  Results Background  Robins AFB (RAFB) needed to:  Control electricity usage and considered Demand Control  Track and bill base tenants for energy usage  Metering Project Originated in 1993  $$ requirements limited interest  Developed criteria for available $$  Energy Policy Act 2005:  All facilities sub-metered by 2012  $$ no longer restricts metering project Metering Criteria prior to EPACT 2005  All New Construction - (per Air Force Instructions)

352

EM Utility Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 12 EM UTILITY CONTRACT Site State Supplier Executed Contract Type DOE Contract # East Tennessee Technology Park TN Tennessee Valley Authority 4/27/2007 Energy supply contract (retail) DE-AC05-07OR23242 Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2001 Transmission Service Agreement Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2011 Power Sales Agreement (retail) Moab UT Paducah KY Electric Energy, Inc. (EEI as agent for DOE) Original Power Contract Portsmouth OH Pike Natural Gas 2/28/2007 Negotiated contract Portsmouth OH Ohio Valley Electric Corporation (OVEC) 9/10/2008 Letter Agreement DE-AC05-03OR22988 Savannah River Site SC South Carolina Electric & Gas

353

Utility Metering - AGL Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGL Resources AGL Resources Mike Ellis Director, AGL Energy Services Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2013 - May 22-23 San Francisco, CA Hosted by: Pacific Gas and Electric Company  Multiple LDCs with legacy metering equipment  Several use Itron 100G technology ◦ Mobile, once-a-month data collection ◦ Meter can store interval data for >30 days ◦ Meter technology could be leverage on fixed-base network, however there are no current plans for upgrade  Technology for capturing interval data is installed on case by case basis ◦ Customers on Interruptible Rate ◦ Large users  Electronic corrector installed on the meter ◦ Pressure and Temperature compensation  Typically data is retrieved once a day ◦ Transmission frequency impacts battery life

354

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Extraction Utility Design Specification May 13, 2013 Document Version 1.10 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version

355

Utility spot pricing study : Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spot pricing covers a range of electric utility pricing structures which relate the marginal costs of electric generation to the prices seen by utility customers. At the shortest time frames prices change every five ...

Caramanis, Michael C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Carbon Dioxide Utilization Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Mercury Sorbent Field Testing Program Sorbent Technologies Corporation Western Kentucky University 9292003 Enhanced Practical Photosynthesis Carbon Sequestration ORNL...

357

Utility stresses environmental programs, research projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B.C. Hydro, the provincial electric utility of British Columbia, views environmental programs and research projects as an important part of its business. Many of these activities stem from some aspect of hydroelectric generation as the utility relies on 39 reservoirs and 30 hydro stations for the bulk of its electricity production. These programs and research projects are featured in B.C. Hydro's first annual Report on the Environment, which summarizes the utility's work to minimize the effects of operations on the natural and social environment. Some programs and research projects were initiated some years ago, while others are new. B.C.'s environmental programs include environmental audits and fish and wildlife compensation (mitigation) programs. In 1988, the utility and the province's Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks began developing compensation programs to address water license requirements for B.C. Hydro's hydroelectric developments. Today, compensation programs for the Peace and Columbia river area serve as models for future programs. The utility also reports it is reviewing all operating orders for its water system to identify opportunities to make operations more sensitive to environmental concerns. Additionally, work is under way on a preliminary strategy for addressing fish and water quality issues and setting minimum flow requirements. And in an effort to control dust storms, B.C. Hydro reports it is studying native perennial plants that can endure the flooding/drawdown cycle typical of a water storage reservoir.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluating Utility Costs from Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the method of calculation of incremental costs of steam, condensate, feedwater and electricity produced by the industrial cogeneration plant. (This method can also be applied to other energy production plants.) It also shows how to evaluate the energy consumption by the process facility using the costs determined by the method. The paper gives practical examples of calculation of the incremental costs of various utilities and emphasizes the importance of the calculation accuracy.

Polsky, M. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cogeneration Assessment Methodology for Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented that enables electric utilities to assess the cogeneration potential among industrial, commercial, and institutional customers within the utility's service area. The methodology includes a survey design, analytic assessment model, and a data base to track customers over time. A case study is presented describing the background, procedures, and results of a cogeneration investigation for Northeast Utilities.

Sedlik, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

An Assessment of the Potential for Remanufacturing Out-of-Service Southern Pine Utility Poles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI engaged The Beck Group (BECK), a forest products consulting firm located in Portland, Oregon, to estimate the supply and quality of out-of-service Southern Pine utility poles and to assess the potential for remanufacturing/reusing and marketing out-of-service utility poles into various solid, roundwood and other products. This report principally identifies the potential volumes and condition of out-of-service utility poles from cooperating utilities that use primarily Southern Pine poles. The report...

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

Utility Connection | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Connection Utility Connection Jump to: navigation, search Return to Connections to Energy Use Data and Information Page Please tell us how connected you are to your customers Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire! As you know, utility data is very important and, if used correctly, can educate consumers and change their behavior to save money and energy. First select your utility company, then provide us a little information about yourself. Only one person from each utility can answer these questions and the results from your input will be shown on the Utility Data Accessibility Map. If the questionnaire has already been completed for your utility and you think the answers need to be changed, or if you are having trouble accessing your questionnaire, please contact the .

365

Pelican Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pelican Utility Pelican Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pelican Utility Place Alaska Utility Id 29297 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.4450/kWh Commercial: $0.4450/kWh Industrial: $0.3890/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Pelican_Utility&oldid=411348

366

Flora Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flora Utilities Flora Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Flora Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 6425 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Municipal Rate Commercial Power Acct. Rate Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0958/kWh Commercial: $0.0893/kWh Industrial: $0.0805/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flora_Utilities&oldid=410706

367

US utilities | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6489 6489 Varnish cache server US utilities Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

368

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Optimizing the Day to Day Operation of Utility Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the 2002 IETC, Linnhoff March presented an overview of spreadsheet-based software packages to rigorously model site utility systems. Such models allow the user to plan future scenarios that might impact upon the system operation (energy saving projects, production changes, new equipment, future energy tariffs, etc). Indeed, since last year, the DOE has made utility system template models freely available to industrial users as reported elsewhere at the 2003 IETC. Until last year, most industrial applications of this utility system software were set up for planning purposes, largely off-line. More recently, these applications have become more sophisticated and can operate on-line in real time. They include complex optimization routines to ensure that the utility system is always being operated in the best possible way under any prevailing conditions of production, energy tariffs and other variables. These optimizer models typically reduce day-to-day utility system operating costs by between 2 and 5%.

Eastwood, A.; Bealing, C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Town of Braintree, Massachusetts (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Braintree, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Braintree, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Braintree Town of Place Massachusetts Utility Id 2144 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COGENERATION AND SMALL POWER PRODUCTION SERVICE - SINGLE PHASE Commercial COGENERATION AND SMALL POWER PRODUCTION SERVICE - THREE PHASE Commercial

372

Solar Energy Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Cover: One route to harvesting the energy of the sun involves learning to mimic natural photosynthesis. Here, sunlight falls on a porphyrin, one member of a family of molecules that includes the chlorophylls, which play a central role in capturing light and using its energy for photosynthesis in green plants. Efficient light-harvesting of the solar spectrum by porphyrins and related molecules can be used to power synthetic molecular assemblies and solidstate devices applying the principles of photosynthesis to the production of hydrogen, methane, ethanol, and methanol from sunlight, water, and atmospheric carbon dioxide.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Utility Marketing Strategies and Pricing Trends (An Overview)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Industries and utilities alike find themselves today in a very competitive environment. Industry finds that it must defend against threats to its markets from both domestic and foreign competitors. Likewise, utilities are challenged by industry and by neighboring utility companies to achieve new levels in customer service, reliability, and pricing. The two, industry and utility, are not antagonists, but are actually partners in the same venture--the industrial customer's costs are oftentimes tied closely to the price of electric power, and the utility's economic health depends upon the continued success of its customers. To work, a utility's marketing strategy and pricing arrangements must form a cohesive whole. Electric 'power rates must be able to recover a utility's costs and provide a sound fiscal footing for the utility, and yet still be attractive to industry and encourage the economic development of the region. However, lower rates are simply not the only answer in a sound marketing strategy. Rather than merely developing plans in accordance with the lowest feasible rates, it is reasonable for the utility to promote electrical efficiency and industrial productivity to ensure that electricity becomes a decreasing economic burden on industry. The utility and its industrial customers must work together as partners for the success of any marketing strategy. In this way, new arrangements may evolve which pave the way for industrial growth. I chair this tutorial having firsthand experience of the value to a utility of fostering trusting relationships with the industrial customers it serves. Through such relationships, TVA has been able to learn at an early date the needs of the customers it serves, and to do what it can as a utility to meet those needs. This tutorial panel consists of national experts from industry, utility, and consulting firms, each having direct experience in the important area of utility marketing, pricing, and customer relations. "

Reynolds, S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Oconomowoc Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Oconomowoc Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13963 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

375

Slinger Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slinger Utilities Slinger Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Slinger Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 17324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial General Service- Three-Phase Commercial General Service- Three-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial Industrial Power- Time-of-Day Industrial Large Power- Time-of-Day Commercial Ornamental Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting Overhead Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting

376

Decatur Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Decatur Utilities Place Alabama Utility Id 4958 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - BILL CODE 50 Commercial Commercial - Bill Code 40 Commercial Residential - Bill Code 22 Residential Security Light 100 W HPS (No Pole) Lighting Security Light 100 W HPS (With Pole) Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS (No Pole) Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS (With Pole) Lighting

377

Dalton Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dalton Utilities Dalton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Dalton Utilities Place Georgia Utility Id 4744 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 - Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting 1000 - Watt Metal Halide Directional Type Lighting 150 Watt Mercury Vapor Underground Service Lighting 150 Watt Sodium Vapor Underground Service Lighting 175 - Watt Mercury Vapor Lighting 175 - Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting

378

Waupun Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waupun Utilities Waupun Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Waupun Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20213 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Renewable Energy Residential Residential Small Power Industrial Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.0968/kWh Industrial: $0.0770/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

379

Maryville Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryville Utilities Maryville Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Maryville Utilities Place Tennessee Utility Id 11789 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Schedule GSA-1 Commercial Commercial- Schedule GSA-2 Commercial Commercial- Schedule GSA-3 Commercial Outdoor Light- 100W HP Sodium Security Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 175W Mercury Vapor Lighting Outdoor Light- 250W HP Sodium Flood Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 250W HP Sodium Security Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 400W Mercury Vapor Lighting

380

Utility solar water heating workshops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to explore the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM measure. Expected benefits from the workshops included an increased awareness and interest by utilities in solar water heating as well as greater understanding by federal research and policy officials of utility perspectives for purposes of planning and programming. Ultimately, the project could result in better information transfer, increased implementation of solar water heating programs, greater penetration of solar systems, and more effective research projects. The objective of the workshops was satisfied. Each workshop succeeded in exploring the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM option. The participants provided a range of ideas and suggestions regarding useful next steps for utilities and NREL. According to evaluations, the participants believed the workshops were very valuable, and they returned to their utilities with new information, ideas, and commitment.

Barrett, L.B. (Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sheffield Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Sheffield Utilities Place Alabama Utility Id 17033 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Security Light 100 W HPS Openbottom Lighting Security Light 150 W HPS Cobrahead Lighting Security Light 150 W HPS Decorative Light Lighting Security Light 1500 W MH Floodlight Lighting Security Light 175 W MV Openbottom Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Cobrahead Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Decorative Light Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Floodlight Lighting

382

Cannelton Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cannelton Utilities Cannelton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Cannelton Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 2964 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting: Murcury Vapor Light, 175 Watt Lighting Rate 1: Residential Residential Rate 2: Multi-Phase Commercial Rate 2: Single Phase Commercial Rate 3: Industrial Phase II Residential Rate 3: Industrial phase I Industrial Street Lighting: Decorative Metal Halide, 175 Watt Lighting Street Lighting: High Pressure Sodium, 100 Watt Lighting

383

Utilities/ Energy efficiency program administrators | ENERGY STAR Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities/ Energy efficiency program administrators Utilities/ Energy efficiency program administrators Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

384

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Utility Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Save Energy Now Utility Partnerships In order to reduce industrial energy intensity and use, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is forming...

385

APS sector layout: Utilities, etc  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin describes the general physical layout of the APS Experiment Hall and the utilities that will be available for the beamlines.

Davey, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

APS sector layout: Utilities, etc.  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin describes the general physical layout of the APS Experiment Hall and the utilities that will be available for the beamlines.

Davey, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESP: A System Utilization Benchmark Adrian T. Wong, LeonidEffective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designedEffective System Performance (ESP) benchmark, which measures

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Utility Partnerships Program Overview (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program overview brochure for the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

390

DOE-NETL Electric Utility-Water R&D Program EPRI Water Advisory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Utility-Water R&D Program EPRI Water Advisory Council September 25, 2002 Milwaukee, WI Thomas J. Feeley, III, Product Manager Innovations for Existing Plants TJFEPRI...

391

Columbia Utilities Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Electricity Place New York Utility Id 55814 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861...

392

2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top...

393

Helio Micro Utility Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helio Micro Utility Inc Helio Micro Utility Inc Address 1827A Fifth Street Place Berkeley, California Zip 94710 Sector Solar Product Contracts with solar installers to build and maintain solar power systems Website http://www.heliomu.com/ Coordinates 37.8695067°, -122.2994149° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8695067,"lon":-122.2994149,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Advanced Light Water Reactor utility requirements document  

SciTech Connect

The ALWR Requirements Document is a primary work product of the EPRI Program. This document is an extensive compilation of the utility requirements for design, construction and performance of advanced light water reactor power plants for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document's primary emphasis is on resolution of significant problems experienced at existing nuclear power plants. It is intended to be used with companion documents, such as utility procurement specifications, which would cover the remaining detailed technical requirements applicable to new plant projects. The ALWR Requirements Document consists of several major parts. This volume is Part I, The Executive Summary. It is intended to serve as a concise, management level synopsis of advanced light water reactors including design objectives and philosophy, overall configuration and features and the steps necessary to proceed from the conceptual design stage to a completed, functioning power plant.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

PRELIMINARY UTILITY SERVICE CONNECTION APPLICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICES: WATER, SANITARY, STORM, GAS, and DISTRICT HEATING Part 3 (a). Water Distribution. Water service.5.7 and Section 02730, Clause 2.5.6). #12;Page 2 of 2 Revised 4 October 2011 Part 3 (c). Gas and District Heating) and Section (TBA-District Heating ­ contact UBC Utilities. · Fax or mail request to UBC Utilities (address

Vellend, Mark

396

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Utility Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Name: Utility Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: A Data:Add4bb7f-e6bd-4427-a614-3a92bd5ba15d Pages using the property "OpenEI/UtilityRate/Utility" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 0000827d-84d0-453d-b659-b86869323897 + Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc + 000086db-7a5e-4356-9c57-c912f7d1622e + Talquin Electric Coop, Inc + 0003a8b3-04b9-4ecb-b06d-6022e7f0f009 + Central Electric Membership Corporation + 000470c7-df04-47aa-bdd2-d70f0a2c52b3 + New London Electric&Water Util + 000b6dfa-a541-428a-9029-423006e22a34 + City of Plymouth, Wisconsin (Utility Company) + 000db36e-b548-43e7-a283-d37ecc77cef1 + Surprise Valley Electrification Corp. +

397

GSA-Utility Interconnection Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Property Asset Management Office of General Counsel Real Property Division Richard R. Butterworth Senior Assistant General Counsel (202) 501-4436 richard.butterworth@gsa.gov The Problem: * Most agreements require indemnity clauses - usually either by tariff or by the submission of standard contracts to PSCs * Federal Government precluded from providing indemnity by: * Anti-deficiency Act - 31 U.S.C. 665(a) * Adequacy of Appropriations Act - 41 U.S.C. 11 GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements Exception: Utility Contracts * GAO decision sets the foundation for exception for utility contracts - 59 Comp. Gen. 705 * But it's a narrow exception - B-197583, January 19, 1981 GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements

398

Proceedings: 1991 Fuel Oil Utilization Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist utilities in improving fossil steam plant operations, EPRI continues to conduct annual fuel oil utilization workshops. At the 1991 conference, personnel from 16 electric utilities exchanged ideas on improving residual fuel oil utilization in their generating plants.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

400

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Delaware...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Chesapeake Utilities Information for Businesses Delmarva Power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Technology Utilization Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilization Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Technology Utilization Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel...

402

Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

Tajbl, Daniel G. (Evanston, IL); Lee, Bernard S. (Lincolnwood, IL); Schora, Jr., Frank C. (Palatine, IL); Lam, Henry W. (Rye, NY)

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environmental Distribution of Petroleum Hydrocarbons at a Utility Service Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field study at a utility service center located in western New York where a petroleum product had leaked into the subsurface over a number of years. The study was a tailored collaboration effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, aimed at delineating the nature and extent of migration of the dissolved hydrocarbons. The information is of interest to many utilities as they develop and implement management prac...

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

NREL: News - NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

213 213 NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders Top 10 programs support more than 4.2 million MWh of voluntary green power June 5, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today released its assessment of leading utility green power programs. Under these voluntary programs, residential and commercial consumers can choose to help support additional electricity production from renewable resources - such as wind and solar - that diversify our nation's energy portfolio and protect our air and water. "Participating in utility green power programs allows consumers to support renewable energy above and beyond what utilities are procuring to comply with state renewable portfolio standards," NREL Analyst Jenny Heeter said. "These utilities are offering first-rate programs that give

405

City of Monmouth, Oregon (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monmouth, Oregon (Utility Company) Monmouth, Oregon (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Monmouth Place Oregon Utility Id 12789 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COGENERATION AND SMALL POWER PRODUCTION RATE, SCHEDULE NO. 6 Residential GENERAL SERVICE RATE SINGLE PHASE Commercial GENERAL SERVICE THREE PHASE Commercial IRRIGATION RATE, SCHEDULE NO. 3 Commercial Residential Rate, Schedule No. 1 Lighting SECURITY LIGHT RATE, SCHEDULE NO. 5 100 W CITY PROVIDES Lighting

406

Michalis Nikiforos On the Desired Rate of Capacity Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the endogeneity (or lack thereof) of the rate of capacity utilization in the long run within the context of the controversy surrounding the Kaleckian model of growth and distribution. We argue that the proposed long-run dynamic adjustment, proposed by Kaleckian scholars, lacks a coherent economic rationale. We provide economic justification for the adjustment of the desired rate of utilization towards the actual rate on behalf of a cost-minimizing firm, after examining the factors that determine the utilization of resources. The cost minimizing firm has an incentive to increase the utilization of its capital if the rate of the returns to scale decreases as its production increases. We show that there are evidence in the theory and the empirical research that justify this behavior of returns to scale. In that way the desired rate of utilization becomes endogenous.

Michalis Nikiforos; Laura Barbosa De Carvalho; Christian Schoder; Jonathan Cogliano For Useful

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Industrial Load Shaping: A Utility Strategy to Deal with Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years competition from various sources such as cogeneration and bypass has led many utilities to refocus attention on their large industrial customers. Industrial load shaping is a customized program involving cost-effective process modifications and operational changes which result in a restructuring of the electric load profile of individual manufacturing facilities. Both the customer and the utility should realize benefits from these changes. There are five generic load shaping categories: rescheduling operations, capacity additions, product storage, automation and flexible manufacturing and electrotechnologies. The customized nature of the program requires that the utility work with industry experts to help customers identify specific load shape opportunities. The remainder of this paper provides guidelines for utility planners interested in developing such a program. It begins with an overview of general objectives, technology alternatives, market evaluation and selection criteria, and program implementation and monitoring procedures. The paper concludes with two utility case studies.

Bules, D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

"ProductCode","ProductName","ProductVersion" ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... UNK","Colin","English","Utility" 705,"Drive log","Shareware ... Utility" 728,"Random Password Generator Pro","9.0 ... 910,"Windows CE Direct X Platform ...

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Estimating the economic value of wind forecasting to utilities  

SciTech Connect

Utilities are sometimes reluctant to assign capacity value to wind plants because they are an intermittent resource. One of the potential difficulties is that the output of a wind plant may not be known in advance, thereby making it difficult for the utility to consider wind output as firm. In this paper, we examine the economics of an accurate wind forecast, and provide a range of estimates calculated by a production cost model and real utility data. We discuss how an accurate forecast will affect resource scheduling and the mechanism by which resource scheduling can benefit from an accurate wind forecast.

Milligan, M.R.; Miller, A.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Chapman, F. [Environmental Defense Fund, Oakland, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Utilities Sell Lighting, Cooling and Heating to Large Customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry is entering an era of unprecedented competition. Competition from traditional sources such as natural gas companies, customer cogeneration, and independent power producers are being joined by new sources of competition, namely, other electric utilities. Compounding this situation are two recent occurrences: 1) the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 which encourages wheeling, and 2) the trend toward institutional and industrial customers outsourcing energy generation and production facilities to third-parties. The electric utility industry is searching for ways to combat this competition, develop more value-added services for their customers, and establish long-term contractual relationships with their important customers. Many utilities are considering selling customers not just electrical energy but the more usable forms of energy like lumens of light, chilled water, hot water, and steam. This paper and presentation will outline the recent and near future electric utility operating environment, introduce the numerous benefits that electric utilities derive from selling end-use output, and outline a number of utility efforts to develop end-use products and services.

Horne, M. L.; Zien, H. B.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Particulate Waste Product Combustion System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The disposal of low value by-products from the processing of agricultural food crops presents many energy consuming problems to the food producing industry. Consequently, industry has the continuous problem of utilization or disposal of the by-products within the frame work of its economic structure. The system presented here is an approach to an economical way of utilizing waste by-products for an energy source there-by reducing dependency on traditional fuel sources.

King, D. R.; Chastain, C. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Utility Energy Savings Contract Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Energy Savings Utility Energy Savings Contract Project Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Presented by Doug Dixon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory For Mark D. Smith, PE, CEM, CEA Energy Manager, Redstone Arsenal Federal Utility Partnership Working Group - Fall 2010 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 0 50 100 150 200 250 Klbs FY09 Total Hourly Steam FY09 Total Threshold $22.76 / MMBTU (Minimum take-or-pay base rate) (Consumer Price Index) Average FY09 Natural Gas Price $5.52 / MMBTU $16.91 / MMBTU (High capacity rate) (Petroleum Price Index) Hours UNCLASSIFIED Resolution * Manage the steam load to the minimum take-or- pay thresholds under the existing contract.  Prune the distribution system by eliminating long runs with low density and high thermal losses.  Ensure summer steam loads are utilized.

415

Deregulating the electric utility industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many functions must be performed in any large electric power system. A specific proposal for a deregulated power system, based on a real-time spot energy marketplace, is presented and analyzed. A central T&D utility acts ...

Bohn, Roger E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

OpenEI Community - utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 en Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogutility-rates-api-version-2-live

417

Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

418

Utility Lines and Facilities (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to the construction of utility and power lines and facilities. They address the use of public right-of-ways for such construction, underground power lines, and construction...

419

Regional Refinery Utilization Shows Gulf Coast Pressure  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: But there is some room for hope. Refineries generally begin maintenance in February or March, and finish in April. The East Coast was experiencing some lengthy refinery maintenance outages, as shown by the drop in utilization that remained low in most of March and April. In the meantime, the East Coast was drawing on extra supplies from the Gulf Coast and imports. The Midwest refineries seem to have been ramping up in April as they finished what maintenance was needed. But the Midwest no longer has the Blue Island refinery, so it also is pulling more product from the Gulf Coast. The high Gulf Coast prices this spring reflect extra "pull" on product from both the Midwest and the East Coast, and probably from California as well. Inputs into Gulf Coast refineries over the last 4 weeks

420

Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Utilities Group Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Utilities Group Inc The Utilities Group Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name The Utilities Group Inc Address 10 Knollcrest Drive, Suite 400 Place Cincinnati, Ohio Zip 45237 Sector Biomass, Buildings, Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services, Solar Product String representation "Agriculture;Bus ... g and education" is too long. Phone number 513-481-7954 Website http://www.theutilitiesgroup.c Coordinates 39.2120793°, -84.4387726° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2120793,"lon":-84.4387726,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

Hustisford Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hustisford Utilities Hustisford Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Hustisford Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9124 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional Time-of-Day Service Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional

423

Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa) Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa) Eligibility Utility...

424

NETL: Carbon Storage - CO2 Utilization Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon Storage CO2 Utilization Focus Area Carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization efforts focus on pathways and novel approaches for reducing CO2 emissions by developing beneficial uses for the CO2 that will mitigate CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. CO2 can be used in applications that could generate significant benefits. It is possible to develop alternatives that can use captured CO2 or convert it to useful products such chemicals, cements, or plastics. Revenue generated from the utilized CO2 could also offset a portion of the CO2 capture cost. Processes or concepts must take into account the life cycle of the process to ensure that additional CO2 is not produced beyond what is already being removed from or going into the atmosphere. Furthermore, while the utilization of CO2 has some potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, CO2 has certain disadvantages as a chemical reactant. Carbon dioxide is rather inert and non-reactive. This inertness is the reason why CO2 has broad industrial and technical applications. Each potential use of CO2 has an energy requirement that needs to be determined; and the CO2 produced to create the energy for the specific utilization process must not exceed the CO2 utilized.

425

Renewable utility-scale electricity production differs by fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

426

Production of Materials with Superior Properties Utilizing High Magnetic Field  

Processing materials in a magnetic field is an innovative and revolutionary means to change materials and structural properties by tailoring the ...

427

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Steam Gasification of Biomass," Department of EnergySteam Gasification of Biomass, 11 April 28, 1978. Liu,Conceptual Commercial Biomass Liquefaction Flow Schematic

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Utilization of accelerators for transmutation and energy production  

SciTech Connect

Given the increased concern over reliable, emission-free power, nuclear power has experienced a resurgence of interest. A sub-critical accelerator driven system (ADS) can drive systems that have either safety constraints (waste transmutation) or reduced fissile content (thorium reactor). The goals of ADS are some or all of the following: (1) to significantly reduce the generation or impacts due to the minor actinides on the packing density and long-term radiotoxicity in the repository design, (2) preserve/use the energy-rich component of used nuclear fuel, and (3) reduce proliferation risk. ADS systems have been actively studied in Europe and Asia over the past two decades and renewed interest is occurring in the U.S. This talk will cover some of the history, possible applicable fuel cycle scenarios, and general issues to be considered in implementing ADS systems.

Sheffield, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Renewable utility-scale electricity production differs by fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... For non-hydro renewables, the 2011 generation share ranges from less than 1% in Alaska, Ohio, Alabama, and Kentucky, ...

431

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21 provided a leaching method and compared its use with results from the EPA-EP, the TCLP, and an ASTM procedure, concluding that leaching tests should be matched to field...

432

Marketing Reordering of the Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELCON is a group of large industrial consumers of electricity with facilities in most of the 50 states and many foreign countries. Our members produce a wide range of products including steel, aluminum, chemicals, industrial gases, glass, motor vehicles, textiles and food. ELCON members consume approximately ten percent of all electricity sold to industrial customers and nearly five percent of all electricity consumed in the United States. We require an adequate and reliable supply of electricity at reasonable prices, so as you can imagine, we have a continuing interest in all aspects of the production, pricing, and delivery of electricity. ELCON member companies believe strongly that the electric utility industry is undergoing a market reordering that is being shaped by technological, institutional and legal forces. We see technical developments that now make small-scale generation economically attractive, if not downright desirable. Key regulatory and consumer institutions are taking fresh, new looks at issues such as wheeling and access to the grid that used to be considered sacred and untouchable. Some states are passing laws and implementing regulations that will require new thinking and new operating procedures on the part of utilities and consumers. I see these developments as logical reactions to changes in market forces. Change will take place. The relevant questions are: How will regulators and policy makers be influenced by market forces in the future? And: Will utilities, consumers and regulators attempt to benefit from market pressures or, alternatively, try to oppose what I believe is inevitable evolution to a more market-oriented electric industry?

Anderson, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group - Utility Interconnection Panel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORKING GROUP - Utility Interconnection Panel M. Renee Jewell, Program/Energy Manager, & Contracting Officer, Forest Service (reneejewell@fs.fed.us) SCENARIO: Fed Agencies had Solar PV Projects To Connect with Utility in California * United States (US) Forest Service (FS) - 1 small Solar Photovoltaic (PV) project; and - 1 small Renewable project (Solar PV) exporting energy to grid. * U.S. National Park Service (NPS) - 24 Small Solar Photovoltaic projects. * U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs (VA) - 6 Renewable generation projects of different sizes. FS Region 5 (California) - Solar Photovoltaic Installations Solar PV Project @ Mono Lake Visitor Center (Inyo NF) Solar PV Project (net exporter) @ San Dimas Technology and Development Center SITUATION - Utility Wanted Feds to Sign Its

434

Supporting rural wood industry through timber utilization research. Research paper  

SciTech Connect

The report evaluates the potential impact of USDA Forest Service wood utilization and wood energy research on rural employment and income. Recent projections suggest employment will decrease in many forest products industries, such as softwood sawmilling, but will eventually increase in softwood plywood and reconstituated panel mills. Forest products industries expected to provide wages exceeding the average manufacturing production wage include logging, softwood sawmills, millwork, softwood plywood--veneer, structural wood members, particle-board, wood partitions, pulp mills, paper mills, and paperboard mills. Industries expected to pay 90 percent of the average manufacturing production wage include wood kitchen cabinets, mobile homes, prefabricated wood buildings, and wood preservatives.

Skog, K.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Jefferson Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jefferson Utilities Jefferson Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9690 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional Time-of-Day Service 7am-9pm with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional

436

Coal pyrolysis for utility use: Final report  

SciTech Connect

EPRI undertook an extensive research effort to evaluate the viability of coal pyrolysis products for utility use. The objectives of the studies were to evaluate the combustion and storage characteristics of pyrolysis char and to evaluate the upgrading potential of pyrolysis liquid products (tar). To achieve these objectives, it was necessary to produce sufficient quantities of the char and tar in a process unit large enough to produce commercially representative products. For both technical and availability reasons, EPRI selected the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (L-R) process for the production run (under subcontract to Bechtel Group, Inc. RP2505-2). Several contractors were to do the liquid upgrading. Two contractors were selected to use alternative processes for upgrading the L-R heavy tar: Lummus-Crest, Inc. (RP2505-5), using its LC-fining technology, and Veba Oel (RP2505-6), using its Combi-Cracking process. (The Combi-Cracking process also simultaneously hydrotreats the coal-tar-derived distillates.) Universal Oil Products, Inc. (UOP) was selected to hydrotreat the light and middle oils from the L-R process (RP2505-7), as well as the distillable material produced by Lummus. Unfortunately, none of these contractors received the anticipated products. The light oil was in the form of a light oil-water emulsion and the middle oil had been blended with the solids-laden heavy oil during L-R operation. Combustion Engineering, Inc. carried out a two-phase program to evaluate the combustion characteristics of pyrolysis char (RP2505-4).

McKinsey, R.; Luebke, C.P.; Thelen, H.J.; ya Nsakala, N.; Riegel, H.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC`S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC'S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

PILOTING UTILITY MODELING APPLICATIONS (PUMA) UTILITY BRIEFING PAPERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., wholesale, has members, wholesale with retail), number of customers, description of supply sources, and solid waste utilities, as well as engineering and customer services. SPU's Director reports to the Mayor wholesale customers created the Seattle Water Supply Operating Board. The board works on policy

440

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government interests, a variety of vendors, and numerous utilities. Keywords: Hydrogen production, natural gas, costs Purpose Assess progress toward the 2005 DOE Hydrogen...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored an Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop in Broomfield, Colorado September 22-23, 2004. Attendees included representatives from utilities and energy companies, researchers, and government officials. Water electrolysis is a leading candidate for hydrogen production as the U.S. begins the transition to a hydrogen economy. Ideally, electrolysis will be able to provide hydrogen fuel for at least 20% of our light duty fleet; at prices competitive with traditional fuels and other hydrogen production pathways, using domestically available resources; and without adverse impacts to the environment. To be successful, the utility sector must play a vital role in identifying opportunities to diversify electricity generation and markets and begin to look at transportation fuel as a high priority business opportunity for the future. This workshop was held to identify the opportunities and challenges facing the widespread deployment of electrolysis based hydrogen production in the U.S.

442

Wind forecasting objectives for utility schedulers and energy traders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind energy industry and electricity producers can benefit in a number of ways from increased wind forecast accuracy. Higher confidence in the reliability of wind forecasts can help persuade an electric utility to increase the penetration of wind energy into its operating system and to augment the capacity value of wind electric generation. Reliable forecasts can also assist daily energy traders employed by utilities in marketing the available and anticipated wind energy to power pools and other energy users. As the number of utilities with wind energy experience grows, and wind energy penetration levels increase, the need for reliable wind forecasts will likely grow as well. This period of wind energy growth also coincides with advances in computer weather prediction technology that could lead to more accurate wind forecasts. Thus, it is important to identify the type of forecast information needed by utility schedulers and energy traders. This step will help develop approaches to the challenge of wind forecasting that will result in useful products being supplied to utilities or other energy generating entities. This paper presents the objectives, approach, and current findings of a US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) initiative to develop useful wind forecasting tools for utilities involved with wind energy generation. The focus of this initiative thus far has been to learn about the needs of prospective utility users. NREL representatives conducted a series of onsite interviews with key utility staff, usually schedulers and research planners, at seven US utilities. The purpose was to ascertain information on actual scheduling and trading procedures, and how utilities could integrate wind forecasting into these activities.

Schwartz, M.N. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bailey, B.H. [AWS Scientific, Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

utility rate | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utility rate utility rate Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 11:14 Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! API developer OpenEI update utility Utility Companies utility rate Utility Rates version 1 version 2 version 3 web service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next generation web service for the utility rate database is finally here! I encourage you to check out the V2 Utility Rates API at http://en.openei.org/services/doc/rest/util_rates Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 22 June, 2012 - 09:30 Increasing ask query limit developer utility rate An NREL user who is trying to use the utility rate service was having an issue. He writes "I noticed that any rates past 10,000 are not accessible via json. For example, this query only returns two entries:

444

Utility Companies | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Companies Utility Companies Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 11:14 Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! API developer OpenEI update utility Utility Companies utility rate Utility Rates version 1 version 2 version 3 web service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next generation web service for the utility rate database is finally here! I encourage you to check out the V2 Utility Rates API at http://en.openei.org/services/doc/rest/util_rates Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy East Coast Hurricane Sandy OpenEI outages storm United States Utility Companies As Hurricane Sandy continues to track towards the coast of the Eastern

445

Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project Begins Full-Scale Operations Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project Begins Full-Scale Operations May 10, 2013 - 11:36am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department's Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Christopher Smith today attended a dedication ceremony at the Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities in Port Arthur, Texas. Supported by a $284 million Energy Department investment, the company has successfully begun capturing carbon dioxide from industrial operations and is now using that carbon for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and securely storing it underground. This first-of-a-kind, breakthrough project

446

Electrochemical Capacitors for Utility Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical capacitors have over 100 times the energy density of conventional electrolytic capacitors, while retaining the high-power, high-life-cycle properties of conventional capacitors. This report presents a summary of the technical trends, commercialization status, and feasibility of electrochemical capacitor (ECC) technology in utility applications.

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Strains of Zymomonas were engineered by introducing a chimeric xylose isomerase gene that contains a mutant promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene. The promoter directs increased expression of xylose isomerase, and when the strain is in addition engineered for expression of xylulokinase, transaldolase and transketolase, improved utilization of xylose is obtained.

Viitanen, Paul V. (West Chester, PA); Tao, Luan (Havertown, PA); Zhang, Yuying (New Hope, PA); Caimi, Perry G. (Kennett Square, PA); McCutchen, Carol M. (Wilmington, DE); McCole, Laura (East Fallowfield, PA); Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Lakewood, CO); Franden, Mary Ann (Centennial, CO)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

Module Utilization Committee. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the US Department of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules. The final report of that committee accounts for that disposition. The membership and activities of the committee are set forth and the results of its activities are reported.

None

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs California...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Businesses Southwest Gas Corporation Information for Businesses Truckee Donner Public Utility District Information for Businesses Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD...

450

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease, construction, reconstruction, extension, remodeling, improvement, repair, and equipping of the facility. This chapter does not limit the powers or authority of

451

Mississippi Public Utility Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Public Utility Act Mississippi Public Utility Act Mississippi Public Utility Act < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Siting and Permitting Provider Public Service Commission The Mississippi Public Utility Act is relevant to any project that plans to generate energy. It requires that a utility must first obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) from the Mississippi Public Service Commission (PSC) before commencing construction of a new electric

452

Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Recent Efforts at Decoupling and Performance Incentives Jump to: navigation, search Name Aligning Utility...

453

Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnering with Utilities and Other Ratepayer-Funded Energy Efficiency Program Administrators May 2013 1 Partnering with Utilities and Other Ratepayer-Funded Energy Efficiency...

454

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home Savings Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting...

455

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Low-Income...

456

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Extraction Utility DEC1387487110111DekkerPMISExtractionUtilityv8020101217.zip More Documents & Publications Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility Release Notes for the PARS...

457

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility (1990-2009) Electricity consumption by Utility company for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight, Industry, Mining & Construction and Total...

458

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Colorado...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Colorado Springs Utilities Information for Businesses Nebraska Municipal Power Pool...

459

Form:Utility Rate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Form:Utility Rate Jump to: navigation, search Add or Update Utility Rate Information Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

460

Federal Energy Efficiency through Utility Partnerships  

SciTech Connect

Two-page fact sheet on FEMP's Federal Utility Program that works with federal agencies and their utilities to reduce energy use.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

462

Utility Marketing Strategies & Pricing Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marketing seems to have come out of the utility closet once again, but it is a far sight different from that of the 1970s. While some are still on a sell, Sell, SELL! campaign, most are soberly looking at their customers from a different perspective. They are concerned about losing them to other service territories or seeing them vanish to domestic and foreign competition. There is a sense of a strategic alliance being sought by the most proactive of utilities in which they become allies of their customers. In this sense, the issue of how much these customers purchased from them vanishes into the shadows of the more important elements of the relationships. Oh sure, there still are some pushing technology as the customers answer. And there are others using incentive and other rate gambits to develop strategic load building. But there is a definite trend emerging toward building the relationship for the long haul and putting short range profit or number game objectives on the back burner. This paper investigates the most successful current utility marketing postures, how they are changing, where pricing fits in and what we are likely to see within the next few years. We will also illustrate the potential traps in competitive marketing and customer service that still lie in wait. We still see a major number of current marketing efforts that are unbalanced, unfairly reward luck, are wasteful and counterproductive. As many of you know, we strongly believe marketing must move from technology-based, silver bullet competition, frenetic non-competitive load retention dissipation and load claiming to relational-based marketing in which absolute integrity and service and their consequent trust become paramount. We believe utilities must build honest relationships with all their customers, not merely their energy purchasers. These include their fuel suppliers and regulators. When a utility is not trusted, the competitive situation is reduced to that of a commodity supplier in which price and terms constitute the whole of the relationship. Utilities reduced to this level of inadequate customer service ultimately will lose to those that recognize the alternative of adding value. As the nature and consequences of competition increase, so does the importance of breaking from the methods of the past.

Gilbert, J. S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

PCBs may spell trouble for utility DSM  

SciTech Connect

Utilities that promote lighting retrofit programs as part of a demand-side management (DSM) program any run into trouble disposing of lighting system ballasts. That's because ballast made before 1979 used polychlorinated biphenyls-better know as PCBs-as dielectric fluids in their capacitors. Because PCBs were found to be toxic, federal regulations banned their use in manufacturing after 1979. With the typical life of a lighting system ballast ranging between 10 to 25 years, many PCB-containing ballasts are ready for replacement. What's more, the growth of electric utility DSM programs over the past decade has accelerated the replacement of ballasts containing PCBs. The result is that large quantities of such ballasts are being discarded at a rate greater than if disposal were the result of ballast burnout of failure alone. Federal regulations banning PCB production also require the cleanup and disposal of existing PCB materials. The process of removing existing low-efficiency ballasts as part of DSM program is complicated by a variety of special handling, labeling, transportation, and disposal requirements and options. Of course, these complications and their associated costs affect the economics of DSM lighting retrofit programs.

Manwell, S.; Epstein, G.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Electric utility system master plan  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains the electric utility system plan and guidelines for providing adequate electric power to the various facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in support of the mission of the Laboratory. The topics of the publication include general information on the current systems and their operation, a planning analysis for current and future growth in energy demand, proposed improvements and expansions required to meet long range site development and the site`s five-year plan.

Erickson, O.M.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

FFTF utilization for irradiation testing  

SciTech Connect

FFTF utilization for irradiation testing is beginning. Two Fuels Open Test Assemblies and one Vibration Open Test Assembly, both containing in-core contact instrumentation, are installed in the reactor. These assemblies will be used to confirm plant design performance predictions. Some 100 additional experiments are currently planned to follow these three. This will result in an average core loading of about 50 test assemblies throughout the early FFTF operating cycles.

Corrigan, D.C.; Julyk, L.J.; Hoth, C.W.; McGuire, J.C.; Sloan, W.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Device for monitoring utility usage  

SciTech Connect

A device for monitoring utility usage for installation and use by homeowners and consumers with existing public utility meters having a disk that is mounted inside a transparent case and that rotates in response to electrical current usage, the device is described comprising: a disk rotation monitoring assembly for mounting on the exterior of the transparent case, said monitoring assembly comprising: (a) a sensor for sensing disk rotation speed and generating a signal in response thereto; and (b) means for mounting said sensor on the transparent case, said mounting means further comprising means for holding said sensor, means for attaching said holding means to the transparent case, and means for adjusting the position of said holding means to enable precise alignment of said sensor with the plane of the disk such that said sensor is in optical communication with the edge of said disk; one or more remote display terminals in electrical communication with said monitoring assembly, each of said one or more remote terminals comprising: (a) means for receiving said signal and processing said signal into utility consumption data; (b) an electronic memory for storing said data; (c) a visual display for displaying data in a reader-usable format about consumption; and (d) a display controller that enables selective displaying of any of said data on said visual display.

Green, R.G.

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

467

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Tennessee...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tennessee Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA...

468

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Maine ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maine Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Central Maine Power...

469

Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Regulation (Iowa) Utility Regulation (Iowa) Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any person, partnership, business association, or corporation that owns or operates any facilities for furnishing gas by piped distribution system, electricity, communications services, or water to the public for compensation. Regulations pertaining to these facilities can be found in this section. Some exemptions apply

470

Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Contract Competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Competition to someone by E-mail Competition to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Contract Competition on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Contract Competition on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Contract Competition on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Contract Competition on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Contract Competition on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Contract Competition on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts Types of Contracts Laws & Regulations Best Practices Financing Decrease Interest Buydown & Buyout Approaches Contract Competition Diversify Project Portfolios

471

Gas utilities to increase outlays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite rising natural gas prices and falling consumer demand for gas, experts predict a 16% increase in US gas transmission and distribution expenditures for 1983. Production and storage outlays will probably decrease because of the current gas surplus. The demand for natural gas has been below production levels since 1981. Increases in residential and commercial requirements have been offset by a drop in industrial use, which represents 50% of total gas demand.

O'Donnell, J.P.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Riverside Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Riverside Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate The incentive cap is $25,000 for all programs per customer, per calendar year with the rebate being no more than 25% of the product/equipment cost Program Info Expiration Date Rebates must be submitted within 90 days of purchase to qualify. State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Exit Sign: $25

473

Avista Utilities - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type Net Metering Provider Avista Utilities Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities' net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar,

474

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Public Utility Public Utility Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Public Utility Definition An entity that owns, controls, operates, or manages a facility that supplies electricity to the public exclusively to charge battery electric

475

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Public Utility Public Utility Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Public Utility Definition A corporation or individual that owns, controls, operates, or manages a facility that supplies electricity to the public exclusively to charge

476

Table A30. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1829," W "," W ",28

477

Synthetic fuel utilization. Final report. Task 330  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of large coal resources in this country provided the spur for consideration of liquids derived from hydrogenation of coal in the search for alternate liquid fuels to replace petroleum. Previous developments particularly in German industry beginning in 1910 and reaching a capacity of approximately four million tons of products a year by 1944 and more recently a series of plants in South Africa have shown the practicability of coal liquefaction. A few more advanced processes have been developed variously to bench, pilot or commercial scale from among the thirty or more which were subject to study. Limitation in the amount of hydrogen used in these for reasons of economy and processing facility results in products containing major amounts of aromatics as well as significant portions of the sulfur and nitrogen of the coal feed. Combustion of the largely aromatic liquids can present problems in commercial burners designed for petroleum fuels, and combustion staging used to reduce NO/sub x/ emissions with the latter may encounter difficulties from sooting in the coal-derived fuels, which occurs readily with aromatics. This report presents a review of such problems in utilization of synthetic fuels from coal, emphasizing basic engineering and scientific studies which have been made. A research program involving a number of universities, industrial laboratories, and non-profit research institutions was carried out under the direction of the Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This program is also reviewed. The major subjects covered are those of liquefaction product composition and properties, fuel spray and droplet processes, synfuel pyrolysis, combustion mechanics, soot formation, and pollutant emission. Recommendations concerning needs for investigation are made from an evaluation of the current status of the field and the results obtained in the program. 15 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

Singer, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Documents Update San Diego, CA November 28, 2007 Deb Beattie & Karen Thomas Overview  Legislative & Executive Actions  Legal Opinions  Agency Guidance  Contracts  Sample Documents  Resources www.eere.energy.gov/femp/pdfs/28792.pdf Enabling Legislation for Utility Programs Energy Policy Act of 1992 Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Agencies:  Are authorized and encouraged to participate in utility programs generally available to customers  May accept utility financial incentives, goods, and services generally available to customers  Are encouraged to enter into negotiations with utilities to design cost effective programs to address unique needs of facilities used by agency

479

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs | Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Programs Suggest a Listing Efficiency United The energy efficiency program for 18 Michigan Utilities including Alpena Power Company, Baraga Electric Utility, Bayfield Electric Cooperative, City of Crystal Falls Electric Department, City of Gladstone Department of Power & Light, City of South Haven Public Works, Daggett Electric Company, Hillsdale Board of Public Utilities, Indiana Michigan Power Company, L'Anse Electric Utility, Michigan Gas Utilities, Negaunee Electric Department, The City of Norway Department of Power & Light, SEMCO ENERGY Gas Company, Upper Peninsula Power Company, We Energies, Wisconsin Public Service and Xcel Energy. Energy Company Links A directory of approximately 700 oil and gas companies, utilities and oil

480

Utility Conservation Programs: Opportunities and Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the use of conservation programs to achieve utility goals in an electric industry environment subject to change. First, the importance of articulating clear goals for the mission of a utility is discussed. Second, a strategic framework for analysis of utility promotion of conservation investment is presented. Third, the rationale, design and marketing of basic conservation strategies based on differences in utility capacity and cost situations are examined. Particular attention is given to evaluating the establishment of a subsidiary by a utility to offer energy management services -- a relatively new concept that: may present great opportunities for many utilities.

Norland, D. L.; Wolf, J. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bmc utility products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

"ProductCode","ProductName","ProductVersion" ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... UNK","Global","English","Game,Videogame" 599,"C-Dogs","1.5 Shareware ... WINNT","Microsoft","English","Web Utility" 1927,"Hot Dog Web Editor ...

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

"ProductCode","ProductName","ProductVersion" ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... UNK","Microsoft","English","Utility" 1721,"Statistics","4.5","UNK ... Sound card","N/A","DOS","Unknown","English","Device" 1981,"Opti-Green ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

483

Property:EiaUtilityId | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EiaUtilityId EiaUtilityId Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "EiaUtilityId" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3 Phases Energy Services + 21093 + 4 4-County Electric Power Assn + 6641 + A A & N Electric Coop + 84 + A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + 84 + AEP Generating Company + 343 + AEP Texas Central Company + 3278 + AEP Texas North Company + 20404 + AES Eastern Energy LP + 134 + AGC Division of APG Inc + 261 + AP Holdings LLC + 56571 + AP Holdings LLC (New York) + 56571 + APN Starfirst, L.P. + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Texas) + 50153 + APNA Energy + 55841 + ARCO Products Co-Watson + 867 +

484

Economic impact of integrating photovoltaics with conventional electric utility operation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the parameters which impact the value of photovoltaics (PV) to the electric utility. We have, therefore, chosen the high, medium and low load days in winter (January) and summer (July). The daily peak load has varied from 5838 MW to 9712 MW. These six days are studied for reference (no PV), high, medium, low and intermittent PV output cases. Results from these 30 case studies are summarized in this paper. In order to study the impact of operating photovoltaic (PV) systems on the electric utility production cost (fuel and variable O and M) we have chosen the load profile of a southeastern utility and the PV output data from solar test facilities in Virginia and North Carolina. In order to incorporate the short-term variations we have used 10-minute resolution data for both load and PV output.

Rahman, S. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Utility Rate API v2 | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate API v2 Rate API v2 Home > Groups > Utility Rate Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 11 September, 2012 - 07:35 There are updates coming through the pipe for the utility rate form. When these updates are deployed to production, then will allow ISU and anyone entering utility rates the ability to define and access richer data. This will cause some changes at the API level. Jordan from ISU is currently working on this. In an email, he noted: "I am working on the API and making sure that it will keep version 1 and make a version 2 to represent the new data. I am also working on a way to automatically convert the version 1 data into a format that version 2 can use and a way to make the data entered in the new version available in version 1 of the API. As

486

EPRI EMF Exposure Database: University of North Carolina (UNC) Electrical Utility Worker Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of North Carolina (UNC) Electrical Utility Worker Data Set contains measurement data collected during an epidemiologic study of leukemia and brain cancer mortality among nearly 139,000 men employed at five U.S. electric utilities. The data set contains eight data products related to measurements of magnetic field personal exposure. This document describes the UNC data products and provides a common set of statistical parameters, facilitating this study's comparison with other data sets in ...

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

487

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) More Documents & Publications Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility

488

Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID Home > Groups > Developer Jayhuggins's picture Submitted by Jayhuggins(15) Member 22 June, 2012 - 09:39 Utility+Utility Access Map Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". Groups: Developer Login to post comments Jayhuggins's blog Latest blog posts Rmckeel The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Posted: 6 Sep 2013 - 14:00 by Rmckeel Jweers New Robust References! Posted: 7 Aug 2013 - 18:23 by Jweers 1 comment(s) 1 of 10 ›› Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

489

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 7 Soybean Meal Processing and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 7 Soybean Meal Processing and Utilization Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Soybean Meal Processing and Util

490

Electric Utility Measurement & Verification Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Hydro is an electric utility with a service area covering over 95% of the province of British Columbia in Canada. Power Smart is BC Hydros demand-side-management (DSM) division. Power Smart develops, operates and manages various DSM programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. The Measurement and Verification (M&V) of applicable Power Smart Industrial projects is the process of verifying the results of the implementation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) at industrial customer facilities. Power Smart M&V activities are based on the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP); a consensus document produced with the international support of industry and government. This paper discusses BC Hydros M&V program and the M&V results from industrial projects. Several case history studies will also be reviewed. The case studies reviewed involve aeration motor speed controls upgrade, steam turbine controls upgrade and natural gas liquid pump speed controls upgrade.

Lau, K.; Henderson, G.; Hebert, D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Energy utilization analysis of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the energy requirements and heating and cooling equipment sizes for buildings is one of the most important, as well as one of the most difficult, problems facing the engineer. The fundamental principles utilized in the procedures developed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) are explained and brief descriptions of the computer programs using these procedures are given. Such computer programs generally are capable of: simulating the thermal response of a building to all sources of heat gains and losses, accounting for all non-thermal energy requirements in the building or on the sites, translating the building operating schedules into energy demand and consumption, identifying the peak capacity requirements of heating and cooling equipment, and performing an economic analysis that would select the most economical overall owning and operating cost equipment and energy source that minimize the building's life cycle cost.

Lokmanhekim, M.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Energy efficiency and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Twenty years have now elapsed since the energy crisis irrevocably changed world energy priorities. The energy crisis banished all apparitions of cheap and almost limitless energy and made the public keenly aware of its scarcity. The sharp rise in energy prices that followed the Arab oil embargo created strong market incentives to conserve energy. Most users have substantially improved the efficiency with which they use energy, although one might lament that the gains have not been larger. In contrast to the increased efficiency with which electricity and other forms of energy are used, electric utilities themselves have singularly failed to improve their heat efficiency in generating electricity. This failure can be attributed to regulation preventing market forces from creating incentive to improve efficiency.

Studness, C.M.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

Spectral utilization in thermophotovoltaic devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multilayer assemblies of epitaxially-grown, III-V semiconductor materials are being investigated for use in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion applications. It has been observed that thick, highly-doped semiconductor layers within cell architectures dominate the parasitic free-carrier absorption (FCA) of devices at wavelengths above the bandgap of the semiconductor material. In this work, the wavelength-dependent, free-carrier absorption of p- and n-type InGaAs layers grown epitaxially onto semi-insulating (SI) InP substrates has been measured and related to the total absorption of long-wavelength photons in thermophotovoltaic devices. The optical responses of the TPV cells are then used in the calculation of spectral utilization factors and device efficiencies.

Clevenger, M.B.; Murray, C.S.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Utility Service Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Service Renovations Utility Service Renovations Utility Service Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:59pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for Utility Service Renovations Photovoltaics Wind Any upgrade to utility service provides an opportunity to revisit a Federal building's electrical loads and costs, but it also may provide an economic way to bundle the upgrade with an onsite renewable electricity project during renovation. Upgrading utility service to the site may involve improving or adding a transformer, upgrading utility meters, or otherwise modifying the interconnection equipment or services with the utility. In some cases, the upgrade may change the tariff structure for the facility and may qualify the property for a different structure with lower overall costs. In all cases, the implementation of renewable energy technologies