National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bmc plant biology

  1. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  2. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  3. BMC{trademark}: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    Barrier Membrane Containment (BMC){trademark} is a high-density polyethylene membrane (HOPE) groundwater barrier and pass-through system, with applications ranging from plume control and containment to groundwater manipulation coupled with in-site treatment. BMC{trademark} system can function as a permeable or impermeable reaction wall, a cut-off wall, interceptor trenches, a barrier with collection and/or monitoring system and a pass-through in a funnel and gate configuration. BMC{trademark} can be inspected with a down-hole video camera, producing a permanent VHS format tape, insuring the integrity of the wall and the interlocking joints. The joints are sealed with a ``U``-packing elastomeric gasket to prevent the flow of fluids or gases.

  4. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  5. BMC{trademark}: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    Barrier Membrane Containment (BMC){trademark} is a high-density polyethylene membrane (HDPE) groundwater barrier and pass-through system, with applications ranging from plume control and containment to groundwater manipulation coupled with in-site treatment. BMC{trademark} system can function as a permeable or impermeable reaction wall, a cut-off wall, interceptor trenches, a barrier with collection and/or monitoring system, and a pass-through in a funnel and gate configuration. BMC{trademark} can be inspected with a down-hole video camera, producing a permanent VHS format tape, insuring the integrity of the wall and the interlocking joints.

  6. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  7. DRAFT February 11, 2009 BMC 20.28 Infill HousingBMC 20.28 Infill HousingBMC 20.28 Infill HousingBMC 20.28 Infill Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    , and property regulated by BMC 16.80 Lake Whatcom Reservoir regulatory chapter. In single family zones

  8. Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallick, R.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

  9. A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaheng

    and development of plants and algae. The Department of Plant Biology is co-located with the Carnegie Department biological networks in plants A bioinformatics postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Dr. Sue Rhee at the Carnegie Institution, Department of Plant Biology (Stanford, CA

  10. 2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sussman

    2010-07-23

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

  11. Biology Mathematics Connection Program Integrating Mathematics and Biology Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biology Mathematics Connection Program Integrating Mathematics and Biology Program BMC pioneered a series of instructional modules for use in high school mathematics and biology classrooms to highlight the interconnections between the mathematical and biological sciences. IMB follows up by developing the BMC modules

  12. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, K.

    1992-01-01

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  13. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, K.

    1992-12-31

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  14. Scientific Correspondence Chemical Genetic Approaches to Plant Biology1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yunde

    the desired natural products out of the plant tissues, in fact, pharmacognostic endeavors with natural view plants as sources of diverse and structurally complex organic molecules (i.e. nat- ural products), frequently with exquisite biological activities. Little knowledge of plant biology is re- quired to extract

  15. Plant & Microbial Biology Spring 2012 Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    Lovley Department of Microbial Biology | University of Massachusetts, Amherst "Artificial Photosynthesis

  16. Plant Molecular Biology 43: 621633, 2000. Dirk Inz (Ed.), The Plant Cell Cycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 43: 621­633, 2000. Dirk Inzé (Ed.), The Plant Cell Cycle. © 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 621 The role and regulation of D-type cyclins in the plant.murray@biotech.cam.ac.uk) Key words: D-type cyclins, differentiation, G1/S control, plant cell cycle, proliferation

  17. Method and apparatus to image biological interactions in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Bonito, Gregory M.; Reid, Chantal D.; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2015-12-22

    A method to dynamically image the actual translocation of molecular compounds of interest in a plant root, root system, and rhizosphere without disturbing the root or the soil. The technique makes use of radioactive isotopes as tracers to label molecules of interest and to image their distribution in the plant and/or soil. The method allows for the study and imaging of various biological and biochemical interactions in the rhizosphere of a plant, including, but not limited to, mycorrhizal associations in such regions.

  18. BS Plant Biology 4/2/2015 Page 1 of 5 PPLLAANNTT BBIIOOLLOOGGYY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    BS Plant Biology 4/2/2015 Page 1 of 5 PPLLAANNTT BBIIOOLLOOGGYY BBAACCHHEELLOORR OOFF SSCCIIEENNCCEE IINN BBIIOOLLOOGGYY The Plant Biology option provides students with strong and broad training in plant biology, ranging from the cellular, physiological and systematic levels to an ecological

  19. HANDLING ARABIDOPSIS PLANTS AND SEEDS Methods used by the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Iris

    . These procedures are designed to generate healthy plants that give maximum set of pure seeds and to preserveHANDLING ARABIDOPSIS PLANTS AND SEEDS Methods used by the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center GROWTH OF PLANTS Growth of plants in sterile conditions Growth of plants on soil · Planting on soil

  20. Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec

    2011-06-01

    The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

  1. 2012 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussman, Michael

    2013-07-20

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Plant Molecular Biology will present cutting-edge research on molecular aspects of plant growth and development, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries in molecular mechanisms involved with plant signaling systems. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics in plant molecular biology including hormone receptors and early events in hormone signaling, plant perception of and response to plant pathogen and symbionts, as well as technological and biological aspects of epigenomics particularly as it relates to signaling systems that regulate plant growth and development. Genomic approaches to plant signaling will be emphasized, including genomic profiling technologies for quantifying various biological subsystems, such as the epigenome, transcriptome, phosphorylome, and metabolome. The meeting will include an important session devoted to answering the question, "What are the biological and technological limits of plant breeding/genetics, and how can they be solved"?

  2. Plant & Microbial Biology (PMB) and the Graduate Group in Microbiology (GGM) offers outstanding doctoral programs. PMB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant & Microbial Biology (PMB) and the Graduate Group in Microbiology (GGM) offers outstanding BioEnergy Institute, the Energy Biosciences Institute, the US Depart- ment of Energy-Joint Genome, Physiology & Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Computa- tional Biology. ·Plant and Microbial Biology (PMB

  3. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community plants and biological soil crusts on desert soil nematode and protozoan abundance and community composition. In the first experiment, biological soil crusts were removed by physical trampling. Treatments

  4. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25

    Plants constantly monitor the light environment for informational light signals used to direct adaptational responses to the prevailing conditions. One major such response, the Shade-Avaoidance Response (SAR), triggered when plants sense the presence of competing neighbors, results in enhanced channeling of photosynthetically-fixed carbon into stem elongation at the expense of deposition in reproductive tissues. This response has been selected against in many modern food crops to ensure maximum edible yield (e.g. seeds). Converse enhancement of the SAR, with consequent increased carbon channeling into vegetative cellulose, could contribute to the generation of crops with improved yield of tissues suitable for cellulosic biofuel production. The signal for this response is light enriched in far-red wavelengths. This signal is produced by sunlight filtered through, or reflected from, neighboring vegetation, as a result of preferential depletion of red photons through chlorophyll absorption. The plant phytochrome (phy) photoreceptor system (predominantly phyB) senses this signal through its capacity to switch reversibly, in milliseconds, between two molecular states: the biologically inactive Pr (red-light-absorbing) and biologically active Pfr (far-red-light-absorbing) conformers. The photoequilibrium established between these two conformers in light-grown plants is determined by the ratio of red-to-far-red wavelengths in the incoming signal. The levels of Pfr then dictate the recipient plant’s growth response: high levels suppress elongation growth; low levels promote elongation growth. Studies on seedling deetiolation have advanced our understanding considerably in recent years, of the mechanism by which the photoactivated phy molecule transduces its signal into cellular growth responses. The data show that a subfamily of phy-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIFs) promote skotomorphogenic seedling development in post-germinative darkness, but that the phy Pfr conformer reverses this activity upon initial light exposure, inducing the switch to photomorphogenic development. This reversal involves light-triggered translocation of the photoactivated phy molecule into the nucleus where it interacts with PIF-family members, inducing rapid phosphorylation and degradation of the PIFs via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This degradation in turn elicits rapid alterations in gene expression that drive the deetiolation transition. This project has made considerable progress in defining phy-PIF signaling activity in controlling the SAR. The biological functions of the multiple PIF-family members in controlling the SAR, including dissection of the relative contributions of the individual PIFs to this process, as well as to diurnal growth-control oscillations, have been investigated using higher-order pif-mutant combinations. Using microarray analysis of a quadruple pif mutant we have defined the shade-induced, PIF-regulated transcriptional network genome-wide. This has revealed that a dynamic antagonism between the phys and PIFs generates selective reciprocal responses during deetiolation and the SAR in a rapidly light-responsive transcriptional network. Using integrated RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analysis of higher order pif-mutant combinations, we have defined the direct gene-targets of PIF transcriptional regulation, and have obtained evidence that this regulation involves differential direct targeting of rapidly light-responsive genes by the individual PIF-family members. This project has provided significant advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the phy-PIF photosensory signaling pathway regulates an important bioenergy-related plant response to the light environment. The identification of molecular targets in the primary transcriptional-regulatory circuitry of this pathway has the potential to enable genetic or reverse-genetic manipulation of the partitioning of carbon between reproductive and vegetative (cellulose-accumulating) tissue, toward enhanced bioenergy yield.

  5. Engineered plant biomass particles coated with biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.

    2014-06-24

    Plant biomass particles coated with a biological agent such as a bacterium or seed, characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to a grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces.

  6. Fundamental Biology of Plants and Plant Pests Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in graduate education and research in fundamental plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and research in molecular biology and genomics of crop plants and their pests, mechanisms of biological and genomics are opening many new pathways for crop plant improvement and pest management, which will enhance organisms. Build faculty capacity in secondary metabolism and the genomics and population genetics

  7. Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minorsky, Peter V.

    2003-06-01

    The symposium ''Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, Systems-Based Approaches'' was held January 15-18, 2003 at the Riverside Convention Center in Riverside, California. The host organization for the symposium was the Center for Plant Cell Biology (CEPCEB) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The meeting, focusing on systems-based approaches to plant cell biology research, was the first of this kind in the field of plant biology. The speakers and nearly 100 posters placed emphasis on recent developments in plant cellular biology and molecular genetics, particularly those employing emerging genomic tools, thereby sharing the most current knowledge in the field and stimulating future advances. In attendance were many well-established scientists and young investigators who approach plant cell biology from different but complementary conceptual and technical perspectives. Indeed, many disciplines are converging in the field of cell biology, producing synergies that will enable plant scientists to determine the function of gene products in the context of living cells in whole organisms. New, cross-disciplinary collaborations, as well as the involvement of computer scientists and chemists in plant biology research, are likely additional outcomes of the symposium. The program included 39 invited session speakers and workshop/panel speakers. Sessions were convened on the following themes: Cell-Cell Communication; Protein Trafficking; Cell Surface, Extracellular Matrix and Cell Wall; Signal Transduction; Signal Transduction and Proteosome; and Systems-Based Approaches to Plant Cell Biology. Workshops on Chemical Genetics and Visual Microscopy were also presented. Abstracts from each of the speaker presentations, as well as the posters presented at the meeting were published in a program booklet given to the 239 faculty members, researchers, postdoctoral scientists and graduate students in attendance. The booklet thus serves as a reference for symposium attendees to locate additional information about a topic of their particular interest and to contact other investigators. In addition, an article reviewing the symposium by science writer Peter V. Minorsky appeared in the June 2003 issue of Plant Physiology, a special issue devoted to systems-based approaches in the study of the model plant Arabidopsis (article submitted as part of this Final Technical Report).

  8. Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803818, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korban, Schuyler S.

    Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803­818, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed. Unfortunately, such markers are not available for most plant species, including woody perennial plants. Here, we, and provides a minimal tiling path of 16 contiguous and overlapping BAC clones, thus generating a sequence

  9. Plant Molecular Biology 37: 155169, 1998. 155 c 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in Belgium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 37: 155­169, 1998. 155 cæ 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed and displays conserved interactions with G1/S regulators and plant cyclin D (CycD) proteins Rachael Huntley1 in revised form 23 December 1997 Key words: evolution, G1-S control, plant cell cycle, retinoblastoma protein

  10. Plant Molecular Biology 53: 423442, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 53: 423­442, 2003. © 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. PrintedInstitute of Plant Sciences, ETH Zürich, LFW E57.1, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland Received 28 July 2003; accepted cultures, transcript profiling Abstract Plant cell suspension cultures are invaluable models for the study

  11. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY Floral Host Plants of Adult Beetles in Central Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    .Weimprovetheutilityofthedatasethere by providing a list of host-plant species for each of the beetle species, and updating all scientiÞc names. WeCONSERVATION BIOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY Floral Host Plants of Adult Beetles in Central Illinois. 105(2): 287Ð297 (2012); DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/AN11120 ABSTRACT We tabulated plant species

  12. What can I do with this degree? PLANT BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Industries including petrochemical, chemical, and lumber and paper Companiesincludingpharmaceutical computer skills. Joinrelatedprofessionalassociations. Learnfederalandstategovernmentjobapplication process agencies Applied Plant Science, Continued Learn federal, state and local government job application process

  13. Check list for introduction of new employees at the Department of Plant Protection Biology, SLU, Alnarp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Check list for introduction of new employees at the Department of Plant Protection Biology, SLU........................ .. ...................................................... 1. Routines and rules for insect and plant cultivation 2. Washing up routines 3. Ordering routines/supervisor............................................................................................. Check list for employee leaving the department Head

  14. Reprogramming alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus : synthetic biology in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runguphan, Weerawat

    2011-01-01

    The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) produces over 130 monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) natural products. Many of these compounds have pharmaceutical value, such as the anticancer agents vinblastine ...

  15. Assessment Plan for the Field of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology All graduate students in PPPMB MS and PhD programs are required to write a thesis research proposal that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Assessment Plan for the Field of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology All graduate students and graphics. 2. Demonstrate a broad knowledge of core concepts in Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology taught in required courses and knowledge of their specialized area

  16. Edinburgh Research Explorer A framework for evolutionary systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer A framework for evolutionary systems biology Citation for published version: Loewe, L 2009, 'A framework for evolutionary systems biology' BMC Systems Biology, vol 3, 27., 10 Systems Biology Publisher Rights Statement: © 2009 Loewe; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open

  17. Postdoctoral position -UC Davis -plant-vector interactions, plant-microbe interactions, molecular biology, ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Postdoctoral position - UC Davis - plant-vector interactions, plant-microbe interactions, molecular August 2014. The primary research goal of the Casteel lab is to identify the functions of microbes- microbe or plant-insect interactions will be preferred. Candidates with a proven record of excellence

  18. Plant Molecular Biology 2008 Gordon Research Conference - July 13-18, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Amasino

    2009-08-28

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2008 conference will continue in that tradition. There will be sessions on metabolism; new methods to study genomes, proteomes and metabolomes; plant-microbe interactions; plant hormones; epigenetics. A new topic for the conference this year will be bioenergy. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines to foster the exchange ideas and to permit the participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner.

  19. BMC-BAMC 2015: 30 March 2 April 2015 LMS Anniversary Celebration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    BMC-BAMC 2015: 30 March ­ 2 April 2015 including 150th LMS Anniversary Celebration Wednesday 1.30pm Lunch 2.00pm Afternoon Workshops (including LMS Scheme 3 meetings) 4.40pm LMS Society Meeting 5 3686; Fax: +44 (0)20 7323 3655; Email: lms@lms.ac.uk; Web: www.lms.ac.uk; Registered charity no. 252660

  20. Impact Highlight: Partial Biological Control of Tarnished Plant Bug in New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Impact Highlight: Partial Biological Control of Tarnished Plant Bug in New Hampshire Dr. Alan Eaton in New Hampshire rose. In the late 1970's, Dr. William Day of the USDA Beneficial Insects Research Lab in 1990, to get it established in New Hampshire. He made three releases in 1990 & 91, and the insect

  1. Genetics & Plant Biology Major Requirements Lower Division Requirements (all major requirements must be taken for a letter grade)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry II [5] Statistics Biology Stat 2, 20, 131A: Probability & Statistics [4] other stat courses may of Algae [4] · PMB 122: Bioenergy [2] · PMB C124: Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass [3] · PMB 142: Environmental Plant Biology [2] · PMB 185: Techniques in Light Microscopy [3] · Ene Res C100: Energy and Society

  2. T-556: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stack-based buffer overflow in BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon for in Performance Analysis for Servers, Performance Assurance for Servers, and Performance Assurance for Virtual Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; Performance Analyzer and Performance Predictor for Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; and Capacity Management Essentials 1.2.00 (7.4.15) allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted length value in a BGS_MULTIPLE_READS command to TCP port 6768.

  3. BMC Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abdulkadir.sufi

    2009-03-21

    Feb 24, 2009 ... Address: 1Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West ... constraints imposed by daily energy requirements, feed-.

  4. LAURA HILL, PH.D. Lecturer and Research Associate, University of Vermont (UVM) Plant Biology Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molofsky, Jane

    plants for food, medicine, clothing, and shelter, why plant biologists are concerned about invasive species and habitat fragmentation, how plants influence earth's climate, why different plant communities

  5. Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charlotte M

    Nightty Enrichment} is a FREE tutoring program to neip students succeed in ?rst year. Biology science courses. CUSINE offers eyening tutoring right in your own ...

  6. Interdisciplinary Dialogue for Education, Collaboration, and Innovation: Intelligent Biology and Medicine In and Beyond 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bing; Huang, Yufei; McDermott, Jason E.; Posey, Rebecca H.; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-12-09

    The 2013 International Conference on Intelligent Biology and Medicine (ICIBM 2013) was held on August 11-13, 2013 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA. The conference included six scientific sessions, two tutorial sessions, one workshop, two poster sessions, and four keynote presentations that covered cutting-edge research topics in bioinformatics, systems biology, computational medicine, and intelligent computing. Here, we present a summary of the conference and an editorial report of the supplements to BMC Genomics and BMC Systems Biology that include 19 research papers selected from ICIBM 2013.

  7. Brilli et al. BMC Genomics 2013, 14:309 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/14/309

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Brilli et al. BMC Genomics 2013, 14:309 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/14/309 RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Short and long-term genome stability analysis of prokaryotic genomes Matteo Brilli1 the variability of this trait and the possible correlations with life-style. Two kinds of events affect genome

  8. Nagarajan et al. BMC Genomics 2010, 11:242 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/242

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    Nagarajan et al. BMC Genomics 2010, 11:242 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/242 Open Finishing genomes with limited resources: lessons from an ensemble of microbial genomes Niranjan Nagarajan*1 ushered in an era where microbial genomes can be easily sequenced, the goal of routinely producing high

  9. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1994-03-01

    On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

  10. Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1995-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  11. Investigating the fate of saxitoxins in biologically active water treatment plant filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayal, N.; Newcombe, G.; Ho, L. [South Australian Water Corp., Salisbury, SA (Australia). Australian Water Quality Centre

    2008-12-15

    The saxitoxins are potent neurotoxins, which can be produced by freshwater cyanobacteria. This study assessed the fate of five saxitoxins variants through biologically active laboratory filters containing media sourced from the filters beds of two water treatment plants (WTPs). Decreases in the concentration of the less toxic variants coincided with increases in the concentrations of the more toxic variants through the filters containing anthracite sourced from two different WTPs. No changes in toxin concentrations were evident through parallel filters containing sand. The results strongly suggest that organisms within the biofilm of the anthracite filters possessed the ability to biotransform the saxitoxins variants, which has important implications for drinking water treatment, particularly since this has the potential to increase the toxicity of the filtered water.

  12. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen-signaling proteins in pollen tubes from the lilly Agapanthus umbellatus. For the uptake of DNA pollen tubes represent a unique system since the growing tip is surrounded by a loose matrix of hemicellulose and pectins, exposing the plasma membrane7 and the first uptake of ODNs by pollen tubes was reported as early as 1994. A breakthrough in the employment of antisense ODN inhibition as a powerful approach in plant biology was recently presented through our work on intact barley leaves. As was illustrated by confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled ODNs, naked ODNs were taken up through the leaf petiole and efficiently imported into the plant cell and the nucleus. The work portrayed in that study demonstrate the applicability of antisense ODN inhibition in plant biology, e.g. as a rapid antecedent to time-consuming transgenic studies, and that it operates through RNase H degradation. We employed the antisense ODN strategy to demonstrate the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor in regulation of starch synthesis, and to depict a possible mechanism for sugar signaling in plants and how it might confer endosperm-specific gene expression during seed development. We also described the employment of the antisense ODN strategy for studies on in vitro spike cultures of barley. Here we present further evidence as to the value of the antisense ODN approach in plant biology by following the effects on starch branching enzyme (SBE) accumulation in barley leaves after suppression of individual SBE genes. In agreement with transcript analyses of SBE expression in barley leaves, a zymogram assay (Fig. 1) revealed that sucrose treatment of barley leaves increased the number of SBE activity bands as compared to sorbitol treatment. In the presence of antisense SBEI or SBEIIA ODNs, zymograms of sucrose-treated leaves displayed only a subset of these activities with bands in the top portion of the zymogram gel missing or diminished. With antisense SBEIIB ODN, all activity bands in the top portion of the gel as well as the lowest band were absent. Based on these data we provide a t

  13. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997.

  14. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  15. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1997-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  16. Report of biological investigations at the Los Medanos Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area of New Mexico during FY 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, T.L.; Neuhauser, S.

    1980-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering the construction of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, NM. This location is approximately 40 km east of Carlsbad, NM. Biological studies during FY 1978 were concentrated within a 5-mi radius of drill hole ERDA 9. Additional study areas have been established at other sites in the vicinity, e.g., the Gnome site, the salt lakes and several stations along the Pecos River southward from Carlsbad, NM, to the dam at Red Bluff Reservoir in Texas. The precise locations of all study areas are presented and their biology discussed.

  17. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium andSamplerBiological Imaging byU.S.

  18. The carbon footprint analysis of wastewater treatment plants and nitrous oxide emissions from full-scale biological nitrogen removal processes in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprint analysis of advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ...

  19. Optimization of biological recycling of plant nutrients in livestock waste by utilizing waste heat from cooling water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, J.J.; Behrends, L.L.; Burch, D.W.; Kingsley, J.B.; Waddell, E.L. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Results are presented from a 5-year study to develop aquatic methods which beneficially use condenser cooling water from electric generating power plants. A method is proposed which uses a system for aquatic farming. Livestock waste is used to fertilize planktonic algae production and filter-feeding fish are used to biologically harvest the algae, condenser cooling water (simulated) is used to add waste heat to the system, and emergent aquatic plants are used in a flow through series as a bio-filter to improve the water quality and produce an acceptable discharge. Two modes of operation were tested; one uses untreated swine manure as the source of aquatic fertilizer and the other uses anaerobic digester waste as a means of pretreating the manure to produce an organic fertilizer. A set of operating conditions (temperature, retention time, fish stocking rate, fertilizer rates, land and water requirements, suggested fish and plant species, and facility design) were developed from these results. The integrated system allows continual use of power plant condenser cooling water from plants in the southeastern United States.

  20. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L.; Adams, S.M.; Black, M.C.

    1993-06-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

  1. First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

    1992-07-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

  2. Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

  3. PlPa 5444: Ecology, Epidemiology, and Evolutionary Biology of Plant-Microbe Interactions Linda L. Kinkel, 318 Christensen Laboratories, 5-0277, kinkel@umn.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    [1] PlPa 5444: Ecology, Epidemiology, and Evolutionary Biology of Plant-Microbe Interactions Linda L. Kinkel, 318 Christensen Laboratories, 5-0277, kinkel@umn.edu Microbes exist in close association and their microbes. We will begin by considering the major groups of microbes associated with plants and what

  4. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY Flowering Plant Hosts of Adult Hymenopteran Parasitoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    of Central Illinois JOHN F. TOOKER AND LAWRENCE M. HANKS Department of Entomology, University of Illinois records of C. Robertson who collected 15,000 insect visitors of ßowering plants in central Illinois during where parasitoid species are likely to occur and provide valuable in- formation for studies

  5. Plant Molecular Biology 37: 803806, 1998. 803 c1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in Belgium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of life in nature [3]. As the Human Genome Project enters its large-scale sequencing phase, computational in the human genome [5]. It is based on the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA). Substantial improvements for identification of human internal coding exons. In order to meet the need of the first plant genome sequencing

  6. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology 2013, 55 (1): 2130 Invited Expert Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xing-Wang

    is a key mechanism that plants use to generate adaptive responses in coping with various en- vironmental and low temperature, drought, flooding, salinity, UV and strong light irradiation, mineral de- ficiency to modify the growth and potentiate adaptive responses. For example, abiotic stressors often induce

  7. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  8. Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glass, N Louise [UC Berkeley

    2013-01-25

    N. Louise Glass from the University of California, Berkeley, presents a talk titled "Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  9. Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, N Louise [UC Berkeley] [UC Berkeley

    2012-03-22

    N. Louise Glass from the University of California, Berkeley, presents a talk titled "Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  10. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE`s Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  11. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE's Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  12. 245V.S.F.T. Merckx (ed.), Mycoheterotrophy: The Biology of Plants Living on Fungi, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-5209-6_6, Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lee

    245V.S.F.T. Merckx (ed.), Mycoheterotrophy: The Biology of Plants Living on Fungi, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-5209-6_6, © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013 6.1 Introduction Mycoheterotrophic plants provide fascinating of mycoheterotrophic plants always target different fungal clades (Taylor and Bruns 1999;BidartondoandBruns2001

  13. Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 16 (2005) 385396 The developmental context of cell-cycle control in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    -cycle control in plants Sarah M. de Jager, Spencer Maughan, Walter Dewitte, Simon Scofield, James A.H. Murray online 2 March 2005 Abstract Plant growth is characterised both by continued growth and organogenesis of cell cycle regulators in plants, creating a challenge to understand how these genes control plant

  14. Systems Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL brings together multidisciplinary expertise and special facilities in genomics, computational biology, plant sciences, microbiology, microbial ecology, biophysics,...

  15. Systems Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL brings together multidisciplinary expertise and special facilities in genomics, computational biology, plant sciences, microbiology, microbial ecology, biophysics,...

  16. Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina PLANT IDENTIFICATION REQUEST FROM: Agent

  17. Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina PLANT IDENTIFICATION REQUEST FROM: Name

  18. BMC Bioinformatics Poster presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Steven

    a list of putative Class I methyltransferases [2]. Recently we have used a combination of a new search of methyltransferases for S. cerevisiae among four of the methyltransferases families are italicized (see Table 1- ferases are found to bind AdoMet through UV-crosslinking experiments (designated * in Table 1

  19. Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaffino, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

  20. ATTENTION BIOLOGY/MARINE BIOLOGY If you think that you qualify, bring this to the attention of a biology faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    ATTENTION BIOLOGY/MARINE BIOLOGY STUDENTS: If you think that you qualify, bring this to the attention of a biology faculty member and seek their nomination. The Gary Hicks Memorial Award The Gary in the Biology Department at Dalhousie University for 27 years where he taught developmental and plant biology

  1. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  2. JColorGrid: software for the visualization of biological measurements.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachimiak, Marcin P; Weisman, Jennifer L; May, Barnaby Ch

    2006-01-01

    BMC Bioinformatics Software BioMed CentralOpen Access JColorGrid: software for the visualization oftraditional statistical software packages. The effectiveness

  3. Biological Engineering integrates life sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    of biological systems. Biological Engineering impacts the well-being of humans, plants, and animals through and global challenges such as ensuring safe and sustainable food and energy supplies, protecting natural agencies. Products of their efforts help ensure a safe and adequate supply of food and water, create new

  4. Genetic analysis of inflorescence and plant height components...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sciences, Dept. of Plant Biology, Dept. of Genetics 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS Domestication has played an important role in shaping characteristics of the...

  5. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area Lakeview Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Cove Fort Power Plant Roosevelt Power Plant Borax Lake

  6. In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol.Plant 37:742747, NovemberDecember 2001 DOI:10.1079/IVP2001205 q 2001 Society for In Vitro Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, John J.

    Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 44691-4096 3 Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, The University protein; methionine. Introduction One of the goals of plant genetic engineering has been to improve crop

  7. Optimization of biological recycling of plant nutrients in livestock waste by utilizing waste heat from cooling water. Final report May 75-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, J.J.; Behrends, L.L.; Burch, D.W.; Kingsley, J.B.; Waddell, E.L. Jr

    1982-05-01

    The report summarizes a 5-year study of the beneficial uses of waste heat from condenser cooling water from steam-electric generating plants. The major effort addressed the recovery of plant nutrients in swine manure by aquatic farming of selected fish and Chinese waterchestnuts. Another effort included biogas production from swine manure in an anaerobic digester and the use of the digester waste to fertilize the aquatic farming system. Optimum recovery of plant nutrients resulted from operation of an integrated fish and waterchestnut system. Flowing water systems were 30-50% more productive than static systems. Annual fish yields of 5000-7000 lb/acre are projected for a properly stocked system over a 150-180 day growing period. Similarly, waterchestnut yields of nearly 17.8 tons/acre and dry hay yields of 6.7 tons/acre from sand-bed filters would be expected when fed wastewater from the fish system. The quality of the water leaving the sand beds would meet tertiary wastewater treatment standards during the growing season. An estimated 2000-head swine facility with a $400,000 investment would annually produce a 20% rate of return, save 360,000 bbl of oil through waste heat utilization, and produce biogas equivalent to 3000 bbl of oil.

  8. Navigation Links Biology News

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Navigation Links Biology News Medicine News Biology Products Medicine Products Biology Definition Medicine Definition Biology Technology Medicine Technology Biology Dictionary Medicine Dictionary Biology Navigation Medical Navigation MHOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS Single-cell transfection tool enables added control

  9. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  10. Human-aided admixture may fuel ecosystem transformation during biological invasions: theoretical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molofsky, Jane

    ,4 & Maarten B. Eppinga5 1 Department of Plant Biology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 2 Molofsky, Department of Plant Biology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, 05405. Tel: 011 802 656

  11. 2K09 and thereafter : the coming era of integrative bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing for functional genomics and personalized medicine research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    USA Yang et al. BMC Genomics 2010, 11(Suppl 3):I1 http://China Yang et al. BMC Genomics 2010, 11(Suppl 3):I1 http://USA Yang et al. BMC Genomics 2010, 11(Suppl 3):I1 http://

  12. L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals for plant cell biological studies and as a growth enhancing agent for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, M. Sajimol, E-mail: sajimollazar@gmail.com [Department of Physics, St.Teresa's College , Kochi-11, Kerala (India); Mathew, Lizzy [Department of Botany, St.Teresa's College , Kochi-11, Kerala (India); Alex, Roselin [Department of Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22 (India); Deepa, G. D. [NCAAH, Cochin University of Science and Technology,Kochi-22, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22 (India)

    2014-01-28

    In the present work, the prospects of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals capped with L- serine, a bio-compatible amino acid, synthesized by wet chemical route, as efficient fluorescent probes for plant cell biological studies have been investigated. The present synthesis route using bio-compatible material is a low cost and easy to control method. The colloidal stability of the capped nano crystals is very good as they remain stable without settling down for long time. It is observed that L- serine significantly modifies the structural and optical characteristics of the ZnS:Mn nanocrystals and hence is suitable as a bio-compatible capping agent. The structural properties of L- serine capped nanocrystals were investigated by XRD technique. The size of the L- serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals is found to be around 2 nm . The optical characterization of the nanocrystals was carried out on the basis of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic studies. The intense photoluminescence emission observed around 597nm for L-serine capped ZnS:Mn offers high prospects of applications in bio-imaging fields. The unique optical properties of nanoparticles make them appealing as in vivo and in vitro fluorophores in a variety of biological investigations. In the present study, L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals were used as a staining dye in fluorescent microscope for observing cell division, cell structure etc. These nanocrystals were also incorporated into the culture media along with the normal auxin- cytokinin hormone combinations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae), an Ayurvedic medicine. The results suggest that L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals can act as efficient enhancers towards quick callusing and shoot proliferation.

  13. Quantum Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-07-11

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since without it most (if not all) of the biological structures and signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-range quantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization, may be invoked to explain signal amplification process in biological systems in general.

  14. Hayes, M., R. I. Eytan and M. E. Hellberg. 2010. High amino acid diversity and positive selection at a putative coral immunity gene (tachylectin-2). BMC Evolutionary Biology, in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellberg, Michael E.

    functions, including pathogen recognition and the activation of innate defense pathways, are among the most adaptively, possibly under selective pressure from coral-associated microorganisms. Tachylectin- 2 may serve

  15. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  16. Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L.) SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Hank W.

    Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L.) SUN- domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of two divergent classes of SUN proteins in plants Murphy et al. Murphy et al. BMC Plant Biology Access Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L.) SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence

  17. Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    Research on plants continued. Topics include: Molecular basis of symbiotic plant-microbe interations; enzymatic mechanisms and regulation of plant cell wall biosynthesis; molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes in plants; resistance of plants to environmental stress; studies on hormone biosynthesis and action; plant cell wall proteins; interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes; sensor transduction in plants; molecular mechanisms of trafficking in the plant cell; regulation of lipid metabolism; molecular bases of plant disease resistance mechanisms; biochemical and molecular aspects of plant pathogenesis; developmental biology of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria; environmental control of plant development and its relation to plant hormones.

  18. Biological Control of Saltcedar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Allen E.; DeLoach, C. Jack; Muegge, Mark A.

    2003-10-21

    stream_source_info pdf_1854.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8896 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_1854.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 A sustainable approach using insect... organisms to suppress saltcedar. This method is called biological control. To help control saltcedar, insects that feed only on the plant are being intro- duced into Texas and the western United States. S Invader of rivers, lakes and wetlands Saltcedar, also...

  19. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  20. Biomimetics Engineering from Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Biomimetics or Engineering from Biology Hari Dharan Department of Mechanical Engineering University" ­ copying only? !!"Biologically-Inspired Design" !!"Engineering from Biology" Definition !!It is not "biology for engineers". !!It is not "imitating" or "copying" biology. !!It is not "reverse

  1. RNA silencing in plants: Flash report!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosher, Rebecca A; Lewsey, Mathew G; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V

    2010-06-30

    different nutrient conditions. Several Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EA, UK Full list of author information is available at the end of the article Mosher et al. Silence 2010, 1:13 http... Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EA, UK and 2Plant Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA References 1. Fire A, Xu S, Montgomery MK, Kostas SA, Driver SE, Mello CC: Potent...

  2. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND MARINE BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND MARINE BIOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REVIEW 2000-2007 #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS ....................................................................... 389 #12;ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Department of Biology and Marine Biology contributes importantly). The department began offering the Master of Science in Marine Biology in 1980, and the Master of Science

  3. Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series Winter 2015, CRN 87368 Seminars: Mondays, 9:00am-10:00am 115 Hutchison Date Speaker Title January 5 Steve Whitham, Professor Department of Plant Pathology, Phakopsora pachyrhizi January 12 Andy Jackson, Professor Emeritus Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

  4. Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series Spring 2015 Seminars: 9:00am - Mondays 115 Hutchison CRN 47034 Date Speaker Title March 30 Venkatesan Sundaresan, Professor Department of Plant Biology UC of grapevine diseases. May 18 Margaret Lloyd, Ph.D. Candidate Department of Plant Pathology, Gordon Lab UC

  5. Biology reflective assessment curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    2011-01-01

    Penick, J. E. (1998). Biology: A community context. Newof a standards-based high school biology curriculum.The American Biology Teacher Li, J. , Klahr, D. , & Siler,

  6. Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ Divisions: Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Cellular, Developmental, and Neurobiology #12;Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ · Cell Biology and Cytogenetics (Beningo, Tucker, Greenberg

  7. Theory in Biology Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbeter, Albert

    Magazine R601 Theory in Biology Computational biology: A propagating wave of interest Albert Goldbeter Systems biology, computational biology, integrative biology... many names are being used and tendency to take a global view of problems in biology. This field is not entirely novel, but what is clear

  8. CMC/ BMC Utility Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy Resources JumpCIA-The World Factbook JumpCISCLCMCCMC/

  9. Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory Spring 2013 (Draft Syllabus, 23 August 2012) Course Description and Objectives: This course is intended for students who have taken Biology and function, particularly for enzymes. Prerequisites: Biology 3510 or Chemistry 3510 Instructor: David P

  10. Splicing bioinformatics to biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Douglas L; Graveley, Brenton R

    2006-01-01

    Splicing bioinformatics to biology Douglas L Black* andand Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut Health26 May 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:317 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006-

  11. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  12. Montana State University 1 Plant Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and also fits into either the Crop Science or Plant Biology options. Crop Science Option Continued. Course requirements in the Crop Science option are designed to acquaint students with the principles. Undergraduate Programs · Crop Science Option (http://catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/ agriculture/plant-science/crop-science

  13. Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    , and Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Instituto de Ingenieria, Unidad Academica cycles (1). Biological wastewater treatment, utilization processes such as activated sludge (AS treatment plants but also in other ecosystems such as edaphic (11), marine (12) and atmospheric (13

  14. Genome Biology 2004, 6:302 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Genome Biology 2004, 6, Technologiepark 927, B-9052 Ghent, Belgium. E-mail: Yves.vandepeer@psb.ugent.be Published: 21 December 2004 Genome at http://genomebiology.com/2004/6/1/302 © 2004 BioMed Central Ltd A report on the Plant Genomics European

  15. Physical Plant Power Plant - 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    Historically, a fixed cooling concept is used in the design of evaporative heat rejection systems for process and power plants. In the fixed cooling mode, a plant is designed for maximum output at the design summer wet bulb temperature...

  16. computational modeling of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    Faculty. Faculty listing for "computational modeling of biological systems" ... Research Interests: computational modeling of biological systems.

  17. Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Programs in Cell & Molecular Biology Developmental, Regenerative and Stem Cell Biology Molecular Cell Biology Molecular Genetics & Genomics Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis #12;PAGE 2 GUIDELINES TO THE PROGRAMS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

  18. PERSPECTIVE SPECIAL SERIES IN LARGE-SCALE BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    PERSPECTIVE SPECIAL SERIES IN LARGE-SCALE BIOLOGY PLAZA: a comparative genomics resource to study gene and genome evolution in plants Sebastian Proost1,2+ , Michiel Van Bel1,2+ , Lieven Sterck1: comparative genomics, evolution, colinearity, gene family, plants Running title: Comparative genomics

  19. BioMed CentralBMC Bioinformatics BMC Bioinformatics2001,2 :7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Sean

    Annotation System Robin D Dowell1, Rodney M Jokerst1, Allen Day2, Sean R Eddy1 and Lincoln Stein*2 Address: 1-mail: Robin D Dowell - robin@genetics.wustl.edu; Rodney M Jokerst - jokerst@genetics.wustl.edu; Allen Day is available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2105/2/7 © 2001 Dowell et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd

  20. Biological water oxidation: Lessons from Nature Mohammad Mahdi Najafpour a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan, Iran b Center of Climate Change and Global Warming of Plant Biology, and of Biochemistry, and Center of Biophysics & Computational Biology, University and plants; further, recently published data on the Manganese­calcium cluster have provided details

  1. LARGE-SCALE BIOLOGY ARTICLE The Potential of Text Mining in Data Integration and Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    LARGE-SCALE BIOLOGY ARTICLE The Potential of Text Mining in Data Integration and Network Biology Ghent, Belgium b Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University, 9052 Ghent, Belgium Despite the availability of various data repositories for plant research, a wealth of information

  2. BOTANICUS INTERACTICUS: Interactive Plants Technology Ivan Poupyrev 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poupyrev, Ivan

    BOTANICUS INTERACTICUS: Interactive Plants Technology Ivan Poupyrev 1 , Philipp Schoessler 2 is a technology for designing highly ex- pressive interactive plants, both living and artificial. We are moti? Figure 1. Top: Precise and playful interaction with living plants; Bottom: Design of biologically

  3. Vision Statement for Plant Physiology Comparative Plant Genomics. Frontiers and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purugganan, Michael D.

    Vision Statement for Plant Physiology Comparative Plant Genomics. Frontiers and Prospects Ana L function and evolution at various levels of biological organiza- tion. The availability of whole-genome sequences as well as other genomic resources (e.g. microarray meth- ods, expressed sequence tag [EST

  4. Mathematical Biology 3 Jurgen Jost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    Mathematical Biology 3 J¨urgen Jost Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences Leipzig, Germany Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 1 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples of interacting elements: Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 2 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples

  5. 2003 Synthetic Biology study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endy, Drew

    2007-08-14

    Biology is a technology for processing information, materials, and energy. As a technology platform, biological systems provide access to artifacts and processes across a range of scales (e.g., the ribosome is a programmable ...

  6. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory Oxford, Maryland #12;Chart of the Tred Avon River, showing the location of the BCF Biological Laboratory and the orientation of this area modern laboratories for chem- ical, histological, microbiological, and physiological re- search

  7. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication Cloning, IL 61801, USA 3Department of Chemistry 4Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

  8. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  9. BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Potential of Entomopathogenic Nematodes for Biological Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nematodes, biological control, cucumber BLACK PLASTIC MULCH and drip or trickle irrigation). Drip irrigation, installed simulta- neously under the plastic mulch, uses less water than conventional is concentrated around the base of the plants (Orzolek et al. 1996). Used in combination, black plastic mulch

  10. Computational Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Biology SHARE Computational Biology Computational Biology research encompasses many important aspects including molecular biophysics for bio-energy, genetic level...

  11. A Central Theory of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torday, JS

    2015-01-01

    JS, Rehan VK. Evolutionary biology, cell–cell communication6] Torday JS. Evolutionary Biology Redux. Pers Biol Med 56,explanations in evolutionary biology. Hist Philos Life Sci

  12. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, R.

    2013-01-01

    aspects of the systems biology approach (metagenomics withthe use of a number of sytems biology parameters can revealRL, Banfield JF: Systems Biology: functional analysis of

  13. Todd Newberry: Professor of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newberry, Andrew Todd; Jarrell, Randall; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2006-01-01

    Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology: Cowell College page 12Jarrell: Why’s that? Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology:Biology Board page 14 Newberry: Well, besides the

  14. HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

  15. BIOLOGY SEMINAR PROMOTION LECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    BIOLOGY SEMINAR PROMOTION LECTURE 12:00 PM SEMINAR HITCHCOCK HALL 132 REFRESHMENTS SERVED IN FOYER, November 24, 2014 "Life is flux" Dr. Jennifer Nemhauser Associate Professor Department of Biology drawn from molecular genetics, genomics, physiology and synthetic biology to build new tools to study

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLES Evolutionary Origins of a Novel Host Plant Detoxification Gene in Butterflies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheat, Christopher

    RESEARCH ARTICLES Evolutionary Origins of a Novel Host Plant Detoxification Gene in Butterflies of Biological Sciences, Pennsylvania State University Chemical interactions between plants and their insect as a coevolutionary key innovation. By generating and sequencing expressed sequence tags, genomic libraries

  17. BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency/Gen Ed Biology BS Core/Supporting Courses (64 credits) *Note: 3.0 GPA required in Biology Core 21800 Genetics & Molecular Biology ______ 4 BIOL 21900 Principles of Functional Biology ______ 3 BIOL

  18. Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology General Goals of the Minor in Marine Biology About who choose the Minor in Marine Biology will learn about the biology, evolution and ecology of organisms that inhabit these environments and the ecological processes linking them. Marine biology draws

  19. Art and Science for Life: Designing and Growing Virtual Plants with L-systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    Art and Science for Life: Designing and Growing Virtual Plants with L-systems Przemyslaw@cpsc.ucalgary.ca Abstract Virtual plants are computer models that recreate the structure and simulate the development of plants. Virtual plant modeling is an interdisciplinary area combining mathematical formalisms, biological

  20. Physical Plant Power Plant - 43 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    with higher efficiency / R&D Climate friendly Power Plants Build coal fired Power Plants with CCS-technology 4 B a c k u p va W GGEHEN ESL-IC-08-10-27 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany..., October 20-22, 2008 RWE Energy / Energieeffizienz bei Immobilien / U. K?nig / ICEBO '08 SEITE 9 Electricity Production: All Energy Sources have to be included! Lignite Power Plant (BoA) produces 8,8 TWh = appr. 12% of the annual demand for electricity...

  1. Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

  2. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  3. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  4. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment Safety and Health More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Biology SHARE...

  5. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

  6. Biological Science courses BE 513 Molecuar and Celluar Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    Biological Science courses BE 513 Molecuar and Celluar Biology BE 555 Nanoscale Systems Biology. BIOM 501 Mechanisms of Disease and Therapeutic BIOM 600 Cell Biology BMB 508 Molecular Biophysics I BMB 509 Macromolecular Biophysics II BMB 567 Bioinorganic Chemistry BMB 590 Biological Physics BMB 614

  7. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ­ BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION A Bachelor of Science degree hours must be upper division coursework. A B.S. in Biology requires a minimum of 19 semester hours of core BIOLOGY courses (BIOLOGY 106, 107, 301, 372 and 405 or 403). An additional 21 semester hours

  8. Biology and Marine Biology Research Areas and Assistantship Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    1 Biology and Marine Biology Research Areas and Assistantship Application Name: LAST FIRST MIDDLE and Marine Biology faculty members will accept graduate students to work in the general research areas listed Next Page Revised 3/08 850 #12;2 Biology and Marine Biology Statement of Interest Statement of Interest

  9. Science Faculty Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Science Faculty Department of Biology Zoological Institute Community Ecology 1 December 2006 Hans-Sigrist-Symposium: Biological Invasions Hans-Sigrist-Stiftung 9.00 Prof. Dr. David M Richardson (Centre for Invasion Biology. Dr. Bruno Baur (Conservation Biology, Department of Integrative Biology, University of Basel

  10. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    appeared at this time. Both of these groups of plants had life cycles, involving two generations. One of the year these mosses will produce tiny sporophytes. Prior to this generation, the tiny plants producedPrimitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after

  11. Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, Edgar P.

    2014-08-12

    The title of our project is “Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants”. Its goals are two-fold: to determine the molecular functions of glutamate receptor-like (GLR) proteins, and to elucidate their biological roles (physiological or developmental) in plants. Here is our final technical report. We were highly successful in two of the three aims, modestly successful in the third.

  12. ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    that obliged the water boards to increase the energy-efficiency of wastewater treatment plants with at least 2ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS Arie de Niet1 , Maartje van de Vrugt2.j.boucherie@utwente.nl Abstract In biological wastewater treatment, nitrogen and phosphorous are removed by activated sludge

  13. Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    in nitrification, denitrification and trace nitrogen gas losses. Plant species also impact herbivore behaviourREVIEW Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling J. M. H. Knops,1 * K. L. Bradley1 and D. A. Wedin2 1 School of Biological Sciences, 2 School of Natural Resource Sciences

  14. Extracting information from biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chindelevitch, Leonid Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    Systems biology, the study of biological systems in a holistic manner, has been catalyzed by a dramatic improvement in experimental techniques, coupled with a constantly increasing availability of biological data. The ...

  15. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biological Engineering Undergraduate Class of 2013 Post-Graduation Report The Department Biological and Environmental Engineering (BEE) offers a bachelor degree program in Biological Engineering and a bachelor degree program in Environmental Engineering. Cornell Career Services surveys

  16. Interdisciplinary research and training program in the plant sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports from the Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences funded through the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering topics such as the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall proteins and assembly, gene expression, stress responses, growth regulator biosynthesis, interaction between nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and membrane trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, the molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 132 refs. (MHB)

  17. Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons PDF explaining the biological process of bioenergy Biological Conversion of Sugars...

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    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  19. Vibrations, Quanta and Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. F. Huelga; M. B. Plenio

    2013-06-27

    Quantum biology is an emerging field of research that concerns itself with the experimental and theoretical exploration of non-trivial quantum phenomena in biological systems. In this tutorial overview we aim to bring out fundamental assumptions and questions in the field, identify basic design principles and develop a key underlying theme -- the dynamics of quantum dynamical networks in the presence of an environment and the fruitful interplay that the two may enter. At the hand of three biological phenomena whose understanding is held to require quantum mechanical processes, namely excitation and charge transfer in photosynthetic complexes, magneto-reception in birds and the olfactory sense, we demonstrate that this underlying theme encompasses them all, thus suggesting its wider relevance as an archetypical framework for quantum biology.

  20. Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Prevent runoff and shrubs, either through directly killing plants or making them more prone to disease. Fertilizer runoff into storm drains pollutes waterways. Maintain plant health and protect water quality by fertilizing

  1. Information on this page was compiled from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, the Encyclopedia of Careers and Vocational Guidance, University of Minnesota departmental websites, What Can You Do With a Major in Biology?, and student-reported data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Information on this page was compiled from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, the Encyclopedia With a Major in Biology?, and student-reported data. WHAT CAN I DO WITH A MAJOR IN: Activities Plant Biology. A bachelor's degree in plant biology provides a solid foundation for advanced professional degrees

  2. Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me? If you have an interest in learning about life in the sea then Marine Biology may be a good option for you. You will need good time management skills a marine biology degree are wide-ranging and provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector

  3. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    solar energy or "green sunshine" derived from the solar- powered photosynthesis process during the growth and development phases of plant materials. Utilizing Biomass Energy The four methods in which, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological

  4. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  5. 130 Florida Entomologist 93(1) March 2010 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF TROPICAL SODA APPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    130 Florida Entomologist 93(1) March 2010 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF TROPICAL SODA APPLE (SOLANACEAE for natural ene- mies of the invasive plant tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae) were con apple in Brazil and Paraguay (Medal et al. 1996). A biological control program was initiated

  6. Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Programs in Cell & Molecular Biology Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis Overview of the Programs in Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate training in Cell and Molecular Biology at Washington University is offered by the Programs in Cell

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Insect Molecular Biology 03/21/2014 POSITION: Research Associate LOCATION in entomology, biochemistry, molecular biology and/or toxicology; extensive research experience in entomology, biochemistry, cell biology and/or molecular biology; excellent organizational, and written and interpersonal

  8. Risk analysis for plant-made vaccines Dwayne D. Kirk1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Risk analysis for plant-made vaccines Dwayne D. Kirk1, *, Kim McIntosh1 , Amanda M Walmsley1, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA 2 Agricultural and Biological Risk Assessment, Montana State University, Bozeman, regulation, risk, transgenic plant Abstract The production of vaccines in transgenic plants was first

  9. in response to touch, oscillations in plants, and long-distance signal transmission in trees.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in response to touch, oscillations in plants, and long- distance signal transmission in trees. Some chapter has a nice reference list to the primary literature. The larger question is: How useful in the neu- robiology paradigm to understanding plant physi- ology and plant biology in general? The editors and many

  10. Mary C. Wildermuth, Associate Professor Department of Plant & Microbial Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research & Development Fund (BARD). 2004- Conference Workshop Organizer/Session Chair 2006 Course Developer & Instructor, Graduate Seminar Regulation of Specialized Metabolism (1 unit) 2008 Postdoctoral Research Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

  11. Plant Molecular Biology Reporter Volume 11(1) 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    ,thusenhanc ingpatientandfamilysatisfactionandreducingthelevelofanxietyandfearwhichtheymaybeexperiencing. Efficientlymovingthepatienttotheirinpatientproviders'resultsinopenEDexamrooms.Thisshortensthe

  12. Synthetic Biology and reshaping plant form Jim Haseloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Lula

    Industrial Revolution: based on innovations in coal, iron, steam and mechanical engineering #12; Steam power machines.This enabled rapid development of e cient semi-automated factories Iron founding - Coke replaced

  13. Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | Center for GasPhysics Physics PrintPicturePlant

  14. Documentation of TRU biological transport model (BIOTRAN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Garcia, B.J.; Sutton, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusive of Appendices, this document describes the purpose, rationale, construction, and operation of a biological transport model (BIOTRAN). This model is used to predict the flow of transuranic elements (TRU) through specified plant and animal environments using biomass as a vector. The appendices are: (A) Flows of moisture, biomass, and TRU; (B) Intermediate variables affecting flows; (C) Mnemonic equivalents (code) for variables; (D) Variable library (code); (E) BIOTRAN code (Fortran); (F) Plants simulated; (G) BIOTRAN code documentation; (H) Operating instructions for BIOTRAN code. The main text is presented with a specific format which uses a minimum of space, yet is adequate for tracking most relationships from their first appearance to their formulation in the code. Because relationships are treated individually in this manner, and rely heavily on Appendix material for understanding, it is advised that the reader familiarize himself with these materials before proceeding with the main text.

  15. The Comparative Genomics of Salinispora and the Distribution and Abundance of Secondary Metabolite Genes in Marine Plankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Kevin Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Buchan A (2007) Ecological Genomics of Marine Roseobacters.biology and comparative genomics. BMC Bioinformatics 10(1):SAN DIEGO The Comparative Genomics of Salinispora and the

  16. Confidence from uncertainty - A multi-target drug screening method from robust control theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luni, Camilla; Shoemaker, Jason E; Sanft, Kevin R; Petzold, Linda R; Doyle, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    method from robust control theory. BMC Systems Biology 2010method from robust control theory Camilla Luni 1 , Jason Eof a method from robust control theory, Structured Singular

  17. Department of Plant ProtectionDepartment of Plant Protection BiologyBiology (www(www.slu.se).slu.se)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modified microorganisms (GMM) 5.2 Genetically modified organism (GMO) 5.2.1Laboratories 5.2.2 Biotrone 5 ansvarig Erland Liljeroth Elisabeth Marling 1098 2807A 5567 5309 0705-915309 Horticum Vegetum GMO ansvarig

  18. Fish Biology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

  19. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    . In each of these cases the native hydroxyl group interacts with a purine exocy- clic amine. Our resultsChemistry & Biology Brief Communication 20 -Fluoro Substituents Can Mimic Native 20 -Hydroxyls signature for tertiary interac- tions between 20 -hydroxyl groups and exocyclic amino groups within RNA

  20. Chemistry & Biology Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Loren

    Chemistry & Biology Perspective The Origin of RNA and ``My Grandfather's Axe'' Nicholas V. Hud,1 *Correspondence: hud@gatech.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2013.03.012 The origin of RNA is one

  1. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    /polymeric materials for electronics or energy storage, and polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications. http projects in emerging fields of science and technology that lie at the intersection between chemistry Biology at Rensselaer invites applications from students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree

  2. Biological Engineering 2014-2015 BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PROGRESS FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Biological Engineering 2014-2015 8 BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PROGRESS FORM Applies to students Calculus for Engineers I* MATH 1910 (4) ______ _____ _____ Calculus for Engineers II* MATH 1920 (4) ______ _____ _____ Engineering Math* (Differential Equations) MATH 2930 (4) ______ _____ _____ Engineering Math* (Linear Algebra

  3. Biology 4410/5410 -Field Biology of Plants -Fall 2007 Instructor: Dr. David E. Lemke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upchurch, Gary - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    of weeks, at least, the sun will be bright and the weather hot. You should use sunscreen with a high SPF

  4. Biology 472 Spring 2009 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Kate

    Biology 472 Spring 2009 1 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles Dr. Kate Jackson Office: Science 200 E Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians. Oxford University Press. (2) Stebbins, R. and R. T. Peterson. 2003 of assorted herps (from labs). #12;Biology 472 Spring 2009 2 · ...know how to access primary sources

  5. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY GENERAL OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    * OR 201 Physics 4 hrs. PHYSICS 102* OR 202 Physics 4 hrs. General Biology Option Requirements: CellBACHELOR OF SCIENCE ­ BIOLOGY GENERAL OPTION A Bachelor of Science degree from Washington State Requirements: Grade BIOLOGY 106 General Biology 4 hrs. BIOLOGY 107 General Biology 4 hrs. BIOLOGY 301 General

  6. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  7. Modular architecture in biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

  8. Experiment design for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apgar, Joshua Farley

    2009-01-01

    Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. ...

  9. Environmental Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbiology, biogeochemistry, molecular biology, molecular dynamics, bioinformatics, genomics, neutron science, chemistry, and computing-and spans multiple scales, from the...

  10. Abengoa Mojave Final Biological Opinion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biological Opinion on Mojave Solar, LLC's Mojave Solar Project, San Bernardino County, California (8-8-11-F-3)

  11. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  12. Quantum physics meets biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Arndt; Thomas Juffmann; Vlatko Vedral

    2009-11-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the last decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world view of quantum coherences, entanglement and other non-classical effects, has been heading towards systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a pedestrian guide to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future quantum biology, its current status, recent experimental progress and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

  13. 720 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Biological Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    : Partitioning Host Responses to the Pathogen and Biocontrol Agent Kevin P. Smith, Jo Handelsman, and Robert M agent. Phytopathology 87:720-729. Breeding plants to improve the effectiveness of biocontrol agents response to the pathogen and the dose of pathogen and biocontrol agent applied to the host. To assess

  14. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Aalten, Daan

    plant-type chitinase reveals that the compound binds the catalytic machinery in the same manner synthesis of derivatives to explore a pocket near the catalytic machinery. This work provides synthetically of enzymes of interest and the design of future therapeutic drugs. Argifin is a natural product

  15. Proportional Relationships in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Proportional Relationships in Biology #12;Bell Ringer... 1) Are 2/3 and 6/12 proportional? 1) No; 6/12 = 1/2 ! 2/3 2) Are 2/3 and 10/15 proportional? 1) Yes; 2/3 = (2*5)/(3*5) = 10/15 3) Are 2/3 and 4/9 proportional? 1) No; both are simplified #12;Proportional Shapes · What does it mean for two shapes

  16. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Paper in Computational Biology The First Step Beyond theM . Glaeser, Mol. & Cell Biology, UCB and Life SciencesLBNL-44460 Computational Biology and High Performance

  17. Nutritional systems biology of type 2 diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Y; Barrere-Cain, RE; Yang, X

    2015-01-01

    HF (2015) Circadian systems biology in Metazoa. BriefingsNutritional systems biology: defini- tions and approaches.PAPER Nutritional systems biology of type 2 diabetes Yuqi

  18. BMC Bioinformatics Prediction of novel miRNAs and associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Pamela

    in soybean. Methods: We utilized Illumina's SBS sequencing technology to generate high-quality small RNA (s the data in a soybean genome browser based on the UCSC Genome Browser architecture. Using the browser, we

  19. DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    Masters of Science Degree Plan A: Thesis DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY #12;DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Masters of Science Degree (Plan A) Thesis The Plan A Master of Science Degree in Biology is a thesis,graduate degree program.The purpose of the program is to provide advanced exposure

  20. Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health PhDProgram Admissions The program seeks highly. PhD Program in Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health Focus Areas Cancer Development, Aging 24016 avanwart@vt.edu · www.tbmh.vt.edu www . tbmh.vt.edu #12;Translational Biology, Medicine

  1. Improved wastewater treatment at Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporations`s Steubenville East Coke Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goshe, A.J.; Nodianos, M.J. [Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corp., Follansbee, WV (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation recently improved its wastewater treatment at it`s by-products coke plant. This has led to greatly improved effluent quality. Excess ammonia liquor, along with wastewater from the light oil recovery plant, desulfurization facility, and coal pile runoff, must be treated prior to being discharged into the Ohio River. This is accomplished using a biological wastewater treatment plant to remove 99.99% of the organic contaminants and ammonia. Biologically treated, clarified wastewater is now polished in the newly constructed tertiary treatment plant.

  2. Biological Materials that REQUIRE an Export License ALL biological agents and biologically derived substances specifically developed, configured,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    Biological Materials that REQUIRE an Export License · ALL biological agents and biologically nationals or to be exported. List of Biological Materials that MAY Require an Export License (including

  3. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2004/05 University Medal in Biology Anna London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2004/05 University Medal in Biology Anna London University Medal in Marine Biology Jennifer Frail Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Ivy Whitehorn, Jennifer Frail

  4. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2003/04 University Medal in Biology Andrew Gillis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2003/04 University Medal in Biology Andrew Gillis University Medal in Marine Biology Kent Russell Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Andrew Gillis, Stephanie Wood

  5. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2006/07 University Medal in Biology Yassein Shamout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2006/07 University Medal in Biology Yassein Shamout University Medal in Marine Biology Sophie Whoriskey Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Shana Watanabe

  6. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2007/08 University Medal in Biology Faiza Siddiqi, Ashley Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2007/08 University Medal in Biology Faiza Siddiqi, Ashley Smith University Medal in Marine Biology Shana Watanabe Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Faiza Siddiqi

  7. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2005/06 University Medal in Biology Oliver Barker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2005/06 University Medal in Biology Oliver Barker University Medal in Marine Biology Katy Garant Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Oliver Barker, Alison Green, Carmen

  8. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2002/03 University Medal in Biology Kate Turner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2002/03 University Medal in Biology Kate Turner University Medal in Marine Biology Shane Gero University Medal in French Annette Woods University Medal

  9. The biology and ecology of Ochrimnus mimulus (Stal, 1874): an assessment of its coevolution with Baccharis in Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Georgianna Grimshaw

    1994-01-01

    The biology, ecology and behavior of Ochrimnus mimulus are described as they relate to its host plant, Baccharis spp. The ecological association between 0. mimulus and Baccharis was examined to determine temporal life cycle correspondence and insect...

  10. Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srienc, Friedrich (Lake Elmo, MN); Somers, David A. (Roseville, MN); Hahn, J. J. (New Brighton, MN); Eschenlauer, Arthur C. (Circle Pines, MN)

    2000-01-01

    Novel transgenic plants and plant cells are capable of biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Heterologous enzymes involved in PHA biosynthesis, particularly PHA polymerase, are targeted to the peroxisome of a transgenic plant. Transgenic plant materials that biosynthesize short chain length monomer PHAs in the absence of heterologous .beta.-ketothiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase are also disclosed.

  11. Ethylene insensitive plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

    2007-05-22

    Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

  12. 52 Plant Protection Quarterly Vol.18(2) 2003 The red coconut scale (Furcaspis oceanica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Gadi VP

    52 Plant Protection Quarterly Vol.18(2) 2003 Summary The red coconut scale (Furcaspis oceanica agent of the red coconut scale. Keywords: Scale insect, Furcaspis oceanica, Homoptera, Diaspididae, parasitoid, Adelencyrtus oceanicus, Hy- menoptera, Encyrtidae, coconut, biologi- cal control, Guam

  13. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2010/11 University Medal in Biology Jennifer Kalil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2010/11 University Medal in Biology Jennifer Kalil University Medal in Marine Biology John O'Brien University Silver Medal John O'Brien Hugh P. Bell Developmental Biology Prize Alexandra Preston Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Jessica Carriere

  14. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2011/12 University Medal in Biology Jaime Wertman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2011/12 University Medal in Biology Jaime Wertman University Medal in Marine Biology Cylia Civelek Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Sarah McBoyle, Lauren Kay, Daniel Developmental Biology Prize Siwar Arda Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Stacey Henderson Cecelia Rajaratnam

  15. Montana State University 1 Cell Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Cell Biology and Neuroscience The department participates: MSU's programs in the biological sciences are distributed across multiple departments. MSU does not have a single Department of Biology. For additional options see Biological Sciences (http

  16. 7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sive, Hazel L.

    The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological ...

  17. Poisonous Plant Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01

    range specialist, The Texas A&M University System . 2 DIAGNOSING POISONOOS PLANT PROBLEMS Accurate diagnosis of poisonous plant problems can be extremely difficult. Many cases of livestock poisoning by plants have been improperly diagnosed... Agricultural Extension Service ~-P~,IJ& H~iN!/ P~,IJ&--------------- poisonous Plant ___ Management_ ..... Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The Texas A&M University System. College Station, Texas POISONO(]S PLANT MANAGEMENT Allan McGinty* Poisonous...

  18. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  19. The number of genome duplications uncovered in the evolutionary history of land plants seems to be steadily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    .vandepeer@psb.vib-ugent.be 1 Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, Technologiepark 927, Ghent, Belgium Full list of authorThe number of genome duplications uncovered in the evolutionary history of land plants seems, previously unnoticed ancient whole genome duplications (WGDs) in seed plants. More precisely, the authors

  20. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers...

  1. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium andSamplerBiological Imaging by

  2. Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship Fund: The Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship is hereby created as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship Fund: The Department of Biology and Marine Biology Merit Scholarship is hereby created as a named fund at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. The scholarship is being created by the Department of Biology and Marine Biology and will be used

  3. Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late-than early-successional stage biological soil crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late- than early-successional stage biological soil crusts Brian J. Darby a,*, Deborah A. Neher a , Jayne Belnap b a Department of Plant and Soil; accepted 12 April 2006 Abstract Biological soil crusts are key mediators of carbon and nitrogen inputs

  4. Synthetic Biology: Engineering, Evolution and Design (SEED) Conference 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voigt, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    SEED2014 focused on advances in the science and technology emerging from the field of synthetic biology. We broadly define this as technologies that accelerate the process of genetic engineering. It highlighted new tool development, as well as the application of these tools to diverse problems in biotechnology, including therapeutics, industrial chemicals and fuels, natural products, and agriculture. Systems spanned from in vitro experiments and viruses, through diverse bacteria, to eukaryotes (yeast, mammalian cells, plants).

  5. Renewable Energy from Synthetic Biology (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay

    2011-04-28

    Jay Keasling, co-leader of Berkeley Lab's Helios Project, is a groundbreaking researcher in the new scientific field of synthetic biology. In Helios, he directs the biology program, incorporating a range of approaches to increasing the efficacy and economy of plants and cellulose-degrading microbes to make solar-based fuels. He is a UC Berkeley professor of Chemical and Bioengineering, and founder of Amyris Biotechnologies, a company that was honored as a Technology Pioneer for 2006 by the World Economic Forum. Keasling has succeeded in using synthetic biology to develop a yeast-based production scheme for precursors of the antimalarial drug artemisinin in work funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  6. For More Information: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/divprograms/PlantMicroBioSci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Gregory

    : dbbs-info@wustl.edu what is plant & microbial biosciences? Researchers in PMB employ prokaryotes and microbial systems adds to our knowledge of basic biology, informs our understanding of the natural world and investment in biological research, and fueled by experimental resources found at WUSTL. Students primarily

  7. Book: Aging and Oxidants in Animals and Plants Aging and oxidants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gems, David

    Book: Aging and Oxidants in Animals and Plants Aging and oxidants in the nematode Caenorhabditis;1.1 Testing the oxidative damage theory of aging in C. elegans The biology of aging remains poorly understood. For example, it remains unclear what sort of biological processes are the primary determinants of aging

  8. Saltcedar: Biology and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2009-05-04

    -like scale from salt secre- tions. As its name implies, saltcedar can tolerate salinities as high as 15,000 ppm, whereas natives such as cottonwoods and willows typically must have salinities be- low 2,500 ppm. From March to September, the plant produces... energy to send down a tap root. The initial tap root grows downward rapidly, with little branching until it reaches the water table. Once it reaches the water ta- ble, the secondary branching of the root becomes profuse. One study documented a...

  9. Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Crop Science Option The challenge for crop scientists is to implement crop and soil management systems, weed science, and entomology. Graduates find careers in farming and ranching; as crop productionDepartment of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology Unique, hands-on study programs for students

  10. Healthcare & Biology Licenses Available | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID 200802058, 200802114) 200802139 Universal Gene Transfer Technology for Gram Positive Bacteria 200802151 Determining Optical Properties of Biological Tissues 200802153 Combined...

  11. CollegeofScience Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ,populations,and even ecosystems. Our courses will help prepare you for a career in biology,be it in biodiversity

  12. Michael Levitt and Computational Biology

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... Levitt ... shares the ... prize with...

  13. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  14. November 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 11 BioScience 991 Atidal wave in the biological sciences, caused by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zhongchi

    , caused by the advent of genomic techniques and data, has begun to sweep across the fields of evolutionary of genome biology,or genomics, surged in the late 1980s under the impetus of the Human Genome Project and functional questions. The National Plant Genome Initiative, which brought genomics to the plant sciences

  15. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (1998), 63: 367378. With 4 figures Herbivores and molecular clocks as tools in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, John N.

    1998-01-01

    a powerful tool to historical plant biogeography. © 1998 The Linnean Society of London ADDITIONAL KEY WORDS and molecular clocks as tools in plant biogeography OLLE PELLMYR AND JAMES LEEBENS-MACK Department of Biology (Apiaceae) and the host-specific herbivore Greya powelli (Lepidoptera: Prodoxidae) in California

  16. Geothermal Demonstration Plant

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    configuration by the preparation of process flow diagrams for the initial plant operating condition and the 1-2 mid-range plant operating condition. have been revised and expanded...

  17. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  18. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2006-06-26

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  19. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-08-02

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  20. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2007-06-05

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  1. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2006-10-10

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  2. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    LBL-8596 itr-t C,d.. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS jmethods of isolating the hydrocarbon-like material from I.privatelyownedrights. HYDROCARBONS AND ENERGY FROM PLANTS

  3. Fluids as Dynamic Templates for Cytoskeletal Proteins in Plant Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Lofthouse

    2008-07-12

    The Dynamic Template model of biological cell membranes and the cytoplasm as spatially organised fluid layers is extended to plant cells, and is shown to offer a feasible shear driven mechanism for the co-alignment of internal and external fibres observed during growth and tropic responses

  4. Review: Northern Ontario medicinal plants Haider M. Hassan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    Review: Northern Ontario medicinal plants Haider M. Hassan1 , Zi-Hua Jiang2 , Tarannum A. Syed3 Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1; 2 Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1; and 3 Department of Biology, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Dr., Peterborough, Ontario

  5. Updated9January2003 DivisionofPlantIndustry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    the biocontrol insects used to attack PHM. !!!!! Please provide our inspectors access to your property! All state contacting your local county extension agent. Biological control works! Fortunately, several natural enemies. If a biocontrol program is launched early enough during an infestation, most affected plants recover fully. PHM

  6. Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants J.ANTONOVIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonovics, Janis

    #12;Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants J.ANTONOVIOS Department of Biology. University of Stirling.K. I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . 2 I1. Ecology of Metal Tolerance . . . . . . . . . 4 A on Contaminated Soils . . 19 1. Metal Concentration and Type . . . . . . . 19 2. Other Soil Factors

  7. Plant evolution The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Plant evolution The Evolution of Plants by Kathy J. Willis and Jenny C. McElwain. Oxford University Press, 2002. $40.00/£22.99 pbk (378 pages) ISBN 0 19 850065 3 Developmental Genetics and Plant Evolution is observed for treatments of evolution and development. Titles of major monographs on the subject imply

  8. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  9. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

  10. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2008/09 University Medal in Biology Alyssa Byers-Heinlein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2008/09 University Medal in Biology Alyssa Byers-Heinlein University Medal in Marine Biology Matthew Morris Avery Prize Jessica Arbour Hugh P. Bell Scholarships, Elisabeth Oakham Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Matthew Morris #12;

  11. Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2009/10 University Medal in Biology Jinnie Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2009/10 University Medal in Biology Jinnie Kim University Medal in Marine Biology Jesse Kelly University Silver Medal Jinnie Kim Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Vemco Scholarship in Marine Biology Jessie Short #12;

  12. Research Councils UK Synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Research Councils UK Synthetic biology #12;Synthetic biology Research funded by the Research a variety of approaches to support innovation and deliver impact from research, including the development of collaborative research programmes, investment in major research capabilities, such as national research

  13. Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management Fabián Menalled menalled@montana.edu 406-994-4783 Montana State #12;http://ipm.montana.edu/cropweeds #12;#12;· Biology and identification of brome species secalinus Not found in MT #12;Cheatgrass Japanese brome #12;Pictures from Interactive Encyclopedia of North

  14. The Plant Cell, Vol. 13, 19731982, September 2001, www.plantcell.org 2001 American Society of Plant Biologists MEETING REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steve

    and depth of the many exciting new discov- eries in plant biology in the last year. A complete listing. The first was the development of DamID (van Steensel et al., 2001), a technique that arose from a desire to identify the genomic binding sites of heterochro- matin protein 1 (HP1). DamID involves the fusion of Dam

  15. Simulation Modeling of Plants and Plant Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    Simulation Modeling of Plants and Plant Ecosystems Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz Reference Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz: Simulation Modeling of Plants and Plant Ecosystems. Communications of the ACM vol. 43 no. 7, pp The modeling of plants and plant ecosystems has the captivating appeal of reproducing the visual beauty

  16. Arts & Sciences Biology, B.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    6/7/13 Arts & Sciences Biology, B.A. Broad Learning Goals A. Understand basic biological principles, and appreciate the breadth of modern biology. B. Understand and apply the scientific principle to conceptual or experimental problems in biology. C. Present biological data, and interpretations of the data, in written

  17. Loop Quantum Theory Applied to Biology and Nonlinear Whole Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-01-02

    The loop quantum theory, which constitutes a very small discontinuous space, as new method is applied to biology. The model of protein folding and lungs is proposed. In the model, some known results are used, and four approximate conclusions are obtained: their structures are quantized, their space regions are finite, various singularities correspond to folding and crossed points, and different types of catastrophe exist. Further, based on the inseparability and correlativity of the biological systems, the nonlinear whole biology is proposed, and four basic hypotheses are formed. It may unify reductionism and holism, structuralism and functionalism. Finally, the medical meaning of the theory is discussed briefly.

  18. Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ussery, David W.

    Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology Visualisation of Large Amounts of Data Dave Ussery 27 February, 2008 #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group

  19. PLANT DISEASES IN SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    INDEX OF PLANT DISEASES IN SOUTH CAROLINA James H. Blake, Ed.D. Director, Home & Garden Information to compile a list of plant diseases occurring on cultivated and native plants in South Carolina. The data or conclusive list of the diseases of plants in South Carolina. New plants as well as new plant pathogens

  20. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  1. Manipulation of lignin composition in plants using a tissue-specific promoter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapple, Clinton C. S.

    2003-08-26

    The present invention relates to methods and materials in the field of molecular biology, the manipulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway and the regulation of proteins synthesis through plant genetic engineering. More particularly, the invention relates to the introduction of a foreign nucleotide sequence into a plant genome, wherein the introduction of the nucleotide sequence effects an increase in the syringyl content of the plant's lignin. In one specific aspect, the invention relates to methods for modifying the plant lignin composition in a plant cell by the introduction there into of a foreign nucleotide sequence comprising at issue specific plant promoter sequence and a sequence encoding an active ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H) enzyme. Plant transformants harboring an inventive promoter-F5H construct demonstrate increased levels of syringyl monomer residues in their lignin, rendering the polymer more readily delignified and, thereby, rendering the plant more readily pulped or digested.

  2. Energy from biological processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This assessment responds to a request by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation for an evaluation of the energy potential of various sources of plant and animal matter (biomass). This report complements an earlier OTA report on the Application of Solar Technology to Today's Energy Needs in evaluating the major solar energy resources available to the United States. The findings also will serve as part of the material to be used in an upcoming OTA assessment of synthetic fuels for transportation. This volume presents analyses of prominent biomass issues, summaries of four biomass fuel cycles, a description of biomass' place in two plausible energy futures, and discussions of policy options for promoting energy from biomass. The four fuel cycles - wood, alcohol fuels, grasses and crop residues, and animal wastes - were chosen because of their near- to mid-term energy potential and because of the public interest in them. A second volume presents technical analyses of the resource base, conversion technologies, and end uses that provide a basis for the discussion in this volume. Also included in Volume II are various unconventional approaches to bioenergy production as well as the use of biomass to produce chemicals.

  3. Rank 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 1 Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Scien

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    Engineering Sociology 3 Sociology 3 Animal Science Animal Science Biochemistry Animal Science Biochem Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences 2 Biochemistry Biochemistry Biochemistry Economics 4 Political Science 2 Political Science 2 Human Development Biochemistry Biochemistry Political

  4. The new biology: beyond the Modern Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R; Oakley, Todd H

    2007-01-01

    The Evolution of Biology. New York: Oxford University Press;2003. Woese CR: A new biology for a new century. Microbiol1961, 5:. Comfort A: The biology of senescence. 3rd edition.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation in systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellenberger, Jan

    2010-01-01

    2 The history of Monte Carlo Sampling in Systems Biology 1.1simulation tools: the systems biology workbench and biospiceCellular and Molecular Biology. ASM Press, Washington

  6. Engineering supported membranes for cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Cheng-han; Groves, Jay T.

    2010-01-01

    membranes in structural biology. J Struct Biol 168:1–2 50.supported membranes for cell biology Cheng-han Yu • Jay T.range problems in cell biology. Because lateral mobility of

  7. Noah A. Rosenberg Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    Noah A. Rosenberg Department of Biology Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-5020 USA (650) 721 appointments 2011- Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Stanford University 2009-2011 Associate Professor, Departments of Human Genetics, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, and Biostatistics, University

  8. THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY OXFORD, MARYLAND: PROGRAMS OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY OXFORD, MARYLAND: PROGRAMS AND PERSPECTIVES Circular 200 Washington, D.C. October 1964 #12;Cover Photo: The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

  9. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2011-04-25

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  10. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines This factsheet explains studies conducted in a...

  11. The sequestration efficiency of the biological pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Preformed phosphate, soft tissue pump and atmospheric CO 2 ,efficiency of the biological pump Tim DeVries, 1 Francoisproduces a “biological pump” that reduces the concentration

  12. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Biology and High Performance Computing Manfred Zorn, TeresaBiology and High Performance Computing Presenters: Manfred99-Portland High performance computing has become one of the

  13. Chemistry & Biology Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Article Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps of Antimalarial Compound FR Engineering 2Institute for Genomic Biology 3Department of Microbiology 4Department of Chemistry 5Departments

  14. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Matthew Posewitz Colorado School of Mines DOE Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop September 24 th , 2013 H 2 production PSIIPSI...

  15. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida (Photo Credit: Michael Masellis, Biology Major Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida Future Science Teachers' Club Recent Grant Successes Forthcoming Publications

  16. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

    2010-02-23

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  17. Architecture & Civil Engineering Biology & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Department Architecture & Civil Engineering Biology & Biochemistry Chemical Engineering Chemistry Computer Science Economics Education Electronic & Electrical Engineering Department Health Management Mathematical Sciences Mechanical Engineering Natural Sciences (please go to the Info Fair ­ no staff in office

  18. BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    The Master of Science in Biological Engineering prepares students to conduct research involving Professor. Conformation of interfacial species, surface spectroscopies/microscopies, binary polymer Sciences. Composites, coating layer mechanical properties. Barbara J. W. Cole, Ph.D. (Washington, 1986

  19. Synthesizing Law for Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    , metabolic pathways, cells, viruses, and whole organisms rapidly, inexpensively, and easily. Already, a number of institutions have helped synthetic biology achieve considerable success, both in terms of science and public awareness. The BioBricks Foundation...

  20. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Preparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering Information Science, Systems, & Technology Materials Science & Engineering Mechanical Engineering Operations

  1. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Preparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Biomedical Engineering* Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering Information Science, Systems, & Technology Materials Science & Engineering Mechanical Engineering

  2. Modular design of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

    2012-01-01

    The focus of my research is the development of technology for building compound biological systems from simpler pieces. I designed BioScaffold parts, a family of variable regions that can be inserted into a DNA sequence ...

  3. ADVANCEMENT COUNCIL Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalcraft, David R.

    Institute Mark Philips, B.S. North Carolina Biotechnology Center Francis J. Reilly, Jr. Ph.D. Logistics Management Institute Bobby J. Ward, Ph. D. Retired, CP&L Biologues A Newsletter of the Department of Biology

  4. Synthetic biology and crop engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA–E

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Triplett, Eric W. (Middleton, WI); Kaeppler, Shawn M. (Oregon, WI); Chelius, Marisa K. (Greeley, CO)

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  6. SC Johnson Waxdale Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 6.4 MW CHP application at SC Johnson Waxdale Plant in Racine, Wisconsin.

  7. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    17 harvest was 19 rainfall contributed 5.6" water. Harvest.harvest 29 Aug~st, when plants began to flower, approximately 15 irrigation water

  8. The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Chemical Biology Cancer Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Chemical Biology Cancer Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology The Chemical Biology Institute at Yale's West Campus #12 and molecular assem- blies, large and small, to address challenging problems in health, energy

  9. Building the "Popper Machine": A Necessary Research Goal for Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breitling, Rainer

    Building the "Popper Machine": A Necessary Research Goal for Systems Biology Rainer Breitling Plant that they require further formalization and automation, including (1) standardized and comprehensive representation of experimental evidence used for model building, addressing issues of reliability and consistency, (2) model

  10. Salt stress response in rice: genetics, molecular biology, and comparative genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    REVIEW Salt stress response in rice: genetics, molecular biology, and comparative genomics Chandan. Evidence show that salt tolerance in plants is a quantitative trait. Several traditional cultivars materials for donation of requisite salt tolerance genes. A large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL

  11. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 21382149 Heterogeneity of soil nutrients and subsurface biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    Author's personal copy Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 2138­2149 Heterogeneity of soil Laboratory, 999-W, Aiken, SC 29808, USA f Department of Plant & Soil Science, University of Vermont, Hills to have a highly heterogeneous distribution of nutrients and soil biota, with greater concentrations

  12. Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Microbial Ecology Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils Roberta M. Veluci1,2 , Deborah A. Neher1,3 and Thomas R. Weicht1,3 (1) Department of Earth, FL 32611-0760, USA (3) Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, 105 Carrigan Dr

  13. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Effects of Air Pollution on Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weathers, Kathleen C.

    THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Effects of Air Pollution on Ecosystems change, and invasive species as prime threats to biodiversity conservation. Although air pollution. In this synthesis, the state of scientific knowledge on the effects of air pollution on plants and animals

  14. Modulating lignin in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  15. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  16. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  17. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed of Reactor Physics SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden GABOR PÓR Budapest University of Technology and Economics H

  18. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed of Reactor Physics SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden GABOR PÓR Budapest University of Technology and Economics H

  19. Petri net modelling of biological Claudine Chaouiya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breitling, Rainer

    Petri net modelling of biological networks Claudine Chaouiya Submitted: 31st March 2007; Received into the functioning of complex biological networks. In this context, Petri nets (PNs) have recently emerged of the computational systems biology. Keywords: dynamical modelling; Petri nets; biological networks INTRODUCTION

  20. MASTER OF SCIENCE STUDIES IN BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Ver. 1.15 MASTER OF SCIENCE STUDIES IN BIOLOGY GUIDE FOR APPLICANTS, GRADUATE STUDENTS AND GRADUATE Biology and Ecology Physiology and Cellular/Molecular Biology Research Tools COURSE LOADS AND RECOMMENDED.......................................................................................................................................12 Change of Thesis Advisor Registration for Biological Research Thesis Proposal Registration

  1. Supplemental Graduate Application DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    Supplemental Graduate Application DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT: ______________________ To assist with processing your application please fill out and submit this form to biology For questions, please refer to the Biology Graduate Programs Handbook or contact the Biology Graduate Program

  2. Biology Advising Office Building 44, Room 135

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Biology Advising Office Building 44, Room 135 Mailing Address: Biology Advising Office, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0840 http://www.biology.utah.edu/undergraduate/advising.php Email: advising@biology.utah.edu Phone: (801) 581-6244 Fax: (801) 581-8571 Denise M. Brenis, Director

  3. 15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    Since the 14th Conference in Amsterdam in 1991, progress in plant hormone research and developmental plant biology has been truly astonishing. The five ``classical`` plant hormones, auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, ethylene, and abscisic acid, have been joined by a number of new signal molecules, e.g., systemin, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, whose biosynthesis and functions are being understood in ever greater detail. Molecular genetics has opened new vistas in an understanding of transduction pathways that regulate developmental processes in response to hormonal and environmental signals. The program of the 15th Conference includes accounts of this progress and brings together scientists whose work focuses on physiological, biochemical, and chemical aspects of plant growth regulation. This volume contains the abstracts of papers presented at this conference.

  4. Modeling plant growth and development Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    Modeling plant growth and development Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz Department of Computer Science plant models or "virtual plants" are increasingly seen as a useful tool for comprehending complex relationships between gene function, plant physiology, plant development, and the resulting plant form

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel...

  6. COPLBI-811; NO. OF PAGES 6 Please cite this article in press as: Pawlowski WP. Chromosome organization and dynamics in plants, Curr Opin Plant Biol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.pbi.2010.09.015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    2010-01-01

    cells as well as during cell division, particularly meiosis. This research has been fueled by new organization and dynamics in plants, Curr Opin Plant Biol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.pbi.2010.09.015 Available:1­6 This review comes from a themed issue on Cell biology Edited by Christian Luschnig and Claire Grierson 1369

  7. Elliott J Blumenthal-Biology Lead Advisor and Associate Chair-Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    Elliott J Blumenthal- Biology Lead Advisor and Associate Chair- Biology Frank V Paladino- Chair, Department of Biology #12;Objectives for Orientation today To give a description of the Biology Program To give an overview of the various "CONCENTRATIONS" that are available for majors in Biology To describe

  8. Biology BS, Environmental Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Environmental Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  9. 6/06/09 BA in General Biology Bachelor of Arts in General Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/06/09 BA in General Biology Bachelor of Arts in General Biology Department of Biology College of Science and Engineering Undergraduate Programs Students majoring in the General Biology degree program are required to complete 57 units in the major. In addition to the biological science courses, it includes

  10. Biology BS, Human Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Human Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  11. Plant Phenotype Characterization System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant Phenotype Characterization System Plant Phenotype Characterization System New X-Ray Technology Accelerates Plant Research The ability to analyze plant root structure and...

  12. Activation tagging identies a gene from Petunia hybrida responsible for the production of active cytokinins in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Peter

    Scollan1 and Peter Meyer1,* 1 Leeds Institute for Plant Biotechnology and Agriculture (LIBA), Centre for Plant Sciences, and 2 Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS 21 December 2001. * For correspondence (fax +44 113 2333144; e-mail p.meyer@leeds.ac.uk). Summary

  13. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  14. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  16. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  18. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  19. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  20. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  1. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  2. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  5. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  6. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  7. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  8. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  9. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  10. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  11. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  14. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  16. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  18. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  19. Vascular Plants of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2001-09-28

    This report provides an updated listing of the vascular plants present on and near the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. This document is an update of a listing of plants prepared by Sackschewdky et al. in 1992. Since that time there has been a significant increase in the botanical knowledge of the Hanford Site. The present listing is based on an examination of herbarium collections held at PNNL, at WSU-Tri Cities, WSU-Pullman, Bringham Young University, and The University of Washington, and on examination of ecological literature derived from the Hanford and Benton county areas over the last 100 years. Based on the most recent analysis, there are approximately 725 different plant species that have been documented on or around the Hanford Site. This represents an approximate 20% increase in the number of species reported within Sackschewsky et al. (1992). This listing directly supports DOE and contractor efforts to assess the potential impacts of Hanford Site operations on the biological environment, including impacts to rare habitats and to species listed as endangered or\\ threatened. This document includes a listing of plants currently listed as endangered, threatened, or otherwise of concern to the Washington Natural Heritage Program or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as well as those that are currently listed as noxious weeds by the State of Washington. Also provided is an overview of how plants on the Hanford Site can be used by people. This information may be useful in developing risk assessment models, and as supporting information for clean-up level and remediation decisions.

  20. Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandy, David

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 CODE of the Department of Chemical of Chemical & Biological Engineering. For clarity of presentation, some passages are copied directly from shall offer an undergraduate chemical and biological engineering program of technological, scientific

  1. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls, OR. Constructing a geothermal power plant on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus.

  2. Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

    1999-01-01

    Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

  3. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    categories: I. Methods of extraction of the dried plants.d) Processing methods: optimum extraction procedures;is the traditional method of extraction for rUbber-pr~duci

  4. Heating Plant Emergency Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    Heating Plant Emergency Instructions In the event of an EMERGENCY dial 403-220-5333 for Campus room, closet or hallway (ground floor, if possible) Stay away from outside walls, windows and doors

  5. & Immobilization Plant Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and monitoring challenges at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) in Hanford. The "black cell" design concept and the use of Power Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer technology on which WTP is...

  6. WithCarbonSequestration Biological-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    342928Net energy ratio 2.603.303.60$/kg H2Total cost Central Hydrogen from Biomass via Gasification · Techno-Economic Analysis of H2 Production by Gasification of Biomass · Renewables Analysis · BiomassWithCarbonSequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Biological

  7. Biology 2250 Principles of Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, David J.

    . David J. Innes B MendelianGenetics Tentative Lecture Dates and Topics Carr: Sept. 14 - 30 Structure1 Biology 2250 Principles of Genetics Instructors: Dr. Steven M. Carr B Molecular Genetics Dr and function of DNA and genes Innes: Oct. 7 ­ Nov. 12 Mendelian Genetics Carr: Nov. 18 ­ Dec. 2 Molecular

  8. Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics Physics 466 / Physics 566 (conjoint) provides a fundamental physical understanding of the operation of cells, biomolecules and molecular machines. MWF 4:10-5:00pm, Webster 11 (3 cr) Instructor: Fred Gittes, Clinical Professor of Physics and Astronomy: gittes

  9. Chemistry & Biology 16 Supplemental Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Chemistry & Biology 16 Supplemental Data Inorganic Mercury Detection and Controlled Release Cheng, Gerard C. L. Wong, and Yi Lu SUPPLEMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES Materials The lipids 1, in Eagle's Menimum Essential Medium, supplemented with 100 units/mL aqueous penicillin G, 100 µg

  10. DCC Case Study: Integrative Biology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Martin; Boyd, Victoria; Spellman, Jill

    2008-04-03

    these illnesses. The main aim of the Integrative Biology (IB) project is to realise this potential by developing multi-scale models - spanning the range from genes to whole organs - and to provide data management features for its disparate users including...

  11. Poverty Grass Biology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Poverty Grass Biology and Management Hilary Sandler, Katherine Ghantous, and Chelsea Hedderig UMass Cranberry Station, East Wareham, MA 02538 www.umass.edu/cranberry Background In the 1950's, Poverty grass identified as our "poverty grass" and has also been known as broom beardgrass. Little bluestem is often

  12. SYSTEMS BIOLOGY Accurate information transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsimring, Lev S.

    SYSTEMS BIOLOGY Accurate information transmission through dynamic biochemical signaling networks) and variability in cellular states (extrinsic noise) degrade information transmitted through signaling networks-induced information loss. In the extracellular signal­regulated kinase (ERK), calcium (Ca2+ ), and nuclear factor

  13. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  14. Advanced Topics in Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lonardi, Stefano

    1 Advanced Topics in Computational Biology April 6, 2015 CS260 3D structure of genomes ... the next frontier in genomic is space #12;2 Genome (chromosome) 3D structure · Conformation of chromosomes in nuclei is critical to many cellular processes such as gene regulation, DNA replication, maintenance of genome

  15. African Rue Biology and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2002-10-17

    s , apply V elpar L?, a herbicid e tha t mus t p enet r a te into the root zone . A pply i t undilu ted to the s o il dir e c tly b e low the plant canopy . V elpar L? is nons e- lec t i v e and will kill gr ass es in the immedia te applica t ion ar ea... t r ea t smaller ar eas or spars ely sca t ter ed plant s , apply V elpar L?, a herbicid e tha t mus t p enet r a te into the root zone . A pply i t undilu ted to the s o il dir e c tly b e low the plant canopy . V elpar L? is nons e- lec t i v e...

  16. Plant training grant: DE-FG02-94ER20162. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashmore, Anthony R.

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this training grant was to educate students of Plant Science in the disciplines of Biochemistry and Chemistry, in addition to the more traditional courses in Plant Biology. Annual retreats were held which involved a day-long meeting and included lectures from Penn faculty as well as famous national and international scientists. Programs for two of these retreats are included. In addition to lecture courses, students performed research within the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry and Biophysics; a publications list is given.

  17. The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Energy Sciences Cancer Biology Chemical Biology Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology The Energy Sciences Institute at Yale's West Campus #12The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Energy Sciences Cancer Biology Chemical Biology;#12;T he need for cheap, abundant energy is among the defining issues of our time. In the twentieth

  18. The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Nanobiology Cancer Biology Chemical Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Nanobiology Cancer Biology Chemical Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Systems Biology The Nanobiology Institute at Yale's West Campus #12;#12;I n energy. The potential for discovery is extraordinary. Yale scientists are exploring a new frontier within

  19. Computational Modelling in Systems and Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Campero, Francisco J.

    modules Networks Cells Colonies Systems Biology and Synthetic Biology #12;Stochasticity is important processes. Executable semantics. o Modularity in cellular systems, especially in gene regulatory networks been successfully applied. Monika Heiner, David Gilbert, Robin Donaldson. Petri Nets for Systems

  20. New Mexico State University Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houde, Peter

    1 New Mexico State University Department of Biology Functions and Criteria for Faculty Evaluation of Biology, the College of Arts and Sciences, and New Mexico State University reward and retain faculty

  1. Authentic teaching and learning through synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuldell, Natalie

    Synthetic biology is an emerging engineering discipline that, if successful, will allow well-characterized biological components to be predictably and reliably built into robust organisms that achieve specific functions. ...

  2. Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology Thomas E. Creighton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oster, George

    Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology Thomas E. Creighton ISBN: 0-471-15302-8 ATP Synthase: Two rotary be divided into two operational regions denoted Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 4 Volume Set Thomas E

  3. Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

    2013-01-01

    The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

  4. Plants & Animals Insects (and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reece, Sarah

    . However, what looks like a team effort is in fact each animal jostling to get to the middle of the group model citizens, too. Unlike herds of bison or shoals of fish -- where individuals may appear to be team involved are united in a common purpose. Dr Andy Gardner, from the School of Biological Sciences

  5. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  6. At the Biological Modeling and Simulation Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    methods (Boolean networks, Petri nets (27), pi- calculi,C. Petri net modelling of biological networks. Brief

  7. Biology and the Foundation of Ethics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McShea, Daniel W.

    . Evolutionary ethics. Biology and Philosophy 1: 325-35. Van Ingen, J. 1994. Why Be Moral? New York: Peter Lang

  8. Module Identification for Biological Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yijie

    2015-08-12

    into the Deoxyri- bonucleic acid (DNA), which is a molecule that stores the genetic instructions used in all biological processes of all known living organisms. Human Genome Project (HGP) has achieved tremendous success in determining the DNA sequence and rec...- ognizing and mapping genes of the human genome based on both their physical and functional responsibilities. However, HGP collaborated all research pioneers around the world and still costed 13 years and $3 billions, which illustrates how difficult...

  9. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  10. Lex Genetica: The Law and Ethics of Programming Biological Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burk, DL

    2015-01-01

    The law and ethics of programming biological code Dan L.biological artifacts. Such programming may include usagerelated to biological programming, the latter technology

  11. Systems biology of the cardiac hypoxia response in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feala, Jacob Daniel

    2008-01-01

    in Molecular Systems Biology , volume 3, article number 99,appear in Molecular Systems Biology. The dissertation authoret al. (2003) The systems biology markup language (SBML): a

  12. Booly : a new data integration platform for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Long Hoang

    2010-01-01

    for enabling conceptual biology. Bioinformatics 2005, 21for data integration in biology. Trends Biotechnol 1999, 17(the unification of biology. The Gene Ontology Consortium.

  13. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the biological and...

  14. Evolution of biological complexity Christoph Adami*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofria, Charles A.

    Evolution of biological complexity Christoph Adami* , Charles Ofria§ , and Travis C. Collier, Pasadena, CA 91125; and ¶Division of Organismic Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, University of California in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined

  15. Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions 2014-2015 Concern Recommendation Action Follow-up 1. The department name is Chemical and Biological Engineering. An analysis of student Biological Engineering programs. 4. The second semester of the senior capstone sequence in Chemical

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE Profile likelihood in systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    REVIEW ARTICLE Profile likelihood in systems biology Clemens Kreutz1,2 , Andreas Raue1,3 , Daniel for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), University of Freiburg, Germany 3 Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology of Freiburg, Germany 5 BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, University of Freiburg, Germany

  17. Synthetic Biology for Therapeutic Applications Zhanar Abil,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Synthetic Biology for Therapeutic Applications Zhanar Abil, Xiong Xiong, and Huimin Zhao of Bioengineering, Department of Chemistry, Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois

  18. Petra Anne Levin Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petra Anne Levin Department of Biology Campus Box 1137 Washington University St. Louis, MO 63130 Fellow Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology Advisor: Dr. Alan Grossman 1996 Ph.D., Biology Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Dissertation: Asymmetric Division During Spore Formation

  19. A CONSTRAINED OBJECT APPROACH TO SYSTEMS BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    A CONSTRAINED OBJECT APPROACH TO SYSTEMS BIOLOGY by Manu Pushpendran September 2006 A thesis towards Dr. Daniel Fischer for allowing me to audit his course on Computational Biology which helped me gain significant insights on many biological terms. Special thanks to Dr. Gokul Das from Roswell Park

  20. FACULTY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    OF BIOLOGY Permanent Full-Time Position (Tenure-Track) Assistant Professor Starting mid-August 2014 REFER of Biology at Sonoma State University seeks applications from broadly trained biologists with teaching and research interests and expertise in molecular biology, for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position

  1. LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Science Meets Life. Minnesota with the guidance of internationally-renowned scientists in the Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (BMBB that is a hallmark of the Twin Cities and Minnesota. The Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Graduate

  2. The Division of Biology & Biomedical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    The Division of Biology & Biomedical Sciences what will YOU discover? #12;620students more than 470faculty 36departments 12programs and one YOU. DBBS Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences Washington. The Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences (DBBS) is ideally positioned to foster the interdisciplinary

  3. Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

  4. Highlights from the Fourth International Society for Computational Biology Student Council Symposium at the Sixteenth Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-10-30

    that are short and error prone, however they come with considerable advantages. Both De Bona et al. [9] and Rausch et al. [10] developed algorithms to circumvent some of the prob- lems faced with short sequence reads. The first approach employed the additional... . BMC Bioinformatics 2008, 9(Suppl 10):O3. 7. Bohnert R, Zeller G, Clark RM, Childs KL, Ulat V, Stokowski R, Ball- inger D, Frazer K, Cox D, Bruskiewich R, Buell CR, Leach J, Leung H, McNally KL, Weigel D, Rätsch G: Revealing sequence variation patterns...

  5. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  6. Salinity tolerance in plants: attempts to manipulate ion transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Volkov

    2014-11-06

    Ion transport is the major determining factor of salinity tolerance in plants. A simple scheme of a plant cell with ion fluxes provides basic understanding of ion transport and the corresponding changes of ion concentrations under salinity. The review describes in detail basic principles of ion transport for a plant cell, introduces set of transporters essential for sodium and potassium uptake and efflux, analyses driving forces of ion transport and compares ion fluxes measured by several techniques. Study of differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes offers knowledge for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion transport. Several attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance are described. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to potential candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. The potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters is discussed and questioned. An alternative approach from synthetic biology is to modify the existing membrane transport proteins or create new ones with desired properties for transforming agricultural crops. The approach had not been widely used earlier and leads also to theoretical and pure scientific aspects of protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis.

  7. Roadmap: Biology Organismal Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI] College of Arts/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses General Elective 3 #12;Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS

  8. Symbolic Systems Biology: Theory and Methods, Jones and Bartlett Publishers 2010 On Statecharts for Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harel, David

    Symbolic Systems Biology: Theory and Methods, Jones and Bartlett Publishers 2010 On Statecharts for Biology Jasmin Fisher and David Harel Biology as Reactivity One of the central issues in software decade or so, we and others have carried out work on viewing biological systems as reactive systems

  9. REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

  10. Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title 160 or MATH 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell

  11. Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Cultural Competence in the College Biology Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feature Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Cultural Competence in the College Biology Classroom Kimberly Tanner* and Deborah Allen *Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132; and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716

  12. Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Making Biology Learning Relevant to Students: Integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feature Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning Making Biology Learning Relevant to Students: Integrating People, History, and Context into College Biology Teaching Katayoun Chamany,*Deborah Allen College, The New School for Liberal Arts, New York, NY 10011; Department of Biological Sciences

  13. Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for students interested in the interface between the life sciences and physical sciences. Molecular biology is an interdisciplinary science that uses the techniques of biology and chemistry to examine genetic inheritance

  14. A First Attempt to Bring Computational Biology into Advanced High School Biology Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Debra S.

    Education A First Attempt to Bring Computational Biology into Advanced High School Biology Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America, 2Boulder of a computational ele- ment in secondary biology classrooms is of growing concern to the computational biology

  15. MSc Marine Biology Module description (A) MODULE A: FUNDAMENTALS OF MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    1 MSc Marine Biology ­ Module description (A) MODULE A: FUNDAMENTALS OF MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY (OBLIGATORY COURSES) A1. Principles of Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography (5 CP) A2. Principles of Marine Ecophysiology (5 CP) A3. Experimental Design and Data Analysis (5 CP) TIMING AND DURATION

  16. Stem cell biology is population biology: differentiation of hematopoietic multipotent progenitors to common lymphoid and myeloid progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangel, Marc; Bonsall, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    M: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biology. New York: Humana Press;In Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biology. Edited by Kondo M. Newmodels in stem cell biology: replacement, quiescence, and

  17. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  18. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics, localization algorithm LOCALIZATION OF A VIBRATING CONTROL ROD PIN IN PRESSURIZED WATER REACTORS USING. The possibility of the localization of a vibrating control rod pin in a pressurized water reactor control assembly

  19. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah

    2013-08-21

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  20. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Foster, G.D. (2012) The top 10 fungal pathogens in molecularBLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteriaC. and Foster, G.D. (2011) Top 10 plant viruses in molecular

  1. Systems biology of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navid, A; Ghim, C; Fenley, A; Yoon, S; Lee, S; Almaas, E

    2008-04-11

    Microbes exist naturally in a wide range of environments, spanning the extremes of high acidity and high temperature to soil and the ocean, in communities where their interactions are significant. We present a practical discussion of three different approaches for modeling microbial communities: rate equations, individual-based modeling, and population dynamics. We illustrate the approaches with detailed examples. Each approach is best fit to different levels of system representation, and they have different needs for detailed biological input. Thus, this set of approaches is able to address the operation and function of microbial communities on a wide range of organizational levels.

  2. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  3. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUSEnergy||slideshow explains theVersatileBiological

  4. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

    1996-01-01

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

  5. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  6. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  7. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  8. Getting Inside Plants | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ability to use additional CO2, how plants pass on additional CO2 to bacteria in the soil (carbon sequestration), and in what ways potential biofuel-producing plants can be...

  9. 7/25/13 Department: -Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department -Universityof Florida -Acalog ACMSTM gradcatalog.ufl.edu/preview_entity.php?catoid=4&ent_oid=2771&returnto=986&print 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    are included in cooperation with NASA at Kennedy Space Center. Biological engineering includes post-harvest and expert systems techniques to biological and agricultural systems. Land and water resources includes soil-water-plant relations, irrigation, water quality, watershed hydrology, BMP and TMDL studies, hydrologic modeling

  10. Independent Oversight Evaluation, Pantex Plant - November 2000...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation, Pantex Plant - November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation, Pantex Plant - November 2000 November 2000 Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise...

  11. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    21 3. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS……………………………………………….. 23 3.1-25 3.2- WASTES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS………………………… 28 4.radionuclides 3. Nuclear Power Plants, which includes some

  12. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    concerns about nuclear power plants safety after the Threedoubts regarding nuclear power plants safety. 3.1- Nuclearof nuclear power plants in order to meet safety requirements

  13. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  14. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  15. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  16. US prep plant census 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-10-15

    Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  17. Biocontrol of plant disease: a (Gram-) positive perspective Elizabeth A.B. Emmert Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    to the downfall of a biocontrol agent. Knowledge of the biological environment in which the agent will be used utilizing Gram-positive biocontrol agents that have been researched in depth and provide modelsMiniReview Biocontrol of plant disease: a (Gram-) positive perspective Elizabeth A.B. Emmert Y , Jo

  18. BIOLOGY SEMINAR MELINDA DENTON ENDOWED LECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    @u.washington.edu Monday, April 06, 2015 "Phylogenetic ecology of plant/insect food webs: examples from the New Guinea forest community is explained by the phylogeny and functional traits of host plants. We destructively

  19. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  20. Plant Microbiology Lab SYLLABUS 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    of beneficial microorganisms on plants. Assays will include colonization of the plants, N stress alleviation for sequencing Mon Mar 3 Measure seedlings (5 wk data). Other plant phys expts? Early in the week: your sequencing results will be emailed to you Fri Mar 7 Lab write-up #2 on Strai

  1. North City Water Reclamation Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -Site Cogeneration Methane Power Plant Methane piped in from: Miramar LandfillMiramar Landfill Metropolitan BiosolidsNorth City Water Reclamation Plant Maja Caroee Diana Lee Niko Salvador #12;What is Water% for plant operation 25% sold to local power grid #12;Technical Issues & Innovations COMNET Clean water

  2. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  3. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard A. (Irvine, CA); Doiron, Daniel R. (Santa Ynez, CA); Crean, David H. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  4. Grasses and Forage Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1898-01-01

    State. A large number of the grasses, including many of the common culti? vated clovers and legumes, and many rare hay plants, on our experi? mental plots during 1897, were gathered and supplied by special agents of the United States Agricultural...), Trifolium hybridum (Alsike Clover), Large Red Clover, Trifolium repens (White Dutch Clover), suffered from the drouth and sun, but have made better growth at this place than during previous years. SPOROBOLUS. 8. wrighti*?Perennial. Germinated April 2...

  5. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO); Ghosh, Tushar K. (Columbia, MO); Tompson, Jr., Robert V. (Columbia, MO); Viswanath, Dabir (Columbia, MO); Loyalka, Sudarshan K. (Columbia, MO)

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  6. On Biology as an Emergent Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pierre Noyes

    2007-05-31

    Biology is considered here as an "emergent science" in the sense of Anderson and of Laughlin and Pines. It is demonstrated that a straightforward mathematical definition of "biological system" is useful in showing how biology differs in structure from the lower levels in Anderson's "More is Different" hierarchy. Using cells in a chemostat as a paradigmatic exemplar of a biological system, it is found that a coherent collection of metabolic pathways through a single cell in the chemostat also satisfies the proposed definition of a biological system. This provides a theoretical and mathematical underpinning for Young's fundamental model of biological organization and integration. Evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of Young's method of analysis is provided by preliminary results of clinical trials of a specific application of Young's model to the treatment of cancer cachexia.

  7. Genome Biology 2004, 5:R82 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchrefereedresearchinteractionsinformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brendel, Volker

    ], although some plants have over 100 copies. Second, they insert late in the maize life cycle, generating and screening of RescueMu plasmid libraries identified plants containing probable germinal insertions and screening of RescueMu plasmid libraries identified plants containing probable germinal insertions. Although

  8. Phytosequestration: Carbon biosequestration by plants and the prospects of genetic engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, C.; Wullschleger, S.D.; Kalluri, U.C.; Tuskan, G.A.

    2010-07-15

    Photosynthetic assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide by land plants offers the underpinnings for terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration. A proportion of the C captured in plant biomass is partitioned to roots, where it enters the pools of soil organic C and soil inorganic C and can be sequestered for millennia. Bioenergy crops serve the dual role of providing biofuel that offsets fossil-fuel greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and sequestering C in the soil through extensive root systems. Carbon captured in plant biomass can also contribute to C sequestration through the deliberate addition of biochar to soil, wood burial, or the use of durable plant products. Increasing our understanding of plant, microbial, and soil biology, and harnessing the benefits of traditional genetics and genetic engineering, will help us fully realize the GHG mitigation potential of phytosequestration.

  9. Engineering Inspired from biological systems, nanotechnology (and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Engineering Inspired from biological systems, nanotechnology (and more recently at Northeastern University in Boston. His research explores the use of nanotechnology in numerous applications

  10. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop. bioh2workshopfinalreport.pdf More Documents & Publications The Hydrogen Program at NREL: A...

  11. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  12. School of Biological Sciences Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trudgett, Alan

    School of Biological Sciences Student Handbook 2014­2015 #12;Student Handbook 2014-2015 1 WELCOME............................................................................................41 #12;Student Handbook 2014-2015 2 Queen's University Library

  13. Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Biology and Oncogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofacre, Andrew; Fan, Hung

    2010-01-01

    J.C. Transformation and oncogenesis by jaagsiekte sheepRetrovirus Biology and Oncogenesis Andrew Hofacre and Hunginduced transformation or oncogenesis has been studied in a

  14. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Undergraduate Handbook Academic Year 2014, pharmaceuticals, semiconductors, adhesives, biopolymers, artificial kidneys, oil refineries, solar panels

  15. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Sys- tem (AHTS) Program supports the research and...

  16. Applied Plant Sciences 48 Applied Plant Sciences Courses (APSC) 226

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    .D. 55 Audiology See Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences B Biochemistry Courses (BIOC) 234 Biochemistry Biological Science 58 M.B.S. 59 Biology Courses (BIOL) 235 Biomedical Engineering 59 Biomedical Engineering Science Engineering and Management 61 Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering Courses (BBE) 237 M

  17. Continuum Electrostatics in Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. John Gagliardi

    2010-02-06

    Recent experiments revealing possible nanoscale electrostatic interactions in force generation at kinetochores for chromosome motions have prompted speculation regarding possible models for interactions between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charge on C-termini near the plus ends of microtubules. A clear picture of how kinetochores establish and maintain a dynamic coupling to microtubules for force generation during the complex motions of mitosis remains elusive. The current paradigm of molecular cell biology requires that specific molecules, or molecular geometries, for force generation be identified. However, it is possible to account for mitotic motions within a classical electrostatics approach in terms of experimentally known cellular electric charge interacting over nanometer distances. These charges are modeled as bound surface and volume continuum charge distributions. Electrostatic consequences of intracellular pH changes during mitosis may provide a master clock for the events of mitosis.

  18. Nonlinear Elasticity in Biological Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelis Storm; Jennifer J. Pastore; Fred C. MacKintosh; Tom C. Lubensky; Paul A. Janmey

    2004-06-01

    Unlike most synthetic materials, biological materials often stiffen as they are deformed. This nonlinear elastic response, critical for the physiological function of some tissues, has been documented since at least the 19th century, but the molecular structure and the design principles responsible for it are unknown. Current models for this response require geometrically complex ordered structures unique to each material. In this Article we show that a much simpler molecular theory accounts for strain stiffening in a wide range of molecularly distinct biopolymer gels formed from purified cytoskeletal and extracellular proteins. This theory shows that systems of semi-flexible chains such as filamentous proteins arranged in an open crosslinked meshwork invariably stiffen at low strains without the need for a specific architecture or multiple elements with different intrinsic stiffnesses.

  19. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-06-01

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  20. Research Positions in Big Data Computational Biology Department of Computational and Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Takis

    Research Positions in Big Data Computational Biology Department of Computational and clinical data related to melanoma and chronic lung diseases. The ideal, and will have research experience in computational biology. 2. One Data Scientist

  1. HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    the green plant to capture and store solar energy, is Brazilsolar energy capturing machine we know, namely, the green plant,

  2. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann; Gerzabek, Martin H.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

  3. Engineering the use of green plants to reduce produced water disposal volume.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchman, R.; Mollock, G. N.; Negri, M. C.; Settle, T.

    1998-01-29

    In 1990, the Laboratory began an investigation into biological approaches for the reduction of water produced from oil and gas wells. In the spring of 1995, the Company began an on-site experiment at an oil/gas lease in Oklahoma using one of these approaches. The process, known as phytoremediation, utilizes the ability of certain salt tolerant plants to draw the produced water through their roots, transpire the water from their leaves, and thereby reduce overall water disposal volumes and costs. At the Company experimental site, produced water flows through a trough where green plants (primarily cordgrass) have been planted in pea gravel. The produced water is drawn into the plant through its roots, evapotranspirates and deposits a salt residue on the plant leaves. The plant leaves are then harvested and used by a local rancher as cattle feed. The produced water is tested to assure it contains nothing harmful to cattle. In 1996, the Company set up another trough to compare evaporation rates using plants versus using an open container without plants. Data taken during all four seasons (water flow rate, temperature, pH, and conductivity) have shown that using plants to evapotranspirate produced water is safe, more cost effective than traditional methods and is environmentally sound.

  4. COURSE INFORMATION Plant Diversity and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    and experimental tools used to understand plant diversity. 4. "Vocabulary" of plant description (see list list) 7. Distinctive features of land plant diversity 8. The history of land plants through time #12COURSE INFORMATION Fall 2009 Plant Diversity and Evolution (11:704:411) and Advanced Plant

  5. UB DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING BS in Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING BS in Chemical and Biological EngineeringD (all in Chemical Engineering) · Average ChE starting salary: $66,000 (BS) · A five-year BS in Chemical by teaching assistants: 0 What Do Chemical and Biological Engineers Do? CBE graduates apply chemistry to make

  6. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 97 (2008) 115157 Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottale, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 97 (2008) 115­157 Review Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology: 2 Macroscopic quantum-type mechanics Laurent Nottalea,b , Charles Auffrayb Meudon, France b Functional Genomics and Systems Biology for Health, UMR 7091-LGN, CNRS/Pierre & Marie

  7. Propagation of Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1955-01-01

    . Whenever possible, sow the seed of most After the seed have germinated, place th~ Texas ornamentals in flats or pots than container where the seedlings will get an abw directly in the open ground. dance of light. If kept in a shady location, leg...!! weak plants will result. Be sure there are cracks or holes in the bot- tom of the flat or that the hole in the bottom - Water from below whenever the soil becomP of the flower pot is kept open to allow excess water to pass quickly out of the soil...

  8. Nuclear Plant Data Bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, C.P.; Turner, M.R.; Spore, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Data Bank (NPDB) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to assist analysts in the rapid and accurate creation of input decks for reactor transient analysis. The NPDB will reduce the time and cost of the creation or modification of a typical input deck. This data bank will be an invaluable tool in the timely investigation of recent and ongoing nuclear reactor safety analysis. This paper discusses the status and plans for the NPDB development and describes its anticipated structure and capabilities.

  9. Propagation of Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1955-01-01

    '~ihtenecl with a fine mist spray of water, since an important factor in rooting cuttings is to keep the cuttings moist. There are many advantages in the use of mist by the home gardener. A cutting continues to lose water by transpiration after... it is removed from the parent plant. It is impossible for the cuttings to take up sufficient water to replace that lost by rapid transpiration until new roots are formed. The mist system prevents ex- cessive loss of water by the cutting. Maintain- ing...

  10. Better Buildings, Better Plants:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUSEnergy|| Department ofBuildings, Better Plants: AMO

  11. Gasification Plant Databases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblems I n QEstimatesPlant Databases

  12. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformancePi Day Pi Day Pi Day isPlanning forPlants &

  13. Invited Review The biology of kinetoplastid parasites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    . Their cell shapes change during a set of complex cell type differentiations in their life cycles and vector. The basics of this rich and complex cell and life cycle biology were described (with often rather developments in our understanding of this biology. Ultrastructural differences in the various cells of the life

  14. The Electronics Biological Matter Interface. Introduction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    , real­time monitoring of biological processes. Second, local electric fields generated by the devices. Electrophoresis, one of the fundamental tools of biotechnology, also relies on electric charges. Charge and biological matter is a subject of significant current interest. The fundamental science of this area

  15. Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    Genome Biology 2005, 6-mail: bbernst@fas.harvard.edu. Manolis Kellis. E-mail: manoli@mit.edu Published: 1 March 2005 Genome Biology- tium, which aims to identify a comprehensive `Encyclopedia of DNA elements' in the human genome [http

  16. Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis- try in Yellowstone National Park. (eds WP Inskeep of life. The legacy of chemical and biologi- cal research in geothermal regimes, while short in duration geothermal areas, including Yellowstone, are largely confined to the specialty literature of geochemical

  17. Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic Respirometers B R U C E E . L O G A N The biological production of hydrogen from the fermentation of different substrates was examined in batch tests product for a sugar (4). The accumulation of hydrogen and other degradation byproducts during fermen

  18. Genome Biology 2004, 5:R43 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchrefereedresearchinteractionsinformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetenschappen, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, 3001 Heverlee (Leuven), Belgium. Current literature indices of selected public biological resources in a flexible text-mining system designed towards of selected public biological resources in a flexible text-mining system designed towards the analysis

  19. Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Mobile DNA: genomes under the influence Cédric Feschotte and Ellen J Pritham Feschotte. Email: cedric@uta.edu Published: 30 June 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006

  20. THE EMERGENCE OF MEANING IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE EMERGENCE OF MEANING IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS THESIS SUBMITTED FOR THE DEGREE OF "DOCTOR OF MEANING IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS THESIS SUBMITTED FOR THE DEGREE OF "DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY" BY URI HERSHBERG and what its functions are. Likewise we study the immune system as an example of cognitive perception

  1. MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS ACADEMIC LEARNING PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    , application and preservation of knowledge. Within this framework, the primary mission of the Department and animals Adherence to appropriate ethical practices in the thesis research E. Project Management Design.MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS EMBEDDED ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENT FOR DOMAIN(S): INTEGRITY/VALUES, PROJECT MANAGEMENT Program: M.S. Biology

  2. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  3. Perspectives on plant vulnerabilities & other plant and containment improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, J.; Kolaczkowski, A.; Kahn, J. [and others

    1996-01-01

    The primary goal of the Individual Plant Examination (IPE) Program was for licensees to identify plant-unique vulnerabilities and actions to address these vulnerabilities. A review of these vulnerabilities and plant improvements that were identified in the IPEs was performed as part of the IPE Insights Program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The purpose of this effort was to characterize the identified vulnerabilities and the impact of suggested plant improvements. No specific definition for {open_quotes}vulnerability{close_quotes} was provided in NRC Generic Letter 88-20 or in the subsequent NRC IPE submittal guidance documented in NUREG-1335. Thus licensees were left to use their own definitions. Only 20% of the plants explicitly stated that they had vulnerabilities. However, most licensees identified other plant improvements to address issues not explicitly classified as vulnerabilities, but pertaining to areas in which overall plant safety could potentially be increased. The various definitions of {open_quotes}vulnerability{close_quotes} used by the licensees, explicitly identified vulnerabilities, proposed plant improvements to address these vulnerabilities, and other plant improvements are summarized and discussed.

  4. Plant–herbivore interactions mediated by plant toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-03-25

    Dec 17, 2007 ... O. Box 249118, Coral Gables, FL 33124, United States. .... Per capital death rate of herbivore unrelated to plant toxicity. 2. Analysis of the ...

  5. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N.more »europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.« less

  6. The SONATRACH jumbo LPG plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed Khodja, A.; Bennaceur, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors aim is to give to the 17 TH world gas conference a general idea on SONATRACH LPG PLANT which is located in the ARZEW area. They develop this communication as follows: general presentation of LPG plant: During the communication, the author's will give the assistance all the information concerning the contractions the erection's date and the LPG PLANT process, start-up of the plant: In this chapter, the authors's will describe the start-up condition, the performance test result, the flexibility test result and the total mechanical achievement of the plant; operation by SONATRACH: After the success that obtained during the mechanical achievement and performance test, the contractor handed over the plant to SONATRACH.

  7. Plant Physiology: Manipulating Plant Growth with Solar Radiation Dennis Decoteau, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Plant Physiology: Manipulating Plant Growth with Solar Radiation Dennis Decoteau, Ph.D. Department of light that surrounds the plant. Light ­ Radiant Energy All light is made up of energy. Light to plants (Villee, 1977). Plant Uses Of Radiant Energy And Plant "Vision" Plants utilize specialized pigments

  8. Better Buildings, Better Plants Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-08

    The Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is part of a national leadership initiative calling on business leaders and others to create American jobs through energy efficiency.

  9. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  10. MHD plant turn down considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Better Plants | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Partners and welcomed more than 20 manufacturers into the program at the World Energy Engineering Congress on October 2, 2014. Read more Better Plants Program Logo Leading...

  12. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global) .................................................................... 14 4.4 High Temperature Gas Reactor

  13. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  14. Home Biology Medicine Technology Products News Definition Dictionary Movies Links Whole Site Goog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Home Biology Medicine Technology Products News Definition Dictionary Movies Links Search RSS Whole Site Goog Navigation Links Biology News Medicine News Biology Products Medicine Products Biology Definition Medicine Definition Biology Technology Medicine Technology Biology Dictionary Medicine Dictionary

  15. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolvanen, Outi K. . E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I.

    2006-07-01

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

  16. Scaling plant nitrogen use and uptake efficiencies in response to nutrient addition in peatlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Bridgham, Scott [University of Oregon; Kellogg, Laurie E. [University of Minnesota, St Paul

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in many terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore plant production per unit N taken up (i.e., N use efficiency, NUE) is a fundamentally important component of ecosystem function. Nitrogen use efficiency comprises two components: N productivity (AN, plant production per peak biomass N content) and the mean residence time of N in plant biomass (MRTN). We utilized a five-year fertilization experiment to examine the manner in which increases in N and phosphorus (P) availability affected plant NUE at multiple biological scales (i.e., from leaf to community level). We fertilized a natural gradient of nutrient-limited peatland ecosystems in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, with 6 g Nm2yr1, 2 g Pm2yr1, or a combination of N and P. Our objectives were to determine how changes in carbon and N allocation within a plant to leaf and woody tissue and changes in species composition within a community, both above- and belowground, would affect (1) NUE; (2) the adaptive trade-off between the components of NUE; (3) the efficiency with which plants acquired N from the soil (N uptake efficiency); and (4) plant community production per unit soil N availability (N response efficiency, NRE). As expected, N and P addition generally increased aboveground production and N uptake. In particular, P availability strongly affected the way in which plants took up and used N. Nitrogen use efficiency response to nutrient addition was not straightforward. Nitrogen use efficiency differed between leaf and woody tissue, among species, and across the ombrotrophic minerotrophic gradient because plants and communities were adapted to maximize either AN or MRTN, but not both concurrently. Increased N availability strongly decreased plant and community N uptake efficiency, while increased P availability increased N uptake efficiency, particularly in a nitrogen-fixing shrub. Nitrogen uptake efficiency was more important in controlling overall plant community response to soil N availability than was NUE, and above- and belowground community N uptake efficiencies responded to nutrient addition in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that plants respond to nutrient availability at multiple biological scales, and we suggest that N uptake efficiency may be a more representative measurement of plant responses to nutrient availability gradients than plant NUE.

  17. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Vogel, John S. (Union City, CA); Felton, James S. (Danville, CA); Gledhill, Barton L. (Alamo, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA); Stanker, Larry H. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-05-11

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  18. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Vogel, John S. (Union City, CA); Felton, James S. (Danville, CA); Gledhill, Barton L. (Alamo, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  19. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  20. Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants Take a step back to examine swollen nodules at the container edge, rather than circling like in a plastic container. The nodules store with soil or mulch ­ ignore these and find the first permanent woody root growing radially out from

  1. Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    ciency of Electric Generating Plants: A Stochastic Frontierthe existing stock of electricity generating plants. Betweenover 300 electric generating plants in the US, accounting

  2. Master Plant List for Texas Range and Pasture Plant Identification Contests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby

    2000-05-03

    Entrants in range and pasture plant identification contests will find this reference useful. It includes explanations of plant characteristics and a master list of plants....

  3. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  4. Honors B.S. in Biology (Aug 2014) Overview: The H.B.S in Biology is a collaboration between the Honors College and the Biology Department to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    1 Honors B.S. in Biology (Aug 2014) Overview: The H.B.S in Biology is a collaboration between the Honors College and the Biology Department to reward students undertaking and completing a more rigorous, research-oriented curriculum while pursuing their Honors Bachelor's Degree in Biology at the University

  5. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  6. Biology and Biodiversity of the Marine Leeches of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    1978. Morphology and biology of Mysidobdella borealis (Wasmann Journal of Biology 13: 297–311. S ELENSKY , W. D.C. M EYER . 1976. Taxonomy and biology of some Newfoundland

  7. BIOLOGY & MEDICINE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978-1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    on research needs in actinide biology (CONF-770491, Seattle,J. Radiation Oncology Biology Physics 3: Lindgren, Frank T.Radiation Oncology Biology, Physics 3: 81-85 Magee, J.L and

  8. Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems Program Requirement Checklists Fall 2007 ­ Summer 2008 Master of Science ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.............................................................2 Doctor of Philosophy ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  9. Aspects of the political economy of development and synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellhausen, Rachel

    What implications might synthetic biology’s potential as a wholly new method of production have for the world economy, particularly developing countries? Theories of political economy predict that synthetic biology can ...

  10. Crafting life : a sensory ethnography of fabricated biologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roosth, Hannah Sophia

    2010-01-01

    This ethnography tracks a diverse set of practices I term "constructive biologies," by which I mean efforts in the post-genomic life sciences to understand how biology works by making new biological things. I examine five ...

  11. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  12. Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

  13. Do Plants Sweat? Core Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Bruce

    in the bright sun and others are grouped together and are regularly sprinkled with water. You begin to wonder plant distribution where you see this principle in action? -Can you predict the effect of seasons data/graph] Three plants are grown in the same greenhouse with the same air temperature, amount

  14. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing OF ST. LUCIE-2 at FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY · Robert E. Uhrig 1974-1986 ­ Vice President, Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  15. From Tucson to Genomics and Transgenics: The Vector Biology Network and the Emergence of Modern Vector Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    mosquitoes. A PL meeting at the Biology of Disease Vectors (as a tool in vector biology. Transformation of the vector ofelement. Insect Molecular Biology 10: 597–604. 11. Balter

  16. Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Life Technologies Corporation and LANL have...

  17. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

  18. Detter, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory] Basic Biological

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems using Genomic Sequencing Detter, John C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science...

  19. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for...

  20. THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Three Nominees in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Chemistry at UCLA #12;