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1

Bluestem Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluestem Electric Coop Inc Bluestem Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Bluestem Electric Coop Inc Place Kansas Utility Id 23826 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Single-Phase General Service Demand Commercial Single-Phase Service Commercial Single-Phase Service Residential Single-Phase Time-of-Use Service Single-Phase Total Electric Service Single-phase Earth-Coupled Heat Pump Service Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1410/kWh Commercial: $0.1160/kWh Industrial: $0.2110/kWh

2

watchlist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Common Name Scientific Name Date Found Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii * INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans * LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius * SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum * CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata * NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea **u PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata **u SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula **u Forbs ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus * WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa * YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata * BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta ** COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum ** CUP-PLANT Silphium perfoliatum **u NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae ** PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum ** RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium ** STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida **

3

prairie plant list  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations Select the common name of the plant you want to view. Common Name Scientific Name Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula FORBS ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum CUP PLANT Silphium perfoliatum NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida

4

Stocking rate effects on intensive-early stocked Flint Hills bluestem range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stocking rate effects on intensive-early stocked Flint Hills bluestem range CLENTON E. OWENSBY, ROBERT COCHRAN, AND ED F. SMITH Stocking rate effects on intensive-early stocked Kansas Flint Hills range- lands is limited to the first 2 1/ 2 months of the growing season in the Kansas Flint Hills. Grazing

Owensby, Clenton E.

5

Fertilizing and Burning Flint Hills Bluestem CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND ED F. SMITH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fertilizing and Burning Flint Hills Bluestem CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND ED F. SMITH Abstract Burned of nitrogen applied more than 80 lb N/acre did. Maintenance of good quality range was favored by burning and 0 and 40 lb N/acre compared to not burning and the same fertilizer rates. Eighty lb N/acre produced poor

Owensby, Clenton E.

6

Microsoft Word - S08266_App_A-2.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 2 2011 Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity Results This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Fernald Preserve, Ohio, Wetland Mitigation Monitoring Report Appendix A-2, 2011 Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity Results Doc. No. S08266 May 2012 Page A-2-1 Table A-2-1. BAPW2 Wetland Vegetation Monitoring Data Summary Total Species 34 Native Species 30 Non-Native (Adventive) Species 4 Average CC b 2.78 Species Common Name Type CC b Nativity Wetland Indicator c Relative Cover Alisma subcordatum SOUTHERN WATER- PLANTAIN forb 2 native OBL 0.296% Ambrosia artemisiifolia COMMON RAGWEED forb 0 native FACU 0.075% Ammannia robusta SESSILE TOOTH-CUP forb 7 native OBL 0.296% Andropogon gerardii BIG BLUESTEM grass 5 native FAC 1.035% Asclepias incarnata SWAMP MILKWEED forb 4 native OBL 0.739%

7

1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LANDFILL COVER REVEGETATION AT THE LANDFILL COVER REVEGETATION AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE Jody K. Nelson Exponent, 4940 Pearl East Circle, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80020 ABSTRACT In 1998, a revegetation project was begun on a landfill cover at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado. After final contouring of the landfill cover, the area was broadcast seeded with native species including: Agropyron smithii, Bouteloua gracilis, Buchloe dactlyoides, Andropogon gerardii, Andropogon scoparius, and Linum perenne. In May 1999, the cover was treated by helicopter with Tordon22K ® to control the noxious weed, Centaurea diffusa. During 2001, vegetation cover and species richness was measured along five 50-m transects. A total of 25

8

Rangeland plant response to elevated CO{sub 2}. Annual report, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Effects of carbon dioxide enrichment on a tallgrass ecosystem were monitored during the 1990 growing season. The chambers, CO{sub 2} delivery system, and data acquisition and control system were in place and operational by 4 April 1990. CO{sub 2} fumigation and data acquisition began on that date. Nitrogen fertilizer as ammonium nitrate was applied at a rate of 45 kg ha {sup -1} on 1 April to the N-fertilized plots. The chambers were 4.5 m in diameter and 4 m in height to allow for destructive sampling for biomass accumulation, leaf area determination, and for grazing esophageally-fistulated sheep. The experimental site was located in pristine Tallgrass Prairie north of/and adjacent to the Kansas State University campus. Vegetation on the site was a mixture of C3 and C4 species and was dominated by big bluestem (Andropogon geradii vitman) and indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash). Subdominants included Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula (Michx.) Torr.), and tall dropseed (Sporobolus asper var. asper (Michx.) Kunth). Members of the sedge family made up 5-10% of the composition. Principal forbs included western ragweed (Ambrosia psilostachya DC.), Louisiana sagewort (Artemesia ludoviciana Nutt.), and mayflower scurfpea (Psoralea tenuiflora var. floribunda (Nutt.) Rydb.). Average peak biomass occurs in early August at 425 g m{sup -2} of which 35 g m{sup -2} is from forbs. The area was ideal for meeting the experimental objectives, in that the mixture of C3 and C4 plants would allow for assessment of competitive relationships among numerous species of both carbon fixation pathways.

Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.; Ham, J.M.; Parton, W.; Rice, C.; Auen, L.M.; Adam, N.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Ion-induced pattern formation on Co surfaces: An x-ray scattering and kinetic Monte Carlo study O. Malis* and J. D. Brock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buffalograss, Buchloi dac- tyloides).On average, the fewest ant mounds were found on Old World bluestem plots, whereas the indigenous grassland had the highest density of harvester ant mounds. However, there were(Cole, 1968). These ants clear vegeta- tion around their nest-sites (mounds) to form a disk of bare ground 1

Headrick, Randall L.

10

Intensive-Early Stocking and Season-Long Stocking of Kansas Flint Hills Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensive-Early Stocking and Season-Long Stocking of Kansas Flint Hills Range ED F. SMITH AND CLENTON E. OWENSBY Highlight: Native Flint Hills bluestem range was stocked at twice the normal rate, 1 gains during the latter half of the growing season on Kansas Flint Hills range are barely one-half those

Owensby, Clenton E.

11

Springview II Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springview II Wind Project Springview II Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Springview II Wind Project Facility Springview II Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Bluestem LLC Developer Bluestem LLC Energy Purchaser NPPD Location Springview NE Coordinates 42.82578163°, -99.77630854° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.82578163,"lon":-99.77630854,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Yield and quality of forages grown on mine spoil  

SciTech Connect

Pasture or hayland is a potential use for much of the reclaimed mined land in Kentucky. To determine the usefulness of several species for forage production, two study areas were established, one in the eastern coal fields, the second in the western coal fields. Eight species were seeded in eight different mixtures at each location. Each plot was harvested twice each year to determine yield, and samples were analyzed to determine percent protein, DMD, and sugar. Analysis of variance of the data show that there are significant differences in yield, stand, percent protein and percent DMD among the different species. There is also a significant difference in the yield of the same species between the two study areas. In eastern Kentucky, two mixtures, switchgrass-Interstate sericea lespedeza and Caucasian bluestem-Appalow sericea lespedeza yielded more hay than tall fescue-Interstate sericea, the standard of comparison. In western Kentucky, all seeding mixtures yielded more than the tall fescue Interstate mixture. There is no difference in stand among the species in eastern Kentucky. In western Kentucky, Caucasian bluestem, tall fescue, and switchgrass have better stands than other species.

Kuenstler, W.F.; Henry, D.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Property:EIA/861/NercSpp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NercSpp NercSpp Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Nerc Spp Entity conducts business operations within the SPP region (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/NercSpp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc + true + Anadarko Public Works Auth + true + Arkansas Electric Coop Corp + true + Ashley Chicot Elec Coop, Inc + true + Auburn Board of Public Works + true + B Bailey County Elec Coop Assn + true + Basin Electric Power Coop + true + Big Country Electric Coop, Inc + true + Bluestem Electric Coop Inc + true + Bowie-Cass Electric Coop, Inc + true + Brown-Atchison E C A Inc + true +

14

Rangeland Plant response to elevated CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Plots of a tallgrass prairie ecosystem were exposed to ambient and twice-ambient CO{sub 2} concentrations in open-top chambers and compared to unchambered ambient CO{sub 2} plots during the entire growing season from 1989 through 1993. Dominant species were Andropogon geradii, A. scoparius, and Sorghastrum nutans (C{sub 4}) and Poa pratensis (C{sub 3}). Aboveground biomass and leaf area were estimated by periodic sampling throughout the growing season in 1989 and 1990. In 1991, 1992, and 1993, peak biomass and leaf area were estimated by an early August harvest. Compared to ambient CO{sub 2} levels, elevated CO{sub 2} increased production of C{sub 4} grass species in 1989-1991, but in 1992 and 1993, wet years, there was no difference in C{sub 4} biomass production among treatments. Biomass production of C{sub 3} grass species did not differ among treatments any year. Root ingrowth biomass was greater in 1990 and 1991 on elevated CO{sub 2} plots compared to ambient or chambered-ambient plots. In 1992 and 1993, there was no difference in root ingrowth biomass among treatments.

Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.; Ham, J.M.; Parton, W.; Rice, C.; Auen, L.M.; Adam, N.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z