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Sample records for blossom street columbia

  1. Director, health Physics Office Columbia University

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    f. 3 -J Mr. Philip tori0 Director, health Physics Office Columbia University 289 Engineering Terrace 520 West 120th Street New York, New York 10027 NY.3 "I A\, 4 f- ' :""5 . . ;. ,_ i._ ' L, Dear Mr. Lorio: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on Columbia University facilities to determine whether they contain residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the

  2. DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street and Area Lighting Inventory Survey DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street and Area Lighting ...

  3. Brighter Lights, Safer Streets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks to support from an Energy Department Recovery Act grant, Washington, DC streets are becoming brighter.

  4. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W^ 8 1903 NEVIS 115 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Department of Physics I n t e n s i t y of Upward Muon F l u x Due t o Cosmic Ray N e u t r i n o s P r o d u c e d i n t h e A t m o s p h e r e D. LEE, H. ROBINSON, M. SCHWARTZ and R. COOL L E G A L N O T I C E This report wse prepared as an account of Government Bpondored work. Neither the United States, nor the Commlsalon, oar any person acting on behajf of the Commission- A. Makes any warranty or representation, expressed or Implied, with respect to

  5. Report from the Street

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SHERMAN STREET, CAMBRIDGE, MA 02140 617.354.4502 LAMPARTNERS.COM BLOG.LAMPARTNERS.COM Report from the Street Glenn Heinmiller, FIALD, LC, LEED AP Principal, Lam Partners Chair,...

  6. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, B. R.; Royer, M. P.; Hadjian, M.; Kauffman, R.

    2013-06-01

    GATEWAY program and Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium report on a demonstration of LED street lighting in Kansas City, MO.

  7. 701 Ninth Street, NW

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Street, NW Washington, DC 20068 202 872-3057 William M. Gausman Vice President, Asset Management January 8, 2007 Mr. Anthony J. Como SEA Document Manager U.S. Department of ...

  8. District of Columbia - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (EIA) District of Columbia District of Columbia

  9. District of Columbia - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (EIA) District of Columbia District of Columbia

  10. District of Columbia - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (EIA) District of Columbia District of Columbia

  11. 200 N. Spring Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dipartment of Energy. ,' Washington,DC20585 ., .\ FEB 1 7 ' 19g5' ,The Honorable Richa,rd. Riordon .', 200 N. Spring Street 'Los Angeles, California ,90012 '~ Dear Mayor Riordon: " Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary'has announced a neb approach to openness ins- the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. fin support of this initiative, we are pleased~ to forward the enclosed information related to the. former Shannon Luminous Metals site in your jurisdiction that

  12. GATEWAY Demonstrations: LED Street Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Tyson; Shackelford, Jordan; Pang, Terrance Pang

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes an assessment project conducted to study the performance of light emitting diode (LED) luminaires in a street lighting application in San Francisco, CA.

  13. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boston, MA Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and ... U.S. Department of Energy Boston's LED Street Lighting Initiative Joanne Massaro, ...

  14. Cate Street Capital Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cate Street Capital Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cate Street Capital, Inc. Place: Portsmouth, New Hampshire Zip: 3801 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: New Hampshire-based...

  15. Pecan Street Project Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pecan Street Project Inc Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78759 Product: Austin-based smart grid, energy system developer. The Pecan Street...

  16. Complete Streets Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete Streets Resources Complete Streets Resources While transportation efficiency policies are often implemented under local governments, national and state programs can play supportive roles in reducing vehicle miles traveled. Find complete streets resources below. National Complete Streets Coalition. Back to Transportation

  17. Adaptive Street Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Webcasts » Adaptive Street Lighting Controls Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of San Jose, CA, and Kelly Cunningham of the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis discussed their experiences as early adopters of these smart street lighting systems. In Part II, presenters

  18. British Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it. British Columbia is a province in Canada. Energy Incentives for British Columbia Energy Monitoring Act (Canada) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy...

  19. DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street and Area

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lighting Inventory Survey | Department of Energy Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street and Area Lighting Inventory Survey DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street and Area Lighting Inventory Survey October 16, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE's Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium (MSSLC) has released the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S., conducted during the latter half

  20. 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wall Street Perspective on SMRs 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs Summary of results of a 2013 survey on Wall Street attitudes toward small modular reactors. PDF icon 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs More Documents & Publications 2014 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs - Report 2014 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs 2015 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs Update

  1. Columbia Water & Light- Solar Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light electric customers are eligible for a $400 rebate for the purchase of a new solar water heater. To apply for this rebate, a customer submits a pre-approval application to...

  2. Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on 320 kW fuel cell and microturbine power plants at Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant in Portland, Oregon.

  3. LEDs for Street Lighting—Here Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-29

    Fact sheet that provides a brief overview of the viability of LED street lighting in municipalities and highlights case studies of two cities—Los Angeles and Seattle—that have invested in LED street lighting.

  4. Smart Street Lights | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LightGrid Provides Real-Time Feedback From Street Lights Click to email this to a friend ... LightGrid Provides Real-Time Feedback From Street Lights You use a GPS to provide ...

  5. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Los Angeles, CA Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and ... Lighting L.M. Seventynine: Who Is He and What Does He Have to Do with LED Street Lighting? ...

  6. Detroit Street Lighting Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detroit Street Lighting Report Detroit Street Lighting Report PDF icon 2015_restoring-detroit.pdf More Documents & Publications LED Roadway Lighting OCTOBER 2015 POSTINGS Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit

  7. SSL Demonstration: Street Lighting, Kansas City, MO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing an SSL street lighting demonstration at nine separate installations in Kansas City, MO.

  8. PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Presidential Permit authorizing British Columbia and Power Authority to...

  9. District of Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (District of Columbia) Glacial Energy Holdings (District of Columbia) Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Integrys Energy Services, Inc. (District...

  10. 2014 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs - Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives on SMRs - Report 2014 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs - Report Summary of the results of a 2014 survey of Wall Street attitudes toward small modular reactors. PDF icon View from Wall Street: Nuclear Energy and Small Modular Reactors More Documents & Publications 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs 2014 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs 2015 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs Update

  11. 2015 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs Update 2015 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs Update Summary briefing on the results of a September 2015 survey of Wall Street attitudes toward SMRs. PDF icon 2015 Financial Survey: Nuclear Energy More Documents & Publications 2014 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs 2014 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs - Report 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs

  12. Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2015-10-21

    The City of Detroit is undertaking a comprehensive restoration of its street lighting system that includes transitioning the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) sources to light-emitting diode (LED). Detroit’s well-publicized financial troubles over the last several years have added many hurdles and constraints to this process. Strategies to overcome these issues have largely been successful, but have also brought some mixed results. This document provides an objective review of the circumstances surrounding the system restoration, the processes undertaken and decisions made, and the results so far.

  13. British Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentives for British Columbia Energy Monitoring Act (Canada) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) References http:...

  14. California Street Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2006 Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCaliforniaStreetBiomassFacility&oldid397263" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  15. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dallas, TX Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Dallas, TX This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal ...

  16. Restoring Detroits Street Lighting System

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    once completed in 2016. Table ES.1. Annual savings a from Detroit street lighting transition Annual Energy Savings (kWh) Annual Electric Cost Savings () Annual...

  17. 2014 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspective on SMRs 2014 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs Summary briefing on the results of a 2014 survey of Wall Street attitudes toward SMRs. PDF icon 2014 New Generation Financial Survey More Documents & Publications 2014 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs - Report 2015 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs Update 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs

  18. Flooded First Street at Y-12 Plant | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flooded First Street at ... Flooded First Street at Y-12 Plant Vehicles negotiate flooded First Street at Y-12 Plant

  19. Solar Resource Measurements in 1400 JR Lynch Street, Jackson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Resource Measurements in 1400 JR Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi Cooperative ... CRADA Number: CRD-07-254 CRADA Title: Solar Resource Measurements in 1400 JR Lynch Street, ...

  20. Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2015_gateway-msslc_portland.pdf More Documents & Publications OCTOBER 2015 POSTINGS Detroit Street Lighting Report Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report

  1. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Nine different ...

  2. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: ...

  3. Member Case Studies: LED Street Lighting Programs in Algona ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Member Case Studies: LED Street Lighting Programs in Algona (IA), Asheville (NC), and Boston (MA) Member Case Studies: LED Street Lighting Programs in Algona (IA), Asheville (NC), ...

  4. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report This ...

  5. EECBG Success Story: Brighter Lights, Safer Streets | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brighter Lights, Safer Streets EECBG Success Story: Brighter Lights, Safer Streets May 15, ... Photo courtesy of Michael Jaycocks EECBG Success Story: North Carolina Playing Fields ...

  6. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  7. Columbia Water & Light- Solar Energy Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers electric residential and commercial customers low-interest loans for photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heaters.

  8. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  9. Brochure: Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these agencies maximize the use of the Columbia River by generating power, protecting fish and wildlife, controlling floods, providing irrigation and navigation, and sustaining...

  10. U. 5. COLUMBIA RIVER POWER SYS1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration deposited 12,800,000 to the reclamation fund in the United States Treasury for the account of Columbia Basin Project, Yakima Project...

  11. Columbia Utilities Electricity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Name: Columbia Utilities Electricity Place: New York Phone Number: (877) 726-5862 Website: www.columbiautilities.com Twitter:...

  12. Columbia, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Missouri. It falls under Missouri's 9th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Columbia, Missouri AFuels Technologies LLC Renewable Alternatives LLC...

  13. City of Columbia- Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In November 2004, voters in Columbia, Missouri, approved* a proposal to adopt a local renewable portfolio standard (RPS). (The state renewable electricity standard adopted by ballot initiative in...

  14. Columbia Gas of Ohio- Residential Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Ohio (CGO) offers energy efficiency rebates for furnaces, boilers, and customers that enroll in the Home Performance Solutions Program. 

  15. British Columbia UILO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UILO Jump to: navigation, search Name: British Columbia UILO Place: Canada Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic Research foundation )...

  16. Columbia Water & Light- Residential HVAC Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light (CWL) provides residential customers with rebates on energy efficient HVAC equipment. Customers should submit the mechanical permit from a Protective Inspection, a copy...

  17. The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Friday, April 21, 1995 - - - The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Timothy D. Mount, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX FAYE DUCHIN JOHN D. GRACE PHILIP HANSWER CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG JAMES L. O'BRIEN DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS A-G-E-N-D-A Page No. Introductory Remarks, TIMOTHY MOUNT, Chairman 3 Announcement of

  18. Remaining Barriers to LED Street Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ownership, involving multiple decision-makers * Utilities own 60-70% of street lighting inventory in U.S. * Sometimes more than one utility present in a given metro area * Often...

  19. Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Day Burners in Detroit, December 2013 Marc Ledbetter, Marc.Ledbetter@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Start date: April, 2010 Planned end date: FY19 Key Milestones 1. Detroit joining MSSLC and deciding to pursue an LED-based system, November, 2013 2. Model Controls Specification V2.0 released; April, 2014 3. Street Lighting Controls Demonstration Established,

  20. Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) PDF icon 2015_gateway-msslc_portland.pdf More Documents & Publications OCTOBER 2015 POSTINGS Detroit Street Lighting Report Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report

  1. Columbia County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Columbia County, Georgia Evans, Georgia Grovetown, Georgia Harlem, Georgia Martinez, Georgia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleColumbiaCounty,Geor...

  2. Devonshire Energy, LLC (District of Columbia) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Devonshire Energy, LLC (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Devonshire Energy, LLC Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  3. Washington Gas Energy Services (District of Columbia) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Gas Energy Services (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Washington Gas Energy Services Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  4. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  5. Columbia County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype C. Places in Columbia County, Oregon Clatskanie, Oregon Columbia City, Oregon Prescott, Oregon Rainier, Oregon Scappoose, Oregon St. Helens, Oregon Vernonia, Oregon...

  6. EERE Success Story-Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy EERE Success Story-Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, ...

  7. Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC (District of Columbia) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  8. Columbia River PUD- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia River PUD offers a variety of rebates to commercial and industrial customers who make energy saving improvements to facilities. Visit Columbia River PUD's website for specific program...

  9. Columbia Water & Light- Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Columbia Water & Light (CWL) Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program allows Columbia residents to finance energy efficiency improvements to homes with affordable, low-interest loans with...

  10. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report This document represents the final Regional Demonstration Project Technical Performance Report (TPR) for Pecan Street Inc.'s (Pecan Street) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, DE-OE-0000219. Pecan Street is a 501(c)(3) smart grid/clean energy research and

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Street Sweepers Improve Air

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Quality in New York Natural Gas Street Sweepers Improve Air Quality in New York to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Street Sweepers Improve Air Quality in New York on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Street Sweepers Improve Air Quality in New York on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Street Sweepers Improve Air Quality in New York on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Street

  12. Jonathan Link, Columbia NuCosmo '02

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7-19, 2002 Jonathan Link, Columbia NuCosmo '02 Jonathan Link Columbia University Workshop on Neutrino News from the Lab and the Cosmos October 17-19, 2002 October 17-19, 2002 Jonathan Link, Columbia NuCosmo '02 Outline 1. The LSND Experiment a. The experimental setup b. Results c. Ramifications 2. MiniBooNE a. The BooNE Collaboration b. The beam line and expected neutrino flux c. The MiniBooNE detector d. Expected backgrounds and systematics e. First neutrino events, and cosmic rays f.

  13. Jonathan Link, Columbia KEK Topical Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -22, 2001 Jonathan Link, Columbia KEK Topical Conference Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillations and MiniBooNE Jonathan Link Columbia University The 5 th KEK Topical Conference - Frontiers in Flavor Physics November 20-22, 2001 November 20-22, 2001 Jonathan Link, Columbia KEK Topical Conference Outline 1. Background on Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillations * A little neutrino physics * The LSND oscillation result 2. About MiniBooNE 3. Status of MiniBooNE. Some of you may have noticed that I'll be

  14. PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Limited PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Electric Company, Limited to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canadian border. PDF icon PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited More Documents & Publications PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited, Amendment 1957

  15. PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited, Amendment 1957 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Limited, Amendment 1957 PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited, Amendment 1957 Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Electric Company, Limited to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canadian border. PDF icon PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited More Documents & Publications PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited

  16. BPA research aids Columbia River white sturgeon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research aids Columbia River white sturgeon 8142015 12:00 AM Tweet Page Content BPA fish biologist Scott Bettin (left) and Brad Cady of the Washington Dept. of Fish and...

  17. Columbia Power System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    931-388-4833 Website: www.cpws.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesColumbia-Power-Water-Systems123897314290346 Outage Hotline: 931-388-4833 References: EIA Form...

  18. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  19. Columbia University | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Columbia University Columbia University Professor Michael Mauel PPPL Engineer Steve Raftopoulos assisted Professor Mike Mauel with the upgrade of the HBT-EP experiment. The upgrade involved installing a new conducting first wall shell that is instrumented with magnetic sensor arrays. The HBT-EB research required these components to be installed with greater precision, and Professor Mauel asked for the assistance of PPPL's metrology engineers and equipment. The stabilization of MHD in HBT-EB will

  20. Mid-Columbia Region Clean Energy Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93 -VA Revision 0 Mid-Columbia Region Clean Energy Opportunities Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited DOE-0393 -VA Revision 0 Mid-Columbia Region Clean Energy Opportunities D. R. Bratzel, Energy Initiatives Mission Support Alliance Date Published February 2012 To be Presented at Business Development Briefing RL Site Stewardship Division

  1. PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmision facilities at the U.S-Canadian border. PDF icon PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority More Documents & Publications PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited, Amendment 1957 PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company,

  2. United States Entity Columbia River Treaty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA A-7 USACE CENWD-DE Ms. Sue Saarnio, Director Office of Canadian Affairs, WHA-CAN United States Department of State 2201 C Street Northwest Washington, D.C. 20520 Dear Ms....

  3. Text-Alternative Version: Evaluating LED Street Lighting Solutions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Evaluating LED Street Lighting Solutions webcast, held July 20, 2010.

  4. Pittsburgh LED Street Lighting Research Project Performance Criteria

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Pittsburgh LED Street Lighting Research Project document on Technical and Aesthetic Performance for Business District LED Lighting.

  5. DOE Publishes Report on Detroit's Street Lighting Conversion | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Report on Detroit's Street Lighting Conversion DOE Publishes Report on Detroit's Street Lighting Conversion October 7, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy has released a new report on the comprehensive street lighting restoration currently being undertaken by the City of Detroit, which includes transitioning the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) sources to LED. Entitled Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System, the report provides an objective review of the

  6. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Report | Department of Energy Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report This report summarizes an LED street lighting assessment project conducted to study the applicability of LED luminaires in a street lighting application. PDF icon emerging_tech_report_led_streetlighting.pdf More Documents & Publications Effective White Light Options for Parking Area

  7. Using the Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tool | Department of Energy Using the Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Using the Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool This August 22, 2013 webinar provided a guided walk-through of the Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool. Developed by a partnership of the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, the Clinton Climate Initiative/C40, and the DOE Federal Energy Management Program,

  8. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Materials-Boston, MA | Department of Energy Boston, MA Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Boston, MA This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Boston August 2-3, 2012. Workshop Agenda DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy Boston's LED Street Lighting Initiative Joanne Massaro, Glenn Cooper, Matthew Mayrl,

  9. Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    913 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2013 / Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite 10800, Arlington, Virginia 22202-4149. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603-7740, Fax: (703) 603-0655, or email CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Addition On 6/28/2013 (78 FR 38952-38953), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published notice of proposed addition to the Procurement List.

  10. America Saves: Energizing Main Street Small Businesses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America Saves: Energizing Main Street Small Businesses Sara Stiltner, sstiltner@savingplaces.org National Trust for Historic Preservation 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Demonstrate a community-based approach to small business and non-profit participation in utility energy retrofit programs and district-based sustainability initiatives. Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2013 Planned end date: 9/30/2016 Key Milestones: 1. Data collection pilot identified; 7/2014 2. Field

  11. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Administration One West Third Street Tulsa OK 74103-3502 918 595 6600 Fax 918 595 6656 www.swpa.gov An Agency of the United States Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration Strategic Plan March 2013 Administrator's Message The Southwestern Power Administration powers the future, all day, every day, as we have for 70 years, through times of abundant water, and through times of drought; despite floods, ice storms, and tornadoes. We have consistently fulfilled our commitment to

  12. Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    13 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2013 / Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite 10800, Arlington, Virginia 22202-4149. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603-7740, Fax: (703) 603-0655, or email CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Addition On 6/28/2013 (78 FR 38952-38953), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published notice of proposed addition to the Procurement List.

  13. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  14. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwestfrom fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the regions electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  15. Bonneville Power Administration- The Power of The Columbia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power of the Columbia Our site is here to showcase the mighty Columbia River. We'll explore some of the history, beauty and magnificence of the northwest's great natural resource,...

  16. Adams-Columbia Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams-Columbia Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Adams-Columbia Electric Coop Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: 800-831-8629 Website: www.acecwi.com Twitter: @ACECWI...

  17. Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, 2013 - 12:00am ...

  18. Comments of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comments of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Comments of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Order No. 202-06-1,...

  19. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NEW YORK, NEW YORK

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NEW YORK, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects CONTENTS Introduction to the Certification Docket for Columbia University, New York, New York Purpose Docket Contents Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at the Columbia University, New York, New York Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of the Columbia University, New York, New York Page I-l II- 1 . . . 111

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia Transportation Data for

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuels and Vehicles District of Columbia Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia's Government Fleet Uses

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    a Wide Variety of Alternative Fuels District of Columbia's Government Fleet Uses a Wide Variety of Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia's Government Fleet Uses a Wide Variety of Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia's Government Fleet Uses a Wide Variety of Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia's Government Fleet Uses a Wide

  2. District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in the District of Columbia reflect a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to renewable energy and advanced battery manufacturing. Through these investments, the District of Columbia's businesses,

  3. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma 74103-3502 918-595-6600 Fax 918-595-6656 www.swpa.gov The UPDATE is published by and for customers, retirees, and employees of Southwestern Power Administration like: Katherine (K.C.) Thomas Director, Division of Information Technology (CIO) Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: Ron Beck Miya Boyken Ashley Butler Scott Carpenter Mike Deihl Ruben Garcia William Hiller David Kannady Jim McDonald Beth Nielsen Fritha Ohlson Tracey Stewart U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N

  4. America Saves! Energizing Main Street Small Businesses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America Saves! Energizing Main Street Small Businesses 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Mark Huppert / mhuppert@savingplaces.org Ric Cochrane / rcochrane@savingplaces.org National Trust for Historic Preservation Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2013 Planned end date: 9/30/2016 Key Milestones 1. Collect building attribute and utility energy data for 1,000 sites (9/30/14) 2. Engage at least one utility in a demonstration of engagement and retrofit analysis (9/30/14) Budget:

  5. Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Videos » Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia. View the text-alternative version. Solid-State Lighting Home About the Solid-State Lighting Program Research & Development SSL Basics Using LEDs Information Resources Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools

  6. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Materials-Los Angeles, CA | Department of Energy Los Angeles, CA Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Los Angeles April 19-20, 2012. Presentations and Materials Workshop Agenda City of Los Angeles: Changing Our Glow for Efficiency Ed Ebrahimian, City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street Lighting L.M. Seventynine:

  7. Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Webcasts » Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory discussed the Consortium's mission and goals, and provided an overview of its first steps, and opportunities to

  8. LED Street Lighting Conversion Workshop Presentations | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Research & Development » Technology Application R&D » Municipal Consortium » News & Events » LED Street Lighting Conversion Workshop Presentations LED Street Lighting Conversion Workshop Presentations This page provides links to the presentations given at the National League of Cities Mobile Workshop, LED Street Lighting Conversion: Saving Your Community Money, While Improving Public Safety, held November 13, 2013, in Seattle, WA. Presentations and Materials State of

  9. Financing Guidance for LED Street Lighting Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Financing Guidance for LED Street Lighting Programs Financing Guidance for LED Street Lighting Programs photo of an urban roadway at night lined with LED streetlights. Financing an LED street lighting replacement program can present a hurdle for many system owners, even if the planned transition offers very favorable economics. Replacing the existing system requires a significant budget, particularly as the scope of the program increases. Cities such as Los Angeles and Seattle have invested many

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Try Street Terminal - PA 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Try Street Terminal - PA 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TRY STREET TERMINAL (PA.14 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Try Street Terminal , Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania PA.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.14-1 Site Operations: Circa 1943 - facility used to store 20 plus drums of uranium slag. PA.14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote PA.14-1 Radioactive

  11. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Kinzey...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Kinzey, Bruce R.; Royer, Michael P.; Hadjian, M.; Kauffman, Rick LED streetlighting; field illuminance measurement LED streetlighting; field...

  12. SEAD Street Lighting Evaluation Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: SEAD Street Lighting Evaluation Tool AgencyCompany Organization: SEAD Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User Interface:...

  13. CHP at Post Street in Downtown Seattle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, Stan

    2012-04-12

    The Post Street project had four (4), 7.960 MW, Solar Taurus-70-10801S natural gas combustion turbines. Each turbine equipped with a 40,000 lb/hr heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The dual-fuel HRSGs was capable of generating steam using gas turbine exhaust heat or surplus electric power. The generation capacity was nominally rated at 29.2 MW. The project as proposed had a fuel rate chargeable to power of 4,900 - 5,880 Btu/kWh dependent on time of year. The CHP plant, when operating at 29.2 MW, can recycle turbine exhaust into supply 145 kpph of steam to SSC per hour. The actual SSC steam loads will vary based on weather, building occupation, plus additions / reductions of customer load served. SSC produces up to 80 kpph of steam from a biomass boiler, which is currently base loaded all year.

  14. PP-22-1 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited PP-22-1 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Electric Company, Limited to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canadian border. PDF icon PP-22-1 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited More Documents & Publications PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited PP-22 British Columbia Electric Company, Limited, Amendment 1957 PP-22-4 British Columbia

  15. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-369 British Columbia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority | Department of Energy 69 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Application from British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission

  16. The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

  17. Columbia Gas of Virginia- Business Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Virginia offers rebates to commercial customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient equipment. Water heaters, furnaces, boilers, controls, and infrared heaters are...

  18. Columbia Water & Light- HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain...

  19. Columbia River PUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia River PUD offers a variety of rebates to residential customers for making energy efficient improvements to electrically heated homes. Rebates are available for Energy Star manufactured...

  20. Columbia Gas of Kentucky- Home Savings Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Kentucky offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient appliances and equipment. These programs include:

  1. PP-22-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Transmission Corporation to construct, operate, and mantain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canadian border.

  2. Pepco and PJM Interconnection Comments on District of Columbia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Pepco and PJM Interconnection Comments on District of Columbia Public ... Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan ...

  3. District of Columbia Public Service Commission. Docket No. EO...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon District of Columbia Public Service Commission. Docket No. EO-05-01 Pepco ... Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan ...

  4. Response of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Response of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission More ... Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan ...

  5. Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby submits this Emergency Petition and Complaint to avert the impending shutdown of the Potomac River Generating Station power ...

  6. District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) Decade Year-0 ...

  7. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per ...

  8. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop: April 19–20, Los Angeles, CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Workshop Location: The Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown Hotel, 711 Hope Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017City Partner: City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street LightingCost: $175

  9. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  10. EA-2006: Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are jointly preparing a programmatic EA for actions recommended by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. Activities under this program could include full reconnection of tidal influence through breaching dikes and levees; partial reconnection of tidal influence through culverts, bridges, and tidegates; enhancement of the quantity and quality of tidal channels; removal of invasive species; and restoration of riparian habitat conditions, such as planting native vegetation.

  11. Nevis Cyclotron Laboratories Columbia University Physics Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevis Cyclotron Laboratories Columbia University Physics Department Irvington-on-Hudson, New York WEAK INTERACTIONS T. D. Lee CU-144-57-ONR-110-l-Physics Reproduction in whole or in part is permitted for any purpose of the United States Government June, 1957 Joint ONR-AEC Program Office of Naval Research Contract Contract N6-ori-110-Task No. 1 Contract AT(30-1)-1932 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

  12. Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,"1,097","9,241",96.2,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,097","9,241",96.2

  13. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison)- Municipal and Street Lighting Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy (Potomac Edision) offers several incentives for non-residential and municipal customers to upgrade traffic signals, pedestrian signals, street lights to more efficient  fixtures. The...

  14. Using the Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developed by a partnership of the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, the Clinton Climate InitiativeC40, and the DOE Federal Energy Management Program, the Excel...

  15. The Recovery Act is "Lighting Up" the streets of Philadelphia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Philadelphia Streets Department is converting 58,000 yellow and green traffic signals and will replace approximately 27,000 red LED lights that have come to the end of their useful life. The...

  16. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Materials-Dallas, TX | Department of Energy Dallas, TX Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Dallas, TX This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Dallas March 15-16, 2012. Presentations and Materials Workshop Agenda ONCOR LED Streetlight Pilot & Technical Evaluation Update Michael Navarro, ONCOR Reading, Understanding, and Applying the LM-80 Standard Chad

  17. Secretary Moniz Applauds Detroit's LED Street Lighting Upgrades |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Secretary Moniz Applauds Detroit's LED Street Lighting Upgrades Secretary Moniz Applauds Detroit's LED Street Lighting Upgrades June 16, 2014 - 10:46am Addthis Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz visited Detroit on May 22, 2014, to mark the city's progress installing energy-efficient LED streetlights in an update of its largely broken public lighting system, speaking at the Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program. Like so many cities across the country, Detroit is

  18. Webcast: Evaluating LED Street Lighting Solutions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In this July 20, 2010 webcast, Edward Smalley of Seattle City Light provided an update on DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium activities. The webcast also presented perspectives from members who are involved with implementing LED street lighting evaluations, including Tod Rosinbum of the City of Portland, Oregon, John Walter of National Grid, and Amy Olay of the City of San Jose, California. View presentation slides Introduction (PDF 984 KB) Edward Smalley, DOE Municipal

  19. Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Financial Analysis Tool | Department of Energy This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided a guided walk-through of what the tool can do and how to use it to evaluate costs and benefits associated with converting to LED street and roadway lighting. The webcast showed how city and other government agencies,

  20. New Rules Help Pocahontas Brighten Streets | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rules Help Pocahontas Brighten Streets New Rules Help Pocahontas Brighten Streets October 21, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis The City of Pocahontas, Iowa swill replace sodium streetlights with LED fixtures. | File photo The City of Pocahontas, Iowa swill replace sodium streetlights with LED fixtures. | File photo Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Pocahontas, Iowa was awarded a Recovery Act grant of more than $81,000. The city will replace 266 high-pressure

  1. Mr. Mark Finkelstein State Street,Associates'L..P. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mr. Mark Finkelstein State Street,Associates'L..P. II 210 Lake Street Ithaca, New York I4856 Dear Mr. Finkelstein: ', 'The Oak Ridge Institute forScience',and Education (ORISEj,has recently sent me the enclosed'radiological survey,conducted at the former Ithaca Gun Company forging building. : The radiationilevels measured during, the'survey were similar to the background'levels in the Ithaca 'area. A number of samples were taken for analysis, and all exhibited background ,concentrations of

  2. DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Research & Development » Technology Application R&D » DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium shares technical information and experiences related to LED street and area lighting demonstrations and serves as an objective resource for evaluating new products on the market intended for those applications. Cities, power providers, and others who invest in street and

  3. Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual flow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak flood waters, that flow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, officials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the flooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

  4. Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Commission | Department of Energy Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Sections 202(c), 207 and 309 of the Federal Power Act ("FPA"), 16 U.S.C. §§ 824a(c), 824f and 825h, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby submits this Emergency Petition and Complaint to avert the impending shutdown of

  5. Direct Energy Services (District of Columbia) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct Energy Services Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 54820 This article is a stub....

  6. Glacial Energy Holdings (District of Columbia) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glacial Energy Holdings Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 54871 This article is a stub....

  7. PEPCO Energy Services (District of Columbia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PEPCO Energy Services Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 14405 This article is a stub....

  8. UGI Energy Services, Inc. (District of Columbia) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UGI Energy Services, Inc. Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56408 This article is a...

  9. EIS-0170: Columbia River System Operation Review, BPA Area

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Columbia River System Operation Review Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) evaluates the potential impacts of four alternatives that represent the likely range of allocations between the Federal and non-Federal projects.

  10. Columbia Water & Light- New Home ENERGY STAR Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water and Light offers a $1,000 rebate to customers for the construction of new homes that achieve certification as Energy Star homes. The Energy Star designation is given to homes that...

  11. Columbia County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Columbia County is a county in Arkansas. Its FIPS County Code is 027. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3...

  12. Columbia Water & Light- Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water and Light, a municipal utility, offers rebates to its residential customers who make certain energy efficient improvements to the home. Under the Home Performance with Energy Star...

  13. Washington, District of Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Washington is a city in the District of Columbia.1 Contents 1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in...

  14. District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2009 -- -- -- -- --

  15. Columbia Power Coop Assn Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Columbia Power Coop Assn Inc Place: Oregon Phone Number: HEPPNER OFFICE: 541-676-9146; CONDON OFFICE: 541-384-2023 Website: www.cbec.cc Outage Hotline:...

  16. American PowerNet (District of Columbia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    American PowerNet Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 49730 This article is a stub. You...

  17. Endeavour Launch 4: From Columbia to Atlantis | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From Columbia to Atlantis Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on...

  18. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (District of Columbia) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 4191 This article is a...

  19. Suez Energy Resources North America (District of Columbia) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Suez Energy Resources North America Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 19107 This...

  20. First Commercially Available Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Hit the Street |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy First Commercially Available Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Hit the Street First Commercially Available Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Hit the Street December 10, 2014 - 12:25pm Addthis A fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) at a fueling station in California. New Energy Department reports signal rapid growth in America’s fuel cell and hydrogen industry as FCEVs are introduced to the market. | Energy Department photo A fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) at a fueling station

  1. New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    at Hanford Site | Department of Energy Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple

  2. EA-1998: Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead Acclimation Project,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chelan County, Washington | Department of Energy EA-1998: Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead Acclimation Project, Chelan County, Washington EA-1998: Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead Acclimation Project, Chelan County, Washington SUMMARY BPA is preparing an EA that will analyze the potential impacts of a proposal to fund the Yakama Nation to improve, develop, and use fish rearing acclimation ponds for hatchery raised steelhead and Chinook salmon in the Methow and Wenatchee

  3. EM's Richland Operations Office Completes Chromium Cleanup along Columbia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    River | Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Completes Chromium Cleanup along Columbia River EM's Richland Operations Office Completes Chromium Cleanup along Columbia River September 24, 2015 - 12:25pm Addthis The inset photo shows Hanford's D and DR Reactor area during operations in the 1950s, and the larger photo shows how the site looked during final backfill activities earlier this year after a chromium contamination cleanup project. The inset photo shows Hanford's D and DR

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Columbia University - NY 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Columbia University - NY 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Columbia University (NY.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.03-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.03-2 NY.03-3 Site Operations: Early research and development -- nuclear chain reaction (fission) and gaseous diffusion during the 1940s. NY.03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria - Indication of university sponsored

  5. Columbia basin project, Washington: Adams, Douglas, Franklin, Grant, Lincoln, and Walla Walla Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Columbia Basin Project is a multipurpose development utilizing a portion of the resources of the Columbia River in the central part of the State of Washington. The key structure, Grand Coulee Dam, is on the main stem of the Columbia River about 90 miles west of Spokane, Wash. The extensive irrigation works extend southward on the Columbia Plateau 125 miles to the vicinity of Pasco, Wash., where the Snake and Columbia Rivers join.

  6. PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Presidential Permit authorizing British Columbia and Power Authority to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon PP-369 BC Hydro.pdf More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority PP-54 Ontario Hydro Electric

  7. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Phase III Continuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Tyson; Shackelford, Jordan; Johnson, Megan; Pang, Terrance

    2008-11-01

    This report summarizes the third phase of an LED street lighting assessment project in Oakland, California, conducted to study the applicability of LED luminaires in a street lighting application.

  8. Text-Alternative Version: Keynote Video from Street and Area Lighting Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following is a text version of Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the recent Street and Area Lighting Conference.

  9. About the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy D » Municipal Consortium » About the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium About the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Numerous cities and organizations around the nation are announcing plans to conduct large scale retrofits/comparisons of LED street and area lighting products with their conventional street lights. The relative newness of LED lighting raises a number of concerns: A significant and unnecessary duplication of effort is likely if

  10. Member Case Studies: LED Street Lighting Programs in Algona (IA), Asheville

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (NC), and Boston (MA) | Department of Energy Member Case Studies: LED Street Lighting Programs in Algona (IA), Asheville (NC), and Boston (MA) Member Case Studies: LED Street Lighting Programs in Algona (IA), Asheville (NC), and Boston (MA) This May 8, 2013 webcast featured presentations from DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium member cities about their experiences with LED street lighting. Presenters John Bilsten of Algona (IA) Municipal Utilities, Maggie Ullman of the City

  11. Street Legal Named SBA HUBZone Business of the Year | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Street Legal Named SBA HUBZone Business of the Year Street Legal Named SBA HUBZone Business of the Year November 3, 2014 - 3:06pm Addthis On Sept. 25, Street Legal Industries, Inc. was recognized as the U. S. Small Business Administration (SBA) 2014 Tennessee HUBZone Small Business of the Year. Street Legal Industries Inc. is a Woman-Owned, SBA HUBZone-certified, small business founded in 1994. The company provides professional infrastructure support services to federal and commercial entities.

  12. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  13. Data Compendium for the Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Huesties, L.R.; Maughan, A.D.; Miley, T.B.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-04-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). The CRCIA is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the CRCIA is to evaluate the current human and ecological risk from the Columbia River attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. Human risk will be addressed for radioactive and hazardous materials over a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The initial effort for the CRCIA is the development of a compendium of existing data on Columbia River contamination. This document provides the data compendium. It also includes a discussion of data sources, descriptions of the physical format of the data, and descriptions of the search process used to identify data.

  14. The Honorable Robert E. Williams 44 W. Washington Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SEC ; : ' ,-<- I ;;;s The Honorable Robert E. Williams 44 W. Washington Street Shelbyville, Indiana 46176 Dear Mayor Williams: Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former General Electric Co. site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies. This

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsColumbia Basin Wind Energy Study Campaign Links Outsmarting the Wind -- U.S. News Science Old meteorological techniques used in new wind farm study -- EcoSeed ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study 2010.09.27 - 2011.05.31 Lead Scientist : Larry Berg For data sets, see below. Abstract The primary focus of this study was to obtain a multi-season data set

  16. Pepco and PJM Interconnection Comments on District of Columbia Public

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01 Comments and Answer to Requests for Rehearing | Department of Energy Pepco and PJM Interconnection Comments on District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01 Comments and Answer to Requests for Rehearing Pepco and PJM Interconnection Comments on District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01 Comments and Answer to Requests for Rehearing Docket No. EO-05-01: In accordance with Order No. 202-06-1, issued by the

  17. EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOEs Bonneville Power Administrations proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

  18. Hydraulic Capacity of an ADA Compliant Street Drain Grate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lottes, Steven A.; Bojanowski, Cezary

    2015-09-01

    Resurfacing of urban roads with concurrent repairs and replacement of sections of curb and sidewalk may require pedestrian ramps that are compliant with the American Disabilities Act (ADA), and when street drains are in close proximity to the walkway, ADA compliant street grates may also be required. The Minnesota Department of Transportation ADA Operations Unit identified a foundry with an available grate that meets ADA requirements. Argonne National Laboratorys Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center used full scale three dimensional computational fluid dynamics to determine the performance of the ADA compliant grate and compared it to that of a standard vane grate. Analysis of a parametric set of cases was carried out, including variation in longitudinal, gutter, and cross street slopes and the water spread from the curb. The performance of the grates was characterized by the fraction of the total volume flow approaching the grate from the upstream that was captured by the grate and diverted into the catch basin. The fraction of the total flow entering over the grate from the side and the fraction of flow directly over a grate diverted into the catch basin were also quantities of interest that aid in understanding the differences in performance of the grates. The ADA compliant grate performance lagged that of the vane grate, increasingly so as upstream Reynolds number increased. The major factor leading to the performance difference between the two grates was the fraction of flow directly over the grates that is captured by the grates.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, IL, Custom, School Street Homes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    StreetScape Development, LLC Libertyville, IL BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give

  20. EA-145-A British Columbia Power Exchange Corporation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A British Columbia Power Exchange Corporation EA-145-A British Columbia Power Exchange Corporation Order authorizing British Columbia Power Exchange Corporation to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-145-A British Columbia Power Exchange Corporation More Documents & Publications EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-171-A Powerex EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Teledyne-Columbia-Summerville - PA 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Teledyne-Columbia-Summerville - PA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TELEDYNE-COLUMBIA-SUMMERVILLE (PA.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Columbia Steel, Summerill Tube, Columbia-Summerill PA.01-1 Location: Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania PA.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.01-1 Site Operations: Metal fabrication operations. No indication radioactive materials were involved. PA.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Site was not involved in

  2. Certification of Non-Residence in the District of Columbia | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Certification of Non-Residence in the District of Columbia Certification of Non-Residence in the District of Columbia PDF icon Certification of Non-Residence in the District of Columbia More Documents & Publications Employee In-Processing Forms W4, Federal Withholding Tax Form CX-000155: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  3. Environmental Justice Activities: Community Leaders' Institute, West Columbia, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Midlands Community Leaders’ Institute (CLI), sponsored by the Medical University of South Carolina, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, South Carolina State University, and Brookland Baptist Church was held in West Columbia, South Carolina, on July 13 and 14, 2012.

  4. Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1996-12-01

    In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

  5. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  6. Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty or CRT) of 1964, Canada and the United States (U.S.) jointly regulate and manage the Columbia River as it flows from British Columbia into the U.S. The Treaty has provided substantial flood control and power generation benefits to both nations. The Treaty established Canadian and U.S. Entities as implementing agents for each government. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (BC Hydro) was designated as the Canadian Entity. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Division Engineer, Northwestern Division, were designated as the U.S. Entity. The Canadian and U.S. Entities are empowered by their respective governments with broad discretion to implement the existing Columbia River Treaty. They are not, however, authorized to terminate, renegotiate, or otherwise modify the Treaty. In the U.S., authority over international treaties rests with the President, assisted in foreign relations and international negotiations by the Department of State and subject in certain cases to the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate. In Canada, international treaties are within the prerogative of the executive branch of the federal government. Under current policy, treaties are tabled in the House of Commons, and are subject to a waiting period before the executive branch brings the treaty into effect. In the case of the Columbia River Treaty, Canada has assigned certain rights and obligations relating to the Treaty to British Columbia pursuant to the Canada-B.C. Agreement. The Phase 1 report is provided to those respective governmental bodies to support possible independent and/or joint decisions that may be made with respect to the future of the Treaty. The Treaty contains two important provisions that take effect on and after September 16, 2024, that could impact the current power and flood control benefits: 1. Canadian flood control obligations automatically change from a pre-determined annual operation to a Called Upon operation. 2. The year 2024 is the earliest date that either Canada or the U.S. can terminate most of the provisions of the Treaty, with a minimum 10-years advance written notice. Hence, September 16, 2014, is the latest date that either nation could provide notice of intent to terminate and still have the termination effective at its earliest possible date in 2024. While termination would end most Treaty obligations, Called Upon flood control and Libby coordination provisions will continue regardless of termination. However, it is important to note that the Treaty has no end date and absent either country using the termination option will continue indefinitely.

  7. Hanford Exceeds Annual Goal for Cleaning up Groundwater near Columbia River

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Exceeds Annual Goal for Cleaning up Groundwater near Columbia River Hanford Exceeds Annual Goal for Cleaning up Groundwater near Columbia River August 28, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial photo of Hanford’s 100-D Area along the Columbia River, which is served by one of five pump-and-treat systems along the Columbia River that are helping shrink areas of contaminated groundwater. An aerial photo of Hanford's 100-D Area along the Columbia River, which is served by

  8. The Recovery Act is "Lighting Up" the streets of Philadelphia

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nutter, Michael; Gajewski, Katherine; Russell, Toby; Williams, Doug; Best, DeLain;

    2013-05-29

    The Philadelphia Streets Department is converting 58,000 yellow and green traffic signals and will replace approximately 27,000 red LED lights that have come to the end of their useful life. The project will use approximately $3 million in EECBG funds, matched with $3 million in PECO funding, and will save the city approximately $1 million in electric costs each year. For more information on Recovery Act projects funded by the Department of Energy in Pennsylvania: http://www.energy.gov/recovery/pa.htm

  9. The Recovery Act is "Lighting Up" the streets of Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, Michael; Gajewski, Katherine; Russell, Toby; Williams, Doug; Best, DeLain;

    2010-01-01

    The Philadelphia Streets Department is converting 58,000 yellow and green traffic signals and will replace approximately 27,000 red LED lights that have come to the end of their useful life. The project will use approximately $3 million in EECBG funds, matched with $3 million in PECO funding, and will save the city approximately $1 million in electric costs each year. For more information on Recovery Act projects funded by the Department of Energy in Pennsylvania: http://www.energy.gov/recovery/pa.htm

  10. A LIMITED LIABILITY PARTNERSHIP 1050 Thomas Jefferson Street, NW

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A LIMITED LIABILITY PARTNERSHIP 1050 Thomas Jefferson Street, NW Seventh Floor Washington, DC 20007 (202) 298-1800 Phone (202) 338-2416 Fax MEMORANDUM TO: DOE Office of General Counsel FROM: Doug Smith DATE: August 29, 2013 RE: Record of Communication Concerning Ceiling Fan and Ceiling Fan Light Kit Framework Document-Docket No. EERE-2012-BT-STD-0045 This memo provides an overview of communications made to DOE staff on the subject of possible changes to standards and test procedures for ceiling

  11. The Honorable Roy Bernadi 233 East Washington Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~ DC 20585 : DEC.'0 'i 1994 The Honorable Roy Bernadi 233 East Washington Street Syracuse, New York 13202, _ Dear,.Mayor Bernadj: -' Secretary of Energy HaieT O'Leary has announced a new approach.to openness in the Department,of Energy (DOE).and its coaununications with the public. In ., support.of 'this initiative, we are pleased to forward the e~nclosed information '. related to the Syracuse University'site, in your jurisdiction th,at performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies..

  12. The Honorable Sandra Freedman 306 E. Jackson Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    N()\J (-j 3 ;;54 The Honorable Sandra Freedman 306 E. Jackson Street Tampa, Florida 33602 Dear Mayor Freedman: Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the pu6lic. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former Gardinier, Inc. site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE's predecessor agencies. This information is provided for your

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting

  14. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO (Technical Report)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | SciTech Connect Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Nine different streetlighting products were installed on various streets in Kansas City, Missouri during February, 2011, to evaluate their performance relative to the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting. The applications investigated included 100 W, 150 W, 250 W, and 400 W HPS installations. Initial measurements

  15. Frequently Asked Questions About the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consortium | Department of Energy Frequently Asked Questions About the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Frequently Asked Questions About the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium This page addresses many of the questions about the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. How does my organization become a member? How do members participate and where? How are demonstration sites selected? How is information on demonstration sites shared? How is the

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utica Street Warehouse - NY 0-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Street Warehouse - NY 0-23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UTICA STREET WAREHOUSE (NY.0-23) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 240 West Utica Street , Buffalo , New York NY.0-23-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-23-1 Site Operations: Stored and rebarrelled uranium process residues from operations at Linde. NY.0-23-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Original building demolished. Current land use - Parking facility. Potential for

  17. Text-Alternative Version: MSSLC Member Case Studies- LED Street Lighting Programs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "MSSLC Member Case Studies - LED Street Lighting Programs" webcast, held May 8, 2013.

  18. Text-Alternative Version: Using the Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Using the Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held August 22, 2013.

  19. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

  20. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

  1. Secretary Chu Op-Ed on Small Modular Reactors in the Wall Street Journal |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Small Modular Reactors in the Wall Street Journal Secretary Chu Op-Ed on Small Modular Reactors in the Wall Street Journal March 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Today, the Wall Street Journal published an op-ed by U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu on small modular reactors. The op-ed can be viewed on the Wall Street Journal. The text of the op-ed is below: America's New Nuclear Option Small modular reactors will expand the ways we use atomic power. By

  2. Secretary Chu's Op-Ed on Small Modular Reactors in the Wall Street Journal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wall Street Journal published an op-ed by U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu on small modular reactors.

  3. District of Columbia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008

  4. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

  5. PROTECTING GROUNDWATER & THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2006-06-29

    Along the remote shores of the Columbia River in southeast Washington state, a race is on. Fluor Hanford, a prime cleanup contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site, is managing a massive, multi-faceted project to remove contaminants from the groundwater before they can reach the Columbia. Despite the daunting nature and size of the problem--about 80 square miles of aquifer under the site contains long-lived radionuclides and hazardous chemicals--significant progress is being made. Many groups are watching, speaking out, and helping. A large. passionate, diverse, and geographically dispersed community is united in its desire to protect the Columbia River--the eighth largest in the world--and have a voice in Hanford's future. Fluor Hanford and the DOE, along with the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) interact with all the stakeholders to make the best decisions. Together, they have made some remarkable strides in the battle against groundwater contamination under the site.

  6. EA-1945: Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas, and Chelan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Counties, Washington | Department of Energy EA-1945: Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas, and Chelan Counties, Washington EA-1945: Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas, and Chelan Counties, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project, a 230-kilvolt transmission line proposed by BPA and the Public Utility Districts of Grant, Chelan, and

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2011_1012_Hansen_ColumbiaRiverComponent_Eco.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Component Risk Assessment Volume I: Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessment (DOE/RL-2010-117, Draft A) Ri C id (DOE/RL 2010 117, Draft A) Overview and key findings River Corridor Closure Project River Corridor Closure Project y g O t b 2011 October, 2011 Protecting the Columbia River U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office RIVER CORRIDOR CLOSURE PROJECT Columbia River Component Columbia River Component Ecological Risk Assessment * Scope - Screening level ecological risk

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Columbia_River_Corridor_Rev_2_v2.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Columbia River Corridor The Columbia River Corridor projects selected for Recovery A t f di i l d d li hi f iliti di ti Act funding include demolishing facilities, remediating waste sites, and containing and treating contamination in groundwater. The projects support completing cleanup along the Columbia River and shrinking the active area of cleanup to the center of the Hanford Site (the Central Plateau) by 2015 1 of the Hanford Site (the Central Plateau) by 2015. May 2009 Shrinking the

  9. Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In preparation for a full-scale bay/ocean demonstration and with EERE support, Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. (CPT) deployed an intermediate-scale wave energy converter to demonstrate and validate its direct drive wave energy Buoy technology, which extracts energy from passing waves.

  10. EERE Success Story-Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Drive Wave Energy Buoy | Department of Energy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy EERE Success Story-Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In preparation for a full-scale bay/ocean demonstration and with EERE support, Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. (CPT) deployed an intermediate-scale wave energy converter to demonstrate and validate its direct drive wave energy Buoy technology,

  11. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix T (Second Continued Volume): Comments & Responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This is Appendix T (second continued volume) giving public comments and responses to the final environmental impact statement for the Columbia River System.

  12. Three Pacific Coast States Join British Columbia to Combat Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia signed a regional agreement to strategically align policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote clean energy.

  13. Letter from the Department of Energy to the District of Columbia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Letter from the Department of Energy to the District of Columbia Public ... Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan ...

  14. District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 246 256 244 2000's 243 236 242 470 466 487 464 238 203 177 2010's 213 1,703 1,068 1,434 1,305 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  15. MiniBooNE Antineutrino Data Van Nguyen Columbia University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moriond EW 2008 Coherent NC π 0 Production in the MiniBooNE Antineutrino Data Van Nguyen Columbia University for the MiniBooNE collaboration Moriond EW 2008 2 Moriond EW 2008 At low energy, NC π 0 's can be created through resonant and coherent production:  Resonant NC π 0 production:  Coherent NC π 0 production: (Signature: π 0 which is highly forward-going) NC π 0 Production 3 Moriond EW 2008 Why study coherent NC π 0 production? ➔ NC π 0 events are the dominant bgd to osc

  16. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Royer, Michael P.; Hadjian, M.; Kauffman, Rick

    2013-06-10

    Nine different streetlighting products were installed on various streets in Kansas City, Missouri during February, 2011, to evaluate their performance relative to the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting. The applications investigated included 100 W, 150 W, 250 W, and 400 W HPS installations. Initial measurements and comparisons included power, illuminance, and luminance; sample illuminance readings have continued at each of the nine locations at roughly 1,000-hour operating intervals since then. All of the LED products consumed less power than their HPS counterparts—with a mean difference of 39% and a range of 31% to 51%—but they also emitted 31% fewer lumens, on average. The net result is just a 15% increase in mean efficacy. Applying the city’s stringent light loss factors to the initial measured data meant that five of the LED products (and two of the HPS luminaires) were predicted to eventually fail to meet the specified mean illuminance over their lifetimes; however, the specified light loss levels are not expected to be reached by the LED products until some distant future date (between 12 and 30 years after installation according to manufacturer specification sheet estimates). The practical value of designing streetlighting systems to meet illumination requirements more than 15 years in the future is questioned. Numerous sources of variation in field measurements are noted throughout the report, particularly seasonal influences such as ambient temperature and foliage that are evident in the time-series illuminance data.

  17. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: M Street Homes, Houston, TX |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy M Street Homes, Houston, TX DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: M Street Homes, Houston, TX DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: M Street Homes, Houston, TX Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Houston, TX, that achieves a HERS 45 without PV or HERS 32 with 1.2 kW PV. The three-story, 4,507-ft2 custom home is powered by a unique tri-generation system that supplies all of the home's electricity, heating, and cooling on site. The tri-generator is powered by a

  19. Using QECBs for Street Lighting Upgrades: Lighting the Way to Lower Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bills in San Diego | Department of Energy QECBs for Street Lighting Upgrades: Lighting the Way to Lower Energy Bills in San Diego Using QECBs for Street Lighting Upgrades: Lighting the Way to Lower Energy Bills in San Diego Summarizes how the City of San Diego leveraged $13.1 million in qualified energy conservation bonds to increase the size of a street lighting upgrade project. Author: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory PDF icon Lighting the Way to Lower Energy Bills in San Diego More

  20. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

  1. EIS-0206: Joint NEPA/SEPA Proposed Columbia Wind Farm No. 1, Goldendale, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Systems (CARES) proposes to construct and operate Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 in the Columbia Hills area, southeast of Goldendale, in Klickitat County, Washington. The U.S. Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement in order to fulfill its National Environmental Policy Act obligations ahead of signing an agreement with CARES.

  2. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume II, Steelhead Stock Summaries, Stock Transfer Guidelines, Information Needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1985-07-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of wild and hatchery-raised steelhead trout stocks in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

  3. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan

    2009-04-16

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit (ESU), Distinct Population Segment (MPG) or Major Population Group (MPG) reviewed, the HSRG presents its findings and recommendations in the form of an HSRG solution. This package of recommended changes to current hatchery and harvest program design and operation is intended to demonstrate how the programs could be managed to significantly increase the likelihood of meeting the managers goals for both harvest and conservation of the ESU/DPS/MPG. The 'HSRG solution' also highlights the biological principles that the HSRG believes must form the foundation for successful use of hatcheries and fisheries as management tools.

  4. EECBG Success Story: Recovery Act is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Philadelphia Streets Department is converting 58,000 yellow and green traffic signals and will replace approximately 27,000 red LED lights that have come to the end of their useful life. Learn more.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    These single-family, HERS 45 homes incorporate 26 wood framed walls with R-20 open cell spray insulation and OSB. The builder, StreetScape Development, won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  6. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Conway Street

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Apartments - Greenfield, Massachusetts | Department of Energy Conway Street Apartments - Greenfield, Massachusetts Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Conway Street Apartments - Greenfield, Massachusetts Through recent research efforts, CARB has been evaluating strategies and technologies that can make dramatic improvements in energy performance in multifamily buildings. In this project, the team helped to transform a 100-year-old empty school building into 12 high

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- GSA 39th Street Warehouse - IL 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GSA 39th Street Warehouse - IL 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GSA 39TH STREET WAREHOUSE (IL.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1716 West Pershing Road , Chicago , Illinois IL.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 IL.02-2 IL.02-3 Site Operations: Stored radioactive materials. IL.02-1 IL.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria IL.02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials

  8. Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1997-11-01

    This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

  9. Supplementation in the Columbia Basin : Summary Report Series : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-12-01

    This progress report broadly defines the scope of supplementation plans and activities in the Columbia Basin. It provides the foundation for more detailed analysis of supplementation in subsequent reports in this series. Topics included in this report are: definition of supplementation, project diversity, objectives and performance standards, uncertainties and theory. Since this is a progress report, the content is subject to modification with new information. The supplementation theory will continue to evolve throughout the duration of RASP and beyond. The other topics in this report are essentially complete and are not expected to change significantly. This is the first of a series of four reports which will summarize information contained in the larger, RASP progress and completion reports. Our goal is to make the findings of RASP more accessible by grouping related topics into smaller but complete narratives on important aspects of supplementation. We are planning to publish the following reports under the general title Supplementation in the Columbia River Basin: Part 1, Background, Description, Performance Measures, Uncertainty and Theory; Part 2, Theoretical Framework and Models; Part 3, Planning Guidelines; and Part 4, Regional Coordination of Research and Monitoring. Supplementation is expected to be a major contributor to the planned increase in salmon and steelhead production in the Columbia Basin. The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) uses three approaches to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin: (1) enhance fish production; (2) improve passage in the mainstem rivers; and (3) revise harvest management to support the rebuilding of fish runs (NPPC 1987). The fish production segment calls for a three-part approach focused on natural production, hatchery production, and supplementation. Supplementation is planned to provide over half of the total production increases. The Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated as a result of a request by NPPC to address long-standing concerns about the need to coordinate supplementation research, monitoring and evaluation. Such coordination was also recommended by the Supplementation Technical Work Group. In August 1990, the NPPC gave conditional approval to proceed with the final design of the Yakima Production Project. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund immediately a supplementation assessment to reevaluate, prioritize and coordinate all existing and planned supplementation monitoring and evaluation activities in the basin. Providing for the participation of the fishery agencies and tribes and others having expertise in this area. RASP addresses four principal objectives: (1) provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities and identify critical uncertainties associated with supplementation, (2) construct a conceptual framework and model which estimates the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and prioritizes uncertainties, (3) provide guidelines for the development of supplementation projects, (4) develop a plan for regional coordination of research and monitoring. These objectives, once attained, will provide the technical tools fishery managers need to carry out the Council's direction to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead. RASP has further divided the four broad objectives into 12 technical topics: (1) definition of supplementation; (2) description of the diversity of supplementation projects; (3) objectives and performance standards; (4) identification of uncertainties; (5) supplementation theory; (6) development of a conceptual model of supplemented populations; (7) development of spreadsheet model of risks and benefits of supplementation; (8) classification of stocks, streams, and supplementation strategies; (9) regional design of supplementation evaluation and monitoring; (10) guidelines for planning supplementation projects (11) application of the spreadsheet model to supplementation planning; and (12)

  10. District of Columbia Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Percent) % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.34 0.33 0.32 0.33 0.32 0.29 0.30 2000's 0.31 0.27 0.29 0.30 0.29 0.29 0.26 0.28 0.27 0.28 2010's 0.28 0.26 0.27 0.27 0.28 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next

  11. District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,903 2,556 2,762 1,663 1,025 649 507 483 494 655 1,099 2,637 1990 3,258 2,193 1,984 1,522 849 596 490 433 435 542 1,005 1,828 1991 2,703 2,543 2,076 1,493 804 503 460 432 463 587 1,220 2,001 1992 2,683 2,829 2,172 1,820 948 630 469 420 446 642 1,314 2,213 1993 2,768 2,823 2,867 1,641 825 546 437 419 427 588

  12. District of Columbia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 34,105 30,409 32,281 2000's 33,468 29,802 32,898 32,814 32,227 32,085 29,049 32,966 31,880 33,177 2010's 33,251 32,862 28,561 32,743 34,057 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release

  13. District of Columbia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 2 1 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  14. District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3.94 4.73 4.37 4.16 3.61 3.02 2.94 3.03 1990's 2.99 2.78 2.95 2.58 2.13 1.97 3.02 2.97 2.52 2.39 2000's 4.63 5.36 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Assessing Pacific Lamprey Status in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Mary L.; Close, David A.

    2003-06-01

    In the Columbia River drainage, salmonid-based monitoring programs have historically been used to assess status of both adult and juvenile Pacific lamprey. We compared adult lamprey counts at hydropower dams to recent radiotelemetry results and found that the counts underestimated losses between some dams and overestimated passage times through reservoirs. Count data were not correlated with trap captures of adults conducted in the same area and at the same time, likely due to lamprey-specific behaviors that result in inaccurate counts. We recommend maintenance of traditional count protocols, but emphasize the need for continued research to develop an accurate correction factor to apply to these data. Existing salmonid-based sampling for juvenile lamprey is inadequate and we highlight the need for standardized larval lamprey monitoring that provides both abundance and size distributions. Our electrofishing survey for juvenile lamprey indicated that this technique provides critical information on lamprey recruitment and is feasible over large spatial scales.

  16. Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

    1996-12-01

    Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

  17. Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Service Commission | Department of Energy Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-05-3: Pursuant to Section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act ("FPA"),1 16 U.S.C. § 824a(c), the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby requests that the Secretary of Energy

  18. Emergency Petition and Complaint of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Emergency Petition and Complaint of ) Docket No. EL05-145-000 District of Columbia Public Service ) Commission ) EMERGENCY PETITION AND COMPLAINT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION Pursuant to Sections 202(c), 207 and 309 of the Federal Power Act ("FPA"), 16 U.S.C. §§ 824a(c), 824f and 825h, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby submits this Emergency Petition and

  19. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the District of Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the District of Columbia.

  1. EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

  2. Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-04-30

    To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in or migrating through the Columbia River estuary and plume.

  3. Written Testimony of Wes Kelley Executive Director Columbia Power & Water Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Testimony of Wes Kelley Executive Director Columbia Power & Water Systems Columbia, Tennessee Before the Department of Energy, Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting #10: Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - East September 8, 2014 Secretary Moniz, it is a pleasure to be here today to speak about the challenges and opportunities facing distribution utilities, especially with the advent and rapid growth of distributed energy resources (DERs). My name is Wes Kelley, and I

  4. Columbia River Pathway Dosimetry Report, 1944-1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Snyder, S.F.; Shipler, D.B.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to individuals who were exposed to the radionuclides released to the Columbia River (the river pathway). This report documents the last in a series of dose calculations conducted on the Columbia River pathway. The report summarizes the technical approach used to estimate radiation doses to three classes of representative individuals who may have used the Columbia River as a source of drinking water, food, or for recreational or occupational purposes. In addition, the report briefly explains the approaches used to estimate the radioactivity released to the river, the development of the parameters used to model the uptake and movement of radioactive materials in aquatic systems such as the Columbia River, and the method of calculating the Columbia River`s transport of radioactive materials. Potential Columbia River doses have been determined for representative individuals since the initiation of site activities in 1944. For this report, dose calculations were performed using conceptual models and computer codes developed for the purpose of estimating doses. All doses were estimated for representative individuals who share similar characteristics with segments of the general population.

  5. Geothermal regime and thermal history of the Llanos Basin, Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.; Ramon, J.C.; Villegas, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Llanos basin is a siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyana Precambrian shield. Data on bottom-hole temperature, lithology, porosity, and vitrinite reflectance from all 318 wells drilled in the central and southern parts of the basin were used to analyze its geothermal regime and thermal history. Average geothermal gradients in the Llanos basin decrease generally with depth and westward toward the fold and thrust belt. The geothermal regime is controlled by a moderate, generally westward-decreasing basement heat flow, by depositional and compaction factors, and, in places, by advection by formation waters. Compaction leads to increased thermal conductivity with depth, whereas westward downdip flow in deep sandstone formations may exert a cooling effect in the central-western part of the basin. Vitrinite reflectance variation with depth shows a major discontinuity at the pre-Cretaceous unconformity. Areally, vitrinite reflectance increases southwestward in Paleozoic strata and northwestward in post-Paleozoic strata. These patterns indicate that the thermal history of the basin probably includes three thermal events that led to peaks in oil generation: a Paleozoic event in the southwest, a failed Cretaceous rifting event in the west, and an early Tertiary back-arc event in the west. Rapid cooling since the last thermal event is possibly caused by subhorizontal subduction of cold oceanic lithospheric plate.

  6. the District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) the District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0

  7. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7.49 7.43 7.72 7.50 7.13 5.91 7.11 6.70 8.60 8.04 7.61 7.31 1990 7.05 7.50 7.70 6.89 7.05 6.51 6.67 6.66 8.29 7.89 7.09 6.83 1991 7.04 7.22 6.90 7.22 7.31 5.96 6.30 6.28 8.31 7.95 7.17 6.93 1992 7.31 7.07 7.23 7.08

  8. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2007-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted interim groundwater remedial activities on the Hanford Site since the mid-1990s for several groundwater contamination plumes. DOE established the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project (Technologies Project) in 2006 to evaluate alternative treatment technologies. The objectives for the technology project are as follows: develop a 300 Area polyphosphate treatability test to immobilize uranium, design and test infiltration of a phosphate/apatite technology for Sr-90 at 100-N, perform carbon tetrachloride and chloroform attenuation parameter studies, perform vadose zone chromium characterization and geochemistry studies, perform in situ biostimulation of chromium studies for a reducing barrier at 100-D, and perform a treatability test for phytoremediation for Sr-90 at 100-N. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the Technologies Project. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is based on the quality assurance requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the technology project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

  9. Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development, LLC,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Libertyville, IL, Custom | Department of Energy StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, IL, Custom DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, IL, Custom Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Libertyville, IL, that scored HERS 45 without PV. This 2,763-square-foot custom home has advanced framed walls with R-20 of open-cell spray foam, R-49 open-cell spray-foam sealed attic, an HRV, and a tankless water heater for hydro coil furnace with

  11. Working with Cities to Light Our Streets Better | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cities to Light Our Streets Better Working with Cities to Light Our Streets Better January 26, 2015 - 9:18pm Addthis Franklin (Lynn) Orr Franklin (Lynn) Orr Under Secretary for Science and Energy Last week, mayors from around the nation visited Washington, D.C., for the U.S. Conference of Mayors' annual winter meeting. During a White House briefing, I had the chance to meet with 30 mayors who are committed to tackling today's energy and climate challenges. Cities are on the frontlines of

  12. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  13. Natural Gas Storage in Basalt Aquifers of the Columbia Basin, Pacific Northwest USA: A Guide to Site Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

    2002-08-08

    This report provides the technical background and a guide to characterizing a site for storing natural gas in the Columbia River Basalt

  14. Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Patton, Gregory W.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2010-10-31

    Our objectives in this study are to quantify the discharge rate of uranium (U) to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site's 300 Area, and to follow that U down river to constrain its fate. Uranium from the Hanford Site has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low-level of Hanford derived U can be discerned, despite dilution to < 1 percent of natural background U, 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site entering the Columbia River to be measured accurately to ascertain whether they are an environmental concern, or are insignificant relative to natural uranium background in the Columbia River.

  15. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  16. Analysis of Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River from an Ecosystem Perspective. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.

    1995-01-01

    Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology was applied to the analysis of chinook salmon in the mid-Columbia subbasins which flow through the steppe and steppe-shrub vegetation zones. The EDT examines historical changes in life history diversity related to changes in habitat. The emphasis on life history, habitat and historical context is consistent with and ecosystem perspective. This study is based on the working hypothesis that the decline in chinook salmon was at least in part due to a loss of biodiversity defined as the intrapopulation life history diversity. The mid Columbia subbasins included in the study are the Deschutes, John Day, Umatilla, Tucannon and Yakima.

  17. Gas bubble disease in smallmouth bass and northern squawfish from the Snake and Columbia Rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Becker, C.D.

    1980-11-01

    Supersaturation of the Columbia and Snake River systems was caused by entrainment of air into water spilling over hydroelectric dams. Total gas saturations of 100% or more have occurred during the spring in each river system. External signs of gas bubble diseases were noted in adult Smallmouth bass and northern squawfish collected from the lower Snake and mid-Columbia rivers during 1975-76. Emboli occurred beneath membranes of the opercula body, and fins of 72% of the smallmouth bass and 84% of the northern squawfish. Hemorrhage was also noted on the caudal, anal, and pectoral fins of several fish.

  18. Development of a high-resolution bathymetry dataset for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Larson, Kyle B.; Lettrick, Joseph W.

    2010-10-08

    A bathymetric and topographic data collection and processing effort involving existing and newly collected data has been performed for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach in central Washington State, extending 60-miles from the tailrace of Priest Rapids Dam (river mile 397) to near the vicinity of the Interstate 182 bridge just upstream of the Yakima River confluence (river mile 337). The contents of this report provide a description of the data collections, data inputs, processing methodology, and final data quality assessment used to develop a comprehensive and continuous merged 1m resolution bathymetric and topographic surface dataset for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach.

  19. District of Columbia Public Service Commission. Docket No. EO-05-01 Pepco

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Response to the City of Alexandria's Supplemental Comments | Department of Energy District of Columbia Public Service Commission. Docket No. EO-05-01 Pepco Response to the City of Alexandria's Supplemental Comments District of Columbia Public Service Commission. Docket No. EO-05-01 Pepco Response to the City of Alexandria's Supplemental Comments Docket No. EO-05-01: In accordance with Order No. 202-06-01, issued by the Department of Energy ("DOE") on February 17, 2006, Potomac

  20. EIS-0163: 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District prepared this statement to analyze four general alternatives to modify the flow of water in the lower Columbia-Snake River in order to help anadromous fish migrate past eight multipurpose Federal dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement on February 10, 1992.

  1. Support for City of Alexandria's Comments on the District of Columbia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01 | Department of Energy Support for City of Alexandria's Comments on the District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01 Support for City of Alexandria's Comments on the District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01 Docket No. EO-05-01. In the above referenced order, responding to the D.C. Public Service Commission's petition, several inaccurate statements relating to environmental issues compel attention

  2. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  3. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume I, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Sockeye Salmon Summaries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose was to identify and characterize the wild and hatchery stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River Basin on the basis of currently available information. This report provides a comprehensive compilation of data on the status and life histories of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

  4. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2003-12-01

    We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  5. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2004-02-01

    We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2015-06-18 Corps Columbia Riverkeeper Settlement SWPA Mtg.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRESENTATION TITLE Wayne Todd Sr. Hydropower Program Manager Northwestern Division Corps of Engineers Agreement with Columbia Riverkeeper Regarding Hydropower Plant Discharges 2015 Southwestern Federal Hydropower Meeting June 18, 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Who is Columbia Riverkeeper? 2 From their official website: Columbia Riverkeeper is the leading public-interest group working to protect the Columbia.... While we utilize sophisticated scientific, legal, and policy tools to protect the river, we

  7. Pecan Street Smart Grid Extension Service at the University of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCracken, Brewster

    2014-02-11

    Through funding from the Department of Energy’s Electricity Delivery and Reliability Office, Pecan Street Inc., in partnership with Austin Energy and Oncor, developed and tested third- party data access platforms and services for Green Button offerings and for other home energy use data providers. As more utilities seek to offer Green Button-compliant data to their customers, the question continually arises of how this data can be used to help customers better manage their energy use.

  8. The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Public Outdoor Lighting Inventory: Phase I: Survey Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Smalley, Edward; Haefer, R.

    2014-09-30

    This document presents the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S. undertaken during the latter half of 2013.This survey attempts to access information about the national inventory in a bottoms-up manner, going directly to owners and operators. Adding to previous top down estimates, it is intended to improve understanding of the role of public outdoor lighting in national energy use.

  9. Main Street Net-Zero Energy Buildings: The Zero Energy Method in Concept and Practice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    870 July 2010 Main Street Net-Zero Energy Buildings: The Zero Energy Method in Concept and Practice Preprint Paul Torcellini, Shanti Pless, and Chad Lobato National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tom Hootman RNL Design Presented at the ASME 2010 4 th International Conference on Energy Sustainability Phoenix, Arizona May 17-22, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No.

  10. Hr. Michael Esposito Audio-Tex Industries, Incorporated 4555 West Addison Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- Hr. Michael Esposito Audio-Tex Industries, Incorporated 4555 West Addison Street Chicago, Illinois 60641 Dear Mr. Esposito: Enclosed is a copy of the final survey report for your facility in Chicago,. Illinois , which is the site of the former ERA Tool & Engineering Company. The survey report documents the fact that the radiological condition of your facility is in compliance with applicable Department of Energy Guidelines and that no remedial action or further investigaticns are

  11. LNG scene; Qatar's export plans intensify; sale of Columbia's U. S. terminal in doubt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-20

    This paper reports that Activity continues to percolate in Qatar's massive liquefied natural gas export program. In the latest development, France's Ste. Nationale Elf Aquitaine and Japan's Sumitomo Corp. agreed to promote development of Qatar's LNG export project based on supergiant North Offshore gas field and step up discussions with potential buyers in coming months. Target markets lie in Japan and the Far East. Among other LNG operations, Columbia Gas System Inc. last week the it was told by Shell LNG Co. it is unlikely that presale conditions will be met prior to Shell LNG's scheduled purchase July 29 of 40.8% of the stock in Columbia LNG. Columbia LNG owns and LNG receiving terminal at Cove Point, Md., with a design sendout capacity of 1 bcfd of regasified LNG. That makes it the biggest in type U.S. Columbia the it had not received work on what action Shell LNG will take on the purchase agreement. However, failure to meet the undisclosed conditions will allow Shell LNG to end the agreement.

  12. EA-1945: Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas, and Chelan Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project, a 230-kilvolt transmission line proposed by BPA and the Public Utility Districts of Grant, Chelan, and Douglas Counties, Washington.

  13. District of Columbia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- --

  14. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  15. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  16. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  17. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  18. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free:

  19. Radiological survey results at 14 Cliff Street, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 14 Cliff Street, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium dust from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines.

  20. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: M Street Homes, Smartlux on Greenpark, Houston, TX

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M Street Homes Smartlux on Greenpark Houston, TX DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are

  1. FOLEY & LARDNER LLP ATTORNEYS AT LAW WASHINGTON HARBOUR 3000 K STREET, N.W.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FOLEY FOLEY & LARDNER LLP ATTORNEYS AT LAW WASHINGTON HARBOUR 3000 K STREET, N.W. SUITE 600 WASHINGTON, D.C. 20007-5109 202.672.5300 TEL 202.672.5399 FAX foley.com WRITER'S DIRECT LINE 202.672.5442 jsnewman©foley.corn EMAIL December 13, 2010 VIA E-Mail (Celia.Sher@hq.doe.gov) Ms. Celia Sher U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel Forrestal Building, GC-71 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 585-0121 Re: Requested Summary of Telephone Conference Regarding

  2. The Honorable Richard M. Daley, Jr. 121 N. LaSalle Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FEB 1 ? 1995 The Honorable Richard M. Daley, Jr. 121 N. LaSalle Street Chicago, Illinois 60602 Dear Mayor Daley: Y aa / 7 l- / J Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former Podbeilniac Corp. site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies. This information

  3. The Honorable Richard M. Daley,. Jr. 121 N.. LaSalle Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pepartment of Energy Washington, DC 20585 FEB 24 1995 The Honorable Richard M. Daley,. Jr. 121 N.. LaSalle Street Chicago, Illinoi~s 60602 Dear Mayor Daley:. Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach.to openness in the Department.of Energy (DOE) and its communicationswith the public. In . support of this initiative, we are,pleased to.forward the enclosed information related to,the former Wyckoff Steel Co. site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DDE or its

  4. The Honorable Richard M., Daley, ~Jr: 121 N. LaSalle Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Richard M., Daley, ~Jr: \ 121 N. LaSalle Street Chicago, Illinois 60602 ', Dear Mayor Daley.:' / Secretary-of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. In support'of this .initiative, we are pleased to forward the.enclosed in7ormatio'n related to the former Crane Co. si,te in your jurisdiction 'that'performed work for DOE or.its predecessor agencies. information, use, and retention. , This in,formation-

  5. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J.

    1997-06-26

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  6. Bonneville Project Act, Federal Columbia River Transmission System Act and Other Related Legislation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Legislative texts are provided for: Bonneville Project Act which authorizes the completion, maintenance, and operation of Bonneville project for navigation, and for other purposes; Federal Columbia River Transmission system Act which enables the Secretary of the Interior to provide for operation, maintenance, and continued construction of the Federal transmission system in the Pacific Northwest by use of the revenues of the Federal Columbia River Power System and the proceeds of revenue bonds, and for other purposes; public law 88--552 which guarantees electric consumers of the Pacific Northwest first call on electric energy generated at Federal hydroelectric plants in that regions and reciprocal priority, and for other purposes; and public law 78--329 which provides for the partial construction of the Hungary Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River in the state of Montana, and for other purposes

  7. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  8. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  9. SUPPLEMENTAL COLUMBIA RIVER PROTECTION ACTIVITIES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE: 2006 TECHNICAL PEER REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; Dawn Kaback; Gene Leboeuf; Jason Mulvihill-Kuntz; Lynn Lefkoff

    2006-12-20

    Prompted by a $10 million Congressional allocation to identify supplemental actions to protect the Columbia River from groundwater contamination beneath the Hanford Reservation, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Clean-up Technology identified twenty-three potential technical projects and then down-selected ten of these for further evaluation. An independent expert peer review was conducted for the ten down-selected proposals. The review panel consisted of twenty-three recognized subject matter experts that broadly represented academia, industry, and federal laboratories. Of the initial ten proposals reviewed, one was given unconditional support, six were given conditional support, and three were not supported as proposed. Three additional proposals were then submitted by DOE for review--these proposals were structured, in part, to respond to the initial round of technical peer review comments. Peer reviews of these additional proposals provided conditional support. For those proposals that received conditional support, DOE requested specific implementation and work plans and assessed whether the plans adequately addressed the technical conditions identified by the review panel. The final list of technology proposals receiving support, or conditional support, primarily focused on understanding and reducing the potential impacts of uranium, chromium, and strontium from facilities adjacent to the Columbia River, with a secondary focus on understanding and limiting the future Columbia River impacts from the large carbon tetrachloride groundwater plume underlying and downgradient of the Hanford Central Plateau facilities. The results and recommendations of the peer reviews informed the final DOE project selections and supported implementation of the selected projects to protect the Columbia River and address groundwater contamination at Hanford.

  10. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0234).

  11. Letter from the Department of Energy to the District of Columbia Public

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Service Commission with respect to the Emergency Petition and Complaint | Department of Energy with respect to the Emergency Petition and Complaint Letter from the Department of Energy to the District of Columbia Public Service Commission with respect to the Emergency Petition and Complaint Docket No. EO-05-01: We have received the Petition and Complaint that you filed with the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on August 24, 2005, on behalf of the

  12. Catherine Naud (Columbia Univ.) and Anthony Del Genio (GISS), New York

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermodynamic phase distribution in midlatitude optically thin clouds Catherine Naud (Columbia Univ.) and Anthony Del Genio (GISS), New York Martial Haeffelin, Yohann Morille and Vincent Noel (IPSL/LMD, France) Dave Turner (Univ. Wisconsin, Madison), Zhien Wang (Univ. Wyoming, Laramie) Chaomei Lo and Jennifer Comstock (PNNL) 5. Ice fraction vs temperature: similar relation at all cloud levels 2. Thermodynamic phase from lidar: determined at all lidar cloud levels from depolarization ratios and

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (Region 2): Love Canal/93rd Street, New York (third remedial action), September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-26

    The Love Canal/93rd Street School site consists of approximately 19 acres and includes a school and an adjacent vacant lot. The site is located in Niagara Falls, New York, less than one mile northwest of Love Canal and is within the Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area. Hooker Chemicals and Plastics Corporation disposed of over 21,000 tons of various chemicals at the Love Canal site from 1942 to 1953, when the site was deeded over to the City of Niagara Falls Board of Education. Sampling has revealed that approximately 6,000 cu yds of soil are contaminated. During the 1950s, home construction accelerated in the area. Specifically, in 1950, the 93rd Street School was built, and in 1954, the 99th Street School was built adjacent to the middle portion of the Canal. Prior to construction of the 93rd Street School, a drainage swale crossed the site. Between 1938 and 1951, the swale was partially filled with soil and rock debris, followed by sand and fly ash materials. In 1980, the 93rd Street School was closed due to public health concerns related to the potentially contaminated fill material. The primary contaminants of concern affecting soil are VOCs, including toluene and xylenes, other organics including dioxins, PAHs and pesticides, and metals including arsenic and lead.

  14. Building America Case Study: Conway Street Apartments, Greenfield, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conway Street Apartments Greenfield, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Conway Street Apartments: A Multifamily Deep Energy Retrofit Location: Greenfield, MA Construction: Multifamily (gut rehabili- tation of a vacant school building) Type: Rental apartments Partners: Olive Street Development, zaccheoproperties.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, carb-swa.com Size: 12 apartments; 1-2 bedroom, 500-1,100 ft 2 Price Range: $900-$1,600/month Date completed: 2014 Climate

  15. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

  16. Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Fishes of the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, Kathy E.; Dawley, Earl; Geist, David R.

    2006-03-31

    Gas supersaturation problems generated by spill from dams on the Columbia River were first identified in the 1960s. Since that time, considerable research has been conducted on effects of gas supersaturation on aquatic life, primarily juvenile salmonids. Also since that time, modifications to dam structures and operations have reduced supersaturated gas levels produced by the dams. The limit for total dissolved gas saturation (TDGS) as mandated by current Environmental Protection Agency water quality standards is 110%. State management agencies issue limited waivers to water quality, allowing production of levels of up to 120% TDGS to facilitate the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids. Recently, gas supersaturation as a water quality issue has resurfaced as concerns have grown regarding chronic effects of spill-related total dissolved gas on salmonids, including incubating embryos and larvae, resident fish species, and other aquatic organisms. Because of current concerns, and because the last comprehensive review of research on supersaturation effects on fishes was conducted in 1997, we reviewed recent supersaturation literature to identify new or ongoing issues that may not be adequately addressed by the current 110% TDGS limit and the 120% TDGS water quality waiver. We found that recent work supports older research indicating that short-term exposure to levels up to 120% TDGS does not produce acute effects on migratory juvenile or adult salmonids when compensating depths are available. Monitoring programs at Snake and Columbia river dams from 1995 to the early 2000s documented a low incidence of significant gas bubble disease or mortality in Columbia River salmonids, resident fishes, or other taxa. We did, however, identify five areas of concern in which total dissolved gas levels lower than water quality limits may produce sublethal effects on fishes of the Columbia River. These areas of concern are 1) sensitive and vulnerable species or life stages, 2) long-term chronic or multiple exposure, 3) vulnerable habitats and reaches, 4) effects on incubating fish in hyporheic habitats, and 5) community and ecosystem effects. Although some of these areas of concern may have been identified previously in earlier works, we suggest that consideration of the issues is warranted to avoid detrimental impacts on aquatic resources of the Columbia River system. We discuss these issues and provide recommendations to regulatory and management agencies based on our review of recent literature. In general, we recommend that additional attention be directed toward resolving the uncertainties within these five areas.

  17. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL POWER PLANT LOCATED AT LADWP MAIN STREET SERVICE CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William W. Glauz

    2004-09-10

    The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) has developed one of the most recognized fuel cell demonstration programs in the United States. In addition to their high efficiencies and superior environmental performance, fuel cells and other generating technologies that can be located at or near the load, offers several electric utility benefits. Fuel cells can help further reduce costs by reducing peak electricity demand, thereby deferring or avoiding expenses for additional electric utility infrastructure. By locating generators near the load, higher reliability of service is possible and the losses that occur during delivery of electricity from remote generators are avoided. The potential to use renewable and locally available fuels, such as landfill or sewage treatment waste gases, provides another attractive outlook. In Los Angeles, there are also many oil producing areas where the gas by-product can be utilized. In June 2000, the LADWP contracted with FCE to install and commission the precommercial 250kW MCFC power plant. The plant was delivered, installed, and began power production at the JFB in August 2001. The plant underwent manufacturer's field trials up for 18 months and was replace with a commercial plant in January 2003. In January 2001, the LADWP contracted with FCE to provide two additional 250kW MCFC power plants. These commercial plants began operations during mid-2003. The locations of these plants are at the Terminal Island Sewage Treatment Plant at the Los Angeles Harbor (for eventual operation on digester gas) and at the LADWP Main Street Service Center east of downtown Los Angeles. All three carbonate fuel cell plants received partial funding through the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. This report covers the technical evaluation and benefit-cost evaluation of the Main Street 250kW MCFC power plant during its first year of operation from September 2003 to August 2004. The data for the month of September 2004 was not available at the time this report was prepared. An addendum to this report will be prepared and transmitted to the Department of Energy once this data becomes available. This fuel cell power plant was originally intended to be installed at an American Airlines facility located at Los Angeles International Airport, however, due to difficulties in obtaining a site, the plant was ultimately installed at the LADWP's Distributed Generation Test Facility at it's Main Street Service Center.

  18. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2002-07-01

    Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

  19. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  20. NEPA analysis of US-Canadian power transactions under the Columbia River Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.S.; Weintraub, N.H.; Linehan, A.O.

    1995-12-01

    The Columbia River Treaty of 1961 led to the development of three hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River in Canada and one in the United States. Canada sold its share of the downstream power generation benefits of these facilities to US utilities for 30 years. The administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) of the US Department of Energy is the {open_quotes}United States Entity{close_quotes} under the Columbia River Treaty with Canada. BPA prepared the {open_quotes}Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement{close_quotes} Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate alternative means for the US to return to Canada the Canadian share of the downstream benefits when these 30-year agreements expire. Alternatives on both sides of the US-Canada border included new high-voltage transmission lines; new generating and conservation resources; and power sales, exchanges, and other transactions. BPA developed an EIS methodology and graphical representation technique for comparing the diverse options associated with the Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement that were instrumental in helping managers understand the impacts of alternatives in a timely manner. A graphical, modular approach helped convey complex relationships in ways that were easy to read and understand. In addition, analysis of potential environmental impacts in Canada was developed in order to provide relevant information to US decision-makers, without compromising the Canadian environmental review process. As a result, environmental analysis was fully integrated into the decision process. The EIS approach used in this project has become a prototype for other Department of Energy NEPA documents, both site-specific and programmatic.

  1. Gas bubble disease in smallmouth bass and northern squawfish from the Snake and Columbia Rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Becker, C.D.

    1980-11-01

    In 1975 and 1976, 179 smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and 85 northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) were collected by angling from the lower Snake and mid-Columbia rivers, southeastern Washington. All fish were examined externally for gas bubble syndrome. Emboli were found beneath membranes of the opercula, body, and fins of 72% of the smallmouth bass and 84% of the northern squawfish. Hemorrhage was also noted on the caudal, anal, and pectoral fins of several smallmouth bass. Presence of gas bubble syndrome corresponded to the spring runoff when total dissolved gas supersaturations in river water exceeded 115%.

  2. The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Annual Report, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Serkowski, John A.

    2013-11-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this project for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Corps). The purpose of the project is to develop a geospatial, web-accessible database (called Oncor) for action effectiveness and related data from monitoring and research efforts for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The intent is for the Oncor database to enable synthesis and evaluation, the results of which can then be applied in subsequent CEERP decision-making. This is the first annual report in what is expected to be a 3- to 4-year project, which commenced on February 14, 2012.

  3. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  4. Lower Columbia River Salmon Business Plan for Terminal Fisheries : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon For All

    1996-07-01

    Salmon fishing in the Northwest requires a public-private partnership. The public through its decision-makers, agencies, and laws states it will do all that is necessary to protect and preserve the valuable salmon resource. Yet, the public side of the partnership is broken. The Columbia River salmon fishing industry, with over 140 years of documented history, is at a crossroads. This report explores a variety of issues, concerns, and ideas related to terminal fishery development. In some cases recommendations are made. In addition, options are explored with an understanding that those designated as decision-makers must make decisions following considerable discussion and reflection.

  5. Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

    1993-06-01

    The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

  6. Status Report of the Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra Trzdentata) in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David A.; Parker, Blaine; James, gary

    1995-07-01

    The widespread decline of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Pacific Northwest, especially in the Columbia River system has led to concerns and questions from a number of regional agencies, Native American tribes, and the public. To address these concerns, new research efforts must focus on specific problems associated with this understudied species. The preservation and restoration of this species is critical for a number of reasons, including its importance to the tribes and its importance as an indicator of ecosystem health. Historically lamprey have been labeled a pest species due to the problems associated with the exotic sea lamprey, (Petromyzon marinus), invading the Great Lakes.

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

  8. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 14.26 2010's 12.12 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  9. Spawning and abundance of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1948--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Watson, D.G.

    1990-03-01

    The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River provides the only major spawning habitat for the upriver bright (URB) race of fall chinook salmon in the mainstem Columbia River. Hanford Site biologists have conducted aerial surveys of spawning salmon in the Hanford Reach since 1948. This report summarizes data on fall chinook salmon spawning in the Hanford Reach and presents a discussion of factors that may affect population trends. Most data are limited to fisheries agency reports and other working documents. Fisheries management practices in the Columbia River system have changed rapidly over the last decade, particularly under requirements of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980. New information has been generated and included in this report. 75 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  11. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operations Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

  12. Sowing Seeds for Success: Interdisciplinary Research Blossoms at DOE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SunShot Initiative is well known for serving as one of the first sources of seed funding for cutting-edge solar energy technologies. At the same time, SunShot is also studying how solar energy...

  13. Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1994-02-01

    The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

  14. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  15. Shrub-Steppe Seasons A Natural History of the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LE Rogers

    1995-08-01

    This book collects and updates a series of articles about the natural history of the Mid-Columbia region. The articles first appeared as a monthly column titled ''Natural History'' in the Tri-City Herald, beginning in May 1991. My approach has been to condense the best of what is known about the ecology of the region to a manageable length with little in the way of technical language and terms. Admittedly, there is a bias toward those topics and species on which I have either been personally involved or observed as part of the ecology research programs conducted on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. The ALE Reserve is situated on the northeast-facing flank of the Rattlesnake Hills. Rattlesnake Mountain with a crest of over 3,600 feet is visible throughout much of the Mid-Columbia. Shrub-steppe grasslands once covered a large part of the western United States but most have been converted to other uses. The ALE site is the only remaining sizeable acreage (120 square miles) that is in near pristine condition and provides the only clear indication as to what the early trappers, traders, pioneers, and tribal members may have encountered in their day-to-day activities. In this respect, ALE provides a visible touchstone linking the past with the present for all of us.

  16. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNLs role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  17. Proposed Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 : Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Joint NEPA/SEPA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat County

    1995-03-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) addresses the Columbia Wind Farm {number_sign}1 (Project) proposal for construction and operation of a 25 megawatt (MW) wind power project in the Columbia Hills area southeast of Goldendale in Klickitat County, Washington. The Project would be constructed on private land by Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) (the Applicant). An Environmental Impact Statement is required under both NEPA and SEPA guidelines and is issued under Section 102 (2) (C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) at 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq and under the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) as provided by RCW 43.21C.030 (2) (c). Bonneville Power Administration is the NEPA lead agency; Klickitat County is the nominal SEPA lead agency and CARES is the SEPA co-lead agency for this DEIS. The Project site is approximately 395 hectares (975 acres) in size. The Proposed Action would include approximately 91 model AWT-26 wind turbines. Under the No Action Alternative, the Project would not be constructed and existing grazing and agricultural activities on the site would continue.

  18. Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

  19. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  20. Simulating coarse-scale vegetation dynamics using the Columbia River Basin succession model-crbsum. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, R.E.; Long, D.G.; Menakis, J.P.; Hann, W.J.; Bevins, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    The paper details the landscape succession model developed for the coarse-scale assessment called CRBSUM (Columbia River Basin SUccession Model) and presents some general results of the application of this model to the entire basin. CRBSUM was used to predict future landscape characteristics to evaluate management alternatives for both mid-and coarse-scale efforts. A test and sensitivity analysis of CRBSUM is also presented. This paper was written as a users guide for those who wish to run the model and interprete results, and its was also written as documentation for some results of the Interior Columbia River Basin simulation effort.

  1. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2009-09-28

    This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

  2. Steelhead Spawning Surveys Near Locke Island, Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DR Geist; RP Mueller

    1999-10-19

    In 1997, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed upper Columbia River steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus znykiss) as endangered. This action affected management of land-use activities along and within the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, which flows through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Steelhead covered in this listing include all naturally spawned populations of steel-head and their progeny in streams in the Columbia River Basin upstream from the Yakima River to the United States/Canada border. The NMFS has identified a general listing of activities that could potentially result in harm to steelhead (62 FR 43937, August 18, 1997). One of these concerns includes land-use changes resulting in mass wasting or surface erosion. Landslide activity along the White Bluffs on the east ,side of Locke Island has redirected river flow into the island where substantial erosion has occurred. This erosion has exposed important anthropological and archaeological resources that were previously buried on the island. The DOE is working with affected tribes and other agencies to develop a plan for addressing the erosion of Locke Island. As part of this effort, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has prepared an assessment of potential alternatives to stabilize the erosion, including a no-action alternative. Steelhead historically spawned in the vicinity of Locke Island, but recent information on the occurrence of steelhead spawning or availability of spawning habitat was lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if steelhead spawned in the vicinity of Locke Island erosion and to evaluate the composition of substrate in the affected area. Surveys to document the occurrence of steelheads redds were conducted in Spring 1999. The surveys were conducted from the air as well as with the use of an underwater video camera. Neither aerial nor underwater surveys documented steelhead spawning within the survey area. Habitat surveys were conducted in July 1999. The survey area was divided into an area adjacent to the erosion zone and an area immediately upstream of this zone. The majority of the survey area was composed of gravel and medium cobble (particle sizes 0.6 to 15.2 cm). Aquatic vegetation (milfoil) was found in the upstream section, indicating lower water velocities not conducive to steelhead spawning. Based on the available substrate within the entire survey area, we estimate 81% of survey site could be used by adult steelhead for spawning.

  3. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-08-11

    This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCHs Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

  4. Survey of Artificial Production of Anadromous Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1981-1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, Percy M.

    1985-11-25

    The overall objective of this project is to collect, organize, and summarize data concerning anadromous fish culture stations of the Columbia River system for 1981, 1982, and 1983 and to create a data archive system with a means of making this information available to the public.

  5. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District Office 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, New York, 14207

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District Office 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, New York, 14207 Explanation of Significant Differences for the Rattlesnake Creek Portion of the Ashland Sites Tonawanda, New York September 20, 2004 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Explanation of Significant Differences for the Rattlesnake Creek Portion of the Ashland Sites Table of Contents I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. SITE mSTORY, CONTAMINATION AND SELECTED REMEDy 2 A. Site History 2 B. Original Remedy 3

  6. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes.

  7. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  8. Population Estimates for Chum Salmon Spawning in the Mainstem Columbia River, 2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawding, Dan; Hillson, Todd D.

    2003-11-15

    Accurate and precise population estimates of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) spawning in the mainstem Columbia River are needed to provide a basis for informed water allocation decisions, to determine the status of chum salmon listed under the Endangered Species Act, and to evaluate the contribution of the Duncan Creek re-introduction program to mainstem spawners. Currently, mark-recapture experiments using the Jolly-Seber model provide the only framework for this type of estimation. In 2002, a study was initiated to estimate mainstem Columbia River chum salmon populations using seining data collected while capturing broodstock as part of the Duncan Creek re-introduction. The five assumptions of the Jolly-Seber model were examined using hypothesis testing within a statistical framework, including goodness of fit tests and secondary experiments. We used POPAN 6, an integrated computer system for the analysis of capture-recapture data, to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of standard model parameters, derived estimates, and their precision. A more parsimonious final model was selected using Akaike Information Criteria. Final chum salmon escapement estimates and (standard error) from seining data for the Ives Island, Multnomah, and I-205 sites are 3,179 (150), 1,269 (216), and 3,468 (180), respectively. The Ives Island estimate is likely lower than the total escapement because only the largest two of four spawning sites were sampled. The accuracy and precision of these estimates would improve if seining was conducted twice per week instead of weekly, and by incorporating carcass recoveries into the analysis. Population estimates derived from seining mark-recapture data were compared to those obtained using the current mainstem Columbia River salmon escapement methodologies. The Jolly-Seber population estimate from carcass tagging in the Ives Island area was 4,232 adults with a standard error of 79. This population estimate appears reasonable and precise but batch marks and lack of secondary studies made it difficult to test Jolly-Seber assumptions, necessary for unbiased estimates. We recommend that individual tags be applied to carcasses to provide a statistical basis for goodness of fit tests and ultimately model selection. Secondary or double marks should be applied to assess tag loss and male and female chum salmon carcasses should be enumerated separately. Carcass tagging population estimates at the two other sites were biased low due to limited sampling. The Area-Under-the-Curve escapement estimates at all three sites were 36% to 76% of Jolly-Seber estimates. Area-Under-the Curve estimates are likely biased low because previous assumptions that observer efficiency is 100% and residence time is 10 days proved incorrect. If managers continue to rely on Area-Under-the-Curve to estimate mainstem Columbia River spawners, a methodology is provided to develop annual estimates of observer efficiency and residence time, and to incorporate uncertainty into the Area-Under-the-Curve escapement estimate.

  9. District of Columbia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 0 417 155 332 1,343 3,954 4,823 8,122 8,045 9,644 2000's 11,420 12,848 14,028 11,879 13,327 13,893 13,695 15,703 15,110 15,550 2010's 15,507 14,029 12,614 13,942

  10. District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BTU per Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,030 1,025 1,021 1,014 1,014 1,025 1,034 1,037 1,043 1,041 1,047 1,048 2014 1,041 1,035 1,031 1,038 1,035 1,038 1,038 1,038 1,039 1,041 1,044 1,043 2015 1,045 1,047 1,046 1,044 1,044 1,040 1,037 1,036 1,035 1,045 1,039 1,044 - = No Data Reported; --

  11. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11 14,683 11,370 11,354 1990's 11,322 11,318 11,206 11,133 11,132 11,089 10,952 10,874 10,658 12,108 2000's 11,106 10,816 10,870 10,565 10,406 10,381 10,410 9,915 10,024 10,288 2010's 9,879 10,050 9,771 9,963 10,049 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 134 130,748 134,758 134,837 1990's 136,183 136,629 136,438 135,986 135,119 135,299 135,215 134,807 132,867 137,206 2000's 138,252 138,412 143,874 136,258 138,134 141,012 141,953 142,384 142,819 143,436 2010's 144,151 145,524 145,938 146,712 147,877 - = No Data Reported; --

  13. District of Columbia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.06 4.94 3.01 2.60 2.80 2000's 3.99 5.14 4.37 5.95 6.76 8.93 9.50 9.49 15.57 6.83 2010's 4.87 4.17 9.38 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next

  14. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  15. Proposed Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Joint NEPA/SEPA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat County

    1995-09-01

    CARES proposes to construct and operate the 25 megawatt Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 (Project) in the Columbia Hills area of Klickitat County, Washington known as Juniper Point. Wind is not a constant resource and based on the site wind measurement data, it is estimated that the Project would generate approximately 7 average annual MWs of electricity. BPA proposes to purchase the electricity generated by the Project. CARES would execute a contractual agreement with a wind developer, to install approximately 91 wind turbines and associated facilities to generate electricity. The Project`s construction and operation would include: install concrete pier foundations for each wind turbine; install 91 model AWT-26 wind turbines using 43 m high guyed tubular towers on the pier foundations; construct a new 115/24-kv substation; construct a 149 m{sup 2} steel operations and maintenance building; install 25 pad mount transformers along the turbine access roads; install 4.0 km of underground 24 kv power collection lines to collect power from individual turbines to the end of turbine strings; install 1.2 km of underground communication and transmission lines from each turbine to a pad mount transformer; install 5.6 km of 24 kv wood pole transmission lines to deliver electricity from the pad mount transformers to the Project substation; install 3.2 km of 115 kv wood pole transmission lines to deliver electricity from the Project substation to the Public Utility District No. 1 of Klickitat County(PUD)115 kv Goldendale line; interconnect with the BPA transmission system through the Goldendale line and Goldendale substation owned by the PUD; reconstruct, upgrade, and maintain 8.0 km of existing roads; construct and maintain 6.4 km of new graveled roads along the turbine strings and to individual turbines; and install meteorological towers guyed with rebar anchors on the Project site.

  16. Hydrodynamic Simulation of the Columbia River, Hanford Reach, 1940--2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2005-06-15

    Many hydrological and biological problems in the Columbia River corridor through the Hanford Site require estimates of river stage (water surface elevation) or river flow and velocity. Systematic collection of river stage data at locations in the Hanford Reach began in 1991, but many environmental projects need river stage information at unmeasured locations or over longer time periods. The Modular Aquatic Simulation System 1D (MASS1), a one-dimensional, unsteady hydrodynamic and water quality model, was used to simulate the Columbia River from Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam from 1940 to 2004, providing estimates of water surface elevation, volumetric flow rate, and flow velocity at 161 locations on the Hanford Reach. The primary input data were bathymetric/topographic cross sections of the Columbia River channel, flow rates at Priest Rapids Dam, and stage at McNary Dam. Other inputs included Yakima River and Snake River inflows. Available flow data at a gaging station just below Priest Rapids Dam was mean daily flow from 1940 to 1986 and hourly thereafter. McNary dam was completed in 1957, and hourly stage data are available beginning in 1975. MASS1 was run at an hourly timestep and calibrated and tested using 1991--2004 river stage data from six Hanford Reach locations (areas 100B, 100N, 100D, 100H, 100F, and 300). Manning's roughness coefficient in the Reach above each river recorder location was adjusted using an automated genetic algorithm and gradient search technique in three separate calibrations, corresponding to different data subsets, with minimization of mean absolute error as the objective. The primary calibration was based on 1999, a representative year, and included all locations. The first alternative calibration also used all locations but was limited in time to a high-flow period during spring and early summer of 1997. The second alternative calibration was based on 1999 and included only 300 Area stage data. Model goodness-of-fit for all years with data was high in the primary calibration and indicated little bias caused by selecting 1999. The alternative calibrations led to improved goodness-of-fit for their limited time and locations, but degraded goodness-of-fit overall. Overall, the simulations were very accurate and even highlighted some probable data problems, as evidenced by systematic shifts in the data. Further improvements in simulating the historic period would depend on correcting these inferred data problems. For all years and locations, the mean absolute error in the primary calibration was 14.8 cm, the mean error was 1 mm, and model efficiency was 0.988. The MASS1 output for 1940--2004 can be used to reconstruct historical river elevations at Hanford or to build scenarios of future river elevations for solving environmental problems such as groundwater-river interaction or fish habitat inventories. Model output and additional processing services are available from the authors. Longer-term scenarios extending more than a few decades from now should also consider the impacts of climate change and reservoir operation change. Once defined, these impacts could be used to drive new simulations with MASS1.

  17. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret

    2003-09-01

    The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

  18. Population Structure of Columbia River Basin Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Technical Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, E.L.; National Science Foundation

    2002-08-01

    The population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead trout is presented as an assimilation of the life history forms that have evolved in synchrony with diverse and complex environments over their Pacific range. As poikilotherms, temperature is described as the overwhelming environmental influence that determines what life history options occur and where they are distributed. The different populations represent ecological types referred to as spring-, summer-, fall, and winter-run segments, as well as stream- and ocean-type, or stream- and ocean-maturing life history forms. However, they are more correctly described as a continuum of forms that fall along a temporal cline related to incubation and rearing temperatures that determine spawn timing and juvenile residence patterns. Once new habitats are colonized, members of the founding populations spread through adaptive evolution to assume complementary life history strategies. The related population units are collectively referred to as a metapopulation, and members most closely associated within common temporal and geographic boundaries are designated as first-order metapopulations. Population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin, therefore, is the reflection of the genetic composition of the founding source or sources within the respective region, shaped by the environment, principally temperature, that defines life history evolutionary strategy to maximize fitness under the conditions delineated. The complexity of structure rests with the diversity of opportunities over the elevations that exist within the Basin. Consistent with natural selection, rather than simply attempting to preserve populations, the challenge is to provide opportunities to expand their range to new or restored habitat that can accommodate genetic adaptation as directional environmental changes are elaborated. Artificial propagation can have a critical role in this process, and the emphasis must be placed on promoting the ability for anadromous salmonids to respond to change by assuring that the genetic diversity to facilitate such responses is present. The key in developing an effective recovery program for chinook salmon and steelhead is to recognize that multiple life history forms associated with temperature characterize the species in the Columbia Basin, and recovery measures taken must address the biological requirements of the population unit within the environmental template identified. Unless such measures are given first and highest priority, establishment of biologically self-sustaining populations will be restrained.

  19. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary. The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as Salmonid Benefits, was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  20. A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2013-12-01

    This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

  1. SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA Thomas C. Jensen Partner thomas.jensen@snrdenton.com D +1 202 408 3956 M 703 304 5211 T +1 202 408 6400 F +1 202 408 6399 snrdenton.com March 28, 2012 BY E-MAIL Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson:: This letter is submitted on behalf of PPL

  2. 3610 N. 44th Street, Suite 250, Phoenix, AZ 85018 ● Phone 602-808-2004 ●

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 N. 44th Street, Suite 250, Phoenix, AZ 85018 ● Phone 602-808-2004 ● Fax 602-808-2099 ● www.sunzia.net October 17, 2013 Transmitted via electronic mail to juliea.smith@hq.doe.gov and christopher.lawrence@hq.doe.gov Subject: SunZia Southwest Transmission Project comments on Department of Energy's August 29, 2013 Federal Register Notice regarding Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects. The following comments are provided to the Department of

  3. Establishing the SECME model in the District of Columbia. Quarterly report, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikers, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    During this quarter, many program activities were held to help SECME teachers and counselors implement, improve and strengthen SECME school programs in the District of Columbia. Teachers were actively engaged in enhanced instructional techniques, ideas, processes and resources to help them enrich their students` learning experience. Students are busily participating in hands-on instructional activities and preparing for the SECME competition where they are learning to excel in a competitive environment designed to help them make the most of their school experience.

  4. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.

    2000-12-01

    The authors report on their progress from April 1998 through March 1999 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report D), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report E), and the University of Idaho (UI; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 1998 through March 1999 are given.

  5. Columbia River White Sturgeon Genetics and Early Life History: Population Segregation and Juvenile Feeding Behavior, 1987 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, Ernest L.

    1988-06-01

    The geographic area of the genetics study broadly covered the distribution range of sturgeon in the Columbia from below Bonneville Dam at Ilwaco at Lake Roosevelt, the Upper Snake River, and the Kootenai River. The two remote river sections provided data important for enhancement considerations. There was little electrophoretic variation seen among individuals from the Kootenai River. Upper Snake river sturgeon showed a higher percentage of polymorphic loci than the Kootenai fish, but lower than the other areas in the Columbia River we sampled. Sample size was increased in both Lake Roosevelt and at Electrophoretic variation was specific to an individual sampling area in several cases and this shaped our conclusions. The 1987 early life history studies concentrated on the feeding behavior of juvenile sturgeon. The chemostimulant components in prey attractive to sturgeon were examined, and the sensory systems utilized by foraging sturgeon were determined under different environmental conditions. These results were discussed with regard to the environmental changes that have occurred in the Columbia River. Under present river conditions, the feeding mechanism of sturgeon is more restricted to certain prey types, and their feeding range may be limited. In these situations, enhancement measures cannot be undertaken without consideration given to the introduction of food resources that will be readily available under present conditions. 89 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Sluiceway Operations to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, J. R.; Klatte, Bernard A.

    2013-11-20

    Existing ice and trash sluiceways are commonly used to pass juvenile salmonids downstream at hydropower dams through a benign, non-turbine route. At The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River, managers undertook optimizing operations of sluiceway weirs to maximize survival of juvenile salmonids at the powerhouse. We applied fixed-location hydroacoustic methods to compare fish passage rates and sluiceway efficiencies for two weir configurations during 2004 and 2005: three weirs versus six weirs, located at the mid- versus east powerhouse, respectively. We also analyzed horizontal distributions of passage at the sluiceway and turbines and the effects of operating turbines beneath open sluiceway gates to provide supporting data relevant to operations optimization. Based on the findings, we recommend the following for long-term operations for the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam: open six rather than three sluiceway weirs to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway; open the three weirs above the western-most operating main turbine unit (MU) and the three weirs at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high; operate the turbine units below open sluiceway weirs as a standard procedure; operate the sluiceway 24 h/d year-round to maximize its benefits to juvenile salmonids; and use the same operations for spring and summer emigrants. These operational concepts are transferable to dams where sluiceway surface flow outlets are used protect downstream migrating fishes.

  7. Solar space heating for the visitors' center, Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, Marion

    1980-06-01

    This document is the final report of the solar energy system located at the Visitors' Center on the Stephens College Campus, Columbia, Missouri. The system is installed in a four-story, 15,000 square foot building designed to include the college's Admission Office, nine guest rooms for overnight lodging for official guests of the college, a two-story art gallery, and a Faculty Lounge. The solar energy system is an integral design of the building and utilizes 176 Honeywell/Lennox hydronic flat-plate collectors which use a 50% water-ethylene glycol solution and water-to-water heat exchanger. Solar heated water is stored in a 5000 gallon water storage tank located in the basement equipment room. A natural gas fired hot water boiler supplies hot water when the solar energy heat supply fails to meet the demand. The designed solar contribution is 71% of the heating load. The demonstration period for this project ends June 30, 1984.

  8. Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Information Needs, 1992 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charlie; Kinney, William J.; Rowe, Mike

    1993-05-01

    Successful application of adaptive management to rebuilding the Columbia Basin`s anadromous fish resources requires that available information and experience be organized and shared between numerous organizations and individuals. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin`s collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases and recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognize these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project is now completing the process of scoping and identification of information needs. Construction of prototype systems will begin in 1992. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information on System scoping and needs identification phase.

  9. Effects of Total Dissolved Gas on Chum Salmon Fry Incubating in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Panther, Jenny; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Dawley, Earl M.; Elston, Ralph A.

    2008-01-30

    This report describes research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 2007 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to characterize the effects of total dissolved gas (TDG) on the incubating fry of chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) in the lower Columbia River. The tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of three objectives are summarized: * to conduct a field monitoring program at the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites, collecting empirical data on TDG to obtain a more thorough understanding of TDG levels during different river stage scenarios (i.e., high-water year versus low-water year) * to conduct laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry at gas levels likely to occur downstream from Bonneville Dam * to sample chum salmon sac fry during Bonneville Dam spill operations to determine if there is a physiological response to TDG levels. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the study methdology and results are provided in Appendixes A through D.

  10. Prediction of Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) at Hydropower Dams throughout the Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, MD Fayzul K; Hadjerioua, Boualem; Stewart, Kevin M; Bender, Merlynn; Schneider, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. The entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin cause elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) saturation. Physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been characterized throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and at real-time water quality monitoring stations. These data have been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange which are site specific and account for the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant transport and exchange in route to the downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the findings from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow for the formulation of optimal water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases.

  11. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume V; Idaho Subbasins, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keifer, Sharon; Rowe, Mike; Hatch, Keith

    1993-05-01

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

  12. Sluiceway Operations for Adult Steelhead Downstream Passage at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Tackley, Sean C.

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated adult steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss; fallbacks and kelts) downstream passage at The Dalles Dam in the Columbia River, USA, during the late fall, winter, and early spring months between 2008 and 2011. The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of operating the dam’s ice-and-trash sluiceway during non-spill months to provide a relatively safe, non-turbine, surface outlet for overwintering steelhead fallbacks and downstream migrating steelhead kelts. We applied the fixed-location hydroacoustic technique to estimate fish passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines of the dam. The spillway was closed during our sampling periods, which generally occurred in late fall, winter, and early spring. The sluiceway was highly used by adult steelhead (91–99% of total fish sampled passing the dam) during all sampling periods. Turbine passage was low when the sluiceway was not operated. This implies that lack of a sluiceway route did not result in increased turbine passage. However, when the sluiceway was open, adult steelhead used it to pass through the dam. The sluiceway may be operated during late fall, winter, and early spring to provide an optimal, non-turbine route for adult steelhead (fallbacks and kelts) downstream passage at The Dalles Dam.

  13. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5.55 5.47 5.74 5.11 4.95 4.64 4.95 4.58 5.08 5.05 5.19 5.61 1990 6.14 5.83 6.62 5.50 5.18 5.30 5.21 4.88 4.64 4.90 5.15 5.56 1991 5.59 5.58 4.91 5.56 4.78 4.47 4.66 4.47 5.06 5.08 5.21 5.15 1992 5.37 5.55 5.24 5.18 5.18 4.89 4.85 4.76

  14. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-02-05

    The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

  15. Use of Aerial Photography to Monitor Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Richard H.; Dauble, Dennis D.); Geist, David R.)

    2002-11-01

    This paper compares two methods for enumerating salmon redds and their application to monitoring spawning activity. Aerial photographs of fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River were digitized and mapped using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques in 1994 and 1995 as part of an annual assessment of the population. The number of visible redds from these photographs were compared to counts obtained from visual surveys with fixed wing aircraft. The proportion of the total redds within each of five general survey areas was similar for the two monitoring techniques. However, the total number of redds based on aerial photographs was 2.2 and 3.0 times higher than those observed during visual surveys for 1994 and 1995, respectively. The divergence in redd counts was most evident near peak spawning activity when the number of redds within individual spawning clusters exceeded 500. Aerial photography improved our ability to monitor numbers of visible salmon redds and to quantify habitat use.

  16. Acoustic Telemetry Studies of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Survival at the Lower Columbia Projects in 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; McComas, Roy L.

    2008-02-01

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct three studies using acoustic telemetry to estimate detection probabilities and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon at three hydropower projects on the lower Columbia River. The primary goals were to estimate detection and survival probabilities based on sampling with JSATS equipment, assess the feasibility of using JSATS for survival studies, and estimate sample sizes needed to obtain a desired level of precision in future studies. The 2006 JSATS arrays usually performed as well or better than radio telemetry arrays in the JDA and TDA tailwaters, and underperformed radio arrays in the BON tailwater, particularly in spring. Most of the probabilities of detection on at least one of all arrays in a tailwater exceeded 80% for each method, which was sufficient to provide confidence in survival estimates. The probability of detection on one of three arrays includes survival and detection probabilities because fish may die or pass all three arrays undetected but alive.

  17. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.

    2009-06-23

    In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

  18. Health assessment for Hooker Chemical (102nd Street Landfill), Niagara Falls, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD980506810. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The 102nd Street Landfill is two sites that comprise 22 acres. Occidental Chemical Corporation (OCC) and its predecessor, the Oldbury Electrochemical Company, deposited approximately 23,500 tons of mixed organic solvents, organic and inorganic phosphates, and related chemicals. Included in the site are approximately 300 tons of hexachlorocyclohexane process cake, including lindane. In addition, brine sludge, fly ash, electrochemical cell parts and related equipment in unknown quantities were dumped at the site. On-site contamination of the 102nd Street Landfill includes soils contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids on both portions of the Landfill. Off-site contamination, based on current studies, results from contaminated ground-water leaching into the Niagara River which causes contamination of the river water, sediments, and aquatic organisms, including fish. The 102nd Street Landfill continues to represent a potential public health threat.

  19. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2005-07-01

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

  20. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2001-06-01

    The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

  1. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

  2. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  3. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) for the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zack, J; Natenberg, E J; Knowe, G V; Waight, K; Manobianco, J; Hanley, D; Kamath, C

    2011-09-13

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In this phase of the project the focus is on the Mid-Columbia Basin region, which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area (Figure 1) that includes the Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate the Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) observational system deployment approach in order to move closer to the overall goal: (1) Perform an Observing System Experiment (OSE) using a data denial approach. The results of this task are presented in a separate report. (2) Conduct a set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for the Mid-Colombia basin region. This report presents the results of the OSSE task. The specific objective is to test strategies for future deployment of observing systems in order to suggest the best and most efficient ways to improve wind forecasting at BPA wind farm locations. OSSEs have been used for many years in meteorology to evaluate the potential impact of proposed observing systems, determine tradeoffs in instrument design, and study the most effective data assimilation methodologies to incorporate the new observations into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (Atlas 1997; Lord 1997). For this project, a series of OSSEs will allow consideration of the impact of new observing systems of various types and in various locations.

  4. Ground water flow velocity in the bank of the Columbia River, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, S.

    1995-12-01

    To properly characterize the transport of contaminants from the sediments beneath the Hanford Site into the Columbia River, a suite of In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors was deployed to accurately characterize the hydrologic regime in the banks of the river. The three dimensional flow velocity was recorded on an hourly basis from mid May to mid July, 1994 and for one week in September. The first data collection interval coincided with the seasonal high water level in the river while the second interval reflected conditions during relatively low seasonal river stage. Two flow sensors located approximately 50 feet from the river recorded flow directions which correlated very well with river stage, both on seasonal and diurnal time scales. During time intervals characterized by falling river stage, the flow sensors recorded flow toward the river while flow away from the river was recorded during times of rising river stage. The flow sensor near the river in the Hanford Formation recorded a component of flow oriented vertically downward, probably reflecting the details of the hydrostratigraphy in close proximity to the probe. The flow sensor near the river in the Ringold Formation recorded an upward component of flow which dominated the horizontal components most of the time. The upward flow in the Ringold probably reflects regional groundwater flow into the river. The magnitudes of the flow velocities recorded by the flow sensors were lower than expected, probably as a result of drilling induced disturbance of the hydraulic properties of the sediments around the probes. The probes were installed with resonant sonic drilling which may have compacted the sediments immediately surrounding the probes, thereby reducing the hydraulic conductivity adjacent to the probes and diverting the groundwater flow away from the sensors.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Love Canal (93rd Street School), Niagara County, City of Niagara Falls, NY. (Third remedial action), (amendment), May 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-15

    The Love Canal (93rd Street) site is an inactive hazardous waste site located in Niagara Falls, New York. The 19-acre 93rd Street School site, one of several operable units for the Love Canal Superfund site, is the focus of the Record of Decision (ROD). The fill material is reported to contain fly ash and BHC (a pesticide) waste. The ROD amends the 1988 ROD, and addresses final remediation of onsite contaminated soil through excavation and offsite disposal. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs including toluene and xylenes; other organics including PAHs and pesticides; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

  6. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River, Estuary, and Plume in 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Skalski, John R.; Deters, Katherine A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Richard L.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.; Kim, Jin A.; Trott, Donna M.

    2011-09-01

    Uncertainty regarding the migratory behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids passing through the lower Columbia River and estuary after negotiating dams on the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) prompted the development and application of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS). The JSATS has been used to investigate the survival of juvenile salmonid smolts between Bonneville Dam (river kilometer (rkm) 236) and the mouth of the Columbia River annually since 2004. In 2010, a total of 12,214 juvenile salmonids were implanted with both a passive integrated transponder (PIT) and a JSATS acoustic transmitter. Using detection information from JSATS receiver arrays deployed on dams and in the river, estuary, and plume, the survival probability of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts tagged at John Day Dam was estimated form multiple reaches between rkm 153 and 8.3 during the spring. During summer, the survival probability of subyearling Chinook salmon was estimated for the same reaches. In addition, the influence of routes of passage (e.g., surface spill, deep spill, turbine, juvenile bypass system) through the lower three dams on the Columbia River (John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville) on juvenile salmonid smolt survival probability from the dams to rkm 153 and then between rkm 153 and 8.3 was examined to increase understanding of the immediate and latent effects of dam passage on juvenile salmon survival. Similar to previous findings, survival probability was relatively high (>0.95) for most groups of juvenile salmonids from the Bonneville Dam tailrace to about rkm 50. Downstream of rkm 50 the survival probability of all species and run types we examined decreased markedly. Steelhead smolts suffered the highest mortality in this lower portion of the Columbia River estuary, with only an estimated 60% of the tagged fish surviving to the mouth of the river. In contrast, yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts survived to the mouth of the river at higher rates, with estimated survival probabilities of 84% and 86%, respectively. The influence of route of passage at the lower three dams in the FCRPS on juvenile salmonid survival appeared to be relatively direct and immediate. Significant differences in estimated survival probabilities of juvenile salmonid smolts among groups with different dam passage experiences were often detected between the dams and rkm 153. In contrast, the influence of route of passage on survival to the mouth of the Columbia River was not apparent among the groups of tagged juvenile salmonids with different FCRPS passage experiences after they had already survived to a point about 80 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. Yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts that migrated through the lower estuary in off-channel habitats took two to three times longer to travel through these lower reaches and their estimated survival probabilities were not significantly different from that of their cohorts which migrated in or near the navigation channel. A large proportion of the tagged juvenile salmonids migrating in or near the navigation channel in the lower estuary crossed from the south side of the estuary near Astoria, Oregon and passed through relatively shallow expansive sand flats (Taylor Sands) to the North Channel along the Washington shore of the estuary. This migratory behavior may contribute to the avian predation losses observed on for fish (2 to 12% of fish in this study).

  7. Estuarine Landcover Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Compact Ariborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and riparian habitats is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. In a recently completed comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River Estuary (CRE), Jerrick (1999) identified habitat loss and modification as one of the key threats to the integrity of the CRE ecosystem. This management plan called for an inventory of habitats as key first step in the CRE long-term restoration effort. While previous studies have produced useful data sets depicting habitat cover types along portions of the lower CRE (Thomas, 1980; Thomas, 1983; Graves et al., 1995; NOAA, 1997; Allen, 1999), no single study has produced a description of the habitats for the entire CRE. Moreover, the previous studies differed in data sources and methodologies making it difficult to merge data or to make temporal comparisons. Therefore, the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) initiated a habitat cover mapping project in 2000. The goal of this project was to produce a data set depicting the current habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River, from its mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of {approx}230-km (Fig. 1) using both established and emerging remote sensing techniques. For this project, we acquired two types of imagery, Landsat 7 ETM+ and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). Landsat and CASI imagery differ in spatial and spectral resolution: the Landsat 7 ETM+ sensor collects reflectance data in seven spectral bands with a spatial resolution of 30-m and the CASI sensor collects reflectance data in 19 bands (in our study) with a spatial resolution of 1.5-m. We classified both sets of imagery and produced a spatially linked, hierarchical habitat data set for the entire CRE and its floodplain. Landsat 7 ETM+ classification results are presented in a separate report (Garono et al., 2003). This report presents classification results from analysis of the CASI imagery. Data sets produced for this project from both types of imagery fill a critical information gap by creating a current description of the condition and extent of estuarine habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River. Results from this study will be used by the Estuary Partnership and its cooperators to: (1) develop indicators of 'habitat health' and biological integrity; (2) develop definitions of 'critical salmonid habitat'; (3) identify and evaluate potential wetland conservation and restoration sites; (4) track exotic and invasive species; and (5) develop an understanding of how estuarine and riverine habitats have changed over the past 200 years. This study focuses on estuarine and riparian habitat cover types important to native species, particularly juvenile salmonids. This study is meant to provide support to the multiple efforts currently underway to recover 12 species of Columbia River salmonids identified as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

  8. Superfund record of decision amendment (EPA Region 2): Hooker (102nd Street Landfill), Niagara Falls, NY, June 9, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This decision document presents the selected modification to the original remedial action (PB91-921417) for the 102nd Street Landfill Site (the `Site`), located in Niagara Falls, New York. The modification to the selected remedy addresses the river sediments within the shallow embayment of the Niagara River adjacent to the Site. The major components of the modification to the selected remedy include: dredging the Niagara River sediments to the `clean line` with respect to Site-related contamination. These sediments, after dewatering, will NOT be incinerated, but will be consolidated on the landfill. Any NAPL found within these sediments will be extracted, and will be incinerated at an off-site facility.

  9. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1994-03-01

    This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  10. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John; Nugent, Michael; Brock, Wendy

    2002-05-29

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has been contracted through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) to perform an evaluation of juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The evaluation, in the fifth year of a multi-year study, has been developed to assess the impacts of water fluctuations from Priest Rapids Dam on rearing juvenile fall chinook salmon, other fishes, and benthic macroinvertebrates of the Hanford Reach. This document provides the results of the 2001 field season.

  11. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  12. The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Serkowski, John A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-12-31

    This Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates is designed to support the Oncor geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The following data categories are covered: water-surface elevation and temperature, sediment accretion rate, photo points, herbaceous wetland vegetation cover, tree plots and site summaries, fish catch and density, fish size, fish diet, fish prey, and Chinook salmon genetic stock identification. The handbook is intended for use by scientists collecting monitoring and research data for the CEERP. The ultimate goal of Oncor is to provide quality, easily accessible, geospatial data for synthesis and evaluation of the collective performance of CEERP ecosystem restoration actions at a program scale.

  13. Effects of Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Fish Residing in the Snake and Columbia Rivers, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrank, Boyd P.

    1998-03-01

    Increased spill at dams has commonly brought dissolved gas supersaturation higher than levels established by state and federal water quality criteria in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. These increased spill volumes are intended to provide safe passage for migrating juvenile salmon. However, dissolved gas supersaturation resulting from spill in past decades has led to gas bubble disease (GBD) in fish. Therefore, during the period of high spill in 1996, the authors monitored the prevalence and severity of gas bubble disease by sampling resident fish in Priest Rapids Reservoir and downstream from Bonneville, Priest Rapids, and Ice Harbor Dams.

  14. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  15. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2008-02-20

    The purpose of this document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program, hereafter called 'the Estuary Program'. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows: (1) Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. (2) Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. (3) Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. (4) Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. (5) Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. The goal leads to three primary management questions pertaining to the main focus of the Estuary Program: estuary habitat conservation and restoration. (1) Are the estuary habitat actions achieving the expected biological and environmental performance targets? (2) Are the offsite habitat actions in the estuary improving juvenile salmonid performance and which actions are most effective at addressing the limiting factors preventing achievement of habitat, fish, or wildlife performance objectives? (3) What are the limiting factors or threats in the estuary/ocean preventing the achievement of desired habitat or fish performance objectives? Performance measures for the estuary are monitored indicators that reflect the status of habitat conditions and fish performance, e.g., habitat connectivity, survival, and life history diversity. Performance measures also pertain to implementation and compliance. Such measures are part of the monitoring, research, and action plans in this estuary RME document. Performance targets specific to the estuary were not included in the 2007 draft Biological Opinion.

  16. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

    2008-03-18

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

  17. Assessment of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival through the Federal Hydropower Projects in the Main-Stem Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Eppard, M. B.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2014-07-11

    High survival through hydropower projects is an essential element in the recovery of salmonid populations in the Columbia River. It is also a regulatory requirement under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) established under the Endangered Species Act. It requires dam passage survival to be ≥0.96 and ≥0.93 for spring and summer outmigrating juvenile salmonids, respectively, and estimated with a standard error ≤ 0.015. An innovative virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival, defined as survival from the face of a dam to the tailrace mixing zone. A coordinated four-dam study was conducted during the 2012 summer outmigration using 14,026 run-of-river subyearling Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic micro-transmitter (AMT) tags released at 9 different locations, and monitored on 14 different detection arrays. Each of the four estimates of dam passage survival exceeded BiOp requirements with values ranging from 0.9414 to 0.9747 and standard errors, 0.0031 to 0.0114. Two consecutive years of survival estimates must meet BiOp standards in order for a hydropower project to be in compliance with recovery requirements for a fish stock.

  18. Qualitative assessment of the impacts of proposed system operating strategies to resident fish within selected Columbia River Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Geist, D.R.; Mavros, W.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) are presently conducting the System Operation Review (SOR) for the Columbia River basin. The SOR began in 1990 and is expected to provide an operating strategy that will take into consideration multiple uses of the Columbia River system including navigation, flood control, irrigation, power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, water supply, and water quality. This report provides descriptions of each of the non-modeled reservoirs and other specified river reaches. The descriptions focus on the distinct management goals for resident fish: biodiversity, species-specific concerns, and sport fisheries. In addition, this report provides a qualitative assessment of impacts to the resident fish within these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 alternative system operating strategies. In addition to this introduction, the report contains four more sections. Section 2.0 provides the methods that were used. Reservoir descriptions appear in Section 3.0, which is a synthesis of our literature review and interviews with resident fish experts. Section 4.0 contains a discussion of potential impacts to fish within each of these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 proposed system operating strategies. The references cited are listed in Section 5.0.

  19. Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2008-07-29

    Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

  20. Review of Monitoring Plans for Gas Bubble Disease Signs and Gas Supersaturation Levels on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fidler, Larry; Elston, Ralph; Colt, John

    1994-07-01

    Montgomery Watson was retained by the Bonneville Power Administration to evaluate the monitoring program for gas bubble disease signs and dissolved gas supersaturation levels on the Columbia and Snake rivers. The results of this evaluation will provide the basis for improving protocols and procedures for future monitoring efforts. Key study team members were Dr. John Colt, Dr. Larry Fidler, and Dr. Ralph Elston. On the week of June 6 through 10, 1994 the study team visited eight monitoring sites (smolt, adult, and resident fish) on the Columbia and Snake rivers. Additional protocol evaluations were conducted at the Willard Field Station (National Biological Survey) and Pacific Northwest Laboratories at Richland (Battelle). On June 13 and 14, 1994, the study team visited the North Pacific Division office of the U.S. Corps of Engineers and the Fish Passage Center to collect additional information and data on the monitoring programs. Considering the speed at which the Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring Program was implemented this year, the Fish Passage Center and cooperating Federal, State, and Tribal Agencies have been doing an incredible job. Thirty-one specific recommendations are presented in this report and are summarized in Section 14.

  1. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2004-09-01

    The runoff volumes in 2003 were below average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (79%) and The Dalles Dam (82%). The year 2003 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that met the spring seasonal Biological Opinion flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam, McNary Dam and Priest Rapids Dam. However, summer seasonal flows at Lower Granite Dam and McNary Dam were considerably below the Biological Opinion objectives of 50.7 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam and 2000 Kcfs at McNary Dam. Actual summer seasonal flows were just 32.3 Kcfs and 135.5 Kcfs, respectively. In most instances spill was provided as described by the Biological Opinion program for fish passage, within the constraints of the State waivers for total dissolved gas supersaturation levels. Spill was altered during spill testing and most notably during the month of August at Ice Harbor dam. At this project spill was modified from a 24-hour program to a 12-hour nightly spill period pending the evaluation of studies being conducted in-season. Spill was not returned to full implementation of the Biological Opinion levels even after data showed that spillway passage had the highest associated fish survival. This experience demonstrated the difficulty of managing the hydrosystem for fish passage based on preliminary data and data collected in-season. Increased hatchery releases and higher wild fish production resulted in a population of yearling chinook at Lower Granite Dam being one of the highest observed in recent years. However, the increased hatchery production may have been offset to some extent by decreased survival from release to Lower Granite Dam as suggested by the lower than average survival observed for the PIT tagged trap released fish to Lower Monumental Dam. Travel times were also longer for hatchery spring chinook compared to recent past years. The short duration of high flows that occurred in the Lower Snake River was too late for yearling chinook, but likely was a benefit for steelhead. Survivals for spring fish in the Lower Granite to McNary Dam and the McNary to Bonneville Dam reach were similar to recent years. Returning numbers of adult spring and summer chinook, coho and steelhead were less than observed in 2002, but far exceeded the ten-year average return numbers. Sockeye numbers were less than both the 2002 returning adults and the ten-year average number. However, fall chinook numbers surpassed all previous counts at Bonneville Dam since 1938. In 2003, about 81 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This was slightly less than the number released last year, but about average for the past several years.

  2. Case studies of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power: South Columbia Basin Irrigation District, Pasco, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.

    1980-05-01

    The case study concerns two modern human uses of the Columbia River - irrigation aimed at agricultural land reclamation and hydroelectric power. The Grand Coulee Dam has become synonomous with large-scale generation of hydroelectric power providing the Pacific Northwest with some of the least-expensive electricity in the United States. The Columbia Basin Project has created a half-million acres of farmland in Washington out of a spectacular and vast desert. The South Columbia River Basin Irrigation District is seeking to harness the energy present in the water which already runs through its canals, drains, and wasteways. The South District's development strategy is aimed toward reducing the costs its farmers pay for irrigation and raising the capital required to serve the remaining 550,000 acres originally planned as part of the Columbia Basin Project. The economic, institutional, and regulatory problems of harnessing the energy at site PEC 22.7, one of six sites proposed for development, are examined in this case study.

  3. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

  4. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-2001 Report : Populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan and Methow River Drainages.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-10-01

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project was to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-2001 was year three (and final year) of a project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-2001 we worked in collaboration with the Wenatchee National Forest to catalog populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan, and Methow River drainages of Washington State.

  5. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  6. Effects of Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Fish Residing in the Snake and Columbia Rivers, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, Brad A.

    1998-04-01

    Large amounts of spill at dams has commonly generated levels of dissolved gas supersaturation that are higher than levels established by state and federal agencies setting criteria for acceptable water quality in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Large spill volumes are sometimes provided voluntarily to increase the proportion of migrating juvenile salmon that pass dams through nonturbine routes. However, total dissolved gas supersaturation (TDGS) resulting from spill in past decades has led to gas bubble disease (GBD) in fish. Therefore, during the period of high spill in 1997, the authors monitored the prevalence and severity of gas bubble disease by sampling resident fish in Ice Harbor reservoir and downstream from Ice Harbor and Bonneville Dams.

  7. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

  8. Assessment of Biasi and Columbia University CHF correlations with GE 3x3 rod bundle experiment. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF), at which a sudden degradation of heat transfer occurs without corresponding decrease in heat generation, is one of the limiting parameters for safe operation of nuclear reactors. Reactor operation beyond the CHF causes a rapid rise in fuel cladding temperature and thus should be avoided to maintain the fuel element integrity. Reactor power limits are therefore set so that a prescribed safety margin below the CHF is maintained. Two CHF correlations are evaluated for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis: the Biasi correlation and the Columbia University correlation. The BODYFIT-2PE computer code is used for this assessment. The CHF predicted by the BODYFIT-2PE using the two correlations is compared with GE 3x3 rod bundle CHF experiment.

  9. Ocean pC02 Data from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 1994 - 2009

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Takahashi, T.

    The Earth Institute of Columbia University has, as an overarching goal, to help achieve sustainable development primarily by expanding the world's understanding of Earth as one integrated system. The Earth Institute encompasses centers of excellence with an established reputation for groundbreaking research, including the renowned Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), home to more than 200 researchers who study Earth and its systems. The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, led by Dr. Taro Takahashi, studies pCO2 in seawater, carbon sequestration models related to deep aquifers, and air-sea CO2 flux. Datasets from ocean cruises in the years 1994 to the present are made available from this website, along with a list of publications, and cruise maps.

  10. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M.

    2006-05-01

    In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

  11. Columbia River White Sturgeon (Acipenser Transmontanus) Population Genetics and Early Life History Study, January 1, 1986 to December 31, 1986, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, Ernest L.

    1986-12-01

    The 1986 Columbia River white sturgeon investigations continued to assess genetic variability of sturgeon populations isolated in various areas of the Columbia River, and to examine environmental factors in the habitat that may affect early life history success. Baseline data have been collected for three character sets. Twenty-eight loci have been analyzed for differences using electrophoresis, snout shapes were assessed for multivariate distinction, and scute counts have been examined as an index of variability. Fish that reside in the mid-Columbia and lower river have been sufficiently characterized by electrophoresis to compare with up-river areas. To date, few electrophoretic differences have been identified. However, Lake Roosevelt sturgeon sample size will be increased to determine if some of the observed differences from lower river fish are significant. Snout shape has been shown to be easily quantifiable using the digitizing technique. Scute count data initially indicate that variability exists within as well as between areas. Patterns of differentiation of one or more of these data sets may be used to formulate stock transplant guidelines essential for proper management or enhancement of this species. The historical habitat available to sturgeon in the Columbia River has changed through the development of hydroelectric projects. Dams have reduced the velocity and turbulence, and increased light penetration in the water column from less silt. These changes have affected the ability of sturgeon to feed and have made them more vulnerable to predation, which appear to have altered the ability of populations isolated in the reservoirs to sustain themselves. Present studies support the theory that both the biological and physical habitat characteristics of the Columbia River are responsible for reduced sturgeon survival, and justify consideration of enhancement initiatives above Bonneville to improve sturgeon reproductive success.

  12. Pecan Street Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides presented in the "What’s Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Conference - Promising Approaches and Lessons Learned" on May 20, 2011 in Washington, D.C.

  13. 1414 Prince Street

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4, 2015 Alice Lippert Senior Technical Advisor Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. ... to Request for Information: National Power Transformer Reserve Dear Ms. ...

  14. Eelgrass Enhancement and Restoration in the Lower Columbia River Estuary, Period of Performance: Feb 2008-Sep 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, C.; Thom, R; Borde, A.

    2009-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to enhance distribution of eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the Columbia River Estuary to serve as refuge and feeding habitat for juvenile salmon, Dungeness crab, and other fish and wildlife. We strongly suspected that limited eelgrass seed dispersal has resulted in the present distribution of eelgrass meadows, and that there are other suitable places for eelgrass to survive and form functional meadows. Funded as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's call for Innovative Projects, we initiated a multistage study in 2008 that combined modeling, remote sensing, and field experimentation to: (1) Spatially predict habitat quality for eelgrass; (2) Conduct experimental plantings; and (3) Evaluate restoration potential. Baseline in-situ measurements and remote satellite observations were acquired for locations in the Lower Columbia River Estuary (LCRE) to determine ambient habitat conditions. These were used to create a habitat site-selection model, using data on salinity, temperature, current velocity, light availability, wave energy, and desiccation to predict the suitability of nearshore areas for eelgrass. Based on this model and observations in the field, five sites that contained no eelgrass but appeared to have suitable environmental conditions were transplanted with eelgrass in June 2008 to test the appropriateness of these sites for eelgrass growth. We returned one year after the initial planting to monitor the success rate of the transplants. During the year after transplanting, we carried out a concurrent study on crab distribution inside and outside eelgrass meadows to study crab usage of the habitat. One year after the initial transplant, two sites, one in Baker Bay and one in Young's Bay, had good survival or expansion rates with healthy eelgrass. Two sites had poor survival rates, and one site had a total loss of the transplanted eelgrass. For submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) restoration projects, these are reasonable success results and represent a small net gain in eelgrass in the LCRE. Crabs used both the eelgrass and unvegetated substrate, though in neither were there great abundance of the young-of-the-year crabs. During the field assessment of 12 potential transplant sites, divers discovered one site in southern Young's Bay that contained a previously undocumented eelgrass bed. This integrated project developed the first predictive maps of sites suitable for eelgrass and other SAV in the lower estuary. In addition, techniques developed for this project to assess light levels in existing and potential submerged habitats have great potential to be used in other regions for nearshore and coastal monitoring of SAV. Based on these preliminary results, we conclude that eelgrass distribution could likely be expanded in the estuary, though additional information on current eelgrass locations, usage by species of interest, and monitoring of current conditions would help develop a baseline and verify benefit. Our recommendations for future studies include: (1) Site Monitoring. Continued monitoring of restoration sites along with physical metrics of light, temperature and salinity within beds. Continued monitoring will both assist managers in understanding the longevity and expansion rate of planted sites and inform practical guidance on the minimum planted eelgrass required to develop a resilient meadow. (2) Natural bed documentation and monitoring. Document current eelgrass habitat conditions in the Columbia River by mapping eelgrass and other SAV species and monitoring physical metrics in natural beds. This will assist by better defining the factors that control the annual and spatial variation in eelgrass in the estuary, and thus lead to improved management. Improved information on conditions will help refine a habitat suitability model that can more accurately predict where eelgrass can be restored or areas under duress. (3) Monitor Species Use. Expanded monitoring of Dungeness crab and salmon use and benefit from eelgrass in the estuary to evaluate how

  15. Salmon Life Histories, Habitat, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary: An Overview of Research Results, 2002-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottom, Daniel L.; Anderson, Greer; Baptisa, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    From 2002 through 2006 we investigated historical and contemporary variations in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha life histories, habitat associations, and food webs in the lower Columbia River estuary (mouth to rkm 101). At near-shore beach-seining sites in the estuary, Chinook salmon occurred during all months of the year, increasing in abundance from January through late spring or early summer and declining rapidly after July. Recently emerged fry dispersed throughout the estuary in early spring, and fry migrants were abundant in the estuary until April or May each year. Each spring, mean salmon size increased from the tidal freshwater zone to the estuary mouth; this trend may reflect estuarine growth and continued entry of smaller individuals from upriver. Most juvenile Chinook salmon in the mainstem estuary fed actively on adult insects and epibenthic amphipods Americorophium spp. Estimated growth rates of juvenile Chinook salmon derived from otolith analysis averaged 0.5 mm d-1, comparable to rates reported for juvenile salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in other Northwest estuaries. Estuarine salmon collections were composed of representatives from a diversity of evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) from the lower and upper Columbia Basin. Genetic stock groups in the estuary exhibited distinct seasonal and temporal abundance patterns, including a consistent peak in the Spring Creek Fall Chinook group in May, followed by a peak in the Western Cascades Fall Chinook group in July. The structure of acanthocephalan parasite assemblages in juvenile Chinook salmon from the tidal freshwater zone exhibited a consistent transition in June. This may have reflected changes in stock composition and associated habitat use and feeding histories. From March through July, subyearling Chinook salmon were among the most abundant species in all wetland habitat types (emergent, forested, and scrub/shrub) surveyed in the lower 100 km of the estuary. Salmon densities within wetland habitats fell to low levels by July, similar to the pattern observed at mainstem beach-seining sites and coincident with high water temperatures that approached or exceeded 19 C by mid-summer. Wetland habitats were used primarily by small subyearling Chinook salmon, with the smallest size ranges (i.e., rarely exceeding 70 mm by the end of the wetland rearing season) at scrub/shrub forested sites above rkm 50. Wetland sites of all types were utilized by a diversity of genetic stock groups, including less abundant groups such as Interior Summer/Fall Chinook.

  16. Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint Docket No. EL05-145-000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Docket No. EO-05-01: Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint...

  17. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

    2009-05-29

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

  18. Columbia River White Sturgeon (Acipenser Transmontanus) Early Life History and Genertics Study, August 1, 1984 to December 31, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, Ernest L.

    1985-12-01

    Research on Columbia River white sturgeon has been directed at their early life history as it may apply to production and enhancement strategies for management of the species. The river environment in which sturgeon historically migrated, spawned, and reared has changed through development. Habitat changes are expected to precipitate genetic changes in the fish, as well as reduce the fitness in populations. Genetic analysis of samples taken from various locations over the length of the Columbia River have indicated that observed gene frequencies in all areas sampled were not in Hardy-Weinburg equilibrium, which could suggest that the general population is experiencing perturbation in the system. Analysis thus far has exposed few differences between samples from the lower, middle, and upper portions of the system. Allelic differences were identified in fish from the Roosevelt Lake, which may be evidence of unique characteristics among fish from that general area.

  19. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2006 Final Season Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roby, Daniel D.; Collis, Ken; Lyons, Donald E.

    2009-06-18

    This study investigates predation by piscivorous waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River Basin. During 2006, study objectives in the Columbia River estuary, work funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, were to (1) monitor and evaluate previous management initiatives to reduce Caspian tern (Hydroprogne caspia) predation on juvenile salmonids (smolts); (2) measure the impact of double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) predation on smolt survival, and assess potential management options to reduce cormorant predation; and (3) monitor large colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds in the estuary (i.e., glaucous-winged/western gulls [Larus glaucescens/occidentalis]) to determine the potential impacts on smolt survival. Study objectives on the mid-Columbia River, work funded by the Walla Walla District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, were to (1) measure the impact of predation by Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants on smolt survival; and (2) monitor large nesting colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds (i.e., California gulls [L. californicus], ring-billed gulls [L. delawarensis], American white pelicans [Pelecanus erythrorhynchos]) on the mid-Columbia River to determine the potential for significant impacts on smolt survival. Our efforts to evaluate system-wide losses of juvenile salmonids to avian predation indicated that Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants were responsible for the vast majority of smolt losses to avian predators in the Columbia Basin, with most losses occurring in the Columbia River estuary. In 2006, East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary supported the largest known breeding colonies of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants in the world. The Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island consisted of about 9,200 breeding pairs in 2006, up slightly (but not significantly so) from the estimate of colony size in 2005 (8,820 pairs). There has not been a statistically significant change in the size of the Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island since 2000. Tern nesting success averaged 0.72 fledglings per breeding pair in 2006, significantly higher than in 2005 (0.37 fledglings per breeding pair), a year of poor ocean conditions. Despite the presumably higher availability of marine forage fishes in 2006, the proportion of juvenile salmonids in diets of Caspian terns (32% of prey items) averaged higher than in 2005 (23% of prey items) and 2004 (18% of prey items). Steelhead smolts were particular vulnerable to predation by East Sand Island terns in 2006, with predation rates as high as 20% on particular groups of PIT-tagged fish reaching the estuary. Consumption of juvenile salmonids by terns nesting at the East Sand Island colony in 2006 was approximately 5.3 million smolts (95% c.i. = 4.4-6.2 million), significantly higher than the estimated 3.6 million smolts consumed in 2005, but still roughly 7 million fewer smolts consumed compared to 1998 (when all terns nested on Rice Island in the upper estuary). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continue to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply, even in 2005 when availability of marine forage fishes declined due to poor ocean conditions. Further management of Caspian terns to reduce losses of juvenile salmonids would be implemented under the Caspian Tern Management Plan for the Columbia River Estuary; the Records of Decision (RODs) authorizing implementation of the plan were signed in November 2006. The ROD lists as the management goal the redistribution of approximately half of the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony to alternative colony sites in interior Oregon and San Francisco Bay, California (USFWS 2006). Implementation of the management plan is stalled, however, because of the lack of appropriated funds.

  20. Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NeSmith, Frank; Long, Mack; Matthews, Dayne

    1995-06-01

    This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

  1. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Smith, Steven G.; Zabel, Richard W.

    2003-07-01

    In 2002, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the tenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,891 hatchery steelhead at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''Single-Release Model''). Primary research objectives in 2002 were to (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2002 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

  2. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XVI; Alternative Designs for Future Adult PIT-Tag Detection Studies, 2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Comas, Jose A.; Skalski, John R.

    2000-09-25

    In the advent of the installation of a PIT-tag interrogation system in the Cascades Island fish ladder at Bonneville Dam (BON), and other CRB dams, this overview describes in general terms what can and cannot be estimated under seven different scenarios of adult PIT-tag detection capabilities in the CRB. Moreover, this overview attempted to identify minimal adult PIT-tag detection configurations required by the ten threatened Columbia River Basin (CRB) chinook and steelhead ESUs. A minimal adult PIT-tag detection configuration will require the installation of adult PIT-tag detection facilities at Bonneville Dam and another dam above BON. Thus, the Snake River spring/summer and fall chinook salmon, and the Snake River steelhead will require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities to guarantee estimates of ''ocean survival'' and at least of one independent, in-river returning adult survival (e.g., adult PIT-tag detection facilities at BON and LGR dams and at any other intermediary dam such as IHR). The Upper Columbia River spring chinook salmon and steelhead will also require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and two other dams on the BON-WEL reach. The current CRB dam system configuration and BPA's and COE's commitment to install adult PIT-tag detectors only in major CRB projects will not allow the estimation of an ''ocean survival'' and of any in-river adult survival for the Lower Columbia River chinook salmon and steelhead. The Middle Columbia River steelhead ESU will require a minimum of two dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and another upstream dam on the BON-McN reach. Finally, in spite of their importance in terms of releases, PIT-tag survival studies for the Upper Willamette chinook and Upper Willamette steelhead ESUs cannot be perform with the current CRB dam system configuration and PIT-tag detection capabilities.

  3. List of currently classified documents relative to Hanford Operations and of potential use in the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment, January 1, 1973--June 20, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, T.B.; Huesties, L.R.

    1995-02-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project seeks to estimate the current risk from the Columbia River resulting from past and present Hanford activities. To resolve the question of the current risk, it is necessary for the CRCIA Project to have access to any classified information that may be relevant to this study. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the search for relevant classified information. There are two classified matter control centers operated by two prime contractors at the Hanford Site. One is operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the other is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Only the WHC collection contained information relevant to a study of the Columbia River in the time frame of interest: January 1, 1973 through June 20, 1994. A list of the classified documents in the WHC collection is maintained in the WHC Classified Document Control database. The WHC Classified Document Control database was searched. The search criteria were the dates of interest and the basic keywords used for the CRCIA Project`s data compendium (Eslinger et al. 1994). All Hanford-generated, Hanford-related entries that were applicable to the CRCIA Project and the dates of interest were provided. The resulting list of 477 titles comprises the Appendix of this report. The information give for each title is exactly as it appears in the database. Any inconsistencies are the result of duplicating the database.

  4. Impacts of individual fish movement patterns on estimates of mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Fidler, Larry E.

    2002-12-31

    Spatial and temporal distributions of dissolved gases in the Columbia and Snake rivers vary due to many factors including river channel and dam geometries, operational decisions, and natural variations in flow rates. As a result, the dissolved gas exposure histories experienced by migrating juvenile salmonids can vary significantly among individual fish. A discrete, particle-based model of individual fish movements and dissolved gas exposure history has been developed and applied to examine the effects of such variability on estimates of fish mortality. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories are then input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. This model framework provides a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological effects. FINS model parameters were estimated and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. The model was then used to simulate exposure histories under selected operational scenarios. We compare mortality rates estimated using the FINS model approach (incorporating individual behavior and spatial and temporal variability) to those estimated using average exposure times and levels as is done in traditional lumped-parameter model approaches.

  5. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

  6. Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan; Whiteaker, John

    2004-11-01

    Iteroparity, the ability to repeat spawn, is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations, and could help reestablish this naturally occurring life history trait. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia River Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, wild emigrating steelhead kelts were placed into one of three study groups (direct capture and transport, short-term reconditioning, or long-term reconditioning). Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 15 March to 21 June 2004. In total, 842 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.5% (842 of 2,755) of the entire 2003-2004 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in 20-foot circular tanks, and fed freeze-dried krill initially or for the duration of the experiment. All steelhead kelts received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement as a means to improve initial nutrition. Long-term steelhead kelts received Moore-Clark pellets to provide essential minerals and nutrients necessary for gonadal redevelopment. Oxytetracycline was administered to all reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. To control parasitic infestations two methods were used, first, after initial capture an intubation of Ivermectin{trademark} was administered to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Next, a Formalin drip was used for the duration of reconditioning to prevent fungal outbreaks. Captured kelts were separated into three experimental groups: short-term reconditioning, long-term reconditioning, and direct transport and release. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 5 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on May 11, 2004. Survival-to-release was good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 79.0%. Long-term steelhead kelts are currently being held for a 6-9 month period with a scheduled release in December 2004. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts has not been determined and will be presented in the 2005 annual report. Direct transport and release kelts and short-term reconditioned kelts were radio or acoustic tagged to assess their travel time and migratory behaviors below Bonneville Dam. A total of 29 direct-transport and release kelts and 29 short-term reconditioned kelts received surgically implanted radio tags, and a total of 28 direct-transport/release and 26 short-term reconditioned fish received surgically implanted hydro acoustic tags. These tags will allow us to determine outm

  7. Information retrieval system: impacts of water-level changes on uses of federal storage reservoirs of the Columbia River.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fickeisen, D.H.; Cowley, P.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    A project undertaken to provide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with information needed to conduct environmental assessments and meet requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Regional Act) is described. Access to information on environmental effects would help BPA fulfill its responsibilities to coordinate power generation on the Columbia River system, protect uses of the river system (e.g., irrigation, recreation, navigation), and enhance fish and wildlife production. Staff members at BPA identified the need to compile and index information resources that would help answer environmental impact questions. A computer retrieval system that would provide ready access to the information was envisioned. This project was supported by BPA to provide an initial step toward a compilation of environmental impact information. Scientists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) identified, gathered, and evaluated information related to environmental effects of water level on uses of five study reservoirs and developed and implemented and environmental data retrieval system, which provides for automated storage and retrieval of annotated citations to published and unpublished information. The data retrieval system is operating on BPA's computer facility and includes the reservoir water-level environmental data. This project was divided into several tasks, some of which were conducted simultaneously to meet project deadlines. The tasks were to identify uses of the five study reservoirs, compile and evaluate reservoir information, develop a data entry and retrieval system, identify and analyze research needs, and document the data retrieval system and train users. Additional details of the project are described in several appendixes.

  8. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume II; Oregon Subbasins Above Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige; Hatch, Keith

    1993-05-01

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fixtion of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and fedend fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions am based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CM project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CM project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan will provide that perspective.

  9. NGP Energy Technology Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: NGP Energy Technology Partners Name: NGP Energy Technology Partners Address: 1700 K Street NW, Suite 750 Place: Washington, District of Columbia Zip: 20006 Product: Invests...

  10. Energy Ventures Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Logo: Energy Ventures Group Name: Energy Ventures Group Address: 3050 K Street, N.W., Suite 205 Place: Washington, District of Columbia Zip: 20007 Product:...

  11. National Park Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Park Service Name: National Park Service Address: 1849 C Street NW Place: Washington, District of Columbia Zip: 20240 Year...

  12. Victoria Transport Policy Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transport Policy Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Address: 1250 Rudlin Street, Place: Victoria, British Columbia Website:...

  13. StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Resource Information Network - Status of Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Duane A.; Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Woodard, Bob

    1996-04-01

    Information on fish populations, fisheries, and fish habitat is crucial to the success of ongoing program to protect, recover, enhance, and manage fish resources in the Columbia River Basin. However, pertinent data are often difficult to locate because it is scattered among many agencies and is often unpublished. The goal of this annual report is to bring many diverse data types and sources into a single comprehensive report on the status of anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin and the environmental conditions that may affect that status. Brief summaries are provided to identify the type and scope of available information. This synopsis is intended to complement other more detailed reports to which readers are referred for comprehensive treatment of specific subjects. This first report focuses mainly on anadromous salmon and steelhead (primarily through 1994) but the authors intend to expand the scope of future issues to include resident species. This is the first of what the authors intend to be an annual report. They welcome constructive suggestions for improvements. This report is a product of the StreamNet (formerly Coordinated Information System and Northwest Environmental Data Base) project which is a part of the Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The project is called for in the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The project`s objective is to promote exchange and dissemination of information in a standardized electronic format throughout the basin. This project is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission with active participation by tribal, state, and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

  14. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  15. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam: Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.

    1999-02-01

    The authors report on their progress from April 1997 through March 1998 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS; Report D), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of the work from April 1997 through March 1998 listed.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Hooker-102nd Street Landfill, Niagara Falls, NY. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-26

    The 22-acre Hooker-102nd Street site is a former industrial landfill in the city of Niagara Falls, Niagara County, New York. The site is adjacent to, and partially within the Niagara River's 100-year floodplain. These studies and the Remedial Investigation (RI) initiated in 1984, identified contamination in ground water, onsite and offsite soil, rivershore sediment, and within a storm sewer. Additionally, the presence of a leachate plume of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) was discovered emanating from the landfill area. The Record of Decision (ROD) is the final remedy which addresses all of the contaminated media. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including benzene, TCE, and toluene; other organics including PCBs and phenols; and metals including arsenic.

  17. COLUMBIA RESEARCH CORPORATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    veterans preferences) were discussed. 3. All follow-up e-mails from BPA vice president Kim Leathley and Human Resources Officer Roy Fox to each other andor to BPA staff...

  18. Columbia River Treaty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates Expand Finance & Rates Involvement & Outreach Expand Involvement & Outreach Doing Business Expand Doing Business...

  19. Columbia River Treaty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acre-feet KCFS - thousand cubic feet per second KLBC - Kootenay Lake Board of Control LCA - Libby Coordination Agreement KSFD - thousand second-foot-days Maf - million acre-feet...

  20. Columbia River Treaty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to usually one or more every year since the mid-1990s. The Libby Coordination Agreement (LCA) is another agreement under the Treaty that often has resulted in operations that help...

  1. ColumbiaGrid Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop Marv Landauer December 13, 2011 2 Northwest Congestion 2006 DOE Congestion Study identified: * "Seattle to Portland" as a Congestion area of Concern * Montana-Wyoming as a Conditional Congestion Area due to potential for coal and wind resource development * Projects are being pursued to relieve Seattle to Portland congestion (Castle Rock-Troutdale line) and Montana-NW congestion (Colstrip Upgrades) 3 Northwest Congestion

  2. EERE Success Story—Sowing Seeds for Success: Interdisciplinary Research Blossoms at DOE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SunShot Initiative is well known for serving as one of the first sources of seed funding for cutting-edge solar energy technologies. At the same time, SunShot is also studying how solar energy...

  3. Factors Affecting the Survival of Upstream Migrant Adult Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 9 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.

    1993-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is developing conservation planning documentation to support the National Marine Fisheries Service`s (NMFS) recovery plan for Columbia Basin salmonid stocks that are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Information from the conservation planning documentation will be used as a partial scientific basis for identifying alternative conservation strategies and to make recommendations toward conserving, rebuilding, and ultimately removing these salmon stocks from the list of endangered species. This report describes the adult upstream survival study, a synthesis of biological analyses related to conditions affecting the survival of adult upstream migrant salmonids in the Columbia River system. The objective of the adult upstream survival study was to analyze existing data related to increasing the survival of adult migrant salmonids returning to the Snake River system. The fate and accountability of each stock during its upstream migration period and the uncertainties associated with measurements of escapement and survival were evaluated. Operational measures that affected the survival of adult salmon were evaluated including existing conditions, augmented flows from upstream storage release, and drawdown of mainstem reservoirs. The potential impacts and benefits of these measures to each ESA stock were, also described based on considerations of species behavior and run timing.

  4. Migrational Characteristics, Biological Observations, and Relative Survival of Juvenile Salmonids Entering the Columbia River Estuary, 1966-1983, 1985 Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawley, Earl M.

    1986-04-01

    Natural runs of salmonids in the Columbia River basin have decreased as a result of hydroelectric-dam development, poor land- and forest-management, and over-fishing. This has necessitated increased salmon culture to assure adequate numbers of returning adults. Hatchery procedures and facilities are continually being modified to improve both the efficiency of production and the quality of juveniles produced. Initial efforts to evaluate changes in hatchery procedures were dependent upon adult contributions to the fishery and returns to the hatchery. Procedures were developed for sampling juvenile salmon and steelhead entering the Columbia River estuary and ocean plume. The sampling of hatchery fish at the terminus of their freshwater migration assisted in evaluating hatchery production techniques and identifying migrational or behavioral characteristics that influence survival to and through the estuary. The sampling program attempted to estimate survival of different stocks and define various aspects of migratory behavior in a large river, with flows during the spring freshet from 4 to 17 thousand cubic meters per second (m/sup 3//second).

  5. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  6. Assessment of the Species Composition, Densities, and Distribution of Native Freshwater Mussels along the Benton County Shoreline of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Tiller, Brett L.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Turner, Gerald; Welch, Ian D.

    2011-01-31

    The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River is the last unimpounded section of the river and contains substrate characteristics (cobble, gravel, sand/silt) suitable for many of the native freshwater mussels known to exist in the Pacific Northwest. Information concerning the native mussel species composition, densities, and distributions in the mainstem of the Columbia River is limited. Under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an assessment of the near-shore habitat on the Hanford Reach. Surveys conducted in 2004 as part of the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance project documented several species of native mussels inhabiting the near-shore habitat of the Hanford Reach. Findings reported here may be useful to resource biologists, ecologists, and DOE-RL to determine possible negative impacts to native mussels from ongoing near-shore remediation activities associated with Hanford Site cleanup. The objective of this study was to provide an initial assessment of the species composition, densities, and distribution of the freshwater mussels (Margaritiferidae and Unionidae families) that exist in the Hanford Reach. Researchers observed and measured 201 live native mussel specimens. Mussel density estimated from these surveys is summarized in this report with respect to near-shore habitat characteristics including substrate size, substrate embeddedness, relative abundance of aquatic vegetation, and large-scale geomorphic/hydrologic characteristics of the Hanford Reach.

  7. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ

    2009-07-06

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

  8. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole

    2008-03-17

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

  9. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Russell .

    2009-09-10

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

  10. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the IM Province of the Columbia Basin, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielgus, Robert; Shipley, Lisa; Myers, Woodrow

    2003-09-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the sub basins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated 'press' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM sub basins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

  11. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison H.A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao

    2014-12-15

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  12. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  13. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

    2002-07-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

  14. Genetic and Phenotype [Phenotypic] Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-99 Report : Populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-05-01

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State.

  15. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  16. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as salmon) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  17. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

    1982-06-01

    This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach.

  18. Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

  19. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M.

    2005-10-01

    In 2004, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the twelfth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,621 hatchery steelhead, 8,128 wild steelhead, and 9,227 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2004 were to (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2004 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2004 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. Overall, the percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses were 68% hatchery-reared yearling Chinook salmon and 32% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 73% hatchery-reared and 27% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.923 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.860 for steelhead. Respective average survival estimates for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 0.875 and 0.820 from Little Goose Dam tailrace to Lower Monumental Dam tailrace; 0.818 and 0.519 from Lower Monumental Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace (including passage through Ice Harbor Dam); and 0.809 and 0.465 from McNary Dam tailrace to John Day Dam tailrace. Survival for yearling Chinook salmon from John Day Dam tailrace to Bonneville Dam tailrace (including passage through The Dalles Dam) was 0.735. We were unable to estimate survival through this reach for steelhead during 2004 because too few fish were detected at Bonneville Dam due to operation of the new corner collector at the second powerhouse. Combining average estimates from the Snake River smolt trap to Lower Granite Dam, from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam, and from McNary Dam to Bonneville Dam, estimated annual average survival through the entire hydropower system from the head of Lower Granite reservoir to the tailrace of Bonneville Dam (eight projects) was 0.353 (s.e. 0.045) for Snake River yearling Chinook salmon. We could not empirically estimate survival through the entire system for steelhead in 2004 because of low detection rates for this species at Bonneville Dam. For yearling spring Chinook salmon released in the Upper Columbia River, estimated survival from point of release to McNary Dam tailrace was 0.484 (s.e. 0.005) for fish released from Leavenworth Hatchery, 0.748 (s.e. 0.015) for fish released from Entiat Hatchery, 0.738 (s.e. 0.036) for fish released from Winthrop Hatchery, and 0.702 (s.e. 0.048) and 0.747 (s.e.0.047) for those from Methow Hatchery, Chewuch Pond and

  20. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2008 Draft Season Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roby, Daniel D.; Collis, Ken; Lyons, Donald E.

    2009-07-08

    This report describes investigations into predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River basin during 2008. East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary again supported the largest known breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in the world (approximately 10,700 breeding pairs) and the largest breeding colony of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America (approximately 10,950 breeding pairs). The Caspian tern colony increased from 2007, but not significantly so, while the double-crested cormorant colony experienced a significant decline (20%) from 2007. Average cormorant nesting success in 2008, however, was down only slightly from 2007, suggesting that food supply during the 2008 nesting season was not the principal cause of the decline in cormorant colony size. Total consumption of juvenile salmonids by East Sand Island Caspian terns in 2008 was approximately 6.7 million smolts (95% c.i. = 5.8-7.5 million). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continued to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony, predation rates were highest on steelhead in 2008; minimum predation rates on steelhead smolts detected passing Bonneville Dam averaged 8.3% for wild smolts and 10.7% for hatchery-raised smolts. In 2007, total smolt consumption by East Sand Island double-crested cormorants was about 9.2 million juvenile salmonids (95% c.i. = 4.4-14.0 million), similar to or greater than that of East Sand Island Caspian terns during that year (5.5 million juvenile salmonids; 95% c.i. = 4.8-6.2 million). The numbers of smolt PIT tags recovered on the cormorant colony in 2008 were roughly proportional to the relative availability of PIT-tagged salmonids released in the Basin, suggesting that cormorant predation on salmonid smolts in the estuary was less selective than tern predation. Cormorant predation rates in excess of 30%, however, were observed for some groups of hatchery-reared fall Chinook salmon released downstream of Bonneville Dam. Implementation of the federal plan 'Caspian Tern Management to Reduce Predation of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary' was initiated in 2008 with construction by the Corps of Engineers of two alternative colony sites for Caspian terns in interior Oregon: a 1-acre island on Crump Lake in the Warner Valley and a 1-acre island on Fern Ridge Reservoir near Eugene. We deployed Caspian tern social attraction (decoys and sound systems) on these two islands and monitored for Caspian tern nesting. Caspian terns quickly colonized the Crump Lake tern island; about 430 pairs nested there, including 5 terns that had been banded at the East Sand Island colony in the Columbia River estuary, over 500 km to the northwest. No Caspian terns nested at the Fern Ridge tern island in 2008, but up to 9 Caspian terns were recorded roosting on the island after the nesting season. There were two breeding colonies of Caspian terns on the mid-Columbia River in 2008: (1) about 388 pairs nested at the historical colony on Crescent Island in the McNary Pool and (2) about 100 pairs nested at a relatively new colony site on Rock Island in the John Day Pool. Nesting success at the Crescent Island tern colony was only 0.28 young fledged per breeding pair, the lowest nesting success recorded at that colony since monitoring began in 2000, while only three fledglings were raised at the Rock Island tern colony. The diet of Crescent Island Caspian terns consisted of 68% salmonid smolts; total smolt consumption was estimated at 330,000. Since 2004, total smolt consumption by Crescent Island terns has declined by 34%, due mostly to a decline in colony size, while steelhead consumption has increased 10% during this same period. In 2008, approximately 64,000 steelhead smolts were consumed by Caspian terns nesting at Crescent Island. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the Crescent Island Caspian tern colony, the average

  1. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by the plant over a 17-day exposure period. The 90Sr in the exuded honeydew during this period amounted to 1.17 0.28% of this total label. The honeydew would eventually be deposited into the soil at the base of the plant, but the activity would be so dispersed as to be undetectable. Moth larvae will consume 90Sr contaminated leaves but retain very little of the label (~0.02%) and only that contained in their digestive tracts. As the moths pupated and became adults, they contained no detectable amounts of 90Sr. Over the 10-day exposure period, ~4% of the phytoextracted 90Sr was lost from the plant as moth feces. However, like the honeydew, feces dispersed into the soil were undetectable. As the plant diminishes the content of 90Sr in the soil, the activity of the label in the leaves and new stems would also diminish. The results of these studies indicate that the risk for detectable transfer of 90Sr from willow trees growing in the contaminated soil along the 100-N shoreline through the food chain of herbivorous insects would be very slight to non-existent

  2. Quantifying the Behavioral Response of Spawning Chum Salmon to Elevated Discharges from Bonneville Dam, Columbia River : Annual Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A.; Kock, Tobias J.

    2008-12-01

    In unimpounded rivers, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) typically spawn under relatively stable stream flows, with exceptions occurring during periodic precipitation events. In contrast, hydroelectric development has often resulted in an artificial hydrograph characterized by rapid changes in discharge and tailwater elevation that occur on a daily, or even an hourly basis, due to power generation (Cushman 1985; Moog 1993). Consequently, populations of Pacific salmon that are known to spawn in main-stem habitats below hydroelectric dams face the risks of changing habitat suitability, potential redd dewatering, and uncertain spawning success (Hamilton and Buell 1976; Chapman et al. 1986; Dauble et al. 1999; Garland et al. 2003; Connor and Pflug 2004; McMichael et al. 2005). Although the direct effects of a variable hydrograph, such as redd dewatering are apparent, specific effects on spawning behavior remain largely unexplored. Chum salmon (O. keta) that spawn below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are particularly vulnerable to the effects of water level fluctuations. Although chum salmon generally spawn in smaller tributaries (Johnson et al. 1997), many fish spawn in main-stem habitats below Bonneville Dam near Ives Island (Tomaro et al. 2007; Figure 1). The primary spawning area near Ives Island is shallow and sensitive to changes in water level caused by hydroelectric power generation at Bonneville Dam. In the past, fluctuating water levels have dewatered redds and changed the amount of available spawning habitat (Garland et al. 2003). To minimize these effects, fishery managers attempt to maintain a stable tailwater elevation at Bonneville Dam of 3.5 m (above mean sea level) during spawning, which ensures adequate water is provided to the primary chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek (Figure 1). Given the uncertainty of winter precipitation and water supply, this strategy has been effective at restricting spawning to a specific riverbed elevation and providing minimum spawning flows that have the greatest chance of being maintained through egg incubation and fry emergence. However, managing the lower Columbia River for a stable tailwater elevation does not provide much operational flexibility at Bonneville Dam, which has little storage capacity. When river discharges increase due to rain events, the traditional approach has been to pass excess water at night to maintain stable tailwater elevations during the daytime. The underlying assumption of this strategy, referred to as reverse load following, is that fish do not spawn at night. However, Tiffan et al. (2005) showed that this assumption is false by documenting nighttime spawning by chum salmon in the Ives Island area. Similarly, McMichael et al. (2005) reported nighttime spawning by Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the Columbia River, indicating that diel spawning may be a common occurrence in Pacific salmon. During the latter portion of the chum spawning period in December 2003 and 2004, discharges from Bonneville Dam increased from an average of 3,398 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 3.5 m above mean sea level) during the day to over 5,664 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 5.1 m) at night, with peak discharges of 7,080 m{sup 3}/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 6.1 m). This caused concern among fishery managers regarding the potential effects of these high discharges on this population of spawning chum salmon, which is listed under the Endangered Species Act (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 1999). We hypothesized that increased water velocities associated with elevated tailwaters might alter chum salmon spawning behavior if water velocities at redd locations increased beyond the range of suitability (>0.8 m/s; Salo 1991). In 2005, we investigated the movement and behavioral responses of spawning chum salmon at Ives Island to increased tailwater elevations at Bonneville Dam. We used acoustic telemetry to determine if the higher velocities associated with increased tailwater elevations caused fish to leave their re

  3. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

  4. DEC SW 40th Street

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project outcomes: Construction of GSHP District Energy Plant. Energy/Cost Savings of HW, CHW, and DHW service (~8-9%). Data Collection to Establish Model for Geothermal District System.

  5. David Streets | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lead author of UNEP black carbon and tropospheric ozone assessment report, 2011; lead author of UNECE hemispheric transport of air pollution reports, 2010, 2008; lead author of US ...

  6. POWs: Physicists on Wall Street

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derman, Emanuel

    2006-10-30

    Quantitative financial modeling seems to employ both the language and techniques of physics, but how similar are the two disciplines in theory and practice? This talk discusses the move from physics to finance, the nature of financial modeling and its deceptive similarity with theoretical physics, what it's like to work in the financial arena, and some of the open problems of interest.

  7. Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

  8. Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS): A particle-based model of juvenile salmonid movement and dissolved gas exposure history in the Columbia River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2002-01-30

    This paper describes a numerical model of juvenile salmonid migration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, employs a discrete, particle-based approach to simulate the migration and history of exposure to dissolved gases of individual fish. FINS is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories can be input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. Therefore, FINS serves as a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological impacts. FINS was parameterized and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. A quasi-inverse approach was used to decouple fish swimming movements from advection with the local water velocity, allowing inference of time series of non-advective displacements of individual fish from the radiotelemetry data. Statistical analyses of these displacements are presented, and confirm that strong temporal correlation of fish swimming behavior persists in some cases over several hours. A correlated random-walk model was employed to simulate the observed migration behavior, and parameters of the model were estimated that lead to close correspondence between predictions and observations.

  9. Development of an Implementation Plan Related to Biological Opinion on Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System ; Step 1: Review and Critique of Implementation Plans.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret

    2000-12-01

    The Draft Biological Opinion on Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System calls for the development of 1- and 5-year implementation plans. These plans will provide the roadmap for planning and subsequent implementation of actions intended to meet specific performance standards (i.e., biological objectives) in a timely manner. To develop implementation plans the key tasks and sequences of steps must be determined. Those responsible for specific tasks must be identified and they must understand what they need to do. There must be assurances that the resources (human, physical, and fiscal) to complete the tasks are available. Motivation and incentive systems should be set up. Systems to coordinate efforts and guide activity must be devised and installed. An information management system must be designed to manage and analyze data and ensure that appropriate data are collected. This will aid managers in assessing whether individual activities or actions are tracking with stated goals and objectives. Training programs to improve managerial and worker capability in making and implementing plans should be designed. Managerial leadership to guide the efforts of all individuals in achieving the goals of the anadromous and resident fish recovery must be developed. It is the entire process of managing fish recovery in relationship to the Biological Opinion that will guide, coordinate, motivate, and control work and determine the effectiveness and efficiency of plan implementation.

  10. Computed solid phases limiting the concentration of dissolved constituents in basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington. Geochemical modeling and nuclide/rock/groundwater interaction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Krupka, K.M.

    1982-08-01

    A speciation-solubility geochemical model, WATEQ2, was used to analyze geographically-diverse, ground-water samples from the aquifers of the Columbia Plateau basalts in eastern Washington. The ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with calcite, which provides both a solubility control for dissolved calcium and a pH buffer. Amorphic ferric hydroxide, Fe(OH)/sub 3/(A), is at saturation or modestly oversaturated in the few water samples with measured redox potentials. Most of the ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with amorphic silica (glass) and wairakite, a zeolite, and are saturated to oversaturated with respect to allophane, an amorphic aluminosilicate. The water samples are saturated to undersaturated with halloysite, a clay, and are variably oversaturated with regard to other secondary clay minerals. Equilibrium between the ground water and amorphic silica presumably results from the dissolution of the glassy matrix of the basalt. The oversaturation of the clay minerals other than halloysite indicates that their rate of formation lags the dissolution rate of the basaltic glass. The modeling results indicate that metastable amorphic solids limit the concentration of dissolved silicon and suggest the same possibility for aluminum and iron, and that the processes of dissolution of basaltic glass and formation of metastable secondary minerals are continuing even though the basalts are of Miocene age. The computed solubility relations are found to agree with the known assemblages of alteration minerals in the basalt fractures and vesicles. Because the chemical reactivity of the bedrock will influence the transport of solutes in ground water, the observed solubility equilibria are important factors with regard to chemical-retention processes associated with the possible migration of nuclear waste stored in the earth's crust.

  11. Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Water Quality at Multiple Locations on the Snake and Columbia Rivers using CRiSP/RealTime, 1998 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, W. Nicholas; Hayes, Joshua A.; Shaw, Pamela

    1999-07-21

    Since 1988, wild salmon have been PIT-tagged through monitoring and research programs conducted by the Columbia River fisheries agencies and Tribes. Workers at the University of Washington have used detection data at Lower Granite Dam to generate predictions of arrival distributions for various stocks at the dam. The prediction tool is known as RealTime. In 1996, RealTime predictions were linked to a downstream migration model, CRiSP.1. The composite model, known as CRiSP/RealTime, predicts the arrival distribution and fraction transported at downriver locations.

  12. Action on the Columbia (1965)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  13. Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

  14. 2005 Evaluation of Chum, Chinook and Coho Salmon Entrapment near Ives Island in the Columbia River; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Jeremy; Duston, Reed A.

    2006-01-01

    During mid-1990s, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) identified several populations of salmon spawning approximately three miles downstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. These populations are exposed to rapidly changing flow regimes associated with Bonneville Dam's operation. This study investigated the relationship between changing water levels and stranding or entrapment of juvenile salmon in the Ives Island area. Walking surveys of the Ives Island and Pierce Island shorelines were conducted every one to three days throughout the juvenile emigration period. The nearby shorelines of the Washington and Oregon mainland were also surveyed. Between January and June of 2005, surveyors examined 21 substantial entrapments and 20 stranding sites. A total of 14,337 salmonids, made up of three species, were found either entrapped or stranded. Nearly 92% of the salmonids were chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), 4.5% were federally listed chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), and 3.8% were coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). When compared to the 2004 study year, 2005 showed an 83% increase in the overall number of observed entrapped or stranded juvenile salmon. Much of this increase can be attributed to one entrapment found along the north shore of Pierce Island (identified as E501). E501 has historically been known to contain relatively large numbers of entrapped salmon. Even so, the number of entrapped salmon observed during 2005 was a 732% increase (5926) over any prior study years. Over 83% of all chum, 63.1% of all chinook, and 63.2% of all coho sampled during 2005 were retrieved from entrapments that were likely to have formed when Bonneville Dam tailwater levels dropped to elevations between 11.5 and 12.9 feet. Peak numbers of chum and chinook were sampled in mid-April when tailwater levels ranged between 11.6ft and 15.6ft. Peak numbers of coho were sampled during the last week of February, mid-March, and mid-April when tailwater level ranged between 11.4 and 14.3 feet, 11.5 and 15.3 ft, and 11.6 and 15.6 feet, respectively. The fork length data indicate that the majority of the entrapped and stranded salmon are in the 35-50 mm range. Stranded members of all three salmon species had mean fork lengths that were 8% to 30% shorter than those of their entrapped counterparts. The locations and habitat attributes of entrapments containing the majority of the observed juvenile salmon remain fairly constant from year to year. Changes in entrapment rankings appear to be more reflective of changes in prevailing tailwater levels than they are of changes in geography, vegetation, or fish behavior. Data collected over the past six study years indicates that there are entrapments that are capable of entrapping large numbers of salmon as various tailwater levels. Avoiding specific tailwater ranges may not minimize the impact of juvenile stranding. The only way to substantially minimize the impact of stranding is to allow no tailwater fluctuations or to only allow a steady increase of the tailwater level throughout the juvenile emigration period.

  15. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-04-08

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  16. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-08-18

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  17. BPA-2014-01391-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2014 In reply refer to: D-Bl James White Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board Ii Spokane Street Wenatchee, WA 98801 FOIA BPA-2014-01391-F Mr. White: We have received your...

  18. LEED Certification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LEED CertificationU.S. Green Building Council Address: U.S. Green Building Council 2101 L Street, NW Suite 500 Place: Washington, District of Columbia Zip: 20037 Sector:...

  19. BLM Field Offices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Offices Jump to: navigation, search Name: BLM Field Offices Address: 1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5665 Place: Washington, District of Columbia Zip: 20240 Phone Number: 202-208-3801...

  20. Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

    2008-02-01

    In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

  1. H.R. 599: A Bill to provide for the reconstitution of outstanding repayment obligations of the Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration for the appropriated capital investments in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This bill proposes to give the administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration the rights to refinance certain capital investments in the Federal Columbia River Power System. The act spells out how to distinguish old and new capital investments, how new principal amounts for old investments are calculated, interest rates and repayment dates. It also deals with interest rates for new capital investments during and after construction, appropriations for the Colville Reservation Grand Coulee Dam Settlement Act, and suggested contract provisions regarding future contracts.

  2. A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ronald J.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

  3. Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

  4. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the point where it filled the gaps between individual icicles and formed massive slabs of ice hanging on the lines," says Larry Jones, Superintendent of Utilities, Kennett...

  5. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to which the agency subscribes. Southwestern will strive for continual improvement and pollution prevention. The ISO Standard 14001-2004-11-15 will be used as a guide. All...

  6. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Administration (Southwestern) has completed its 2014 review of the continuing adequacy of the existing hydroelectric power rates for the Sam Rayburn Dam Hydropower Project. ...

  7. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) has completed its 2015 review of the continuing adequacy of the existing hydroelectric power rates for the Integrated System. ...

  8. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EF14-2-000 Southwestern Power Administration (Sam Rayburn Dam Hydroelectric Project) ORDER ... Southwestern from the Sam Rayburn Dam Hydroelectric Project (Sam Rayburn Project). 1 The ...

  9. One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conley Jennings Lineman Springfield, MO Special thanks to: Marshall Boyken Mike Deihl Ruben Garcia Bethel Herrold William Hiller Beth Nielsen George Robbins Gary Swartzlander Cris Van Horn Rutha Williams Jan Woolverton U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J U LY - S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 5 Strategic Workshop Unites Hydropower Community At the invitation of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), Federal power customers joined representatives of the Corps,

  10. One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jason Gray Accountant Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: Tony Cochran Dallas Cooper Jerry Ferguson Ruben Garcia Bethel Herrold William Hiller Jimmy Isaacs Danny Johnson Darlene Low Ken McGuire Beth Nielsen Rutha Williams and Pete Hentschel, USACE-KCD Andrew Lachowsky, AECC U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N O C T O B E R - D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 5 Southwestern Coordinates Efforts to Restore Power After Hurricane Rita The efforts of the Southwestern Power

  11. One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    918-595-6600 Fax 918-595-6656 www.swpa.gov The UPDATE is published by and for customers, retirees, and employees of Southwestern Power Administration like: Rick Jones Working Foreman Gore Maintenance Unit Special thanks to: Dallas Cooper Mike Deihl Ruben Garcia William Hiller Darrick Moe Beth Nielsen Gene Reeves George Robbins Donna Short Gary Swartzlander Gloria Cuevas Piazza Dusty Wilson Vicksburg District Alfred Dulaney Mississippi Valley Division - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U P D AT E S O

  12. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryan Hoog, Electrician Gore Maintenance Unit Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Dallas Cooper Loyd Hines Harry Mardirosian Beth Nielsen Fritha Ohlson WNT Ashley Butler Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia William Hiller Brad Howland Kathy O'Neal Corps Lee Beverly Little Rock District SPRA Barbara DelGrosso U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N A p r i l - J u n e 2 0 0 8 "Produce the Power!" was the theme as representatives from Federal hydropower customers,

  13. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jane Thomas Supply Technician Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Kenny Broadaway Mike Dawson Scott Holland Beth Nielsen Margaret Skidmore Randy Staponski Gary Swartzlander Ron Szatmary Steve Wall Jon Worthington CNI/Bearskin Ashley Butler Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia William Hiller Kathy O'Neal KC District Corps George Boban Andre Vasseur Tulsa District Corps Dan Brueggenjohann Little Rock District Corps Lee Beverly U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R

  14. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jimmy Hardin Working Foreman Jonesboro Maintenance Unit Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Kenny Broadaway Scott Carpenter Dallas Cooper Jerry Ferguson Janet Hagar Danny Johnson Darlene Low Jim McDonald Jerry Murr Beth Nielsen Carrie Quick Aiden Smith Steve Wall Jon Worthington WNT Ashley Butler Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia Brad Howland William Hiller Kathy O'Neal Elaine Webb U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J u l y - S e p t e m b e r 2 0 0 8

  15. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... City Water and Light Plant of the City of Jonesboro, ... its new program, the Hydropower Modernization Initiative, which, ... an update on the ozaRk majoR RehaBilitation pRoject. ...

  16. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the International Boundary and Water Commission. These agencies build and operate various projects. The Power Marketing...

  17. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Reclamation, Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the International Boundary and Water Commission. These agencies build and operate various projects. The Power Marketing...

  18. One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    men and women in uniform and is convinced that, despite what comes to us from the news media, a lot of good things are being done by U.S. forces as well as by native Iraqis and...

  19. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or shows hostility or aversion toward a person on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin, disability (physical or mental), sexual orientation, status as...

  20. Southwestern Power Administration One West Third Street

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and by granting all personnel the same consideration regardless of sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin, disability (physical and mental), sexual orientation, and...

  1. One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    people here outside the military don't notice the difference (more rounds, different guns, different timing). It's an interesting place. More to come. LEFT: CONTRACTOR STRINGING...

  2. One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ken Hollis David Kannady Jerry Martin Stan Mason Neil McInnis Beth Nielsen George Robbins Dave Sargent Anna Smith Katherine Thomas Rutha Williams Mary Beth Hudson Tulsa...

  3. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for transformer oil containment where practical, and replacement or relocation of transformers where the risk was judged to be most critical and containment impractical or cost...

  4. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program (Technical Report) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Program signed-up over 1,000 participants who are sharing their home or businesses's electricity consumption data with the project via green button protocols, smart meters,...

  5. One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    says Dave Sargent, an Electrical Engineer in ... 2 Southwestern Power Administration Update ... that occurs during outages of the nearby 161-kV line. ...

  6. Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AGENDA Biomass 2009: Fueling Our Future March 17 and 18, 2009 www.biomass2009.com Gaylord National 201 Waterfront Street National Harbor, Maryland 20745 March 17, 2009 7:30 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. Registration Room: Cherry Blossom Ballroom Foyer Exhibit Hall Opens Room: National Harbor 2 and 3 Refreshments Room: Woodrow Wilson Ballroom Foyer 8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Welcoming Remarks and Direction of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Steven G. Chalk,

  7. DOE Tour of Zero: The School Street Homes by StreetScape Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the owners return home at night. 5 of 17 Advanced solid-state lighting technology uses LED lights for 90% of the fixtures. All of the lights are integrated into the home's smart...

  8. Columbia County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jamison City, Pennsylvania Jerseytown, Pennsylvania Lightstreet, Pennsylvania Lime Ridge, Pennsylvania Locustdale, Pennsylvania Mainville, Pennsylvania Mifflinville,...

  9. Columbia Power Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:...

  10. Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heaters: 400 Tankless Water Heaters: 500 - 800 Condensing Water Heater: 400 Storage Water Heaters: 100 Thermostat: 25 After Market Boiler Reset: 225 Heat Recovery...

  11. Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Commercial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - 800 Indirect Water Heater: 400 Condensing Stand Alone Water Heaters: 500 Storage Water Heaters: 100 After Market Boiler Reset: 225 Commercial Griddles: 500 Gas Fryers...

  12. District of Columbia Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    82-2005 Citygate -- -- -- -- -- -- 1989-2015 Residential 13.53 13.06 12.10 12.45 13.05 12.52 1980-2015 Commercial 12.26 12.24 11.19 11.64 12.18 11.55 1980-2015 Industrial -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 4.87 4.17 9.38 1995-2012 Electric Power -- 4.96 -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 33,251 32,862 28,561 32,743 34,057 1997-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 213 1,703 1,068 1,434 1,305 1997-2014 Delivered to Consumers 33,038 31,159 27,493 31,309

  13. District of Columbia Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- -- -- -- -- -- 1989-2015 Residential 17.68 18.15 18.17 16.21 12.60 10.70 1989-2015 Commercial 11.15 11.17 11.50 11.68 11.28 10.01 1989-2015 Industrial -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 984 1,037 1,072 1,740 2,437 2,907 2001-2015 Residential 242 240 253 520 911 1,335 1989-2015 Commercial 657 711 736 1,135 1,443 1,487 1989-2015 Industrial 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 86 86 83 86 83 86 2010-2015

  14. Alexis A. Aguilar-Arvalo Columbia University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mesons, LE configuration. flux: energy: p K K En E ,k (GeV) - Electron component also important as calibration source for MiniBooNE (similar energy as signal...

  15. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Agency Valley) Juntura (Warmsprings) Mahon s Reservoir Harper Bully Creek Deadwood Harry Nelson Mann Creek Mason Dam (Phillips Lake) Thief Valley Non-Federal with Power Owyhee...

  16. The Columbia River System: Inside Story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Agency Valley) Juntura (Warmsprings) Mahon's Reservoir Harper Bully Creek Deadwood Harry Nelson Mann Creek Mason Dam (Phillips Lake) Thief Valley Non-Federal with Power Owyhee...

  17. Columbia Water & Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The process involves several steps. First, the customer should have an ASHRAE Level II energy assessment conducted and complete a commercial loan application. Upon approval, the customer may proc...

  18. District of Columbia Natural Gas Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    -- -- -- -- -- -- 1989-2015 Residential Price 17.68 18.15 18.17 16.21 12.60 10.70 1989-2015 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 68.0 68.8 69.6 70.6 70.1 72.4 2002-2015 Commercial Price 11.15 11.17 11.50 11.68 11.28 10.01 1989-2015 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 15.8 16.0 15.0 15.9 17.4 21.9 1989-2015 Industrial Price -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 0 0 0 0 0 0

  19. District of Columbia Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    82-2005 Citygate Price -- -- -- -- -- -- 1989-2015 Residential Price 13.53 13.06 12.10 12.45 13.05 12.52 1980-2015 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 75.5 75.0 73.9 75.0 73.8 73.2 1989-2015 Commercial Price 12.26 12.24 11.19 11.64 12.18 11.55 1980-2015 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 16.9 17.9 19.1 19.9 21.4 1990-2015 Industrial Price -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 0 0 0 0 0 0

  20. Columbia Gas preserves wetlands with directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luginbuhl, K.K.; Gartman, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper reviews the use of directional drilling to install a 12 inch natural gas pipeline near Avon, Ohio. As a result of increased demand, the utility decided that it would need additional lines for pressure control with the only feasible route being through a forested and scrub/shrub wetland. This paper reviews the permitting requirements along with the directional drilling design and operation. Unfortunately during drilling, bentonite drilling fluids came to the surface requiring remedial action procedures. The paper then provides a detailed clean up strategy and makes recommendations on how to prevent such a break through in the future.