Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Cat Sight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Referencing NEWTON About NEWTON About Ask A Scientist Education At Argonne Cat Sight Name: aaron Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: i just want to know if...

2

4SIGHT Computer Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The 4SIGHT computer program was written to facilitate concrete performance prediction under various exposure conditions. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Black and White Sight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black and White Sight Name: Andy Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do some animals see in black and White? Replies: In the animal kingdom, sight is accomplished by...

4

Events and Sightings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue of Events & Sightings recaps the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), Society for the Social Studies of Science (4S), and History of Science Society (HSS) collocated annual meetings in Cleveland, Ohio, on 2–6 November ... Keywords: history of computing, SHOT, 4S, HSS, Patrick C. Fischer, Steve Jobs, Dennis M. Ritchie, John McCarthy

Chigusa Kita

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sight of Deer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sight of Deer Sight of Deer Name: Ken Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We live in Montana and, during the hunting season, wear bright orange as protection against errant hunters. This has prompted us to wonder if deer can see the orange? Would they be frightened by it? Are deer colorblind? Thanks for your help. Ken and Barbara Niles, Pray, MT. Replies: As far as I understand, deer are colorblind. This is why hunter's camoflage is red and black - it has the same values of dark and light as military forest camoflage, so colorblind animals have a hard time seeing it. Most people, at least those who are not red-green colorblind, can easily pick out the red color among the forest greens and browns. So as long as hunters only shoot at what they see, it reduces the chance of being in the line of fire.

6

Sight and Sound - Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario Summary Student Pages Internet Links Index Introduction Development/Rationale for the Year-End Project Teacher Preparation for the Year-End Project The Sight and Sound Project - an Anecdotal Account Introduction to and Selection of Year-End Projects Conducting the Literature Search Project Proposal Conducting the Experiments Wrapping up with the Reports and Presentations Introduction: Mr. Tom Henderson is part of a talented science staff at Glenbrook South High School. Glenbrook South High School (GBS) is set in an educationally supportive and affluent community. The physics staff work in teams teaching physics to over 80 percent of the student population and are constantly looking for ways to use technology to empower students with the ability to apply learned concepts of physics to their lives. With this goal in mind,

7

Restoring Sight to the Blind - Industrial Partnerships Office  

CalTech – California Institute of Technology. The artificial retina can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye.

8

Recent Bird Sightings at Fermilab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Bird Sightings at Fermilab Recent Bird Sightings at Fermilab Author: Peter Kasper See the following link information concerning the Current Status of Access to Fermilab Summaries from past years .. '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 and past months .. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year List: Contains the list of birds seen so far this year. Seasonal List: The list of birds recorded on site at this time of year. Recent entries ... Dec 29 Dec 22 Dec 19 Dec 14 Dec 9 Dec 8 Dec 5 Dec 1 Nov 24 Nov 22 Nov 17 Nov 13 Nov 10 Nov 7 Nov 3 Nov 2 Oct 30 Oct 28 Oct 27 Oct 23 Oct 20 Oct 13 Oct 10 Oct 6 Oct 3 Oct 2 Sep 29 Sep 27 Sep 26 Sep 1 Aug 30 Aug 23 Aug 18 Aug 16 Aug 11 Aug 9 Aug 4 Aug 1 Jul 28 Jul 25 Jul 21 Jul 17 Jul 14 Jul 11 Jul 7 Jul 5 Jun 30 Jun 27

9

Sight and Sound - Student Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Sheet Information Sheet Project: Your project involves a study of the physics involved in the production of sound and the detection of light and sound by animal species. Technical information about the ability of animals to produce sound and their ability to perceive the world through sight and hearing will be collected by means of background readings. The behavior of light and sound waves will be experimentally analyzed using computer-interfaced light and sound probes (or a computer-interfaced motion detector for ultrasound studies) and the results will be extended to the sensory ability of various animal species. By the end of this project, you should be able to: discuss with both words and diagrams the nature (description, category, physical means of creation and propagation, etc.) and

10

Line-of-sight deposition method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line-of-sight method of depositing a film having substantially 100% of theoretical density on a substrate. A pressure vessel contains a target source having a surface thereof capable of emitting particles therefrom and a substrate with the source surface and the substrate surface positioned such that the source surface is substantially parallel to the direction of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface, the distance between the most remote portion of the substrate surface receiving the particles and the source surface emitting the particles in a direction parallel to the substrate surface being relatively small. The pressure in the vessel is maintained less than about 5 microns to prevent scattering and permit line-of-sight deposition. By this method the angles of incidence of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface are in the range of from about 45/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/ even when the target surface area is greatly expanded to increase the deposition rate.

Patten, J.W.; McClanahan, E.D.; Bayne, M.A.

1980-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Line-of-sight deposition method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line-of-sight method of depositing a film having substantially 100% of theoretical density on a substrate. A pressure vessel contains a target source having a surface thereof capable of emitting particles therefrom and a substrate with the source surface and the substrate surface positioned such that the source surface is substantially parallel to the direction of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface, the distance between the most remote portion of the substrate surface receiving the particles and the source surface emitting the particles in a direction parallel to the substrate surface being relatively small. The pressure in the vessel is maintained less than about 5 microns to prevent scattering and permit line-of-sight deposition. By this method the angles of incidence of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface are in the range of from about 45.degree. to 90.degree. even when the target surface area is greatly expanded to increase the deposition rate.

Patten, James W. (Richland, WA); McClanahan, Edwin D. (Richland, WA); Bayne, Michael A. (West Richland, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Higgs Boson May Be Within Sight?? | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Higgs Boson May Be Within Sight Higgs Boson May Be Within Sight December 16, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the concept of how the...

13

Color Blind Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blind Animals Name: Hillary Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Are dogs and cats colorblind? If so what is the percentage? Are all animals color blind? Replies: yes,...

14

Safety Share - Window Blinds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Window Blinds On November 17, 2010, an HSS employee was adjusting the window blinds in his office. One might expect this low hazard, routine operation to require little or no...

15

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: eSight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may be integrated into eSight from a wide range of systems and formats (meters, loggers, BAS, controls, production data, spreadsheets, oBIX, OPC and more), allowing organizations...

16

Vorticity from Line-of-Sight Lidar Velocity Scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented to compute the spanwise vorticity in polar coordinates from 2D vertical cross sections of high-resolution line-of-sight Doppler wind lidar observations. The method uses the continuity equation to derive the velocity ...

Martin Weissmann; Andreas Dörnbrack; James D. Doyle

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars September 4, 2012 - 3:29pm Addthis Curiosity, left, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in late November 2011. Shown here is the flight hardware that was being assembled prior to shipment to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for the launch. | Photo Credit Dr. Robert C. Nelson Curiosity, left, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in late November 2011. Shown here is the flight hardware that was being assembled prior to shipment to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for the launch. | Photo Credit Dr. Robert C. Nelson Erin Szulman Erin Szulman Special Assistant, Office of Environmental Management

18

Color blind animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not color blind. I believe that all the primates also see color as well as dogs, cats, some birds, fish, and insects. --- jade Apes and monkeys see color. So do bees, in a...

19

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): ISSM: Mountain Lion Sightings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Safeguards & Security Management Integrated Safeguards & Security Management Home ISSM Plan Security at LBNL Clearance Holders Export Control International Visitors Security Updates Contact Us CI Awareness Security and Emergency Operations Website Mountain Lion Sightings Mountain Lion Adult Mountain Lion Cub Mountain Lion Adult Mountain Lion Cub Updated 11/19/2012: Mountain lions generally exist where deer are found. Warning signs have been placed at walkways and gate entrances. As a precaution, the use of isolated stairs/walkways at dusk, night, or dawn is discouraged. To limit an interaction with a mountain lion, avoid hiking or jogging in the undeveloped areas of the lab alone or at dawn, dusk or night. If you see a mountain lion, immediately call 7-911 from any Lab phone or 911 from any cell phone. Go to http://www.dfg.ca.gov/keepmewild/lion.html

20

Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Killer Whale Sightings in the Galapagos Marine Reserve, Ecuador  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was conducted using data compiled from two sources to test the hypothesis that killer whales display seasonal variability in their occurrence in the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR), Ecuador. Three questions arise from this hypothesis: 1) do killer whale sightings display temporal variability; 2) are sightings spatially associated with resources; and 3) if sightings are spatially associated with resources, does the spatial association change temporally? I combined and evaluated two sets of GMR killer whale sighting data (n=154) spanning a twenty-year time frame collected via opportunistic sightings by an observer network and shipboard line-transect surveys. I tested for a (a) correlation between the total annual sightings and bi-annual seasonality (upwelling versus non-upwelling); (b) correlation between the total annual sightings and the Multivariate El Nino Southern Oscillation Index (MEI); (c) correlation between sightings, the MEI, and seasonality; (d) spatial association between sightings and resources; and (e) spatial change in sightings with seasonality. Sightings were roughly equally distributed between non-upwelling (56%) and upwelling seasons (July-December). No direct correlation was found between sightings and the MEI. Sightings occurred more often than expected by chance during the peak upwelling months of August-November when the MEI was within one standard deviation of the average (binomial z=2.91, p<0.05). Sightings were spatially associated with areas of high chlorophyll a values (binomial z=4.46, p<0.05), pinniped rookeries (binomial z=6.03, p<0.05), and areas with high combined resource value (binomial z=5.36, p<0.05). The spatial distribution of sightings did not shift with seasonality, with the exception that sightings occurred less often than expected in areas of low combined resource value during the upwelling period (binomial z=-3.17, p<0.05). Though variability in observer effort should be considered when evaluating these data, these results do not suggest a strong pattern of seasonal occupancy or that killer whales are responsive to El Nino Southern Oscillation events. Further research is needed to determine if killer whales in the GMR comprise a single resident population, multiple resident and transient populations, or if killer whales observed in the GMR are part of a population inhabiting the eastern tropical Pacific region, which visit the area at various times.

Smith, Kerri

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Efficient universal blind computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party's quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party's computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(J log(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation.

Vittorio Giovannetti; Lorenzo Maccone; Tomoyuki Morimae; Terry G. Rudolph

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

Options and UTP RSM code plug-ins to iSIGHT and Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Provide two C routines (one through a .tgen file) to create a new Tcl package and Tcl com- mand your technique to iSIGHT 4. Any GUI interfaces need to be programmed (in Tcl/Tk) & incor- porated into the overall control structure. Basis for iSIGHT plug- in development ­ the Tcl language: · Tcl language

Sóbester, András

23

Evolution of blind cave fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of blind cave fish Evolution of blind cave fish Name: rudeeric Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am a biology teacher, now starting a unit on evolution. Just about every book on the topic mentions the blind and albino cave fish. But I've always been bothered by this example. Why is being blind and white an advantage for animals in a cave? I understand that they have no use for eyes or pigment, but this sounds like we're back to Lamarck's law of use and disuse. Wouldn't there first have to be the mutations to cause these? And in order for the changes to become common, they would have to be advantageous. Although there is no use for the eyes or pigment, what is the advantage to losing them? Replies: I can think of one important use for the loss of pigment in fish. It has been documented with the early breeding of black mollies and black angelfish, that the fry were extremely hard to keep alive. The breeders found that these fish required much greatly quantities of protein to produce the pigment melanin, and therefore supplementing the fry with protein quantities that were many times higher than those required by less pigmented fish kept them alive. Imagine then, a situation where a random mutation of albinism in a cave dwelling fish results in a population that can use the protein that it consumes for growth and reproduction, rather than for pigment production. The albino fish could quickly out-produce the pigmented fish. What the "real" explanation would be as described by an evolutionary biologist, I have no idea.

24

Testing the Probability of Clear Line of Sight Models with ARM Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Probability of Clear Line of Sight Models the Probability of Clear Line of Sight Models with ARM Observations Y. Ma Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland R. G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Abstract Clouds play a major role in regulating Earth's climate. However, computer models of Earth's climate neglect the effects of cloud vertical extend in a broken cloud field. The vertical extent allows clouds to shade more of the atmosphere and allow radiative exchange over a larger temperature range. One way to parameterize this 3D cloud effect is to relate the various cloud properties, including the cloud vertical extent, to a statistical cloud field parameter called the probability of clear line of sight (PCLS) (see

25

Blind Geothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blind Geothermal System Blind Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Blind Geothermal System Dictionary.png Blind Geothermal System: An area with a geothermal heat source, but no modern surface manifestations. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Many geothermal areas show no signs of geothermal activity at the surface if the heated water is too far below or no conduits to the surface are available. An area of geothermal activity with no surface features is referred to as a "blind geothermal system." Examples Want to add an example to this list? Select a Geothermal Resource Area to

26

VISION: cloud-powered sight for all: showing the cloud what you see  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud-powered sight for mobile users. We present sample applications that will be empowered by this vision, discuss why the timing is right to tackle it, ... Keywords: camera, cloud, computer vision, mobile computing, wearable computing

Paramvir Bahl; Matthai Philipose; Lin Zhong

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Pacific Walrus Sightings Documented by COMIDA Aerial Surveys of the Northeastern Chukchi Sea in 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Walrus Sightings Documented by COMIDA Aerial Surveys of the Northeastern Chukchi Sea agreement with the Minerals Management Service, conducted aerial surveys in the northeastern Chukchi Sea as part of the Chukchi Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area (COMIDA) project. The surveys, which have been

28

A system for optimizing interior daylight distribution using reflective Venetian blinds with independent blind angle control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An operational algorithm for blind angle control is developed to optimize the daylighting performance of a system of reflective Venetian blinds. Numerical modeling and experiment confirm that independent control of alternating ...

McGuire, Molly E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of sight distance as a criterion for prioritizing rail-highway intersections in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Priority or hazard indices are used by the states to rank their rail-highway intersections according to relative hazard to aid in locating crossings for treatment of conditions and/or improvements in warning devices. The Texas Priority Index has been effective over the years in identifying particularly hazardous rail-highway intersections based on high vehicle volumes, train volumes, and accident histories, and these crossings have been treated or improved. Many of the remaining crossings, however, are not well discriminated in terms of their need for improvement; many crossings have the same index number. The objective of this research was to evaluate sight distance as a criterion for prioritizing rail-highway intersections in Texas to help distinguish between the crossings with similar or identical priority index numbers. Accident and sight distance data were compiled and analyzed. A sight distance variable was incorporated into the current Texas Priority Index and evaluated for its effects on the overall ranking of the rail-highway intersections. A state hazard index was chosen from a state-of-the-practice review with which to compare the current and revised Texas Priority Indices. Finally, the effectiveness of each of the indices was predicted in terms of the distribution of priority index numbers and their ability to move the most potentially hazardous crossings up in the rankings. It was concluded from the accident analysis that sight distance contributed to more vehicle-train accidents than any other factor. Further, improvements to warning devices at passive crossings would effectively reduce the overall sight obstruction, reduce the number of train involved accidents, and thus, reduce the number of injuries and fatalities resulting from accidents at rail-highway intersections. It was concluded from the field data analysis that the Method 1 revised Texas Priority Index was the most effective index of the four priority indices evaluated in this thesis for ranking crossings in terms of exposure, accident history, sight distance, and protection type. The Method 1 revised index was effective at redistributing the individual index numbers in the rank and identifying crossings with restricted sight distance while conserving the significance of the exposure values.

Pecheux, Kelley Klaver

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Optimization Online - Blind Source Separation using Relative ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 19, 2005 ... Abstract: We study a relative optimization framework for quasi-maximum likelihood blind source separation and relative Newton method as its ...

31

Using an implicit min/max KD-tree for doing efficient terrain line of sight calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of accurate Line of Sight (LOS) visibility information consumes significant resources in large scale synthetic environments such as many-on-many serious games and battlefield simulators. Due to the importance of optimum utilisation of ... Keywords: implicit kd-tree, line of sight, spherical earth

Bernardt Duvenhage

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Blind Source Separation Techniques for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blind Source Separation techniques, based both on Independent Component Analysis and on second order statistics, are presented and compared for extracting partially hidden texts and textures in document images. Barely perceivable features may occur, for instance, in ancient documents previously erased and then re-written (palimpsests), or for transparency or seeping of ink from the reverse side, or from watermarks in the paper. Detecting these features can be of great importance to scholars and historians. In our approach, the document is modeled as the superposition of a number of source patterns, and a simplified linear mixture model is introduced for describing the relationship between these sources and multispectral views of the document itself. The problem of detecting the patterns that are barely perceivable in the visible color image is thus formulated as the one of separating the various patterns in the mixtures. Some examples from an extensive experimentation with real ancient documents are shown and commented.

Detecting Hidden Texts; Anna Tonazzini; Emanuele Salerno; Matteo Mochi; Luigi Bedini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

PROBING THE ROLE OF CARBON IN ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION ALONG GALACTIC SIGHT LINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report previously undetermined interstellar gas and dust-phase carbon abundances along 15 Galactic sight lines based on archival data of the strong 1334.5323 A transition observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. These are combined with previously reported carbon measurements along six sight lines to produce a complete sample of interstellar C II measurements determined with the 1334 A transition. Our data set includes a variety of Galactic disk environments characterized by different extinctions and samples paths ranging over three orders of magnitude in average density of hydrogen ((n(H))). Our data support the idea that dust, specifically carbon-based grains, are processed in the neutral interstellar medium. We, however, do not find that the abundance of carbon in dust or the grain-size distribution is related to the strength of the 2175 A bump. This is surprising, given that many current models have polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the bump-producing dust.

Parvathi, V. S.; Babu, B. R. S. [Department of Physics, University of Calicut, Kerala 673635 (India); Sofia, U. J. [Department of Physics, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016 (United States); Murthy, J., E-mail: veena.makesh@gmail.com, E-mail: brsbabu@gmail.com, E-mail: sofia@american.edu, E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Methodologies and Comparisons for Lund's Two Methods for Calculating Probability of Cloud-Free Line-of-Sight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help in the implementation of Lund's probability of cloud-free line-of-sight (PCFLOS) calculations (method A and method B) for limited altitudes, a methodology for cumulative cloud cover calculation (required for both methods) is introduced ...

Shawn Yu; Kenneth E. Case; Julian Chernick

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Comparisons of Line-of-Sight Water Vapor Observations Using the Global Positioning System and a Pointing Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Line-of-sight measurements of integrated water vapor from a global positioning system (GPS) receiver and a microwave radiometer are compared. These two instruments were collocated at the central facility of the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric ...

John Braun; Christian Rocken; James Liljegren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Multimodal interface device for online board games designed for sight-impaired people  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online games between remote opponents playing over computer networks are becoming a common activity of everyday life. However, computer interfaces for board games are usually based on the visual channel. For example, they require players to check their ... Keywords: blindness, board games, deafblindness, haptic device, multimodal feedback

Nicholas Caporusso; Lusine Mkrtchyan; Leonardo Badia

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Recovering the Line-Of-Sight Magnetic Field in the Chromosphere from Ca II IR Spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method to derive the line-of-sight magnetic flux density from measurements in the chromospheric Ca II IR line at 854.2 nm. The method combines two well-understood techniques, the center-of-gravity and bisector methods, in a single hybrid technique. The technique is tested with magneto-static simulations of a flux tube. We apply the method to observations with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) installed at the Dunn Solar Telescope of the NSO/SP to investigate the morphology of the lower chromosphere, with focus on the chromospheric counterparts to the underlying photospheric magnetic flux elements.

Wöger, F; Uitenbroek, H; Rimmele, T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Bayesian analysis of joint strong gravitational lensing and dynamic galactic mass in SLACS: evidence of line-of-sight contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We readdress the calculation of the mass of early-type galaxies using strong gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics. Our sample comprises 27 galaxies in the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. Comparing the mass estimates from these two independent methods in a Bayesian framework, we find evidence of significant line-of-sight mass contamination. Assuming a power-law mass distribution, the best fit density profile is given by $\\rho \\propto r^{-1.69\\pm0.05}$. We show that neglecting the line-of-sight mass contamination produces an overestimate of the mass attributed to the lens-galaxy by the lensing method, which introduces a bias in favor of a SIS profile when using the joint lensing and dynamic analysis to determine the slope of the density profile. We suggest that the line-of-sight contamination could also be important for other astrophysical and cosmological uses of joint lensing and dynamical measurements.

Antonio C. C. Guimarães; Laerte Sodré Jr.

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modeling the Line-of-Sight Integrated Emission in the Corona: Implications for Coronal Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the outstanding problems in all of space science is uncovering how the solar corona is heated to temperatures greater than 1 MK. Though studied for decades, one of the major difficulties in solving this problem has been unraveling the line-of-sight (LOS) effects in the observations. The corona is optically thin, so a single pixel measures counts from an indeterminate number (perhaps tens of thousands) of independently heated flux tubes, all along that pixel's LOS. In this paper we model the emission in individual pixels imaging the active region corona in the Extreme Ultraviolet. If LOS effects are not properly taken into account, erroneous conclusions regarding both coronal heating and coronal dynamics may be reached. We model the corona as a LOS integration of many thousands of completely independently heated flux tubes. We demonstrate that despite the superposition of randomly heated flux tubes, nanoflares leave distinct signatures in light curves observed with multi-wavelength and high time cadence...

Viall, Nicholeen M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

ChemCam laser sets its sights on first martian target  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First martian target First martian target ChemCam laser sets its sights on first martian target The successful capture of ChemCam's first 10 photos sets the stage for the first test bursts of the instrument's rock-zapping laser in the near future. August 17, 2012 Curiosity zaps Mars for vital signs: ChemCam, designed by Lab team, looks for elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, all of which are crucial for life. Curiosity zaps Mars for vital signs: ChemCam, designed by Lab team, looks for elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, all of which are crucial for life. Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203 Email "The successful delivery of these photos means we can begin efforts in earnest for the first images of Mars rocks by the ChemCam instrument and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Supernovae as probes of cosmic parameters: estimating the bias from under-dense lines of sight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correctly interpreting observations of sources such as type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) require knowledge of the power spectrum of matter on AU scales - which is very hard to model accurately. Because under-dense regions account for much of the volume of the universe, light from a typical source probes a mean density significantly below the cosmic mean. The relative sparsity of sources implies that there could be a significant bias when inferring distances of SNe Ia, and consequently a bias in cosmological parameter estimation. While the weak lensing approximation should in principle give the correct prediction for this, linear perturbation theory predicts an effectively infinite variance in the convergence for ultra-narrow beams. We attempt to quantify the effect typically under-dense lines of sight might have in parameter estimation by considering three alternative methods for estimating distances, in addition to the usual weak lensing approximation. We find in each case this not only increases the errors in the...

Busti, V C; Clarkson, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch Lighting Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch Lighting Project Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch Lighting Project Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch Lighting Project August 20, 2010 - 12:29pm Addthis The Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind is replacing almost 2,900 lights in 19 buildings across its campuses.| Photo courtesy of Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind The Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind is replacing almost 2,900 lights in 19 buildings across its campuses.| Photo courtesy of Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE For over a century, students at the Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) have proudly displayed the school colors-blue and red-in the hallways, classrooms and dorm rooms. But this school year, they're "Going Green."

43

A framework for universally composable non-committing blind signatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies non-committing type of universally composable (UC) blind signature protocols where an adversary does not necessarily commit to a message when requesting a signature. An ordinary UC blind signature functionality requires users to commit ...

Masayuki Abe; Miyako Ohkubo

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Blindness, Technology and Haptics Vincent Levesque  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blindness, Technology and Haptics Vincent L´evesque TR-CIM-05.08 Haptics Laboratory Centre, Montr´eal, Qu´ebec, Canada H3A 2A7 Telephone: (514) 398-6319 FAX: (514) 398-7348 Email: cim@cim

Hayward, Vincent

45

Multichannel blind separation and deconvolution of images for document analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we apply Bayesian blind source separation (BSS) from noisy convolutive mixtures to jointly separate and restore source images degraded through unknown blur operators, and then linearly mixed. We found that this problem arises in several ... Keywords: Markov random fields (MRFs), blind image deconvolution, blind source separation, document image processing, parameter learning

Anna Tonazzini; Ivan Gerace; Francesca Martinelli

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Partially blind threshold signatures based on discrete logarithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a group-oriented partially blind (t, n) threshold signature scheme based on the discrete logarithm problem. By the scheme, any t out of n signers in a group can represent the group to sign partially blind threshold signatures, ... Keywords: Discrete logarithm, E-cash systems, Partially blind signatures, Privacy and security, Secure, Secure voting schemes, Threshold signatures

W. -S. Juang; C. -L. Lei

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Usability Evaluation of Email Applications by Blind Users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, we discuss results of usability evaluations of desktop and web-based email applications used by those who are blind. Email is an important tool for workplace communication, but computer software and websites can present accessibility ... Keywords: Blind, banner blindness, email, human-computer interaction, screen reader, unemployment, usability, visual impairment

Brian Wentz; Jonathan Lazar

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Untraceable blind signature schemes based on discrete logarithm problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the help of a blind signature scheme, a requester can obtain a signature on a message from a signer such that the signer knows nothing about the content of the messages and is unable to link the resulting message-signature pair; namely, a blind ... Keywords: DSA, RSA, blind signature, cryptography

Cheng-Chi Lee; Wei-Pang Yang; Min-Shiang Hwang

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Supernovae as probes of cosmic parameters: estimating the bias from under-dense lines of sight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correctly interpreting observations of sources such as type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) require knowledge of the power spectrum of matter on AU scales - which is very hard to model accurately. Because under-dense regions account for much of the volume of the universe, light from a typical source probes a mean density significantly below the cosmic mean. The relative sparsity of sources implies that there could be a significant bias when inferring distances of SNe Ia, and consequently a bias in cosmological parameter estimation. While the weak lensing approximation should in principle give the correct prediction for this, linear perturbation theory predicts an effectively infinite variance in the convergence for ultra-narrow beams. We attempt to quantify the effect typically under-dense lines of sight might have in parameter estimation by considering three alternative methods for estimating distances, in addition to the usual weak lensing approximation. We find in each case this not only increases the errors in the inferred density parameters, but also introduces a bias in the posterior value.

V. C. Busti; R. F. L. Holanda; C. Clarkson

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

1979-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

Barnes, Paul R. (Lenoir City, TN); Shapira, Hanna B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

EVIDENCE OF POSSIBLE SPIN-ORBIT MISALIGNMENT ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT IN TRANSITING EXOPLANET SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Of the 26 transiting exoplanet systems with measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, eight have now been found to be significantly spin-orbit misaligned in the plane of the sky (i.e., RM misalignment angle |{lambda}| {approx}> 30{sup 0} and inconsistent with {lambda} = 0{sup 0}). Unfortunately, the RM effect does not constrain the complement misalignment angle between the orbit of the planet and the spin of its host star along the line of sight (LOS). I use a simple model of stellar rotation benchmarked with observational data to statistically identify 10 exoplanet systems from a sample of 75 for which there is likely a significant degree of spin-orbit misalignment along the LOS: HAT-P-7, HAT-P-14, HAT-P-16, HD 17156, Kepler-5, Kepler-7, TrES-4, WASP-1, WASP-12, and WASP-14. All 10 systems have host stellar masses M {sub *} in the range 1.2 M {sub sun} {approx}< M {sub *} {approx}< 1.5 M {sub sun}, and the probability of this occurrence by chance is less than one in ten thousand. In addition, the planets in the candidate-misaligned systems are preferentially massive and eccentric. The coupled distribution of misalignment from the RM effect and from this analysis suggests that transiting exoplanets are more likely to be spin-orbit aligned than expected given predictions for a transiting planet population produced entirely by planet-planet scattering or Kozai cycles and tidal friction. For that reason, there are likely two populations of close-in exoplanet systems: a population of aligned systems and a population of apparently misaligned systems in which the processes that lead to misalignment or to the survival of misaligned systems operate more efficiently in systems with massive stars and planets.

Schlaufman, Kevin C., E-mail: kcs@ucolick.or [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Identification of a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and Shallow Temperature Measurements at Columbus Salt Marsh, Esmeralda County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search...

54

Metro Environmental: The impact of training HVAC technicians using the SightPros-VirTechs system for remote, wireless, Internet video assistance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This qualitative study explored the overall impact of training HVAC technicians using the SightPros-VirTechs system for remote, wireless, internet video assistance at a small HVAC… (more)

Daily, Ellen Wilmoth Matthews

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Resolving permutation ambiguity in correlation-based blind image separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of permutation ambiguity in blind separation of multiple mixtures of multiple images (resulting, for instance, from multiple reflections through a thick grass plate or through two overlapping glass plates) with unknown mixing coefficients. ... Keywords: Blind image separation, Generalized multiple correlation, Permutation ambiguity, Pruning scheme, Separation of reflection

Kenji Hara; Kohei Inoue; Kiichi Urahama

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Web 2.0: blind to an accessible new world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of Web 2.0 technologies, websites have evolved from static pages to dynamic, interactive Web-based applications with the ability to replicate common desktop functionality. However, for blind and visually impaired individuals who rely ... Keywords: blind, screen reader, user models, visually impaired, web 2.0

Joshua Hailpern; Loretta Guarino-Reid; Richard Boardman; Srinivas Annam

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Camera-Based signage detection and recognition for blind persons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Signage plays an important role for wayfinding and navigation to assist blind people accessing unfamiliar environments. In this paper, we present a novel camera-based approach to automatically detect and recognize restroom signage from surrounding environments. ... Keywords: blind people, navigation and wayfinding, signage detection and recognition

Shuihua Wang; Yingli Tian

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

BAMBI: blind accelerated multimodal Bayesian inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present an algorithm for rapid Bayesian analysis that combines the benefits of nested sampling and artificial neural networks. The blind accelerated multimodal Bayesian inference (BAMBI) algorithm implements the MultiNest package for nested sampling as well as the training of an artificial neural network (NN) to learn the likelihood function. In the case of computationally expensive likelihoods, this allows the substitution of a much more rapid approximation in order to increase significantly the speed of the analysis. We begin by demonstrating, with a few toy examples, the ability of a NN to learn complicated likelihood surfaces. BAMBI's ability to decrease running time for Bayesian inference is then demonstrated in the context of estimating cosmological parameters from WMAP and other observations. We show that valuable speed increases are achieved in addition to obtaining NNs trained on the likelihood functions for the different model and data combinations. These NNs can then be used for an...

Graff, Philip; Hobson, Michael P; Lasenby, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Identification of a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral Remote  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral Remote Identification of a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and Shallow Temperature Measurements at Columbus Salt Marsh, Esmeralda County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Identification of a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and Shallow Temperature Measurements at Columbus Salt Marsh, Esmeralda County, Nevada Abstract Hyperspectral remote sensing-derived mineral maps and follow-up shallow temperature measurements were used to identify a new blind geothermal target in the Columbus Salt Marsh playa, Esmeralda County, Nevada. The hyperspectral survey was conducted with the ProSpecTIR VS2 instrument and consists of 380 km2 of 4-meter spatial resolution data acquired on October

60

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - SCR Catalyst Blinding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCR Catalyst Blinding SCR Catalyst Blinding University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) is determining the potential of low-rank coal ash to cause blinding or masking of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. A secondary goal will be to determine the degree of elemental mercury conversion across the catalysts. Specific objectives include (1) identify candidate coals and blends for testing under bench-scale conditions, (2) conduct bench-scale testing to screen coals and identify key conditions for full-scale testing, (3) design and construct an SCR slipstream test chamber for sampling at full-scale facilities, (4) conduct testing at full-scale testing, (5) identify SCR blinding mechanisms, rates, and cleaning methods as well as mercury conversion efficiencies, and (6) interpret data, prepare a report, and attend sponsor meetings to present information and recommendations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS) Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS) Speaker(s): Boris Lamontagne Date: June 22, 2012 - 2:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Stephen Selkowitz At the National Research Council, Canada we are developing a new type of smart glass based on micro-blinds (MEMS). The micro-blinds are tiny stressed metallic foils curling up once released or rolling down once actuated using electrostatic forces. Such smart glass is characterized by fast switching speed, UV-temperature insensitive and neutral appearance. Recent results will be presented as a well as our demo. Transmittance and thermal characteristics will also be addressed. There are various possible applications in building, automotive, aerospace as well as in display sectors. A video briefly describing the technology is

62

Blind source recovery: a framework in the state space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blind Source Recovery (BSR) denotes recovery of original sources/signals from environments that may include convolution, temporal variation, and even nonlinearity. It also infers the recovery of sources even in the absence of precise environment identifiability. ...

Khurram Waheed; Fathi M. Salem

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Three Blind Men and the Elephant  

SciTech Connect

Just like the blind men in the popular story of perceiving the elephant, the three major constituencies participating in the energy debate have greatly different perceptions of the problem. The constituency that is worried about climate change believes the energy problem is caused by profligate use of fossil fuel that has dramatically changed our atmosphere. The energy security group sees dangerous reliance on foreign sources of oil increasingly held by countries hostile to the US. The economic vitality group sees high energy prices and their effect on the economy and our life-style. Just like the blind men, each of the three constituencies perceives a different problem. And just as with the blind men, while each perspective is right as a piece of the elephant, it takes all the perspectives together to actually solve the problem. Environmentalists focus on solutions responding to the scientific consensus that greenhouse gases are creating rapid climate change. The tipping point has come: it is now a consensus position among scientists the global warming is being affected by anthropogenic activity to 90% certainty according to the last IPCC report. Although they still struggle with the prediction of how much global temperatures will rise if we do nothing--is it 5 deg or 10 under BAU? This group believes that we cannot afford to take a chance because we get only one chance. We can not afford to do this kind of experiment with the Earth. Any choice which decreases our CO{sub 2} footprint is favored, even if it means a decrease in standard of living. The energy security constituency sees the geo-politics of oil becoming increasingly dire. They look at oil money being used to fund anti-American activities of groups such as the Wahabis in Saudi Arabia, Hezbollah in Lebanon and the infamous Al Qaeda. They quip that the Iraq war is the first war where we are paying for both sides. They note Iran and the Shia throughout the Middle East seeing the possibility of controlling 2/3 of the world's oil. They see oil and gas being used by Russia to exert political power using the gas tap and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela clearly anti-American and now a virtual dictator who controls 15% of our oil imports. Conflicts in Nigeria over oil wealth and corruption affected our oil supply. Countries such as China are at best unwilling to join political action against countries such as Sudan that supply them oil, and at worst, selling them arms in order to cement their relationships with respect to importing oil. This security constituency favors ending our vulnerability by ending our ''addiction to foreign oil''. This group thinks that there is no domestic source of energy that is bad. They will be happy to see our corn turned into ethanol; our coal turned into liquid fuel for transportation. No matter that the price of tortillas doubles in Mexico, we expand corn farming at the expense of the environment, our tanks and pipes in gas stations corrode and leak, or we make liquid fuel from coal, thus increasing the carbon footprint by 30% per unit of energy. The economic vitality group sees increasing international demand for oil occurring simultaneously with a peaking supply of light sweet crude. They see an oil market where higher prices drive more production of oil which is heavier and more sour (supply follows demand). However, fast growth in world-wide demand increases even faster and prices will go up. For example, China adds 10,000 cars per month, and there is an uncanny correlation between the price of oil and the amount of oil imported by China. The security contingent also worries about reliability of supply as affected by pipeline leaks in Alaska or hurricanes or potential terrorism. This constituency thinks the problem is one of capacity and favors solutions that will increase oil production, reservoirs, pipelines and refineries. They believe that the energy system will be determined by the market and want solutions that favor investment in capacity. What the environmentalists don't seem to get is climate change b

Long, J S

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

64

Three Blind Men and the Elephant  

SciTech Connect

Just like the blind men in the popular story of perceiving the elephant, the three major constituencies participating in the energy debate have greatly different perceptions of the problem. The constituency that is worried about climate change believes the energy problem is caused by profligate use of fossil fuel that has dramatically changed our atmosphere. The energy security group sees dangerous reliance on foreign sources of oil increasingly held by countries hostile to the US. The economic vitality group sees high energy prices and their effect on the economy and our life-style. Just like the blind men, each of the three constituencies perceives a different problem. And just as with the blind men, while each perspective is right as a piece of the elephant, it takes all the perspectives together to actually solve the problem. Environmentalists focus on solutions responding to the scientific consensus that greenhouse gases are creating rapid climate change. The tipping point has come: it is now a consensus position among scientists the global warming is being affected by anthropogenic activity to 90% certainty according to the last IPCC report. Although they still struggle with the prediction of how much global temperatures will rise if we do nothing--is it 5 deg or 10 under BAU? This group believes that we cannot afford to take a chance because we get only one chance. We can not afford to do this kind of experiment with the Earth. Any choice which decreases our CO{sub 2} footprint is favored, even if it means a decrease in standard of living. The energy security constituency sees the geo-politics of oil becoming increasingly dire. They look at oil money being used to fund anti-American activities of groups such as the Wahabis in Saudi Arabia, Hezbollah in Lebanon and the infamous Al Qaeda. They quip that the Iraq war is the first war where we are paying for both sides. They note Iran and the Shia throughout the Middle East seeing the possibility of controlling 2/3 of the world's oil. They see oil and gas being used by Russia to exert political power using the gas tap and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela clearly anti-American and now a virtual dictator who controls 15% of our oil imports. Conflicts in Nigeria over oil wealth and corruption affected our oil supply. Countries such as China are at best unwilling to join political action against countries such as Sudan that supply them oil, and at worst, selling them arms in order to cement their relationships with respect to importing oil. This security constituency favors ending our vulnerability by ending our ''addiction to foreign oil''. This group thinks that there is no domestic source of energy that is bad. They will be happy to see our corn turned into ethanol; our coal turned into liquid fuel for transportation. No matter that the price of tortillas doubles in Mexico, we expand corn farming at the expense of the environment, our tanks and pipes in gas stations corrode and leak, or we make liquid fuel from coal, thus increasing the carbon footprint by 30% per unit of energy. The economic vitality group sees increasing international demand for oil occurring simultaneously with a peaking supply of light sweet crude. They see an oil market where higher prices drive more production of oil which is heavier and more sour (supply follows demand). However, fast growth in world-wide demand increases even faster and prices will go up. For example, China adds 10,000 cars per month, and there is an uncanny correlation between the price of oil and the amount of oil imported by China. The security contingent also worries about reliability of supply as affected by pipeline leaks in Alaska or hurricanes or potential terrorism. This constituency thinks the problem is one of capacity and favors solutions that will increase oil production, reservoirs, pipelines and refineries. They believe that the energy system will be determined by the market and want solutions that favor investment in capacity. What the environmentalists don't seem to get is climate change by itself will fail to gather b

Long, J S

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

65

Comparative Study Between Measurement and Predictions Using Geometrical Optics and Uniform Theory of Diffraction for Case of Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) in Indoor Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the investigation and comparison of the accuracy of a deterministic model for a WLAN system in the indoor environment. The measurement system consisted of a spectrum analyzer and a log-periodic antenna. Non-line-of-sight (NLOS) propagation ... Keywords: Diffraction, Geometrical optics, Uniform theory of diffraction

E. M. Cheng; Zulkifly Abbas; M. Fareq; K. Y. Lee; K. Y. You; S. F. Khor

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fault-tolerant Operations for Universal Blind Quantum Computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blind quantum computation is an appealing use of quantum information technology because it can conceal both the client's data and the algorithm itself from the server. However, problems need to be solved in the practical use of blind quantum computation and fault-tolerance is a major challenge. On an example circuit, the computational cost measured in T gates executed by the client is 97 times more than performing the original computation directly, without using the server, even before applying error correction. (The client still benefits due to drastically reduced memory requirements.) Broadbent et al. proposed running error correction over blind computation, but our first protocol applies one layer of Steane's [[7,1,3

Chia-Hung Chien; Rodney Van Meter; Sy-Yen Kuo

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

Edmiston, Jessica L

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION Seungjin on the variance of decon­ volved signal. We also consider the maximum negen­ tropy principle and show that the CME version, without any prior knowledge (such as channel impulse response, training data). As the demand

Choi, Seungjin

69

Blind component separation in wavelet space: application to CMB analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a recurrent issue in astronomical data analysis that observations are incomplete maps with missing patches or intentionally masked parts. In addition, many astrophysical emissions are nonstationary processes over the sky. All these effects impair ... Keywords: blind source separation, cosmic microwave background, data analysis, missing data, wavelets

Y. Moudden; J.-F. Cardoso; J.-L. Starck; J. Delabrouille

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Blind separation of non-stationary sources using continuous density hidden Markov models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blind source separation (BSS) has attained much attention in signal processing society due to its 'blind' property and wide applications. However, there are still some open problems, such as underdetermined BSS, noise BSS. In this paper, we propose a ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Continuous density hidden Markov model, Expectation-maximization, Gaussian mixture model, Non-stationary

Fanglin Gu, Hang Zhang, Desheng Zhu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

REPLACEMENTS ARE IN SIGHT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3300 Mountain Road NE Albuquerque, NM 87106-1920 (505) 256-1463 and Lance Lankford, PE Environmental Management 3200 Peacekeeper ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

Gamma-ray blind beta particle probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intra-operative beta particle probe is provided by placing a suitable photomultiplier tube (PMT), micro channel plate (MCP) or other electron multiplier device within a vacuum housing equipped with: 1) an appropriate beta particle permeable window; and 2) electron detection circuitry. Beta particles emitted in the immediate vicinity of the probe window will be received by the electron multiplier device and amplified to produce a detectable signal. Such a device is useful as a gamma insensitive, intra-operative, beta particle probe in surgeries where the patient has been injected with a beta emitting radiopharmaceutical. The method of use of such a device is also described, as is a position sensitive such device.

Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Grafton, VA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modulation during learning of the responses of neurones in the lateral hypothalamus to the sight of food, Exp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recordings were made from single neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and substantia innominata of the rhesus and squirrel monkey during feeding. A population of these neurons which altered their firing rates while the monkeys looked at food but not at nonfood objects was investigated. Because the responses of these neurons must have been affected by the previous experience of the animals, the activity of the neurons was measured during tasks in which the monkeys learned whether or not objects which they saw were associated with food. During visual discrimination tests these neurons came to respond when the monkey saw one stimulus associated with food (e.g., a black syringe from which the animal was fed glucose), but not when the monkey saw a different stimulus which was not associated with food (e.g., a white syringe from which the animal was offered saline). During extinction tests these units ceased to respond when the monkey saw a visual stimulus such as a peanut if the peanut was repeatedly not given to the monkey to eat. The learning or extinction behavior approximately paralleled the response of the neurons. The findings that the neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and substantia innominata respond when a monkey is shown food only if he is hungry, and as shown here, if as a result of learning the visual stimulus signifies food, provide information on a part of the brain which may be involved in feeding. The findings are consistent with other data which suggest that the responses of these neurons are involved in the autonomic and/or behavioral reactions of the animal to the sight of food.

F. Mora; E. T. Rolls; M. J. Burton

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Solar heat gain coefficient of complex fenestrations with a venetian blind for differing slat tilt angles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured bidirectional transmittances and reflectances of a buff-colored venetian blind together with a layer calculation scheme developed in previous publications are utilized to produce directional-hemispherical properties for the venetian blind layer and solar heat gain coefficients for the blind in combination with clear double glazing. Results are presented for three blind slat tilt angles and for the blind mounted either interior to the double glazing or between the glass panes. Implications of the results for solar heat gain calculations are discussed in the context of sun positions for St. Louis, MO.

Klems, J.H.; Warner, J.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A FOURTH H I 21 cm ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN THE SIGHT LINE OF MG J0414+0534: A RECORD FOR INTERVENING ABSORBERS  

SciTech Connect

We report the detection of a strong H I 21 cm absorption system at z = 0.5344, as well as a candidate system at z = 0.3389, in the sight line toward the z = 2.64 quasar MG J0414+0534. This, in addition to the absorption at the host redshift and the other two intervening absorbers, takes the total to four (possibly five). The previous maximum number of 21 cm absorbers detected along a single sight line is two and so we suspect that this number of gas-rich absorbers is in some way related to the very red color of the background source. Despite this, no molecular gas (through OH absorption) has yet been detected at any of the 21 cm redshifts, although, from the population of 21 cm absorbers as a whole, there is evidence for a weak correlation between the atomic line strength and the optical-near-infrared color. In either case, the fact that so many gas-rich galaxies (likely to be damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems) have been found along a single sight line toward a highly obscured source may have far-reaching implications for the population of faint galaxies not detected in optical surveys, a possibility which could be addressed through future wide-field absorption line surveys with the Square Kilometer Array.

Tanna, A.; Webb, J. K. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Curran, S. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Whiting, M. T. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bignell, C., E-mail: sjc@physics.usyd.edu.au [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Rt. 28/92 Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hydrogen chloride in diffuse interstellar clouds along the line of sight to W31C (G10.6-0.4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of hydrogen chloride, HCl, in diffuse molecular clouds on the line of sight towards the star-forming region W31C (G10.6-0.4). The J = 1-0 lines of the two stable HCl isotopologues, H35Cl and H37Cl, are observed using the 1b receiver of the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The HCl line is detected in absorption, over a wide range of velocities associated with di?use clouds along the line of sight to W31C. The analysis of the absorption strength yields a total HCl column density of few 10^13 cm^-2, implying that HCl accounts for ~0.6 % of the total gasphase chlorine, which exceeds by a factor of ~6 the theoretical model predictions. This result is comparable to those obtained from the chemically-related species H2Cl+ and HCl+, for which large column densities have also been reported on the same line of sight. The source of discrepancy between models and observations is still unknown; however, the detection of these Cl-bearing molecu...

Monje, R R; Roueff, E; Gerin, M; De Luca, M; Neufeld, D A; Godard, B; Phillips, T G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Application of second generation wavelets to blind spherical deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of spherical deconvolution in a non-parametric statistical framework, where both the signal and the operator kernel are subject to measurement errors. After a preliminary treatment of the kernel, we apply a thresholding procedure ... Keywords: 62G05, 62G99, 65J20, 65J22, Blind deconvolution, Blockwise SVD, Linear inverse problems, Nonparametric adaptive estimation, Second generation wavelets, Spherical deconvolution

T. Vareschi

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

E-voting: a new approach using double-blind identity-based encryption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new cryptographic construction, double-blind identitybased encryption (DB-IBE). In standard IBE, the identity string that is passed to a key generation centre (KGC) during the key extraction phase is visible to the KGC. Recent work introduced ... Keywords: blind identity-based encryption, designated confirmer signatures, double-blind identity-based encryption, electronic voting, identity-based encryption, receipt-freeness, voter verifiability

David Gray; Caroline Sheedy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Hadron Blind Detector for the PHENIX Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel Hadron Blind Detector (HBD) has been developed for an upgrade of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The HBD will allow a precise measurement of electron-positron pairs from the decay of the light vector mesons and the low-mass pair continuum in heavy-ion collisions. The detector consists of a 50 cm long radiator filled with pure CF4 and directly coupled in a windowless configuration to a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector with a CsI photocathode evaporated on the top face of the first GEM foil.

I. Ravinovich

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Experimental study of full-size automated venetian blind windows  

SciTech Connect

This study presents an experimental study on full-size automated venetian blind window systems consisting of horizontal pivoted louvers installed and hermetically sealed between two glass panes. The experimental study was carried out using a test cell of 2.43 m high, 1.48 m wide, and 1.92 m deep. Various parameters were measured instantaneously and recorded using a data acquisition system: interior and exterior air temperatures; various surface temperatures; and total and direct solar radiations. A linearized numerical model was used to verify the experimental results.

Rheault, S.; Bilgen, E. (Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A New Gold Pan For The West- Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

blind geothermal systems in Nevada, USA and has helped to define the spatial extent of thermal anomalies at two other locations. At Teels Marsh, two shallow temperature anomalies...

82

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

83

Composable security of measuring-Alice blind quantum computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blind quantum computing [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science 517 (2009)] is a secure cloud quantum computing protocol which enables a client (who does not have enough quantum technology at her disposal) to delegate her quantum computation to a server (who has a universal quantum computer) without leaking any relevant information to the server. In [T. Morimae and K. Fujii, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf87}, 050301(R) (2013)], a new blind quantum computing protocol, so called the measuring-Alice protocol, was proposed. This protocol offers several advantages over previous protocols, such as the device-independent security, less demanding requirements for the client, and a simpler and stronger security based on the no-signaling principle. In this paper, we show composable security of the measuring-Alice protocol by using the formalism of the constructive cryptography [U. Maurer, Proceedings of Theory of Security and Applications, TOSCA 2011, pages 33-56. Springer (2011)]. The above advantages of measuring-Alice protocol enable more intuitive and transparent proofs for the composable security.

Tomoyuki Morimae; Takeshi Koshiba

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

HIGH-PERFORMANCE ALXGA1-XN-BASED UV PHOTODETECTORS FOR VISIBLE/SOLAR-BLIND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HIGH-PERFORMANCE ALXGA1-XN-BASED UV PHOTODETECTORS FOR VISIBLE/SOLAR-BLIND APPLICATIONS-PERFORMANCE ALXGA1-XN-BASED UV PHOTODETECTORS FOR VISIBLE/SOLAR-BLIND APPLICATIONS Necmi Biyikli Ph. D, environmental (ozone layer) monitoring, detection of biological/chemical agents, missile early warning systems

Gürel, Levent

85

Blind source separation with dynamic source number using adaptive neural algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A difficult blind source separation (BSS) issue dealing with an unknown and dynamic number of sources is tackled in this study. In the past, the majority of BSS algorithms familiarize themselves with situations where the numbers of sources are given, ... Keywords: Adaptive learning rate, Adaptive neural algorithm, Blind source separation, Dynamic number of sources

Tsung-Ying Sun; Chan-Cheng Liu; Shang-Jeng Tsai; Sheng-Ta Hsieh

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Astrophysical image separation by blind time--frequency source separation methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, two prevalent blind time-frequency (TF) source separation methods in the literature are adapted to astrophysical image mixtures and four algorithms are developed to separate them into their astrophysical components. The components considered ... Keywords: Astrophysical image separation, Blind time--frequency source separation methods, Cosmic microwave background radiation, Joint diagonalization, Source separation

Mehmet Tankut Özgen; Ercan Engin Kuruo?lu; Diego Herranz

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Blind separation with unknown number of sources based on auto-trimmed neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on blind source separation with an unknown number of sources, which is the case generally assumed in most practical applications. Several over-determined neural algorithms (more sensors m than sources n) have been proposed to solve ... Keywords: Auto-trimmed neural network, Blind source separation (BSS), Unknown number of sources

Tsung-Ying Sun; Chan-Cheng Liu; Sheng-Ta Hsieh; Shang-Jeng Tsai

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A robust blind sparse source separation algorithm using genetic algorithm to identify mixing matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel identification of mixing matrix using genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed to deal with the blind sparse source separation (BSS) problem. A preprocessing filters the most of minor mixtures at first, and then represents the remainder ... Keywords: blind source separation (BSS), genetic algorithm (GA), sparse representation, under-determined

Tsung-Ying Sun; Chan-Cheng Liu; Sheng-Ta Hsieh; Shang-Jeng Tsai; Kan-Yuan Li

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A robust blind sparse source separation algorithm using genetic algorithm to identify mixing matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel identification of mixing matrix using genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed to deal with the blind sparse source separation (BSS) problem. A preprocessing filters the most of minor mixtures at first, and then represents the remainder ... Keywords: blind source separation (BSS), genetic algorithm (GA), sparse representation, under-determined

Tsung-Ying Sun; Chan-Cheng Liu; Sheng-Ta Hsieh; Shang-Jeng Tsai; Kan-Yuan Li

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Maximum likelihood blind image separation using nonsymmetrical half-plane Markov random fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a maximum likelihood approach for blindly separating linear instantaneous mixtures of images. The spatial autocorrelation within each image is described using non-symmetrical half-plane (NSHP) Markov random fields in order to simplify ... Keywords: blind source separation (BSS), maximum likelihood approach, nonstationary sources, nonsymmetrical half-plane (NSHP) Markov random fields

Rima Guidara; Shahram Hosseini; Yannick Deville

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Markov model for blind image separation by a mean-field EM algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with blind separation of images from noisy linear mixtures with unknown coefficients, formulated as a Bayesian estimation problem. This is a flexible framework, where any kind of prior knowledge about the source images and the mixing ... Keywords: Blind source separation (BSS), Markov random fields (MRFs), edge and feature detection, parameter learning, scene analysis

A. Tonazzini; L. Bedini; E. Salerno

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Blind equalization in spatial multiplexing MIMO-OFDM systems based on vector CMA and decorrelation criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we address the problem of blind recovery of multiple OFDM data streams in a Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) system. We propose an equalization algorithm which is based on a combined criterion designed ... Keywords: Blind equalization, Local convergence analysis, MIMO systems, OFDM, Spatial multiplexing

Traian Emanuel Abrudan; Visa Koivunen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Electrical signal measurement in plants using blind source separation with independent component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical signals of a plant leaf measured using surface recording are mixed signals which involve the electrical activities of the epidermis cells, guard cells, and mesophyll cells. Blind source separation (BSS) is a general signal processing approach, ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Electrical signal in plant, Independent component analysis

Lan Huang; Zhong-Yi Wang; Long-Lian Zhao; Dong-jie Zhao; Cheng Wang; Zhi-Long Xu; Rui-Feng Hou; Xiao-Jun Qiao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Does a sonar system make a blind maze navigation computer game more "fun"?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Blind Programming Project at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, we are investigating ways to make programming more fun for school aged blind children. We are beginning this search by creating and empirically analyzing a number ... Keywords: accessibility, auditory games

Matt Wilkerson; Amanda Koenig; James Daniel

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Venetian Blind Control System Based on Fuzzy Neural Network for Indoor Daylighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the indoor daylighting need, venetian blinds are a key element in the passive control of building’s vision environment. They help to control glare, daylighting, and overheating, all of which affect both the comfort of occupants and a building’s ... Keywords: fuzzy neural network, visual comfort, position of venetian blind, double control loops

Yifei Chen; Huai Li; Xueliang Chen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Postprocessing and sparse blind source separation of positive and partially overlapped data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study sparse blind source separation (BSS) for a class of positive and partially overlapped signals. The signals are only allowed to have nonoverlapping at certain locations, while they could overlap with each other elsewhere. For nonnegative data, ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Noise detection and reduction, Nuclear magnetic resonance, Peak-based corrections, Postprocessing

Y. Sun; C. Ridge; F. del Rio; A. J. Shaka; J. Xin

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Signing on the tactile line: A multimodal system for teaching handwriting to blind children  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present McSig, a multimodal system for teaching blind children cursive handwriting so that they can create a personal signature. For blind people handwriting is very difficult to learn as it is a near-zero feedback activity that is needed only occasionally, ... Keywords: Multimodal interaction, audio and haptic feedback, children, handwriting, visually impaired users

Beryl Plimmer; Peter Reid; Rachel Blagojevic; Andrew Crossan; Stephen Brewster

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Underdetermined blind source separation based on relaxed sparsity condition of sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Aissa-El-Bey et al, have proposed two subspace-based methods for underdetermined blind source separation (UBSS) in time-frequency (TF) domain. These methods allow multiple active sources at TF points so long as the number of active sources ... Keywords: eigenvalue, eigenvector, time-frequency distribution, underdetermined blind source separation

Dezhong Peng; Yong Xiang

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Review: A general framework for second-order blind separation of stationary colored sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the blind separation of stationary colored sources using the second-order statistics (SOS) of their instantaneous mixtures. We first start by presenting a brief overview of existing contributions in that field. Then, we present ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Second-order statistics, Stationary colored sources

Abdeldjalil A?ssa-El-Bey; Karim Abed-Meraim; Yves Grenier; Yingbo Hua

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Eye-Shield: protecting bystanders from being blinded by mobile projectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces Eye-Shield, a mobile projector-camera prototype designed for the purpose of protecting people from being accidently blinded with a handheld projector. Since they might be used regularly in public space, mobile projectors can be ... Keywords: blinding light suppression, camera, face detection, mobile projector, social aspects

Bonifaz Kaufmann; Martin Hitz

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Details Activities (7) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Extensive geological and geophysical studies were carried out during the summer of 1973 in a blind geothermal area near Marysville, Montana. Earlier studies of regional heat flow resulted in the discovery of the area (BLACKWELL 1969; BLACKWELL, BAAG 1973). The area is blind in the sense that there are no surface manifestations of high heat flow (recent volcanics, hot springs, etc.) within the area. The country rocks are Precambrian sedimentary rocks and Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks. The most recent Tertiary igneous event took place approximately 37 M.Y.

102

Artificial Retina In the News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases News Articles Press Releases Mark Humayun Inducted into Institute of Medicine Institute of Medicine press release, 10/12/2009 Artificial Retina Project Wins Prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Award Article and multiple press releases, 07/20/2009 Second Sight to Double Patient Enrollment for Argus(tm) II Retinal Implant U.S. Clinical Trial Second Sight press release, 05/04/09 See more releases in Press Release Archive Recent Articles Bionic eye opens new world of sight for blind National Public Radio, October 20, 2009 Burst of technology helps blind to see New York Times, September 26, 2009 Artificial retina project has ORNL roots ORNL Reporter, August 28, 2009 The "holy grail" of ophthalmic devices Assembly Magazine, August 20, 2009 Artificial-retina project designed to restore sight to the blind

103

A double-blind, randomized, prospective trial to evaluate topical vitamin C solution for the prevention of radiation dermatitis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object of this study was to ascertain the value of topical ascorbic acid in the prevention of radiation dermatitis. Patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors were eligible. Patients applied a topical solution, twice per day prior to and throughout the course of radiotherapy, to the left and right sides of the head. The radiotherapist and the patient were blinded as to the contents of the solutions. The bottle for one side of the head contained topical ascorbic acid solution. THe bottle for the other side of the head contained only vehicle. During and after the course of treatment the radiotherapist scored the skin reaction on both the left and right sides of the irradiated head using a skin reaction scale. The data were analyzed with a matched pair analysis. Since each patient received both treatments (ascorbic acid and control solutions) the statistical analysis concentrated on the paired differences in scores based on the probability of a [open quotes]preference[close quotes] for the treatment or control. Eighty-four patients entered the study. Sixty-five were suitable for analysis. In 10 patients there was a preference for ascorbic acid solution (15%), in 20 patients there was a preference for placebo (31%), and there was a preference for neither in 35 patients (54%). Ascorbic acid solution could be considered to have an effect if the percentage of preferences favoring ascorbic acid over placebo, among those subjects with a preference, significantly exceeded the 50% expected by chance. The observed percentage of preferences for ascorbic acid was only 33% (10 of 30 with a preference; p = .10, two-sided sign test). Patient age, race, sex, and total dose of irradiation had no detectable influence on the comparative skin toxicity scores. There is no discernible benefit to ascorbic acid lotion, in the manner in which it was used it in this trial, for the prevention of radiation dermatitis. 19 refs., 1 tab.

Halperin, E.C.; George, S.; Darr, D.; Pinnell, S. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Gaspar, L. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada))

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

P ifi W l Si hti D t d b COMIDA A i l SPacific Walrus Sightings Documented by COMIDA Aerial Surveys f C S 2009of the Northeastern Chukchi Sea in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P ifi W l Si hti D t d b COMIDA A i l SPacific Walrus Sightings Documented by COMIDA Aerial Surveys In the summer and fall of 2009, aerial surveys were conducted in the northeastern Chukchi Sea as part. For more information on COMIDA surveys i t "A i l Figure 2. Aerial survey coverage from June 24 to October

105

Blind signal separation methods for the identification of interstellar carbonaceous nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of Blind Signal Separation methods (ICA and other approaches) for the analysis of astrophysical data remains quite unexplored. In this paper, we present a new approach for analyzing the infrared emission spectra of interstellar dust, obtained ...

O. Berné; Y. Deville; C. Joblin

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

FDA Approves First Bionic Eye for the Blind | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FDA Approves First Bionic Eye for the Blind FDA Approves First Bionic Eye for the Blind FDA Approves First Bionic Eye for the Blind February 14, 2013 - 1:06pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON- The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that its support for a decade of revolutionary research has contributed to the creation of the first ever retinal prosthesis - or bionic eye - to be approved in the United States by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for blind individuals with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. "The development of the artificial retina is just one more example of the unique value of our National Laboratories and research universities," said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. "While no one can predict a breakthrough before it happens, the investments we're making in research

107

A New Gold Pan For The West- Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gold Pan For The West- Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems With Gold Pan For The West- Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems With Shallow Temperature Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: A New Gold Pan For The West- Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems With Shallow Temperature Surveys Details Activities (6) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: The use of rapidly deployable 2-meter-deep shallow temperature surveys has led to the discovery of at least two blind geothermal systems in Nevada, USA and has helped to define the spatial extent of thermal anomalies at two other locations. At Teels Marsh, two shallow temperature anomalies with a combined strike length of almost 4 km were identified adjacent to a Quaternary fault on the west side of the playa. At Rhodes Marsh, a thermal anomaly at least 5 km long was located adjacent to

108

Blind calibration of timing skew in time-interleaved analog-to-digital converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of time-interleaved analog-to-digital converters is often significantly degraded by timing mismatch errors. We develop methods for performing blind calibration of such converters, i.e., for estimating the ...

Divi, Vijay

109

SiC APDs and arrays for UV and solar blind detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report advancements in APDs and arrays using 4H SiC. Novel structures, array designs and specialized read out integrated circuits have been developed towards the realization of UV and solar-blind detector arrays exhibiting ...

Shaw, Gary A.

110

Energy efficient louver and blind. Technical progress report for Quarter 2, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In this quarter we jumped ahead and performed Task 5 which is testing to get empirical energy saving data. One 4` X 3` horizontal Incredibling prototype and one black and one white conventional control blinds with the same size were delivered to the Lawrence Berekely Laboratories Mobile Test Facility in Reno. The blinds are still in testing since we had only two sunny days in the month of June and we encountered some hardware problem with the computers at the lab.

Khajavi, S.

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Blind Separation of Underdetermined Convolutive Mixtures Using Their Time–Frequency Representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the blind separation of nonstationary sources in the underdetermined convolutive mixture case. We introduce, two methods based on the sparsity assumption of the sources in the time-frequency (TF) domain. The first one assumes that ... Keywords: Blind source separation (BSS), convolutive mixture, sparse signal decomposition/representation, speech signals, subspace projection, time–frequency distribution (TFD), underdetermined/overcomplete representation, vector clustering

A. Aissa-El-Bey; K. Abed-Meraim; Y. Grenier

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF A DIFFUSE CLOUD ALONG A LINE OF SIGHT TOWARD W51: MOLECULAR FRACTION AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption lines from the molecules OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sup +} {sub 3} have been observed in a diffuse molecular cloud along a line of sight near W51 IRS2. We present the first chemical analysis that combines the information provided by all three of these species. Together, OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} are used to determine the molecular hydrogen fraction in the outskirts of the observed cloud, as well as the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen. H{sup +} {sub 3} is used to infer the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H{sub 2} in the molecular interior of the cloud, which we find to be {zeta}{sub 2} = (4.8 {+-} 3.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. Combining the results from all three species we find an efficiency factor-defined as the ratio of the formation rate of OH{sup +} to the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H-of {epsilon} = 0.07 {+-} 0.04, much lower than predicted by chemical models. This is an important step in the future use of OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} on their own as tracers of the cosmic-ray ionization rate.

Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gerin, M. [LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris and ENS, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Geballe, T. R. [Gemini Observatory, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Black, J. H. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Menten, K. M. [MPI fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Goicoechea, J. R. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY t&668-677 (1976) Effects of Hunger on the Responses of Neurons in the Lateral Hypothalamus to the Sight and Taste of Food1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recordings were made from single neurons in the monkey lateral hypothalamus and substantia innominata which had previously been shown to res’pond with an increase or decrease of their firing rates when the hungry monkey tasted food, and/or when he looked at food. It was found that the responsiveness of these neurons to food decreased over the course of a meal of glucose as satiety increased. When satiety, measured by whether the monkey rejected the glucose, was complete, there was no response of the neurons to the taste and/or to the sight of glucose. The spontaneous firing rates of these cells were not affected by the transitions from hunger to,satiety. This modulation of responsiveness to food of hypothalamic cells was specific to them in that it was not seen in cells in the globus pallidus which responded in relatimon to swallowing and mouth movements, or in cells in the visual inferotemporal cortex which responded when the monkey looked at the glucose-containing syringe. On the basis of this and other evidence it is suggested that the hypothalamic cells described here could be involved in the autonomic, the endocrine, and/or the feeding responses which occur when an animal sees or tastes food.

M. J. Burton; E. T. Rolls; F. Mora A

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Blind Benchmark Calculations for Melt Spreading in the ECOSTAR Project  

SciTech Connect

The Project ECOSTAR (5. EC Framework Programme) on Ex-Vessel Core Melt Stabilisation Research is oriented towards the analysis and mitigation of severe accident sequences that could occur in the ex-vessel phase of a postulated core melt accident. Spreading of the corium melt on the available basement surface is an important process, which defines the initial conditions for concrete attack and for the efficiency of cooling in case of water contact, respectively. The transfer and spreading of the melt on the basement is one of the major issues in ECOSTAR. This is addressed here by a spreading code benchmark involving a large-scale spreading experiment that is used for the validation of the existing spreading codes. The corium melt is simulated by a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, CaO and FeO with a sufficiently wide freezing interval. In the 3-dim benchmark test ECOKATS-1 170 litres of oxide melt are poured onto a 3 m by 4 m concrete surface with a low flow rate of about 2 l/s. From the results of an additional 2-dim channel experiment some basic rheological data (e.g. initial viscosity) are obtained in order to minimise the uncertainty in material properties of the melt. The participating spreading codes CORFLOW (Framatome ANP/FZK), LAVA (GRS), and THEMA (CEA) differ from each other by their focus of modelling and the assumptions made to simplify the relevant transport equations. In a first step both experiments (3-dim/2-dim) are calculated blindly by the participating codes. This serves for an overall assessment of the codes capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with rather unknown material properties. In a second step the 3-dim experiment ECOKATS-1 is recalculated by the codes with the more precise knowledge of the rheological behaviour of the oxide melt in the 2-dim experiment. This, in addition, serves for the validation of the codes' capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with well-known material properties. Based on the benchmark results and taking the specific validation process for each of the three codes applied into account, it is recommended that the spreading issue for reactor safety research be considered closed. (authors)

Spengler, C.; Allelein, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Cologne (Germany); Foit, J.J.; Alsmeyer, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 36 40, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Spindler, B.; Veteau, J.M. [CEA, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Artnik, J.; Fischer, M. [Framatome ANP, P.O. Box 32 20, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sight and Sound - Project Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Scenario Student Pages Internet Links Index SubjectContent Area: PhysicsBiology Target Audience: This project primarily targets grades 9-12. The project is best suited as...

116

Birds Sighted at Freels Bend  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and water, an increasingly rare combination in the region. Common loon Eastern wood-pewee c Black-throated green warbler Pied-billed grebe Acadian flycatcher c...

117

Preventing Blindness: A Vision of Technology | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Preventing Blindness: Preventing Blindness: A Vision of Technology Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Preventing Blindness: A Vision of Technology Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page ORNL technology to scan millions for diabetic retinopathy traces roots to

118

RFID Information Grid and Wearable Computing Solution to the Problem of Wayfinding for the Blind User in a Campus Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into building code requirements as part of ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) at a cost of less than $1 per square foot. With an established RFID grid infrastructure blind students will gain the freedom to explore, and by the year 2030-2.4 million [4] Number of working age blind who are unemployed: 74% [5] Estimated annual cost

Helal, Abdelsalam

119

Fast correction of bleed-through distortion in grayscale documents by a blind source separation technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ancient documents are usually degraded by the presence of strong background artifacts. These are often caused by the so-called bleed-through effect, a pattern that interferes with the main text due to seeping of ink from the reverse side. A similar effect, ... Keywords: Bleed-through cancellation, Blind source separation, Grayscale document restoration, Independent component analysis

Anna Tonazzini; Emanuele Salerno; Luigi Bedini

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Change blindness and situation awareness in a police C2 environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We conducted a field study at the British Transport Police (BTP) Control Room in London to evaluate three hypotheses: that operators in a command and control environment miss changes; that missing changing information affects Situation Awareness (SA); ... Keywords: CDM, attention, change blindness, situation awareness

Gabriela Mancero; William Wong; Martin Loomes

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stability of two-dimensional blind grasping under the gravity effect and rolling constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to show a sensory-motor coordination control scheme that realizes stable pinching of rigid objects with parallel or nonparallel flat surfaces movable in 2-dimensional vertical plane by a pair of robot fingers with hemispherical ends. ... Keywords: Bernstein's DOF problem, Blind grasping, Force/torque balance, Multifingered hand, Sensory-motor coordination

S. Arimoto; M. Yoshida; J.-h. Bae

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Blind Source Separation, ISI Cancellation and Carrier Phase Recovery in SDMA Systems for Mobile Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current rates of demand for radio cellular services will soon reach the saturation point of the actual cellular infrastructures. Thus, spectral bandwidth-saving multiple access schemes are necessary to expand the actual networks‘ capacity. ... Keywords: SDMA wireless communications, blind source separation, carrier phase recovery, intersymbol interference cancellation

João Xavier; Victor Barroso

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On the design of an educational infrastructure for the blind and visually impaired in computer science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The blind and visually impaired community is significantly underrepresented in computer science. Students who wish to enter the discipline must overcome significant technological and educational barriers to succeed. In an attempt to help this population, ... Keywords: accessibility, assistive technology, auditory debugging, visual impairments

Andreas M. Stefik; Christopher Hundhausen; Derrick Smith

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

SENSITIVITY OF BLIND PULSAR SEARCHES WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect

We quantitatively establish the sensitivity to the detection of young to middle-aged, isolated, gamma-ray pulsars through blind searches of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data using a Monte Carlo simulation. We detail a sensitivity study of the time-differencing blind search code used to discover gamma-ray pulsars in the first year of observations. We simulate 10,000 pulsars across a broad parameter space and distribute them across the sky. We replicate the analysis in the Fermi LAT First Source Catalog to localize the sources, and the blind search analysis to find the pulsars. We analyze the results and discuss the effect of positional error and spin frequency on gamma-ray pulsar detections. Finally, we construct a formula to determine the sensitivity of the blind search and present a sensitivity map assuming a standard set of pulsar parameters. The results of this study can be applied to population studies and are useful in characterizing unidentified LAT sources.

Dormody, M.; Johnson, R. P.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Razzano, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Grenier, I. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Johnson, T. J., E-mail: dormody@scipp.ucsc.edu [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

One patient's artificial retina story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helping To Advance the Frontiers of Medical Research Helping To Advance the Frontiers of Medical Research A patient's perspective on what the retinal implant has meant to her Patient following a white line In psychophysical testing, Kathy B. demonstrates how her artificial retina implant allows her to walk along a white line to its termination. A highly functioning person with a job, family, and household to tend to, Kathy B. doesn't feel like she's blind despite the fact that she's had no vision for about 15 years. Nevertheless, she was excited when she recently was able to find the full moon in the dark, nighttime sky. "We were out walking, and I looked upwards, scanning my head back and forth," Kathy B. explains. "All of a sudden, I saw a big flash, and I asked my husband, 'Is that the moon?'" It was, and she began thinking

126

The DOE Artificial Retina Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENvisioNiNG siGht for thE BLiND ENvisioNiNG siGht for thE BLiND The DOE Artificial Retina Project Leveraging DOE expertise to enhance the quality of life for millions Major advances achieved by researchers in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Artificial Retina Project are beginning to offer some hope to millions of people blinded by retinal diseases worldwide. In a breakthrough operation performed by project leaders at the Doheny Eye Institute (University of Southern California) in 2002, doctors threaded an electrode-studded array through an incision into the eye of a man who had been blind for 50 years and tacked it onto his damaged retina. Within weeks, the 77-year-old patient could see patterns of light and dark that allowed him to detect motion and locate and differentiate

127

Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the Developed and Developing World Speaker(s): Lee Schipper Date: February 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon A new "Great Wall" has emerged in China, this one a string of miles of cars stuck in traffic. Emissions from road transport in developing countries are expected to rise sharply in the coming decades if current trends continue. Projections of passenger and freight activity, vehicle use, and CO2 emissions push up overall CO2 emissions by a factor of three in Latin American and five in Asia by 2030, even with fuel economy improvements. The increase in car use is in part a result of growing incomes and economic activity, but it also reflects the poor quality of transit and

128

Boundary-Layer Water Vapor Probing with a Solar-Blind Raman Lidar: Validations, Meteorological Observations and Prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of a solar-blind Raman lidar (SBRL) to measure the vertical profile of water vapor in the boundary layer is proved from a theoretical as well as an experimental point of view.

D. Renaut; R. Capitini

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Blind identification methods applied to Electricite de France's civil works and power plants monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: In this article, the authors present results obtained on industrial data with source separation techniques in an instantaneous mix. They introduce three applications developed to perform the monitoring of Electricite de France civil works and ... Keywords: Electricite de France, applications, blind identification methods, dams supervision, electricity supply industry, flattening noise reduction, higher-order statistical algorithm, hydropower plants, monitoring performance, multi-sensor approach, neutron noise, nondestructive testing, nuclear power plants, power plants monitoring, source separation techniques, steam generators, two-order statistical algorithm, vibration modes

G. D'Urso; P. Prieur; C. Vincent

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Double-blind evaluation of the DKL LifeGuard Model 2  

SciTech Connect

On March 20, 1998, Sandia National Laboratories performed a double-blind test of the DKL LifeGuard human presence detector and tracker. The test was designed to allow the device to search for individuals well within the product`s published operational parameters. The Test Operator of the DKL LifeGuard was provided by the manufacturer and was a high-ranking member of DKL management. The test was developed and implemented to verify the performance of the device as specified by the manufacturer. The device failed to meet its published specifications and it performed no better than random chance.

Murray, D.W.; Spencer, F.W.; Spencer, D.D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal and Daylighting Performance of an automated venetian blind and lighting system in a full scale private office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic envelope/lighting systems have the potential to optimize the perimeter zone energy balance between daylight admission and solar heat gain rejection on a real-time basis, and to increase occupant comfort. Two side-by-side full-scale offices in Oakland, California were built to further develop and test this concept. An automated venetian blind was operated in synchronization with a dimmable electric lighting system to block direct sun, provide the design workplane illuminance, and maximize view. The research program encompassed system design refinements, energy measurements, and human factors tests. In this study, we present lighting energy and cooling load data that were monitored in this facility over the course of a year. Significant energy savings and peak demand reductions were attained with the automated venetian blind / lighting system compared to a static venetian blind with the same dimmable electric lighting system. Correlations between key weather parameters and

E. S. Lee; D. L. Dibartolomeo; S. E. Selkowitz; E. S. Lee; D. L. Dibartolomeo; S. E. Selkowitz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Detecting false alarms in transit data from space: Rejection methods tested in Corot Blind Test 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transit searches provide a large number of planet candidates. Before attempting follow-up observations, the best effort should be spent in classifying the light-curves, rejecting false alarms and selecting the most likely ones for real planets. A number of analysis tools has been developed with these objectives. Here, we apply such tools to 237 simulated multi-color light-curves from CoRoT Blind Test 2, which contain simulated planet transits and several configurations of impostors. Their comparison gives indications of the various tools' classification and false-alarm rejection capabilities. In order to arrive at the candidate identifications, we used an automated scheme of weighted punctuations assigned to the individual tests, which avoids that results from a single test dominate a candidate's classification.

J. M. Almenara; H. J. Deeg; C. Regulo; R. Alonso

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

A blind image copyright protection scheme for e-government q Shi-Jinn Horng a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A blind image copyright protection scheme for e-government q Shi-Jinn Horng a,b, , Didi Rosiyadi b,f , Tianrui Li a , Terano Takao c , Minyi Guo d , Muhammad Khurram Khan e a School of Information Science

Guo, Minyi

134

Analysis of variance of three contrast functions in a genetic algorithm for non-linear blind source separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The task of recovering a set of unknown sources from another set of mixtures directly observable and little more information about the way they were mixed is called the blind source separation problem. If the assumption in order to obtain the original ...

F. Rojas; J. M. Górriz; O. Valenzuela

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Blind channel identification algorithms based on the Parafac decomposition of cumulant tensors: The single and multiuser cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we exploit the symmetry properties of 4th-order cumulants to develop new blind channel identification algorithms that utilize the parallel factor (Parafac) decomposition of cumulant tensors by solving a single-step (SS) least squares (LS) ... Keywords: Channel identification, Parameter estimation, Tensor decomposition, Underdetermined linear mixtures

Carlos Estêvão R. Fernandes; Gérard Favier; João Cesar M. Mota

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Trigger-disabling Acquisition System for Quantum Key Distribution failsafe against Self-blinding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern single-photon detectors based on avalanche photodiodes offer increasingly higher triggering speeds, thus fostering their use in several fields, prominently in the recent area of Quantum Key Distribution. To reduce the probability of an afterpulse, these detectors are usually equipped with a circuitry that disables the trigger for a certain time after a positive detection event, known as dead time. If the acquisition system connected to the detector is not properly designed, efficiency issues arise when the triggering rate is faster than the inverse of detector's dead-time. Moreover, when this happens with two or more detectors used in coincidence, a security risk called "self-blinding" can jeopardize the distribution of a secret quantum key. In this paper we introduce a trigger-disabling circuitry based on an FPGA-driven feedback loop, so to avoid the above-mentioned inconveniences. In the regime of single-photon-attenuated light, the electronics dynamically accept a trigger only after detectors' compl...

Bawaj, M; Natali, R; Di Giuseppe, G; Tombesi, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Trigger-disabling Acquisition System for Quantum Key Distribution failsafe against Self-blinding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern single-photon detectors based on avalanche photodiodes offer increasingly higher triggering speeds, thus fostering their use in several fields, prominently in the recent area of Quantum Key Distribution. To reduce the probability of an afterpulse, these detectors are usually equipped with a circuitry that disables the trigger for a certain time after a positive detection event, known as dead time. If the acquisition system connected to the detector is not properly designed, efficiency issues arise when the triggering rate is faster than the inverse of detector's dead-time. Moreover, when this happens with two or more detectors used in coincidence, a security risk called "self-blinding" can jeopardize the distribution of a secret quantum key. In this paper we introduce a trigger-disabling circuitry based on an FPGA-driven feedback loop, so to avoid the above-mentioned inconveniences. In the regime of single-photon-attenuated light, the electronics dynamically accept a trigger only after detectors' complete recovery from dead-time. This technique proves useful to work with detectors at their maximum speed and to increase the security of a quantum key distribution setup.

M. Bawaj; M. Lucamarini; R. Natali; G. Di Giuseppe; P. Tombesi

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Daylighting: Measuring the Performance of Light Shelves and Occupant-Controlled Blinds on a Dimmed Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a day lighted space is both an art and a science. The biggest challenge facing the lighting designer is to admit only as much light as necessary and distribute it evenly throughout the space without introducing glare or heat. In warm climates such as Florida, it has become common practice in windowed spaces to specify blinds and glazing with high shading coefficients to control glare and minimize heat gain. However, this practice reduces the effectiveness of lighting systems that dim automatically. Improved systems are needed to capture natural daylight and distribute it uniformly throughout a space while controlling heat gain and glare. One such system is the light shelf. Light shelves shade the space from direct sunlight and reflect this sunlight onto the ceiling for a deeper and more uniform distribution. While this is not a new idea, little unbiased empirical data has been collected, outside the laboratory, that compares the performance (energy savings, uniformity, and level) of an automatic daylighting system. This study measures the effectiveness of light shelves and manually controlled horizontal blinds in an automatic daylighting system. Power consumption and interior work-plane lighting levels were compared in four essentially identical private offices. Two offices were configured with an interior light shelf, one with a white diffuse top surface and the other with a specular surface. The third office had no window treatment and the fourth office had horizontal blinds, which were manually adjusted by the user. All offices had two lamp fluorescent luminaires with dimming ballasts (min. 20%) controlled by a ceiling mounted photosensor. The study showed that daytime savings ranged from 29% to 46%, with the largest savings from the office with the light shelves. The office with horizontal blinds showed the poor savings (32%) and also the poorest light uniformity and level.

Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A numerical study of free convective heat transfer in a double-glazed window with a between-pane Venetian blind.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The free convective heat transfer in a double-glazed window with a between-pane Venetian blind has been studied numerically. The model geometry consists of a two-dimensional… (more)

Avedissian, Tony

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Molecular beam epitaxy-grown wurtzite MgS thin films for solar-blind ultra-violet detection  

SciTech Connect

Molecular beam epitaxy grown MgS on GaAs(111)B substrate was resulted in wurtzite phase, as demonstrated by detailed structural characterizations. Phenomenological arguments were used to account for why wurtzite phase is preferred over zincblende phase or its most stable rocksalt phase. Results of photoresponse and reflectance measurements performed on wurtzite MgS photodiodes suggest a direct bandgap at around 5.1 eV. Their response peaks at 245 nm with quantum efficiency of 9.9% and enjoys rejection of more than three orders at 320 nm and close to five orders at longer wavelengths, proving the photodiodes highly competitive in solar-blind ultraviolet detection.

Lai, Y. H.; He, Q. L. [Nano Science and Nano Technology Program, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China) [Nano Science and Nano Technology Program, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Cheung, W. Y.; Lok, S. K.; Wong, K. S.; Sou, I. K. [Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Ho, S. K. [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)] [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China); Tam, K. W. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Discovery of Nine Gamma-Ray Pulsars in Fermi-LAT Data Using a New Blind Search Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of nine previously unknown gamma-ray pulsars in a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found with a novel hierarchical search method originally developed for detecting continuous gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Designed to find isolated pulsars spinning at up to kHz frequencies, the new method is computationally efficient, and incorporates several advances, including a metric-based gridding of the search parameter space (frequency, frequency derivative and sky location) and the use of photon probability weights. The nine pulsars have spin frequencies between 3 and 12 Hz, and characteristic ages ranging from 17 kyr to 3 Myr. Two of them, PSRs J1803-2149 and J2111+4606, are young and energetic Galactic-plane pulsars (spin-down power above 6e35 erg/s and ages below 100 kyr). The seven remaining pulsars, PSRs J0106+4855, J0622+3749, J1620-4927, J1746-3239, J2028+3332, J2030+4415, J2139+4716, are older and less energetic; two of them are located at higher Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 deg). PSR J0106+4855 has the largest characteristic age (3 Myr) and the smallest surface magnetic field (2e11 G) of all LAT blind-search pulsars. PSR J2139+4716 has the lowest spin-down power (3e33 erg/s) among all non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars ever found. Despite extensive multi-frequency observations, only PSR J0106+4855 has detectable pulsations in the radio band. The other eight pulsars belong to the increasing population of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.

H. J. Pletsch; L. Guillemot; B. Allen; M. Kramer; C. Aulbert; H. Fehrmann; P. S. Ray; E. D. Barr; A. Belfiore; F. Camilo; P. A. Caraveo; O. Celik; D. J. Champion; M. Dormody; R. P. Eatough; E. C. Ferrara; P. C. C. Freire; J. W. T. Hessels; M. Keith; M. Kerr; A. de Luca; A. G. Lyne; M. Marelli; M. A. McLaughlin; D. Parent; S. M. Ransom; M. Razzano; W. Reich; P. M. Saz Parkinson; B. W. Stappers; M. T. Wolff

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

Schneider, A.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

General blind watermark schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital watermark is an active research area that has received a considerable attention in multimedia applications. For most watermark applications, it is often desired to retrieve the embedded information without access to the host data, which is known ...

Liu Yongliang; Wen Gao; Minghao Cui; Yaxiao Song

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Artificial Retina Implant Patient Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interviews with Artificial Retina Recipients Interviews with Artificial Retina Recipients Image of Mr. R Mr. R: Argus II recipient (Italy) You Tube video (2012; 2011 implantee) Image of Mr. F Mr. F: Argus II recipient (Italy) You Tube video (2012; 2011 implantee) Image of Mr. P Mr. P: Argus II recipient (France) You Tube video (2012; 2009 implantee) Image of Mr. K Mr. K: Argus II recipient (England) You Tube video (2012; 2009 implantee) Image promoting Mail Online Article Peter L.: Blind man fitted with 'bionic eye' sees for first time in 30 years Mail Online (UK) (2009) Image promoting Mail Online Article Barbara C .: Blind U.S. woman has experimental electronic eye implant CNN video and article (2009) NDTV video and article (2009) Image promoting BBC story Ron: The man with the bionic eye BBC Video and article (2009)

145

Professional Preface, 2 (3): Enjoy the Sights - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of a multimedia CD-ROM on careers in materials science and engineering is being considered by an ad hoc committee. The project will be ...

146

Interactive SIGHT: textual access to simple bar charts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information graphics, such as bar charts and line graphs, are an important component of many articles from popular media. The majority of such graphics have an intention (a high-level message) to communicate to the graph viewer. Since the intended message ... Keywords: Accessibility, Assistive technology, Graph summarization, Information graphics, Visual impairments

Seniz Demir; David Oliver; Edward Schwartz; Stephanie Elzer; Sandra Carberry; Kathleen F. Mccoy; Daniel Chester

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hiding in Plain Sight: Exploiting Broadcast for Practical Host Anonymity  

SciTech Connect

Users are being tracked on the Internet more than ever before as Web sites and search engines gather pieces of information sufficient to identify and study their behavior. While many existing schemes provide strong anonymity, they are inappropriate when high bandwidth and low latency are required. In this work, we explore an anonymity scheme for end hosts whose performance makes it possible to have it always on. The scheme leverages the natural grouping of hosts in the same subnet and the universally available broadcast primitive to provide anonymity at line speeds. Our scheme is strongly resistant against all active or passive adversaries as long as they are outside the subnet. Even within the subnet, our scheme provides reasonable resistance against adversaries, providing anonymity that is suitable for common Internet applications.

Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Gupta, Prof. Minaxi [Indiana University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Sights and Sounds of the Mysterious Side of Myself.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This film is an autobiographical documentary which tells the story of the process of documenting the filmmaker's trip to his land of heritage. As his… (more)

Dojs, Marek Ryszard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NISTIR 6747 Validation and Modification of the 4SIGHT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the service life of new underground concrete structures ... for different values of water-cement ratio ... The final form exploits the formation factor, which is ...

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

An optical system for line-of-sight communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We design and implement a system for short and medium range directional two-way wireless communication. The system uses infrared radiation to transmit and receive voice data digitally. We utilize narrow angle infrared light ...

Mehta, Agustya R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

4SIGHT Manual: A Computer Program for Modeling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by a space. Stoichiometric ratios are not used. ... NOTE: The two ion specifications are separated bya space and stoichiometric 8 Page 14. 5 Example ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Head-and-Neck Target Delineation Among Radiation Oncology Residents After a Teaching Intervention: A Prospective, Blinded Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We conducted this study to determine the feasibility of incorporating a teaching intervention on target delineation into the educational curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program and to assess the short-term effects on resident skills. Methods and Materials: The study schema consisted of a baseline evaluation, the teaching intervention, and a follow-up evaluation. At the baseline evaluation, the participants contoured three clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) (70 Gy, 59.4 Gy, and 54 Gy) on six contrast-enhanced axial computed tomography images of a de-identified patient with Stage T2N2bM0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right base of the tongue. The participants attended a series of head-and-neck oncology and anatomy seminars. The teaching intervention consisted of a didactic lecture and an interactive hands-on practical session designed to improve the knowledge and skills for target delineation in the head and neck. At the follow-up evaluation, the residents again contoured the CTVs. Results: Of the 14 eligible residents, 11 (79%) actually participated in the study. For all participants, but especially for those who had not had previous experience with head-and-neck target delineation, the teaching intervention was associated with improvement in the delineation of the node-negative neck (CTV 54 Gy contour). Regardless of clinical experience, participants had difficulty determining what should be included in the CTV 59.4 Gy contour to ensure adequate coverage of potential microscopic disease. Conclusion: Incorporating a teaching intervention into the education curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program is feasible and was associated with short-term improvements in target delineation skills. Subsequent interventions will require content refinement, additional validation, longer term follow-up, and multi-institutional collaboration.

Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: bekelmaj@mskcc.org; Wolden, Suzanne; Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Study Protocol: Phase III single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention for breathlessness in advanced disease.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the randomisation sequence, and contributed to revising the paper. PM co-designed Phase III (economic evaluation), co-applied for funding, and contributed to revising the paper. JG was the research associate during the first half of the Phase III RCT and led... studies of breath- lessness interventions had focused on patients with malignancies. Funding was sought for a Phase II trial with patients with malignancies but was unsuccessful. Thus the methods outlined here for Phase III have not been tested on patients...

Farquhar, Morag C; Prevost, A Toby; McCrone, Paul; Higginson, Irene J; Gray, Jennifer; Brafman-Kennedy, Barbara; Booth, Sara

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

NUMERICAL OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR BLIND ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecular structure determination, International Journal of High Performance Computing. Applications, 24 (2010), pp. 117–135. [10] J. Frank, Three-

155

Supporting Patient Safety Through EHR Design Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. EHR Usability & Patient Safety Roundtable "Supporting Patient Safety through EHR Design" April 19, 2013 Presentations. ...

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

EHR Usability and Patient Safety Roundtable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EHR Usability & Patient Safety Roundtable. Purpose: Background. In its recent report “Health IT and Patient Safety,” the ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Category:OutPatient | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OutPatient OutPatient Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "OutPatient" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVOutPatient Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVOutPatient Bismarck ... 72 KB SVOutPatient International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVOutPatient Internati... 87 KB SVOutPatient LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVOutPatient LA CA Cit... 91 KB SVOutPatient Memphis TN City of Memphis Tennessee (Utility Company).png SVOutPatient Memphis T... 66 KB SVOutPatient Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVOutPatient Minneapol... 87 KB SVOutPatient Minot ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png

158

One patient's artificial retina story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eyeing the Future, A New Kind of Vision One Patient's Story Linda M meets Mickey Mouse Linda M., a petite brunette in her early 60s (pictured at right), first realized that...

159

FY 2010 Performance Goals Artificial Retina Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Performance Goals 10 Performance Goals 2010 Annual Goal: Advance blind patient sight: Initiate preclinical studies of 200+ electrode implantable device. Complete specification for 1000+ pixel device. Performance Goal/Annual Target Quarter Quarter Goal Quarterly Results: Yes or No? 1st Quarter Design verification of subsystems for preclinical 200+ system. Goal Met. The design verification of the subsystems for the preclinical 200+ system has been completed. The thin film electrode array and the demultiplexer which were updated based on the A - 60 clinical trials have been fabricated and successfully tested. 2nd Quarter Assembly of preclinical 200+ systems. Goal Met. The assembly of the components including the thin film electrode array and the electronics package for a Preclinical 200+ system has been completed. Initial functional testing has verified that wireless power and telemetry was transmitted and received from the Preclinical 200+ system.

160

FY 2009 Performance Goals Artificial Retina Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FY 2009 Performance Goals FY 2009 Performance Goals 2009 Annual Goal: Advance blind patient sight. FY09: Complete in vitro/benchtop development of implantable 200+ electrode prototype. 2009 Annual Goal Met: The bench-top development of an implantable 200+ electrode prototype has been completed. All the components of the 200+ electrode prototype have been integrated and characterized. Performance Goal/Annual Target Quarter Quarter Goal Quarterly Results: Yes or No? 1st Quarter Build electronics module for implantable active A-200+ system Goal Met. The electronics module for an implantable active A-200+ system was assembled and tested. It is a key component required to fabricate the active A-200+ prototype system. 2nd Quarter Complete fabrication of active A - 200+ Prototype system

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Phenylbutyrate Mouthwash Mitigates Oral Mucositis During Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Deleterious oral mucositis (OM) develops during radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients. There are currently no effective cytoprotective treatments for OM without a potential risk of tumor protection. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study aimed to determine the therapeutic safety and efficacy of phenylbutyrate (an antitumor histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemical chaperone) 5% mouthwash for treating OM caused by cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2005 and June 2006, 36 HNC patients were randomized to standard oral care plus 5 mL of either phenylbutyrate 5% mouthwash (n = 17) or placebo (mouthwash vehicle, n = 19) taken four times daily (swish and spit). Treatment began when mild mucositis (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1) occurred, and ended 4 weeks after RT completion. Safety and efficacy were based on adverse events, physical examination, laboratory determinations, vital signs, Oral Mucosa Assessment Scale (OMAS) and World Health Organization scores, the ability to eat, body weight change, local control, and survival. Results: We found no severe drug-related side effect. At RT doses of 5500-7500 cGy, phenylbutyrate significantly mitigated the severity of mucositis compared with placebo, based on both the WHO score (severity {>=} 3; p = 0.0262) and the OMAS scale (ulceration score {>=} 2; p = 0.0049). The Kaplan-Meier estimates for 2- and 3-year local control, and overall survival were 100% and 80.8%, and 78.6% and 64.3%, respectively, in the phenylbutyrate group and 74.2% and 74.2%, and 57.4% and 50.2%, respectively, in the placebo group. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggested that phenylbutyrate mouthwash significantly decreased the impact of OM in HNC patients receiving RT or chemoradiotherapy and did not confront the tumor control. Larger Phase II randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

Yen, Sang-Hue; Wang, Ling-Wei [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Hsien [Division of Radiotherapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Yih-Lin, E-mail: ylchung@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

Niazi, Tamim M. [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Vuong, Te, E-mail: tvuong@jgh.mcgill.ca [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Azoulay, Laurant [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Marijnen, Corrie [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bujko, Kryzstof [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland)] [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland); Nasr, Elie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon); Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of Spatial Displays for Navigation without Sight JAMES R. MARSTON and JACK M. LOOMIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spatial information (waypoint direction and distance) through small air-tubes inserted into the ear of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Permissions may be requested from Publications Dept., ACM

Loomis, Jack M.

164

Iran sets sights on 5 million b/d of crude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that Iran, currently producing 3.2 million b/d of oil, has set a production target of 5 million b/d by March 1994. On the way to that target Iran's oil flow will climb to 4 million b/d by March 1993, says A. Moshtaqhian, director of exploration and production for National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC). With oil reserves of about 100 million bbl, Iran will find it easy to increase productive capacity, Moshtaqhian told the Gulf Oil and Politics publication.

Not Available

1992-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Universal Design of Auditory Graphs: A Comparison of Sonification Mappings for Visually Impaired and Sighted Listeners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining patterns in data is an important and often difficult task for scientists and students. Unfortunately, graphing and analysis software typically is largely inaccessible to users with vision impairment. Using sound to represent data (i.e., sonification ... Keywords: Magnitude estimation, auditory display, visually impaired

B. N. Walker; L. M. Mauney

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Standardization and sustainability of open source products: barriers and conflicts demonstrated with the linux screenreader SUE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SUE is an open source screenreader developed for the graphical interface using Linux. The screenreader allows the visually impaired to work with Linux for typical office tasks and the desktop (GNOME) itself. A special training course will instruct teachers ... Keywords: ECDL, GNOME, SUE, accessibility, blind, linux, low vision, open source, partially sighted, screenreader & usability extensions, training programme

Andrea Gaal; Gerhard Jaworek; Joachim Klaus

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Beyond a visuocentric way of a visual web search clustering engine: the sonification of WhatsOnWeb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely accepted that spatial representation is processed by an amodal system. Recent studies show that blind subjects have a better motion ability than sighted people in performing spatial exploration guided only by auditory cues. The sonification ... Keywords: accessibility, information visualization, sonification, usability

Maria Laura Mele; Stefano Federici; Simone Borsci; Giuseppe Liotta

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Haptic graphs for blind computer users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yu,W. Ramloll,R. Brewster,S.A. Proceedings of the First Workshop on Haptic Human-Computer Interaction pp 102-107 Academic Press

Yu, W.; Ramloll, R.; Brewster, S.A.

169

Haptic graphs for blind computer users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yu,W. Ramloll,R. BrewsterS.A.,R. Haptic Human-Computer Interaction. Brewster, S.A. and Murray-Smith, R. (Eds.),Springer LNCS,Vol 2058 pp 41-51 Springer

Yu, W.; Ramloll, R.; BrewsterS.A., R.; Haptic Human-Computer Interaction.; Brewster, S.A.; and Murray-Smith, R.; (Eds.), Springer LNCS, Vol 2058 pp 41-51 Springer [More Details

170

Blind multiuser detection based on kernel approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A kernel based multiuser detection (MUD) scheme in code-division multiple-access (CDMA) system is proposed. In this scheme, the support vector (SV) under support vector (SVM) framework is obtained through a kernel sparsity approximation, which regulates ...

Tao Yang; Bo Hu

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Medical Information Technology trative skills of scheduling appointments, interacting with patients, submitting patient insurance claims using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Information Technology - - trative skills of scheduling appointments, interacting with patients, submitting patient insurance claims using current coding procedures, and maintaining medical Description: Medical Information Technology Associate of Applied Science Medical Administrative Assisting

Crone, Elizabeth

172

A novel patient mobility and rehabilitation robot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel Home Lift, Position, and Rehabilitation (HLPR) Chair, designed at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to provide independent patient mobility for indoor tasks, such as moving to and placing a person on ... Keywords: 4D/RCS control architecture, autonomous, home assist device, mobility, patient transfer, rehabilitation

Roger Bostelman; James Albus

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Patient training in respiratory-gated radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Respiratory gating is used to counter the effects of organ motion during radiotherapy for chest tumors. The effects of variations in patient breathing patterns during a single treatment and from day to day are unknown. We evaluated the feasibility of using patient training tools and their effect on the breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility during respiratory-gated radiotherapy. To monitor respiratory patterns, we used a component of a commercially available respiratory-gated radiotherapy system (Real Time Position Management (RPM) System, Varian Oncology Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304). This passive marker video tracking system consists of reflective markers placed on the patient's chest or abdomen, which are detected by a wall-mounted video camera. Software installed on a PC interfaced to this camera detects the marker motion digitally and records it. The marker position as a function of time serves as the motion signal that may be used to trigger imaging or treatment. The training tools used were audio prompting and visual feedback, with free breathing as a control. The audio prompting method used instructions to 'breathe in' or 'breathe out' at periodic intervals deduced from patients' own breathing patterns. In the visual feedback method, patients were shown a real-time trace of their abdominal wall motion due to breathing. Using this, they were asked to maintain a constant amplitude of motion. Motion traces of the abdominal wall were recorded for each patient for various maneuvers. Free breathing showed a variable amplitude and frequency. Audio prompting resulted in a reproducible frequency; however, the variability and the magnitude of amplitude increased. Visual feedback gave a better control over the amplitude but showed minor variations in frequency. We concluded that training improves the reproducibility of amplitude and frequency of patient breathing cycles. This may increase the accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy.

Kini, Vijay R.; Vedam, Subrahmanya S.; Keall, Paul J.; Patil, Sumukh; Chen, Clayton; Mohan, Radhe

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller patients. However, the overall risk of cancer incidence attributable to the CT examination was much higher for the newborn (2.4 in 1000) than for the teenager (0.7 in 1000). For the two pediatric-aged patients in our study, CTDI{sub vol} underestimated dose to large organs in the scan coverage by 30%-48%. The effective dose derived from DLP using published conversion coefficients differed from that calculated using patient-specific organ dose values by -57% to 13%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 60 were used, and by -63% to 28%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 103 were used. Conclusions: It is possible to estimate patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations by combining a validated Monte Carlo program with patient-specific anatomical models that are derived from the patients' clinical CT data and supplemented by transformed models of reference adults. With the construction of a large library of patient-specific computer models encompassing patients of all ages and weight percentiles, dose and risk can be estimated for any patient prior to or after a CT examination. Such information may aid in decisions for image utilization and can further guide the design and optimization of CT technologies and scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

FACTORS AFFECTING RURAL KENTUCKY PATIENTS HOSPITAL CHOICE AND BYPASS BEHAVIOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the underutilization of rural hospitals in Kentucky. The authors study hospital and patient characteristics to determine why and how rural patients bypass… (more)

He, Xiao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Heart Failure:Heart Failure: The Patient's ExperienceThe Patient's Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Heart Failure:Heart Failure: The Patient's ExperienceThe Patient's Experience Jason Ryan, MD, MPHJason Ryan, MD, MPH CoCo--director, UCONN Heart Failure Centerdirector, UCONN Heart Failure Center,084,000 $34.8 billion Background on Heart FailureBackground on Heart Failure 1 Heart failure (HF) is a major

Oliver, Douglas L.

177

Catalyzing social support for breast cancer patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Social support is a critical, yet underutilized resource when undergoing cancer care. Underutilization occurs in two conditions: (a) when patients fail to seek out information, material assistance, and emotional support from family and friends or (b) ... Keywords: health consumers, participatory design, social network

Meredith M. Skeels; Kenton T. Unruh; Christopher Powell; Wanda Pratt

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

MEDICAL OR PSYCHOLOGICAL EMERGENCY Ambulatory Patient (Students)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEDICAL OR PSYCHOLOGICAL EMERGENCY Ambulatory Patient (Students): Medical assistance can) with a physician is available for urgent medical concerns. Faculty and Staff can seek medical assistance If the individual needing assistance is not ambulatory, call 911 to request assistance from Emergency Medical

Meyers, Steven D.

179

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a “functional model patient room.” This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

DOE-STD-1040-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Control of On-Sight Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-93 0-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL OF ON-SHIFT TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No.1 DOE-STD-1040-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Control of On-Shift Training Page/Section Change pg. vii / Definitions The definition "Performance-Based Training"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comment on “Persistence and Recurrence Probabilities of Cloud-Free and Cloudy Lines of Sight through the Atmosphere”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although published some time ago, the subject paper represents a well-known resource for modeling and assessing cloud impacts on land-based and air-based electro-optical systems. The Lund dataset, derived from whole-sky photographs taken during ...

Charles L. Medler; Kenneth B. MacNichol

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Priori vision : the transcendence of pre-ontological sight : the disparity of externalizing the internal architecture of creation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The completion of any visual work is not an arrival, but furthered from the origin, the inner plane of perspective, which is so readily lent from the context of communicating the seemingly coded space from which I am ...

Lawson, Matthew Everett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009  

SciTech Connect

The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Sanders, Charlene A [ORNL; Kandagor, Vincent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Drift compensated inertial position sensor for healthcare patient monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to provide more effective health care, especially to the elderly, we must enable the physician to monitor the patient outside of the clinic or hospital. A patient's activities are a critical indicator of his or ...

Nelson, David Lee, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A mobile physiological monitoring system for patient transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More and more intra-hospital transport of patients is required to perform special examination or therapy in recent years. The key point of all critical care transport is the continuous monitoring of vital signs. Also, with the growing popularity of wireless ... Keywords: Motes, RFID, Wireless sensor network, patient identification, patient transport, physiological monitoring, telemedicine system

Jui-Chi Shen; Dong-Her Shih; Hsiu-Sen Chiang; Shih-Bin Lin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Lacrimal Gland Radiosensitivity in Uveal Melanoma Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To find a dose-volume effect for inhomogeneous irradiated lacrimal glands. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2006, 72 patients (42 men and 30 women) were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial (median follow-up, 32 months). A total dose of 50 Gy was given on 5 consecutive days. The mean of all Schirmer test results obtained {>=}6 months after treatment was correlated with the radiation dose delivered to the lacrimal gland. Also, the appearance of dry eye syndrome (DES) was related to the lacrimal gland dose distribution. Results: Of the 72 patients, 17 developed a late Schirmer value gland vs. reduced tear production (p = 0.000) and vs. the appearance of DES (p = 0.003), respectively. A median dose of 7 Gy/fraction to the lacrimal gland caused a 50% risk of low Schirmer results. A median dose of 10 Gy resulted in a 50% probability of DES. Conclusion: We found a clear dose-volume relationship for irradiated lacrimal glands with regard to reduced tear production and the appearance of DES.

Muller, Karin [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: k.muller@erasmusmc.nl; Nowak, Peter J.C.M. [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Naus, Nicole [Department of Ophthalmology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pan, Connie de [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Santen, Cornelis A. van [Department of Ophthalmology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Luyten, Gre P.M. [Department of Ophthalmology, Leids University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

188

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

189

Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Patients With Unresectable Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is an uncommon but lethal malignancy. We analyzed the role of definitive chemoradiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma treated at a single institution. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis included 37 patients who underwent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with concurrent chemotherapy and/or brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were assessed, and univariate regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-three patients received EBRT alone, 8 patients received EBRT plus BT, and 6 patients received BT alone (median follow-up of 14 months). Two patients were alive without evidence of recurrence at the time of analysis. Actuarial OS and LC rates at 1 year were 59% and 90%, respectively, and 22% and 71%, respectively, at 2 years. Two patients lived beyond 5 years without evidence of recurrence. On univariate analysis, EBRT with or without BT improved LC compared to BT alone (97% vs. 56% at 1 year; 75% vs. 56% at 2 years; p = 0.096). Patients who received EBRT alone vs. BT alone also had improved LC (96% vs. 56% at 1 year; 80% vs. 56% at 2 years; p = 0.113). Age, gender, tumor location (proximal vs. distal), histologic differentiation, EBRT dose ({<=} or >50 Gy), EBRT planning method (two-dimensional vs. three-dimensional), and chemotherapy were not associated with patient outcomes. Conclusions: Patients with locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma have poor survival. Long-term survival is rare. The majority of patients treated with EBRT had local control at the time of death, suggesting that symptoms due to the local tumor effect might be effectively controlled with radiation therapy, and EBRT is an important element of treatment. Novel treatment approaches are indicated in the therapy for this disease.

Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Nelson, John W.; Willett, Christopher G.; Chino, Junzo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Oncology and Transplantation, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Tyler, Douglas S. [Department of General Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Uronis, Hope E.; Morse, Michael A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology and Transplantation, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Clough, Robert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Oncology and Transplantation, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Czito, Brian G., E-mail: Czito001@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Oncology and Transplantation, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Patient-Wandering System Disabled by Broken Utility Powerline Clamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Case Study describes EPRI's investigation into malfunctions of the patient-wandering system (PWS) at an assisted-living center in Tennessee.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Patients' role expectations of home-based caregivers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This study investigates and describes palliative care patients’ expectations of their homebased caregivers. This paper attempts to expand on the findings of a… (more)

Armenis, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Rapid cooling technology could aid surgery patients, heart attack...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cooling technology could aid surgery patients, heart attack victims Diagram shows how ice slurry cools blood INTERNAL COOLING - An ice slurry, delivered through an endotracheal...

193

How Accurately Can Emergency Department Providers Estimate Patient Satisfaction?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 : September 2012 Western Journal of Emergency Medicineand satisfaction with emergency 13. Waggoner DM, Jackson EB,Patient satisfaction in emergency medicine. perceptions and

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Acute Thrombotic Mesenteric Ischemia: Primary Endovascular Treatment in Eight Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with initial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) {+-} stenting as valuable options in the acute setting. Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, eight patients with abdominal angio-MDCT-scan proven thrombotic AMI benefited from initial PTA {+-} stenting. We retrospectively assessed clinical and radiological findings and their management. Seven patients presented thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery, and in one patient both mesenteric arteries were occluded. All patients underwent initial PTA and stenting, except one who had balloon PTA alone. One patient was treated by additional in situ thrombolysis. Results: Technical success was obtained in all patients. Three patients required subsequent surgery (37.5%), two of whom had severe radiological findings (pneumatosis intestinalis and/or portal venous gas). Two patients (25%) died: both had NIDD, an ASA score {>=}4, and severe radiologic findings. Satisfactory arterial patency was observed after a follow-up of 15 (range, 11-17) months in five patients who did not require subsequent surgery, four of whom had abdominal guarding but no severe CT scan findings. One patient had an ileocecal stenosis 60 days after the procedure. Conclusions: Initial PTA {+-} stenting is a valuable alternative to surgery for patients with thrombotic AMI even for those with clinical peritoneal irritation signs and/or severe radiologic findings. Early surgery is indicated if clinical condition does not improve after PTA. The decision of a subsequent surgery must be lead by early clinical status reevaluation. In case of underlying atherosclerotic lesion, stenting should be performed after initial balloon dilatation.

Gagniere, Johan [CHU Estaing, Digestive Surgery Department (France); Favrolt, Gregory; Alfidja, Agaiecha; Kastler, Adrian; Chabrot, Pascal; Cassagnes, Lucie [EA 3295 Universite d'Auvergne Clermont 1, Radiology B, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire G Montpied (France); Buc, Emmanuel; Pezet, Denis [CHU Estaing, Digestive Surgery Department (France); Boyer, Louis, E-mail: lboyer@chu-clermontferrand.fr [EA 3295 Universite d'Auvergne Clermont 1, Radiology B, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire G Montpied (France)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effectiveness of Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a central role in the definitive treatment of glioblastoma. However, the optimal management of elderly patients with glioblastoma remains controversial, as the relative benefit in this patient population is unclear. To better understand the role that radiation plays in the treatment of glioblastoma in the elderly, we analyzed factors influencing patient survival using a large population-based registry. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,836 patients more than 70 years of age diagnosed with glioblastoma between 1993 and 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Demographic and clinical variables used in the analysis included gender, ethnicity, tumor size, age at diagnosis, surgery, and radiotherapy. Cancer-specific survival and overall survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using Cox regression. Results: Radiotherapy was administered in 64% of these patients, and surgery was performed in 68%. Among 2,836 patients, 46% received surgery and radiotherapy, 22% underwent surgery only, 18% underwent radiotherapy only, and 14% did not undergo either treatment. The median survival for patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy was 8 months. The median survival for patients who underwent radiotherapy only was 4 months, and for patients who underwent surgery only was 3 months. Those who received neither surgery nor radiotherapy had a median survival of 2 months (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that radiotherapy significantly improved cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.49) after adjusting for surgery, tumor size, gender, ethnicity, and age at diagnosis. Other factors associated with Cancer-specific survival included surgery, tumor size, age at diagnosis, and ethnicity. Analysis using overall survival as the endpoint yielded very similar results. Conclusions: Elderly patients with glioblastoma who underwent radiotherapy had improved cancer-specific survival and overall survival compared to patients who did not receive radiotherapy.

Scott, Jacob [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Tsai, Ya-Yu [Cancer Prevention and Control, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Chinnaiyan, Prakash [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael, E-mail: Michael.Yu@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hanover County Improves Its Response to Emergency Medical 911 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting emergency medical service (EMS) performance measure benchmarks for patient response times is an important factor in saving patient lives. Hanover County Fire and EMS in Virginia initiated a quick-response vehicle (QRV) pilot program in which ... Keywords: emergency medical services, nonparametric statistical methods, public services

Laura A. McLay; Henri Moore

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS AUBURN * 3200 BELL ROAD AUBURN, CA 95602-7373 to schedule an appointment ** Ucdmc laboratory patient service centers up-dated May 8, 2013 wpd #12; FOR HEALTH *** 550 West Ranch View Road, Suite 1100 Rocklin, Ca 95765 Lab: (916) 295-5800 Fax: (916) 295

Hammock, Bruce D.

198

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS AUBURN * 3200 BELL ROAD AUBURN, CA 95602 Services on an Emergency basis Ucdmc laboratory patient service centers up-dated May 8, 2012wpd #12; Monday ­ Friday PLACER CENTER FOR HEALTH *** 550 West Ranch View Road, Suite 1100 Rocklin, Ca 95765 Lab

Hammock, Bruce D.

199

Usability of mobile computing technologies to assist cancer patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical researchers are constantly looking for new methods for early detection and treatment of incurable diseases. Cancer can severely hinder the lives of patients if they are not constantly attended to. Cancer patients can be assisted with the aid ... Keywords: MARKS, TinyOS, cancer, chemotherapy, mote, pervasive health care, tmote sky, wellness monitor

Rezwan Islam; Sheikh I. Ahamed; Nilothpal Talukder; Ian Obermiller

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for any other patient in the same size/protocol group who undergoes the chest scan. In summary, this work reported the first assessment of dose variations across pediatric CT patients in the same size/protocol group due to the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus and provided a previously unavailable method for patient-specific organ dose estimation, which will help in assessing patient risk and optimizing dose reduction strategies, including the development of scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

202

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

203

Expanding Patient Access to Medical Records | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanding Patient Access to Medical Records July 1, 2013 Last month we at ONC and the health IT team at the White House gathered a group of diverse stakeholders to talk about ways...

204

Improving surgical patient flow in a congested recovery area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent movement in healthcare reform requires hospitals to care for more patients while simultaneously reducing costs. Medical institutions can no longer afford to simply add beds and hire staff to increase capacity. ...

Schwartz, Trevor A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Disturbed Sound Lateralization in Patients with Spatial Neglect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies on auditory space perception in patients with neglect have investigated localization of free-field-sound stimuli or lateralization of dichotic stimuli that are perceived intracranially. Since those studies in part revealed contradictory ...

Ulrike Zimmer; Jörg Lewald; Hans-Otto Karnath

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pharmaceutical Companies and Patient Care – The Mixed Effects Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Times. The New York Times Company, 7 Mar. 2012. Web. 14 Mar.Pharmaceutical Companies and Patient Care – The MixedDoctor Is Paid By Drug Companies. ” Health Affairs 30.12 (

Gururangan, Kapil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Intermittent patient suction system, self-contained control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermittent patient suction system, a self-contained control device therefor and methods of making the same are provided, the self-contained control device having a housing that contains two restrictor units therein for respectively controlling the "on" time and "off" time that the control device applies a vacuum and does not apply a vacuum through the output of the control device to the patient.

Lewis, Jay L. (Knoxville, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Unsupervised blind separation and debluring of mixtures of sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the problem of separating source images from linear mixtures with unknown coefficients, in presence of noise and blur. In particular, we consider as a special case the problem of estimating the Cosmic Microwave Background from ...

Livio Fedeli; Ivan Gerace; Francesca Martinelli

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Shadow Elimination and Blinding Light Suppression for Interactive Projected Displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1 The average cost of office space in the USA is $77 per square foot [10]. #12;2 In this paper we's over- all cost, increases portability, and allows easier retro-fitting of existing spaces, but suffers

Haro, Antonio

210

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

211

The Path of the Blind Watchmaker: A Model of Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mean, and a row showing how many standard deviations aboveThe next two rows show the mean and standard deviation of

Poggio, Andrew Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Integrated Performance of an Automated Venetian Blind/Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For this southeast-facing office, we found that 1-22% lighting energy savings, 13-28% cooling load reductions, and 13-28% peak cooling load reductions can be achieved by the...

213

NIST Demonstrates New Reading Device For the Blind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST held the world's first e-book conference in 1998. The agency has been working with the e-book industry to develop ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

214

Blind Source Separation of More Sources Using Overcomplete Representations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lee,T.W. Lewicki,M.S. Girolami,M. Sejnowski,T. IEEE Signal Processing Letters pp v.1, no.4 87-90 IEE

Lee, T.W.; Lewicki, M.S.; Girolami, M.

215

Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anita Estner James McMahon A new "Great Wall" has emerged in China, this one a string of miles of cars stuck in traffic. Emissions from road transport in developing...

216

Development, Evaluation and Optimization of Blind Controls for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In western Europe, about 55% of the building stock was constructed between 1950 and 1990. During that time, the regulations concerning...

217

A biomechanical analysis of patient handling techniques and equipment in a remote setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Remote area staff performing manual patient handling tasks in the absence of patient lifting hoists available in most health care settings are at an elevated… (more)

Muriti, Andrew John

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radiation Enterocolitis Requiring Surgery in Patients With Gynecological Malignancies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify the characteristics, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The records of 1,349 patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of the patients (88%) were treated with 50 Gy or 50.4 Gy pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionations with anteroposterior fields. Results: Forty-eight patients (3.6%) developed radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery. Terminal ileum was the most frequent site (50%) and most of the lesions had stenosis or perforation. On univariate analysis, previous abdominopelvic surgery, diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking and primary site had an impact on the complications, and on multivariate analysis, abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking were independent predictors of the complications requiring surgery. After the surgical intervention, the frequency of Grade 2 or more bleeding was significantly lower in patients treated with intestinal resection in addition to decompression than those treated with intestinal decompression alone. Conclusions: Severe radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery usually occurred at the terminal ileum and was strongly correlated with previous abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking. Concerning the management, liberal resection of the affected bowel appears to be the preferable therapy.

Iraha, Shiro [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)]. E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Moromizato, Hidehiko [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Shiraishi, Masayuki [Department of Surgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nagai, Yutaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Samura, Hironori [Department of Surgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kakinohana, Yasumasa [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Adachi, Genki [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Tamaki, Wakana [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Hirakawa, Makoto [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kamiyama, Kazuya [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Inamine, Morihiko [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nishimaki, Tadashi [Department of Surgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Aoki, Yoichi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Outcome of Patients With Pilocytic Astrocytoma and Leptomeningeal Dissemination  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics of patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and leptomeningeal dissemination (LMD). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language studies pertaining to PA with LMD was performed using a combination of keywords that included juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, low-grade astrocytoma, low-grade glioma, leptomeningeal dissemination, neuraxis spread, and radiotherapy. We found 26 studies with 58 patients between 1976 and 2005 that met these criteria. Results: The median survival for PA patients with LMD was 65 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 81.1%, 75.7%, and 55.5%. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 69.3%, 66.5%, and 34.6%, respectively. Age, gender, primary site location, timing of LMD presentation (synchronous vs. metachronous), and LMD location did not significantly influence OS or PFS. No statistically significant difference was found in OS or PFS between the chemotherapy and radiotherapy groups. Likewise, no difference was found in OS or PFS according to the use of craniospinal irradiation vs. less extensive RT fields. Conclusions: Approximately one-half of PA patients were alive 5 years after the diagnosis of LMD. Both chemotherapy and radiotherapy have efficacy against LMD. Although the use of craniospinal irradiation did not have an effect on PFS, the patient numbers were small and a larger number treated with craniospinal irradiation is needed to determine its efficacy.

Mazloom, Ali; Hodges, Joseph C.; Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Paulino, Arnold C., E-mail: apaulino@tmhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Effect of Performance-Based Financial Incentives on Improving Patient Care Experiences: A Statewide Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizational and market influences on physician performance on patient experience measures. Health

Rodriguez, Hector P.; Glahn, Ted; Elliott, Marc N.; Rogers, William H.; Safran, Dana Gelb

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of diabetic patients through their examination history  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of medical data is a challenging task for health care systems since a huge amount of interesting knowledge can be automatically mined to effectively support both physicians and health care organizations. This paper proposes a data analysis ... Keywords: Cluster analysis, Data mining, Diabetes, Patient examination history

Dario Antonelli; Elena Baralis; Giulia Bruno; Tania Cerquitelli; Silvia Chiusano; Naeem Mahoto

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fracture risk assessment in patients with chronic kidney disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 8, 2011 ... population, but the utility of these measurements in patients with CKD, and ... density testing, both by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and by peripheral ... One potential way to decrease the economic costs, morbidity, and ... mineralization, volume, linear growth, or strength — the abnormality of bone ...

223

Ice slurry technology can save heart attack victims, surgery patients  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Ice slurry technology can save heart attack victims, surgery patients Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Ice slurry technology can save heart attack victims, surgery patients Doctors use an endoscope to see the application of the slurry during a laparoscopic kidney surgery on a pig

224

Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA  

SciTech Connect

In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242- 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lewgoy, H. R. [Universidade Anhanguera Bandeirante, UNIBAN R. Maria Candida, 1813, Bloco G / 6o andar - 02071-013 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Artificial Retina Project Collaborators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborators map Map of project collaborators and descriptions of their primary contributions. Click on map for larger image. Artificial Retina Project Collaborators An effort spanning 6 DOE national laboratories, 4 universities, and private industry Multidisciplinary groups across the United States are using a highly focused and coordinated approach to develop a dramatically improved retinal prosthetic device to restore sight to the blind. The Doheny Eye Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Second Sight(tm) Medical Products, Inc., lead the collaborative effort through an executive committee. Meet the Team Doheny logo Doheny Eye Institute at the University of Southern California Provided medical direction and performs preclinical and clinical testing of the electrode array implants. Leads the Artificial Retina Project.

226

A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology  

SciTech Connect

To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

Koetser, Inge C. J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Vries, Eefje N. de [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Smorenburg, Susanne M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Study of the Probability of Clear Line of Sight through Single-Layer Cumulus Cloud Fields in the Tropical Western Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plane-parallel horizontal (PPH) hypothesis used to approximate clouds in GCMs neglects three-dimensional cloud effects. Such effects can amount to as much as 20 W m?2 in longwave radiation. Several investigators have proposed accounting for ...

Patrick C. Taylor; Robert G. Ellingson

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

Paulsen, Frank, E-mail: frank.paulsen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Doerr, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wilhelm, Helmut [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Becker, Gerd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany); Bamberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Classen, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Prognosis of Esophageal Cancer Patients With Pathologic Complete Response After Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define failure patterns and predictive factors in esophageal cancer patients who had a pathologic complete response (pCR) after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 61 esophageal cancer patients who were enrolled in prospective studies and showed pCR after PCRT. All of the patients had squamous cell carcinoma. Of the patients, 40 were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (4,560 cGy in 28 fractions) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (FP), and 21 patients received conventional fractionation radiotherapy with capecitabine and cisplatin (XP). Results: The median follow-up time was 45.2 months (range, 6.5-162.3 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival rates (DFS) were 60.2% and 80.4%, respectively. In univariate analysis, age and lymph node (LN) metastasis were poor prognostic factors for OS, and pretreatment weight loss (>2 kg) was a poor prognostic factor for DFS. In multivariate analysis, lymph node metastasis and pretreatment weight loss were independent prognostic factors for OS and DFS. Nine patients (15%) had disease recurrence. Of the nine patients, 5 patients had locoregional failure, 1 patients had distant metastasis, and 3 patients had distant and locoregional failure. In-field failure occurred in 5 patients; out-of-field failure occurred in 1 patient; both in-field and out-of-field failure occurred in 2 patients; and both marginal and out-of-field failure occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Even in pCR patients, the most common failure site was within the radiation field, which suggests that more efficient local treatment is needed. Tumor recurrence was more common in patients with older age and with pretreatment weight loss.

Park, Jae Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang-wook; Yoon, Sang Min; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Yu Sun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Bae [Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung il [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Radioembolization After Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with Multifocal Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Radioembolization is an effective locoregional therapy for patients with intermediate or advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been shown that radioembolization is safe in patients with portal vein thrombosis. This case report describes safe radioembolization after portal vein embolization in a patient with multifocal HCC.

Burgmans, Mark C., E-mail: mburgmans@hotmail.com; Irani, Farah G., E-mail: farah.gillan.irani@sgh.com.sg; Chan, Wan Ying, E-mail: chanwanying01@gmail.com; Teo, Terence K., E-mail: teo.kiat.beng@sgh.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology Center (Singapore); Kao, Yung Hsiang, E-mail: yung.h.kao@gmail.com; Goh, Anthony S.W., E-mail: anthony.goh.s.w@sgh.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET (Singapore); Chow, Pierce K., E-mail: pierce.chow@duke-nus.edu.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of General Surgery (Singapore); Lo, Richard H., E-mail: richard.lo.h.g@sgh.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology Center (Singapore)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Licenses Available in Chemicals | Tech Transfer | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemicals Chemicals SHARE Chemicals 199800555 Imprinting Method for Selective Mesoporous Sorbents 200000806 Flow Cytometry Using Electroosmotically Induced Pressures 200000812 Method for Sequencing Nucleic Acids 200000815 Standoff Tissue-Based Biosensors 200000845 Positron Lifetime System for dc Positron Beams 200000869 Metallization of Bacterial Cellulose for Electrical and Electronic Device Manufacture 200000884 Method of Restoring Sight to Blind Persons 200100899 Catalyst- Induced Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Tips of Cantilevers and Nanowires 200100918 Cell Transport, Lysis and Analysis on Microfluidic Devices 200100947 Boron Loaded Scintillator 200100948 Precursor Soot Synthesis of Fullerenes and Nanotubes without Carbonaceous Soot 200100968 Melt-spun Carbon Fiber Precursors Containing Lignin

233

Somatic mosaicism in a patient with neurofibromomatosis type 1  

SciTech Connect

Using loss of heterozygosity analysis, a method designed to detect moderate to large gene deletions, we have identified a new-mutation neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patient who is somatically mosaic for a large maternally derived deletion in the NF1 gene region. The deletion extends at least from exon 4 near the 5{prime} end of the gene to intron 39 near the 3{prime} end. The gene-coding region is, therefore, mostly or entirely deleted, encompassing a loss of {>=}100 kb. We hypothesize that the deletion occurred at a relatively early developmental timepoint, since signs of NF in this patient are not confined to a specific body region, as seen in {open_quotes}segmental{close_quotes} NF, and since both mesodermally and ectodermally derived cells are affected. This report provides the first molecular evidence of somatic mosaicism in NF1 and, taken together with a recent report of germ-line mosaicism in NF1, adds credence to the concept that mosaicism plays an important role in phenotypic and genetic aspects of NF1 and may even be a relatively common phenomenon. 37 refs., 4 figs.

Colman, S.D.; Rasmussen, S.A.; Ho, V.T. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Portable, space-saving medical patient support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support platform having a stowed configuration and a deployed configuration on a floor. The support platform is related to stretcher devices that are used for transporting, confining, or conducting medical procedures on medical patients in medical emergencies. The support platform typically includes a work surface that has a geometric extent. A base that typically includes a plurality of frame members is provided, and the frame members are disposed across the geometric extent of, and proximal to, the work surface in the stowed configuration. The frame members are typically disposed on the floor in the deployed configuration. There is a foldable bracing system engaged with the work surface and engaged with the base. At least a portion of the foldable bracing system is disposed substantially inside at least a portion of the plurality of frame members in the stowed configuration. Further, the foldable bracing system is configured for translocation of the work surface distal from the base in the deployed configuration.

Bzorgi; Fariborz (Knoxville, TN)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Stereotactic radiosurgery for brainstem metastases: Survival, tumor control, and patient outcomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Patients with brainstem metastases have limited treatment options. In this study, we reviewed outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of patients with brainstem metastases. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 22 consecutive patients presenting with brainstem metastases who underwent SRS. The most frequent primary malignancy was the lung (n = 11), followed by breast (n = 3) and kidney (n = 2). Three patients (14%) also underwent whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The median tumor volume was 0.9 mL (range, 0.1-3.3 mL); the median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 14-23 Gy). Results: Median survival time after SRS was 8.5 months. Although local tumor control was achieved in all patients with imaging follow-up (n = 19), 5 patients died from development and progression of new brain metastases. Two patients (9%) had symptom improvement after SRS, whereas 1 patient (5%) developed a new hemiparesis after SRS. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is safe and provides a high local tumor control rate for patients with small brainstem metastases. Patients with limited systemic disease and good performance status should be strongly considered for SRS.

Hussain, Aamir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.k [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Center for Clinical Trials, National Cancer Center, Kyongi (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

Welzel, Grit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: grit.welzel@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Fleckenstein, Katharina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D. [Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

Perez, Rodrigo O. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil) [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Habr-Gama, Angelita, E-mail: gamange@uol.com.br [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sao Juliao, Guilherme P. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nahas, Sergio Carlos [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil) [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Original Article The Internet as a Source of Information for Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives. To determine the prevalence of Internet use by patients considering rhinoplasty and to identify the impact of such information on their decisions. Methods. Prospective analysis of the impact of information received via the Internet by patients considering rhinoplasty on their decision-making prior to surgery. Eighty six patients, scheduled for post-traumatic or aesthetic rhinoplasty, received a questionnaire, consisting of 19 questions, which sought to evaluate their perception of the importance of the Internet information to them and also collected relevant demographic and sociological data. Results. Respondents searched online for descriptions of medical procedures, information about how to contact other patients, pre- and post-operative pictures and making contact with a doctor. Patients considering aesthetic rhinoplasty received medical information from a third party or via the Internet. Individuals requiring post-traumatic surgical treatment were usually referred by family doctor. Conclusion. Patients planning nasal aesthetic surgery form their opinions after consulting friends and searching the Internet,

Prior To Rhinoplasty

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 210 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 210 patients treated with gross complete resection (R0: 147 patients; R1: 63 patients) and IORT with or without EBRT were reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients (70.0%) were treated without EBRT and 114 patients (54.3%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy (range, 20-30 Gy) and 45 Gy (range, 20-60Gy), respectively. The median follow-up of the surviving 62 patients was 26.3 months (range, 2.7-90.5 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 150 of 210 patients (71.4%) had disease recurrences. Local failure was observed in 31 patients (14.8%), and the 2-year local control rate in all patients was 83.7%. The median survival time and the 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) in all 210 patients were 19.1 months and 42.1%, respectively. Patients treated with IORT and chemotherapy had a significantly more favorable OS than those treated with IORT alone (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use, degree of resection, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and pathological N stage had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; these four factors were significant prognostic factors. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of NCI-CTC Grade 4 was observed in 7 patients (3.3%). Conclusion: IORT yields an excellent local control rate for resected pancreatic cancer with few frequencies of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy confers a survival benefit compared with that of IORT alone.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

Ge Jin [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fishman, Jessica [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xie, Sharon X. [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mao, Jun J., E-mail: maoj@uphs.upenn.edu [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

Yoon, Sang Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Suk [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hyung Jin [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Gyu [Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong Jin [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Patient satisfaction with physiotherapy services for low back pain at selected hospitals in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Patient satisfaction is one of the indicators of the quality of care being given to the users of a service. It can also be used… (more)

Kamau, Peter Waweru

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sexual health and wellness of physically disabled patients| A curriculum for health care professionals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this project was to create a curriculum for healthcare professionals to provide education about the sexual health needs of patients with… (more)

Nix, Shannon Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Radioimmunoguided surgery using iodine 125 B72. 3 in patients with colorectal cancer  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary data using B72.3 murine monoclonal antibody labeled with iodine 125 suggested that both clinically apparent as well as occult sites of colorectal cancer could be identified intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma detecting probe. We report the preliminary data of a multicenter trial of this approach in patients with primary or recurrent colorectal cancer. One hundred four patients with primary, suspected, or known recurrent colorectal cancer received an intravenous infusion of 1 mg of B72.3 monoclonal antibody radiolabeled with 7.4 x 10 Bq of iodine 125. Twenty-six patients with primary colorectal cancer and 72 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer were examined. Using the gamma detecting probe, 78% of the patients had localization of the antibody in their tumor; this included 75% of primary tumor sites and 63% of all recurrent tumor sites; 9.2% of all tumor sites identified represented occult sites detected only with the gamma detecting probe. The overall sensitivity was 77% and a predictive value of a positive detection was 78%. A total of 30 occult sites in 26 patients were identified. In patients with recurrent cancer, the antibody study provided unique data that precluded resection in 10 patients, and in another eight patients it extended the potentially curative procedure.

Cohen, A.M.; Martin, E.W. Jr.; Lavery, I.; Daly, J.; Sardi, A.; Aitken, D.; Bland, K.; Mojzisik, C.; Hinkle, G. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lymphoscintigraphy Can Select Breast Cancer Patients for Internal Mammary Chain Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Given the risk of undesired toxicity, prophylactic internal mammary (IM) chain irradiation should be offered only to patients at high risk of occult involvement. Lymphoscintigraphy for axillary sentinel node biopsy might help in selecting these patients. Methods and Materials: We reviewed published studies with the following selection criteria: {>=}300 breast cancer patients referred for axilla sentinel node biopsy; scintigraphy performed after peritumoral or intratumoral tracer injection; IM biopsy in the case of IM drainage; and axilla staged routinely independent of IM status. Results: Six prospective studies, for a total of 3,876 patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Parasternal drainage was present in 792 patients (20.4%). IM biopsy was performed in 644 patients and was positive in 111 (17.2%). Of the positive IM biopsies, 40% were associated with tumors in the lateral breast quadrants. A major difference in the IM positivity rate was found according to the axilla sentinel node status. In patients with negative axilla, the IM biopsy was positive in 7.8% of cases. In patients with positive axilla, however, the IM biopsy was positive in 41% (p < .00001). Because biopsy of multiple IM hot nodes is difficult, the true risk could be even greater, probably close to 50%. Conclusions: Patients with IM drainage on lymphoscintigraphy and a positive axilla sentinel node have a high risk of occult IM involvement. These women should be considered for IM radiotherapy.

Hindie, Elif, E-mail: elif.hindie@sls.aphp.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Bordeaux, University of Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux (France); Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Vercellino, Laetitia; Berenger, Nathalie; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Maylin, Claude [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Espie, Marc [Breast Diseases Unit, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

International Perspective from Turkey on “Unsuspected Pulmonary Embolism in Observation Unit Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chest pain observation unit. Am J Emerg Med. Volume X, no .Embolism in Observation Unit Patients” Arif Alper Cevik, MDbe admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), even without

Cevik, Arif A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Curing consumers : how the patient became a consumer in modern American medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

smart patient: An insider's handbook for getting the best2003. Introduction. In Handbook of health communication. ,civil liberties union handbook. 2nd , completely rev. and

Lee, Nancy Stark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Impact of CyberHealthcare on the Physician-Patient Relationship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper addresses include the following: What are the major factors that are leading to the increased use of the Internet by consumers to obtain health-related information? How do physicians view the use of the Internet by patients to obtain health-related information and services? How is the use of the Internet by consumers affecting physician--patient communications? What are the implications of the Internet for the future of physician--patient relationships? KEY WORDS: information technology; physician-patient relationship; use of the Internet; physicianpatient e-mail

James G. Anderson; Michelle R. Rainey; Gunther Eysenbach

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Daily intake of antioxidants in relation to survival among adult patients diagnosed with malignant glioma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II patients, moderate intake of water-soluble folate wasfor tertiles of daily intake of water-soluble antioxidants4: Associations between intake of water-soluble antioxidants

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

doi:10.1155/2012/372371 Clinical Study The Avantgarde Carbostent in Patients Scheduled for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2012 Carlo Briguori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Treatment of patients who need coronary revascularization before undelayable non-cardiac surgery is challenging. Methods. We assessed the safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) using the Avantgarde TM Carbostent (CID, Italy) in patients undergoing PCI before undelayable non-cardiac surgery. The Multiplate analyzer point-of-care was used to assess residual platelet reactivity. One major cardiac events (MACE, defined as death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis and major bleeding) were assessed. Results. 42 consecutive patients were analyzed. Total stent length ?25 mm was observed in 16 (37%) patients. Multivessel stenting was performed in 11 (31.5%) patients. Clopidogrel was interrupted 5 days before surgery in 35 patients, whereas it was stopped the day of the surgery in 7 patients. Surgery was performed after 27 ± 9 (7–42) days from PCI. MACE occurred in one patient (2.4%; 95 % confidence interval: 0.01–13%), who had fatal acute myocardial infarction 3 days after abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery and 12 days after stent implantation. No case of major bleeding in the postoperative phase was observed. Conclusions. The present pilot study suggests that, although at least 10–14 days of dual antiplatelet therapy remain mandatory, the Avantgarde TM stent seems to have a role in patients requiring undelayable surgery. 1.

Undelayable Noncardiac Surgery; Carlo Briguori; Gabriella Visconti; Francesca De Micco; Amelia Focaccio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A survey study comparing adult orthodontic patient quality of life between Invisalign and fixed appliances.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??M.S. We aimed to examine differences in treatment impacts and quality of life between adult orthodontic patients with Invisalign and fixed appliances. Adults represent a… (more)

Nicholson, Keith Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Online Health Information Impacts Patients’ Decisions to Seek Emergency Department Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume XII, no .Patients’ Decisions to Seek Emergency Department Care AliUniversity, Department of Emergency Medicine, Washington, DC

Pourmand, Ali; Sikka, Neal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evaluation of an Emergency Department Educational Campaign for Recognition of Suicidal Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Your Patient Suicidal? ’’ poster. ED, emergency department;EMS, emergency medical services. Volume XIII, NO .2012 Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Suicide Training

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 144 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) + external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 144 patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT were reviewed. One hundred and thirteen patients (78.5%) were treated with IORT + EBRT and 114 patients (79.2%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up of all 144 patients was 9.6 months (range, 0.5-69.7 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 131 of 144 patients (91.0%) had disease recurrences. Local progression was observed in 60 patients (41.7%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 44.6%. Patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT had significantly more favorable LC (2-year LC, 50.9%) than those treated with IORT without EBRT (p = 0.0004). The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all 144 patients were 14.7% and 10.5 months, respectively. Patients treated with chemotherapy had a significantly favorable OS than those treated without chemotherapy (p < 0.0001). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use alone had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; chemotherapy use was a significant prognostic factor. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3 was observed in 2 patients (1.4%). Conclusion: IORT + EBRT yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic cancer with low frequency of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy conferred a survival benefit compared with IORT without chemotherapy.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Wada, Hitoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo; Etoh, Hidehiro [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Takayama, Makoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyorin University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States) and Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CareVis: Integrated visualization of computerized protocols and temporal patient data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Currently, visualization support for patient data analysis is mostly limited to the representation of directly measured data. Contextual information on performed treatment steps is an important source to find reasons and explanations for certain ... Keywords: Clinical guidelines, Information visualization, Patient data, Protocol-based care, Temporal uncertainties, Treatment plans, User-centered design

Wolfgang Aigner; Silvia Miksch

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Decreased T-Cell Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Patients with Heart Failure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decreased T-Cell Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Patients with Heart Failure Orly Vardeny vaccination in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are less vigorous than the responses of healthy strategies for influenza vaccination. Key Words: chronic heart failure, CHF, influenza vaccination, immune

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

MEDICAL BOARD OF CALIFORNIA California physicians now required to notify their patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEDICAL BOARD OF CALIFORNIA California physicians now required to notify their patients that they are licensed by the Medical Board of California SACRAMENTO -- Effective June 27, 2010, physicians practicing in California must inform their patients that they are licensed by the Medical Board of California, and include

Ford, James

262

Designing flexible EMR systems for recording and summarizing doctor-patient interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic Medical Records (EMR) are increasingly transitioning from desktop systems to mobile devices. This innovation presents challenges to medical practitioners in terms of doctor-patient interaction, patient record integrity and continuing reliance ... Keywords: electronic medical record, health information technology, interface, usability

Kyle Larkin; Aisling Kelliher

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Heart rate fluctuations in post?operative and brain?death patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power spectra of heart rate in patients receiving intensive care were calculated and the relation between gain and frequency discussed. 1/f fluctuations in heart rate can be observed in both post?operative and brain?death patients in the intensive care unit. These results suggested that 1/f fluctuations are a fundamental human phenomenon.

Toshiyo Tamura; Kazuki Nakajima; Tuyoshi Maekawa; Yoshiyuki Soejima; Yasuhiro Kuroda; Akio Tateishi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Impact of CyberHealthcare on the Physician–Patient Relationship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is estimated that 70 million Americans have used the Internet to acquire health-related information. Multiple factors provide the driving force behind this demand for online health information. Information technology is beginning to change the exclusive ... Keywords: information technology, physician-patient e-mail, physician-patient relationship, use of the Internet

James G. Anderson; Michelle R. Rainey; Gunther Eysenbach

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Timed automata-based rehabilitation training game design for the affected lower extremity of hemiparetic patient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a timed automata based rehabilitation training game design to effectively strengthen the affected leg of the hemiparetic patient. The proposed system is implemented by applying a simple motion capture technique to a rhythm game. Especially, ... Keywords: hemiparetic patient, isometric training, motion capture, rehabilitation training game, timed automata

Gi Sook Jung; Sang Yun Kim; Soon Ki Jung; Seung Deuk Byun; Yang Soo Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Gastrostomy Tube Placement Without Nasogastric Tube: A Retrospective Evaluation in 85 Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Our study evaluated techniques for percutaneous gastrostomy (G)-tube placement without the use of a nasogastric (NG) tube. Instead, direct puncture of a physiologic air bubble or effervescent-enhanced gastric bubble distention was performed in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO) or psychological objections to NG tubes. Materials and Methods: A total of 886 patients underwent G-tube placement in our department during a period of 7 years. We present our series of 85 (9.6%) consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous G-tube placement without use of an NG tube. Results: Of these 85 patients, fluoroscopic guided access was attempted by direct puncture of a physiologically present gastric air bubble in 24 (28%) cases. Puncture of an effervescent-induced large gastric air bubble was performed in 61 (72%) patients. Altogether, 82 (97%) of 85 G tubes were successfully placed in this fashion. The three failures comprised refusal of effervescent, vomiting of effervescent, and one initial tube misplacement when a deviation from our standard technique occurred. Conclusion: The described techniques compare favorably with published large series on G-tube placement with an NG tube in place. The techniques are especially suited for patients with UDTO due to head, neck, or esophageal malignancies, but they should be considered as an alternative in all patients. Direct puncture of effervescent-enhanced gastric bubble distention is a safe, patient-friendly and effective technique.

Heberlein, Wolf E., E-mail: weheberlein@uams.edu; Goodwin, Whitney J.; Wood, Clint E.; Yousaf, Muhammad; Culp, William C. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate outcome (overall survival [OS], the actuarial 5-year cancer-specific survival [CSS], disease-free survival [DFS], biochemical failure-free survival [BFS]), complications and morbidity in patients treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost and hormonal treatment with curative aims. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 275 prospectively followed pN0/N0M0 patients were included: 19 patients (7%) with T2, Gleason score 7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 and 256 patients (93%) with T3 or Gleason score 8-10 or PSA >20 received multimodal treatment with conformal four-field radiotherapy (prostate/vesiculae 2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25) combined with HDR-BT (iridium 192; prostate 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: After a median observation time of 44.2 months (range, 10.4-90.5 months) 12 patients had relapsed clinically and/or biochemically and 10 patients were dead, of which 2 patients died from prostate cancer. Five-year estimates of BFS, CSS, DFS, and OS rates were 98.5%, 99.3%, 95.6%, and 96.3%, respectively. None of the patients with either Gleason score <8 or with intermediate risk profile had relapsed. The number of HDR-BT treatments was not related to outcome. Despite of age (median, 65.7 years; range, 45.7-77 years) and considerable pretreatment comorbidity in 39 of 275 patients, Genitourinary treatment-related morbidity was moderate with long-lasting Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 voiding problems in 26 patients (9.5%) and occasionally mucous discharge in 20 patients (7%), none with Grade >2 for gastrointestinal at follow-up. Complications during implantations were related to pubic arch interference (4 patients) and lithotomy time, causing 2 patients to develop compartment syndrome. Conclusion: Despite still preliminary observations, our 5-year outcome estimates favor the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in high-risk patients combined with conformal external radiotherapy and long-term ADT. High-quality implants can be achieved by a trained specialized team at a high-turnover center using transrectal ultrasound-based treatment plans with acceptable morbidity and complication rates.

Lilleby, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.lilleby@ous-hf.no [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K. [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Characterization of Motor Unit Behavior in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this study, we investigated the behavior of active motor units identified via analysis of electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle using a quadrifilar needle electrode. Data was collected from control subjects and patients with both lower (LMN) and upper (UMN) motor neuron dominant forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). EMG recordings were gathered during isometric contractions reaching 20 or 50 % of the force output produced during a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Recordings were analyzed using available EMG decomposition software (EMGLAB). Results showed differences in mean motor unit firing rates between patients with ALS and control subjects. Differences were also observed between patients with LMN- and UMN-dominant forms of ALS. Motor unit substitution was observed in patients despite the contractions lasting just a few seconds. Finally, we observed that motor unit action potential (MUAP) waveforms recorded from patients were more complex than those recorded from control subjects as often observed in motor neuron diseases.

Patrick K. Kasi; Lisa S. Krivickas; Melvin Meister; Effie Chew; Paolo Bonato; Maurizio Schmid; Roma Tre; Gary Kamen; Pu Liu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fossil Energy Know-How Helps Heart Patients | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Know-How Helps Heart Patients Fossil Energy Know-How Helps Heart Patients Fossil Energy Know-How Helps Heart Patients February 9, 2012 - 10:14am Addthis Researchers from the National Energy Technology Laboratory have received national recognition for developing a new metal alloy that has dramatically improved coronary stents used in patients with heart problems. Coronary stents made from the award-winning platinum-chromium (PtCr) alloy are more flexible and conformable than traditional stents. The improved stents are manufactured by Boston Scientific. | Photo courtesy of Boston Scientific Corporation. Researchers from the National Energy Technology Laboratory have received national recognition for developing a new metal alloy that has dramatically improved coronary stents used in patients with heart problems. Coronary

270

Electromagnetic Interference and the Pacemaker Patient T1-Electromagnetic Interference and the Pacemaker Patient 10/03/03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While clinically significant problems with electromagnetic interference (EMI) are rare, a pacemaker’s response to EMI becomes more diverse as technology advances. Pacemaker manufacturers continue to develop interference protection circuitry to keep up with these vast sources of EMI. The pacemaker’s response to EMI is dependent on the characteristics of the EMI, proximity to the interference, available shielding, and the sensing characteristics and polarity of the pacemaker. The pacemaker circuitry is designed to attenuate any interference outside the normal intracardiac range (10 Hz – 100 Hz). This is achieved by using bandpass filters. EMI sources can be broadly classified as galvanic, electromagnetic or magnetic. • Galvanic interference requires direct contact with electrical current. This is most often seen in defibrillation/cardioversion, cautery, TENS units and diathermy. • Electromagnetic or electrically coupled interference does not require direct body contact. This interference is most often seen with arc welders, ham radios, electrical appliances, metal detectors, therapeutic ultrasound and high voltage power lines. • Magnetic interference occurs when a patient comes in close proximity with an intense magnetic field. This is often seen in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR/MRI) and steel mill induction furnaces. EMI with signal modulation can mimic normal intracardiac signals. When detected, the response to EMI may present itself as a single beat inhibition, total inhibition, noise reversion/asynchronous pacing, rate increase, erratic pacing, or no output. These responses are usually temporary, but can be permanent if the pulse generator circuitry is damaged. A pacemaker’s response to EMI is highly dependent on the specific EMI source, the pacemaker’s mode, and sensing polarity. Included is a list that details the interaction of commonly encountered pacemaker EMI sources. Accompanying this list is a summary table of these sources and reported associated pacemaker responses.

Rev A

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Common Variants at 9p21 and 8q22 Are Associated with Increased Susceptibility to Optic Nerve Degeneration in Glaucoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optic nerve degeneration caused by glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Patients affected by the normal-pressure form of glaucoma are more likely to harbor risk alleles for glaucoma-related optic nerve ...

Ernst, Jason M.

272

In vivo operation of the Boston 15-channel wireless subretinal visual prosthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation concerns the engineering development of the Boston visual prosthesis for restoring useful vision to patients blind with degenerative retinal disease. A miniaturized, hermetically-encased, 15-channel ...

Wyatt, John L.

273

Stimulating Robotic Technology Development for First ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Safety ? Power Page 13. ... Communications Range - Line of Sight Communications Range - Beyond Line of Sight ... Facilities • Nevada (8/05) ...

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Adjuvant Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and multiagent systemic therapies were reviewed to determine the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on survival and toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with salvage SRS from September 2002 to March 2010. All patients had experienced progression after treatment with temozolomide and radiotherapy. Salvage SRS was typically administered only after multiple postchemoradiation salvage systemic therapies had failed. Results: 63 patients were treated with SRS for recurrent high-grade glioma; 49 patients had World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 4 disease. Median follow-up was 31 months from primary diagnosis and 7 months from SRS. Median overall survival from primary diagnosis was 41 months for all patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival from SRS (OS-SRS) were 6 and 10 months for all patients, respectively. The 1-year OS-SRS for patients with Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant (concurrent with or after SRS) bevacizumab was 50% vs. 22% for patients not receiving adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.005). Median PFS for patients with a WHO Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant bevacizumab was 5.2 months vs. 2.1 months for patients who did not receive adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.014). Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and age were not significantly different between treatment groups. Treatment-related Grade 3/4 toxicity for patients receiving and not receiving adjuvant BVZ was 10% and 14%, respectively (p = 0.58).On multivariate analysis, the relative risk of death and progression with adjuvant bevacizumab was 0.37 (confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.82) and 0.45 (CI 0.21-0.97). KPS >70 and age <50 years were significantly associated with improved survival. Conclusions: The combination of salvage radiosurgery and bevacizumab to treat recurrent malignant gliomas is well tolerated and seems to be associated with improved outcomes. Prospective multiinstitutional studies are required to determine efficacy and long-term toxicity with this approach.

Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Vredenburgh, James J.; Sampson, John H.; Reardon, David A.; Desjardins, Annick; Peters, Katherine B.; Friedman, Henry S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kirkpatrick, John P., E-mail: john.kirkpatrick@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes, mediastinal lymph nodes, and unsuspected sites of distant metastasis. This information is important in the design of radiotherapy treatment fields and, therefore, we recommend that PET/CT be a component of initial staging for IBC.

Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niikura, Naoki [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)] [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yang Wei [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rohren, Eric [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Valero, Vicente [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Ricardo H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lucci, Anthony [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Pain Relief for Osteoarthritis Patients Benchmarked against Fish Oil, a Randomized Trial, without Placebo Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Osteoarthritis (OA) typically generates pain, reduced mobility and reduced quality of life. Most conventional treatments for osteoarthritis, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and simple analgesics, have side effects. PCSO-524™, a non polar lipid extract from the New Zealand Green Lipped Mussel, is rich in omega-3 fatty acids and has been shown to reduce inflammation in both animal studies and patient trials. This OA trial examined pain relief changes in relation to quality of life and safety of use for OA patients who took PCSO-524 ™ compared with patients who took fish oil (containing an industry standard EPA-18 % and DHA-12 % blend). PCSO-524 ™ patients showed a statistically significant improvement compared with patients who took fish oil. There was an 89 % decrease in their pain symptoms and 91 % reported an improved quality of life. Patients treated with fish oil showed significantly less improvement and a greater level of physical discomfort during the study. These results suggest that PCSO-524 ™ might offer a potential alternative complementary therapy with no side effects for OA patients.

Marek Zawadzki; Claudia Janosch; Jacek Szechinski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Outcome analysis of 300 prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy is an established treatment for localized prostate carcinoma. This study sought to analyze the outcomes of patients treated with relatively low-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated between 1996 and 2001. Patients were prescribed 3 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation before receiving 5250 cGy in 20 fractions. Patients' case notes and the oncology database were used to retrospectively assess outcomes. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results: Patients presented with prostate cancer with poorer prognostic indicators than that reported in other series. At 5 years, the actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 83.2% and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse rate was 57.3%. Metastatic disease had developed in 23.4% of patients. PSA relapse continued to occur 5 years from treatment in all prognostic groups. Independent prognostic factors for relapse included treatment near the start of the study period, neoadjuvant oral anti-androgen monotherapy rather than neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone releasing hormone therapy, and diagnosis through transurethral resection of the prostate rather than transrectal ultrasound. Conclusion: This is the largest reported series of patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not appear to adequately compensate for the relatively low effective radiation dose used.

Higgins, Geoffrey S. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: geoffrey.higgins@luht.scot.nhs.uk; McLaren, Duncan B. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kerr, Gillian R. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Elliott, Tony [Department of Clinical Oncology, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Howard, Grahame [Department of Clinical Oncology, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes After Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Several retrospective analyses have suggested that obese men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have outcomes inferior to those of normal-weight men. However, a recently presented analysis for the first time challenged this association between body mass index (BMI) and treatment failure. It is therefore important to provide further data on this issue. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 564 men treated with risk-adapted conformal EBRT at a single institution. Low-risk patients received EBRT alone, and the other patients received EBRT plus endocrine treatment. In addition, high-risk patients were treated to higher EBRT doses (74 Gy). A rectal balloon catheter for internal immobilization, which can be identified on portal images, was used in 261 patients (46%). Thus, localization did not rely on bony landmarks alone in these cases. Results: The median BMI was 26, and 15% of patients had BMI {>=}30. Neither univariate nor multivariate analyses detected any significant impact of BMI on biochemical relapse, prostate cancer-specific survival, or overall survival. The 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 21% and prostate cancerspecific survival 96%. Conclusions: The present analysis of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients suggests that efforts to reduce prostate movement and geographic miss might result in comparable outcomes in obese and normal-weight patients.

Geinitz, Hans, E-mail: hans.geinitz@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Thamm, Reinhard; Mueller, Tobias; Jess, Kerstin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Zimmermann, Frank B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitaetsspital Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Molls, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromso, Tromso (Norway)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Patients With Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas: Results From a 15-Year Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and complications of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 62 patients with NFA undergoing radiosurgery between 1992 and 2004, of whom 59 (95%) underwent prior tumor resection. The median treatment volume was 4.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.8-12.9). The median treatment dose to the tumor margin was 16 Gy (range, 11-20). The median maximum point dose to the optic apparatus was 9.5 Gy (range, 5.0-12.6). The median follow-up period after radiosurgery was 64 months (range, 23-161). Results: Tumor size decreased for 37 patients (60%) and remained unchanged for 23 patients (37%). Two patients (3%) had tumor growth outside the prescribed treatment volume and required additional treatment (fractionated radiation therapy, n = 1; repeat radiosurgery, n 1). Tumor growth control was 95% at 3 and 7 years after radiosurgery. Eleven (27%) of 41 patients with normal (n = 30) or partial (n = 11) anterior pituitary function before radiosurgery developed new deficits at a median of 24 months after radiosurgery. The risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits at 5 years was 32%. The 5-year risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits was 18% for patients with a tumor volume of {4.0 cm{sup 3} (risk ratio 4.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-14.9, p = 0.02). No patient had a decline in visual function. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery is effective in the management of patients with residual or recurrent NFA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. The primary complication is hypopituitarism, and the risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits correlates with the size of the irradiated tumor.

Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Cochran, Joseph [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Natt, Neena [Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Erickson, Dana [Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Stafford, Scott L.; Schomberg, Paula J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Percutaneous Transhepatic Removal of Bile Duct Stones: Results of 261 Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic removal of bile duct stones when the procedure of endoscopic therapy fails for reasons of anatomical anomalies or is rejected by the patient. Methods: Between April 2001 and May 2010, 261 patients (138 male patients and 123 female patients; age range, 14-92 years; mean age, 64.6 years) with bile duct stones (common bile duct [CBD] stones = 248 patients and hepatolithiasis = 13 patients) were included in the study. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography was performed, and stones were identified. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of the papilla of Vater was performed. Then stones were pushed out into the duodenum with a Fogarty balloon catheter. If the stone diameter was larger than 15 mm, then basket lithotripsy was performed before balloon dilation. Results: Overall success rate was 95.7%. The procedure was successful in 97.5% of patients with CBD stones and in 61.5% of patients with hepatolithiasis. A total of 18 major complications (6.8%), including cholangitis (n = 7), subcapsular biloma (n = 4), subcapsular hematoma (n = 1), subcapsular abscess (n = 1), bile peritonitis (n = 1), duodenal perforation (n = 1), CBD perforation (n = 1), gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), and right hepatic artery transection (n = 1), were observed after the procedure. There was no mortality. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that percutaneous transhepatic stone expulsion into the duodenum through the papilla is an effective and safe approach in the nonoperative management of the bile duct stones. It is a feasible alternative to surgery when endoscopic extraction fails or is rejected by the patient.

Ozcan, Nevzat, E-mail: nevzatcan@yahoo.com; Kahriman, Guven, E-mail: guvenkahriman@hotmail.com; Mavili, Ertugrul, E-mail: ertmavili@yahoo.com [Erciyes University, Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty (Turkey)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Chemoembolization Decreases Drop-Off Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients on the Liver Transplant List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction: The drop-off risk for patients awaiting liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is 22%. Transplant liver availability is expected to worsen, resulting in longer waiting times and increased drop-off rates. Our aim was to determine whether chemoembolization can decrease this risk. Patients and Methods: Eighty-seven consecutive HCC patients listed for liver transplant (Milan criteria) underwent statistical comparability adjustments using the propensity score (Wilcoxon, Fisher's, and chi-square tests). Forty-three nonchemoembolization patients and 22 chemoembolization patients were comparable for Child-Pugh and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores, tumor size and number, alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels, and cause of cirrhosis. We calculated the risk of dropping off the transplant list by assigning a transplant time to those who dropped off (equal probability with patients who were on the list longer than the patient in question). The significance level was obtained by calculating the simulation distribution of the difference compared with the permutations of chemoembolization versus nonchemoembolization assignment of the patients. Kaplan-Meier estimators (log-rank test) were used to determine survival rates. Results: Median follow-up was 187 {+-} 110 weeks (range 38 to 435, date of diagnosis). The chemoembolization group had an 80% drop-off risk decrease (15% nonchemoembolization versus 3% chemoembolization, p = 0.04). Although survival was better for the chemoembolization group, it did not reach statistical significance. Two-year survival for the nonchemoembolization and chemoembolization group was 57.3% {+-} 7.1% and 76.0% {+-} 7.9%, respectively (p = 0.078). Conclusions: Chemoembolization appears to result in a significant decrease in the risk of dropping off liver transplant list for patients with HCC and results in a tendency toward longer survival.

Frangakis, Constantine [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Kim, Daniel [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Chen, Yong [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Koteish, Ayman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Transplant Hepatology (United States); Hong, Kelvin; Liapi, Eleni; Georgiades, Christos S., E-mail: g_christos@hotmail.com [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

Chon, Young Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beom Kyung [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jihye [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Kwan, E-mail: kaarma@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Young, E-mail: dyk1025@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Critical processes and performance measures for patient safety systems in healthcare institutions: a Delphi study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation study presents a conceptual framework for implementing and assessing patient safety systems in healthcare institutions. The conceptual framework consists of critical processes and performance measures identified in the context of the 2003 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence. Methodology: The Delphi technique for gaining consensus from a group of experts and forecasting significant issues in the field of the Delphi panel expertise was used. Data collection included a series of questionnaires where the first round questionnaire was based on literature review and the MBNQA criteria for excellence in healthcare, and tested by an instrument review panel of experts. Twenty-three experts (MBNQA healthcare reviewers and senior healthcare administrators from quality award winning institutions) representing 18 states participated in the survey rounds. The study answered three research questions: (1) What are the critical processes that should be included in healthcare patient safety systems? (2) What are the performance measures that can serve as indicators of quality for the processes critical for ensuring patient safety? (3) What processes will be critical for patient safety in the future? The identified patient safety framework was further transformed into a patient safety tool with three levels: basic, intermediate, and advanced. Additionally, the panel of experts identified the major barriers to the implementation of patient safety systems in healthcare institutions. The identified "top seven" barriers were directly related to critical processes and performance measures identified as "important" or "very important" for patient safety systems in the present and in the future. This dissertation study is significant because the results are expected to assist healthcare institutions seeking to develop high quality patient safety programs, processes and services. The identified critical processes and performance measures can serve as a means of evaluating existing patient safety initiatives and guiding the strategic planning of new safety processes. The framework for patient safety systems utilizes a systems approach and will support healthcare senior administrators in achieving and sustaining improvement results. The identified patient safety framework will also assist healthcare institutions in using the MBNQA Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence for self-assessment and quality improvement.

Akins, Ralitsa B.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Development of robotic arm rehabilitation machine with biofeedback that addresses the question on Filipino elderly patient motivation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many robotic systems have been developed for assisting rehabilitating stroke patients. Their failure lies on the system design's inability to motivate the patients to voluntarily conduct different activities that could stretch the impaired arm to its ...

Matthew Ang; Luke Limkaichong; Winston Perez; Lyka Sayson; Nikka Tampo; Nilo Bugtai; Eppie Estanislao-Clark

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Monitoring Motor Fluctuations in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Using Wearable Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a pilot study to assess the feasibility of using accelerometer data to estimate the severity of symptoms and motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. A support vector ...

Patel, Shyamal

286

NETL: News Release - Fossil Energy Know-How Helps Heart Patients  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 9, 2012 Fossil Energy Know-How Helps Heart Patients Cross-posted from energy.gov Washington, DC - For their work developing a new metal alloy that has dramatically...

287

A survey of data resources for simulating patient flows in healthcare delivery systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling and simulation studies of patient flows in healthcare systems have been reported consistently in these Proceedings for over a decade. Our ongoing research in this area is motivated by our desire to develop models which will illuminate ...

K. Preston White, Jr.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

User-centred design: the investigation, design and evaluation of an information handbook for coeliac patients .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coeliac disease is an intestinal disorder, requiring patients to maintain a life-long gluten-free diet to ensure better health and reduce the risks of osteoporosis, intestinal… (more)

Walkinshaw, Rosemary

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Smart Home-based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Home-based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients and programming opportunities. Results: The smart home-based health platform technologies have been tested in two

Cook, Diane J.

290

Multiple cavernous malformations presenting in a patient with Poland syndrome: a case report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vessels in patients with Poland syndrome and comparing them20 September 2011 References 1. Poland A: Deficiency of theof a vascular etiology for Poland, Klieppel-Feil and Möbius

Lizarraga, Karlo J; De Salles, Antonio AF

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Detecting hazardous intensive care patient episodes using real-time mortality models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern intensive care unit (ICU) has become a complex, expensive, data-intensive environment. Caregivers maintain an overall assessment of their patients based on important observations and trends. If an advanced ...

Hug, Caleb W. (Caleb Wayne)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Detecting Hazardous Intensive Care Patient Episodes Using Real-time Mortality Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern intensive care unit (ICU) has become a complex, expensive, data-intensive environment. Caregivers maintain an overall assessment of their patients based on important observations and trends. If an advanced ...

Hug, Caleb

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

Using prediction to facilitate patient flow in a health care delivery chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A health care delivery chain is a series of treatment steps through which patients flow. The Emergency Department (ED)/Inpatient Unit (IU) chain is an example chain, common to many hospitals. Recent literature has suggested ...

Peck, Jordan S. (Jordan Shefer)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Patients providing the answers: narrowing the gap in data quality for emergency care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective The authors examined the validity of documentation produced during paediatric emergency care to determine if a patient-driven health information technology called ParentLink produced higher-quality data than ...

Porter, Stephen Calder

295

Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

Rades, Dirk, E-mail: rades.dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Evers, Jasmin N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lohynska, Radka [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

Yang Haihua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Hu Wei, E-mail: huw@enzemed.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Luo Wei [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

An ontology-based personalization of health-care knowledge to support clinical decisions for chronically ill patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronically ill patients are complex health care cases that require the coordinated interaction of multiple professionals. A correct intervention of these sort of patients entails the accurate analysis of the conditions of each concrete patient and the ... Keywords: Health care personalization, Medical decision support systems, Ontologies

David RiañO; Francis Real; Joan Albert LóPez-Vallverdú; Fabio Campana; Sara Ercolani; Patrizia Mecocci; Roberta Annicchiarico; Carlo Caltagirone

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Concurrent cisplatin, 5-FU, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Phase I-II data regarding neoadjuvant cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), paclitaxel, and radiation (PFT-R) from our institution demonstrated encouraging pathologic complete response (pCR) rates. This article updates our experience with PFT-R, and compares these results to our experience with cisplatin, 5-FU, and radiation therapy (PF-R) in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: We searched the Massachusetts General Hospital cancer registry for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy between 1994-2002. Records of patients treated with curative, neoadjuvant therapy were examined for chemotherapeutic regimen. Outcomes of patients treated with PF-R or PFT-R were assessed for response to therapy, toxicity, and survival. Results: A total of 177 patients were treated with neoadjuvant therapy with curative intent; 164 (93%) received PF-R (n = 81) or PFT-R (n = 83). Median overall survival was 24 months. After a median follow-up of 54 months for surviving patients, 3-year overall survival was 40% with no significant difference between PF-R (39%) and PFT-R (42%). Conclusions: Our findings failed to demonstrate an improvement in pCR or survival with PFT-R vs. PF-R. These results do not support this regimen of concurrent neoadjuvant PFT-R in esophageal cancer, and suggest that further investigations into alternative regimens and novel agents are warranted.

Roof, Kevin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: kroof@sero.net; Coen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lynch, Thomas J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wright, Cameron [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Fidias, Panos [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Prospective Study of Salivary Gland Function in Lymphoma Patients Receiving Head and Neck Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the radiation dose-response relationship on salivary dysfunction and quality of life (QOL) over time in patients with lymphoma receiving radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck (H and N). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective study on salivary-gland function in lymphoma patients receiving RT to the H and N. Fifteen patients were enrolled on the study. Dose-volume histograms and mean doses to the salivary glands were generated. Radiation-related toxicities and H and N-specific QOL were assessed before treatment and at prespecified time points posttreatment. Factors predicting a decrement in QOL were explored using Fisher's exact test. Results: During RT, 47% of patients experienced Grade >= 2 acute toxicity of the salivary gland, mucous membrane, or both. QOL scores improved over time, but up to one third of patients continued to have persistent oral symptoms at 2 years. At 6 months, a mean dose to at least one of the parotids of > 31 Gy was significantly associated with persistent dry mouth (100% vs. 17%, p = 0.02) and sticky saliva (100% vs. 25%, p = 0.04); a mean dose of > 11 Gy to the minor salivary glands was significantly associated with persistent sticky saliva (100% vs. 25%, p = 0.04), although the difference was no longer significant at 1 year. Conclusions: Limiting the mean parotid dose to gland dose to <= 11 Gy in lymphoma patients treated to the H and N may help reduce the risk of subacute xerostomia.

Rodrigues, Neesha A.; Killion, Leah; Hickey, Gail; Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Martin, Chrystalla; Stevenson, Mary Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ng, Andrea K., E-mail: ang@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Predictive Factors for Radiation Pneumonitis in Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study sought to quantify the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients receiving mediastinal radiation therapy (RT) and to identify predictive factors for RP. Methods and Materials: We identified 75 patients with newly diagnosed HL treated with mediastinal RT and 17 patients with relapsed/refractory HL treated with mediastinal RT before or after transplant. Lung dose-volumetric parameters including mean lung dose and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy were calculated. Factors associated with RP were explored by use of the Fisher exact test. Results: RP developed in 7 patients (10%) who received mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1 in 6 cases). A mean lung dose of 13.5 Gy or greater (p = 0.04) and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy of 33.5% or greater (p = 0.009) significantly predicted for RP. RP developed in 6 patients (35%) with relapsed/refractory HL treated with peri-transplant mediastinal RT (Grade 3 in 4 cases). Pre-transplant mediastinal RT, compared with post-transplant mediastinal RT, significantly predicted for Grade 3 RP (57% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Conclusions: We identified threshold lung metrics predicting for RP in HL patients receiving mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy, with the majority of cases being of mild severity. The risk of RP is significantly higher with peri-transplant mediastinal RT, especially among those who receive pre-transplant RT.

Fox, Amy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Dosoretz, Arie P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Fisher, David C.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Freedman, Arnold S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ng, Andrea K., E-mail: ang@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

In vivo evaluation of a new method for chemical analysis of volatile components in the respiratory gas of mechanically ventilated patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the volatile anaesthetic isoflurane as a marker substance a gas chromatographic method for analysis of exhaled gas in mechanically ventilated patients was evaluated. Twelve patients with and 10 patients without preceding isoflurane exposure ... Keywords: breath analysis, isoflurane, mechanical ventilation

J. K. Schubert; I. Esteban-Loos; K. Geiger; J. Guttmann

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Proposal of human spinal cord reirradiation dose based on collection of data from 40 patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Driven by numerous reports on recovery of occult radiation injury, reirradiation of the spinal cord today is considered a realistic option. In rodents, long-term recovery was observed to start at approximately 8 weeks. However, prospective clinical studies are lacking. Therefore, a combined analysis of all published clinical data might provide a valuable basis for future trials. Methods and materials: We collected data from 40 individual patients published in eight different reports after a comprehensive MEDLINE search. These represent all patients with data available for dose per fraction and total dose of each of both treatment courses. We recalculated the biologically effective dose (BED) according to the linear-quadratic model using an {alpha}/{beta} value of 2 Gy for the cervical and thoracic cord and 4 Gy for the lumbar cord. In this model, a dose of 50 Gy given in single daily fractions of 2 Gy is equivalent to a BED of 100 Gy{sub 2} or 75 Gy{sub 4}. For treatment with two daily fractions, a correction term was introduced to take incomplete repair of sublethal damage into account. Results: The cumulative doses ranged from 108 to 205 Gy{sub 2} (median dose, 135 Gy{sub 2}). The median interval between both series was 20 months. Three patients were treated to the lumbar segments only. The median follow-up was 17 months for patients without myelopathy. Eleven patients developed myelopathy after 4-25 months (median, 11 months). Myelopathy was seen only in patients who had received one course to a dose of {>=}102 Gy{sub 2} (n = 9) or were retreated after 2 months (n = 2). In the absence of these two risk factors, no myelopathy developed in 19 patients treated with {<=}135.5 Gy{sub 2} or 7 patients treated with 136-150 Gy{sub 2}. A risk score based on the cumulative BED, the greatest BED for all treatment series in a particular individual, and interval was developed. Low-risk patients remained free of myelopathy and 33% of intermediate-risk patients and 90% of high-risk patients developed myelopathy. Conclusion: On the basis of these literature data (and with due caution), the risk of myelopathy appears small after {<=}135.5 Gy{sub 2} when the interval is not shorter than 6 months and the dose of each course is {<=}98 Gy{sub 2}. We would recommend limiting the dose to this level, whenever technically feasible. However, it appears prudent to propose the collection of prospective data from a greater number of patients receiving doses in the range of 136-150 Gy{sub 2} to assess the safety of higher retreatment doses for those patients in whom limited doses might compromise tumor control.

Nieder, Carsten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Andratschke, Nicolaus H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Molls, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Managing Patient Test Data in Primary Care: Developing and Evaluating a System for Test Tracking to Enhance Processes, Safety, and Understanding of Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Patient testing is vital for primary care and serves as a gateway to specialty healthcare. Patient safety is worsened when testing orders (e.g., laboratory, imaging… (more)

Cloud-Buckner, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Timing of Radiotherapy and Outcome in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the association between the interval from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy (RT) and the clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods: Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. The analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median number of days between BCS and RT and into four groups according to the quartile of time between BCS and RT. The endpoints were the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results: The median interval between BCS and RT was 77 days. RT timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, no significant effect of a RT delay {=}113 days. Conclusion: A RT delay of {<=}20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, the timing of RT was not significantly associated with the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

Karlsson, Per, E-mail: per.karlsson@oncology.gu.s [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Cole, Bernard F. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, Burlington, VT (United States); International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Colleoni, Marco [Department of Medicine, Research Unit in Medical Senology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Roncadin, Mario [Department of Radiotherapy, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy); Chua, Boon H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Murray, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Groote Shuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa); Price, Karen N. [International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Boston, MA (United States); Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica [International Breast Cancer Study Group Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Goldhirsch, Aron [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Gruber, Guenther [Institut fuer Radiotherapie, Klinik Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Effects of Ketorolac Injected via Patient Controlled Analgesia Postoperatively on Spinal Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lumbar spinal fusions have been performed for spinal stability, pain relief and improved function in spinal stenosis, scoliosis, spinal fractures, infectious conditions and other lumbar spinal problems. The success of lumbar spinal fusion depends on multifactors, such as types of bone graft materials, levels and numbers of fusion, spinal instrumentation, electrical stimulation, smoking and some drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). From January 2000 to December 2001, 88 consecutive patients, who were diagnosed with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. One surgeon performed all 88 posterolateral spinal fusions with instrumentation and autoiliac bone graft. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (n=30) was infused with ketorolac and fentanyl intravenously via patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively

Si-young Park; Seong-hwan Moon; Moon-soo Park; Kyung-soo Oh; Hwan-mo Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Patient self-attenuation and technologist dose in positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

Positron emission tomography (PET), with 511-keV radiation and long patient-uptake times, presents unique radiation safety concerns. This two-part study considers aspects of PET radiation safety as they relate to PET suite design, dose to the public, and technologist occupational dose. In the first part of the study, the self-attenuation of radiation by patients' bodies was quantified. The radiation exposure was measured at three positions from 64 patients injected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during the uptake period. Compared with an in vitro control used as a point source, a significant decrease in exposure (>40% at 1 m) was observed due to nonuniform distribution of FDG and attenuation within the patients. The attenuation data are consistent with results from simulations [M. E. Phelps, ''Comments and Perspectives,'' J. Nucl. Med. 45, 1601 (2004)] that treat the body as a uniform, water-filled cylinder. As distance is often the principal source of protection for 511-keV radiation, the considerable self-attenuation may allow for more compact PET suites. However, despite high patient self-attenuation, shielding, and standard precautionary measures, PET technologist occupational doses can remain quite high ({approx}12 mSv/year). The second part of this study tracked the daily dose received by PET technologists. Close technologist-patient interaction both during and following FDG administration, as much as 20 min/study, contribute to the high doses and point to the need for a more innovative approach to radiation protection for PET technologists.

Zeff, Benjamin W.; Yester, Michael V. [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Pilot program on patient dosimetry in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to present the results of a pilot program on patient dosimetry carried out in Chile during the last 5 yr, using a biplane x-ray angiography system settled for pediatrics. This research was conducted in Latin America under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supporting programs on radiological protection (RP) of patients. Methods: Patient age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time, and two dosimetric quantities [air kerma-area product (P{sub ka}) and cumulative dose (CD) at the patient entrance reference point] were recorded for each procedure. Results: The study includes 544 patients grouped into four age groups. The distributions by age group were 150 for <1 yr; 203 for 1 to <5 yr; 97 for 5 to <10 yr; and 94 for 10 to <16 yr. Median values of P{sub ka} and CD for the four age groups were 0.94, 1.46, 2.13, and 5.03 Gy cm{sup 2} and 23.9, 26.8, 33.5, and 51.6 mGy, respectively. No significant statistical differences were found between diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A moderate correlation (r = 0.64) was seen between P{sub ka} and patient weight. Conclusions: The dose values reported in this paper were lower than those published in the previous work for the same age groups as a result of the optimization actions carried out by cardiologists and medical physicists with the support of the IAEA. Methodology and results will be used as a starting point for a wider survey in Chile and Latin America with the goal to obtain regional diagnostic reference levels as recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for interventional procedures.

Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando [Clinical Sciences Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty and CHIDE, Tarapaca University, Arica (Chile); Radiology Department, Complutense University and San Carlos Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago (Chile); Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago, Chile and Faculty of Medicine, Diego Portales University, Santiago (Chile)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Procedural Predictors of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify factors impacting outcome in patients undergoing interventions for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endovascular therapy for AIS secondary during a 30 month period. Outcome was based on modified Rankin score at 3- to 6-month follow-up. Recanalization was defined as Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score 2 to 3. Collaterals were graded based on pial circulation from the anterior cerebral artery either from an ipsilateral injection in cases of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion or contralateral injection for internal carotid artery terminus (ICA) occlusion as follows: no collaterals (grade 0), some collaterals with retrograde opacification of the distal MCA territory (grade 1), and good collaterals with filling of the proximal MCA (M2) branches or retrograde opacification up to the occlusion site (grade 2). Occlusion site was divided into group 1 (ICA), group 2 (MCA with or without contiguous M2 involvement), and group 3 (isolated M2 or M3 branch occlusion). Results: A total of 89 patients were studied. Median age and National Institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS) score was 71 and 15 years, respectively. Favorable outcome was seen in 49.4% of patients and mortality in 25.8% of patients. Younger age (P = 0.006), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.001), successful recanalization (P < 0.0001), collateral support (P = 0.0008), distal occlusion (P = 0.001), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.01) were associated with a favorable outcome. Factors affecting successful recanalization included younger age (P = 0.01), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.05), collateral support (P = 0.01), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.03). An ICA terminus occlusion (P < 0.0001), lack of collaterals (P = 0.0003), and unsuccessful recanalization (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion: Angiographic findings and preprocedure variables can help prognosticate procedure outcomes in patients undergoing endovascular therapy for AIS.

Rai, Ansaar T., E-mail: ansaar.rai@gmail.com; Jhadhav, Yahodeep; Domico, Jennifer [West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Interventional Neuroradiology (United States); Hobbs, Gerald R. [West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Department of Community Medicine (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Survival Impact of the Intergroup 0116 Trial on Patients With Gastric Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The Intergroup 0116 (INT 0116) trial demonstrated a survival benefit for a broad group of fully resected gastric cancer patients. This study examined the impact on survival of the release of this landmark trial. Methods and Materials: Patients with gastric carcinoma diagnosed between 1995 and 2004 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients from the overall population as well as those potentially eligible for the INT 0116 trial were classified as having been diagnosed either before (1995-1999) or after (2000-2004) this trial. Both Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox models were used to examine survival trends within these cohorts. Results: For the overall population of 22,982 patients, the use of radiotherapy (RT) significantly changed after the INT 0116 trial (p < 0.0001), with postoperative RT increasing from 6.5% to 13.3%. For the two periods of interest, overall survival significantly improved in recent years (p = 0.00008). A similar improvement was also seen for patients who were potentially eligible for the INT 0116 trial (p = 0.004), with 3-year survival rates improving from 32.2% to 34.5%. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, use of RT was associated with a significant survival improvement (HR, 0.65 [0.48-0.88]; p = 0.005). Conclusion: Use of postoperative RT for gastric cancer has significantly increased after the release of the INT 0116 trial, likely reflecting increased use of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. This change has been associated with improved survival in gastric cancer patients, suggesting that the improved outcome seen in this trial has been successfully translated to the community.

Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Moody, John S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL (United States)], E-mail: jsmoody@uabmc.edu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Pulmonary uptake in Indium-111 leukocyte imaging: clinical significance in patients with suspected occult infections  

SciTech Connect

A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the frequency and significance of pulmonary activity noted on 306 indium-111 leukocyte studies involving 232 patients with suspected occult infections. Forty-eight studies showed pulmonary activity in one of two patterns of uptake, focal or diffuse. Fourteen of 27 studies (52%) with focal uptake and two of 21 studies (10%) with diffuse uptake were associated with infectious processes. Lung uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes was a poor predictor of pulmonary infection in patients studied for occult infection, although the focal pattern was more likely than the diffuse pattern to be associated with infection.

Cook, P.S.; Datz, F.L.; Disbro, M.A.; Alazraki, N.P.; Taylor, A.T.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially minimized intraoperative trauma and may have contributed to less toxicity. A learning curve in prostate brachytherapy programs affect not only the outcome but also the toxicity from the treatment.

Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Agranovich, Alexander [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Partnership Status, Continued Drug Use and Treatment Adherence among Newly Enrolled Methadone Maintenance Therapy Patients in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Therapy Patients in China Abstract Introduction: Drug users'among young male drug users in southwest China. AIDS, 10 (W. , Improving drug addiction treatment in China. Addiction,

Wan, Dai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

How Frequently are “Classic” Drug-Seeking Behaviors Used by Drug-Seeking Patients in the Emergency Department?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intravenous opioids in emergency patients: a prospectivemedical care survey: 1997 emergency department summary. AdvInadequate analgesia in emergency medicine. Ann 24. Belgrade

Grover, Casey A.; Elder, Joshua W.; Close, Reb JH; Curry, Sean M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluation of Patient Residual Deviation and Its Impact on Dose Distribution for Proton Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

The residual deviations after final patient repositioning based on bony anatomy and the impact of such deviations on the proton dose distributions was investigated. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and kilovoltage (kV) 'portal verification' images from 10 patients treated with passively scattered proton radiotherapy was used to estimate the residual deviation. These changes were then applied to the location of isocenter points that, in effect, moved the isocenter relative to the apertures and compensators. A composite verification plan was obtained and compared with the original clinical treatment plan to evaluate any changes in dose distributions. The residual deviations were fitted to a Gaussian distribution with {mu} = -0.9 {+-} 0.1 mm and {sigma} = 2.55 {+-} 0.07 mm. The dose distribution showed under- and overcovered dose spots with complex dose distributions both in the target volumes and in the organs at risk. In some cases, this amounts to 63.5% above the intended clinical plan. Although patient positioning is carefully verified before treatment delivery and setup uncertainties are accounted for by using compensator smearing and aperture margins, a residual shift in a patient's position can considerably affect the dose distribution.

Arjomandy, Bijan, E-mail: arjomandy_2000@yahoo.com

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

On-Line Evidence for Context Use by Right-Brain-Damaged Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of right-brain-damaged (RBD) patients to use on-line contextual information in a word-monitoring task was examined. Subjects were required to monitor for target words in the contexts of both normal and semantically anomalous sentences. Similar ...

Carol L. Leonard; Shari R. Baum

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Knowledge Management in Locating the Patient in an Emergency Medical Service in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines an Emergency Medical Service in order to analyze the composite set of activities and instruments directed at locating the patient. The good management of information about the location of the emergency is highly relevant for a reliable ... Keywords: control room, emergency calls, ethnography, ethnomethodology, knowledge management, technology blending

Fabio Dovigo; Ilaria Redaelli

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Prioritizing Burn-Injured Patients During a Disaster Carri W. Chan, Linda V. Green, Yina Lu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York City, this corresponds to 400 patients. There are currently 140 burn beds in the region which can on September 11, 2001, the US government initiated the development of disaster plans for resource allocation, Bravata et al. 2006). In the event of a nuclear attack, guidance is needed on whether people should

Chan, Carri W.

319

Recursive Partitioning Analysis for New Classification of Patients With Esophageal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Background: The 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system does not include lymph node size in the guidelines for staging patients with esophageal cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine the prognostic impact of the maximum metastatic lymph node diameter (ND) on survival and to develop and validate a new staging system for patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: Information on 402 patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT at two institutions was reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses of data from one institution were used to assess the impact of clinical factors on survival, and recursive partitioning analysis was performed to develop the new staging classification. To assess its clinical utility, the new classification was validated using data from the second institution. Results: By multivariate analysis, gender, T, N, and ND stages were independently and significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05). The resulting new staging classification was based on the T and ND. The four new stages led to good separation of survival curves in both the developmental and validation datasets (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed that lymph node size is a strong independent prognostic factor and that the new staging system, which incorporated lymph node size, provided good prognostic power, and discriminated effectively for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT.

Nomura, Motoo, E-mail: excell@hkg.odn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan) [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan); Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Shitara, Kohei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kondoh, Chihiro; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Minoru [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan); Muro, Kei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Sawada, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A lattice boltzmann simulation of hemodynamics in a patient-specific aortic coarctation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a system to determine the pressure gradient at rest in the aorta. We developed a technique to efficiently initialize a regular simulation grid from a patient-specific aortic triangulated model. On this grid we employ the lattice ... Keywords: coarctation of the aorta, computational fluid dynamics, lattice boltzmann, parallel computing

Amanda Peters Randles, Moritz Bächer, Hanspeter Pfister, Efthimios Kaxiras

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Artificial Neural Network to Predict Skeletal Metastasis in Patients with Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of an artificial neural network (ANN) in prediction of outcomes using clinical data is being increasingly used. The aim of this study was to assess whether an ANN model is a useful tool for predicting skeletal metastasis in patients with ... Keywords: Artificial intelligence, Bone metastasis, Computer assisted, Image interpretation, Prostatic neoplasm, Radionuclide imaging

Jainn-Shiun Chiu; Yuh-Feng Wang; Yu-Cheih Su; Ling-Huei Wei; Jian-Guo Liao; Yu-Chuan Li

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

RAPID COMMUNICATION P Mutations Within the Piga Gene in Patients With Paroxysmal Nocturnal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an acquired clonal hematologic disorder with protean clinical manifestations, including erythrocyte hemolysis, venous thrombosis, infections, and defective hematopoiesis.'.' The primary biochemical defect in PNH resides in the incomplete synthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors used to attach certain proteins to the cell ~urface.~' ~ In PNH, there is a deficiency of all GPI-linked surface proteins on the abnormal clone of hematopoietic cells, with clinical manifestations resulting from the absence of these proteins. In all patients tested to date, the defect occurs at the level of N-acetyl-glucosamine addition to the phosphatidylinositol acceptor molecule, an early step in GP1 anchor biosynthesi^.'.^ Using the nomenclature of GPI-deficient murine cell lines, " all PNH patients have a class A complementation defect.' Miyata et all ' recently cloned the Piga cDNA, which repairs the class A defect in a human GPI-deficient cell line. Named for its ability to repair a phosphatidylinositol glycan class A defect, Piga is a candidate gene for PNH. Genetic mutations within the Piga gene could cause incomplete GP1 anchor biosynthesis and abnormal expression of all GPIlinked surface proteins. Recently, a nucleotide deletion leading to a splicing defect in the Piga gene was reported in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cell line derived from a patient with PNH, and confirmed in the patient's peripheral blood neutrophils.'' Using highly purified GPI-deficient granulocytes as a source of RNA, we have performed total RNA (Northern blot) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

Aroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (pnh

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Assessment of inflammation in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2010. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Purpose Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/ dysplasia (ARVC/D) is a myocardial disease that predominantly affects the right ventricle (RV). Its hallmark feature is fibro-fatty replacement of RV myocardium. However, patchy inflammatory infiltrates in the RV are also consistently reported using autopsy and myocardial biopsy. Although the role of inflammation in ARVC/D is unresolved, the ability to assess inflammation non-invasively may aid in the diagnostic process. We aimed to establish whether cardiac inflammation can be assessed non-invasively in ARVC/D patients. Methods In eight ARVC/D patients and nine controls (haematology/oncology patients), the level of inflammatory activation was assessed by measuring plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines. Regional myocardial inflammation was assessed with 67 Ga scintigraphy. Results ARVC/D patients had higher plasma levels than controls of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1? (1.22±0.07 vs 0.08±0.01 pg/ml, p<0.0001), IL-6 (3.16±

Maria E. Campian; Hein J. Verberne; Maxim Hardziyenka; Elisabeth A. A. De Groot; Astrid F. Van Moerkerken; Berthe L. F. Van Eck-smit; Hanno L. Tan; H. L. Tan; H. L. Tan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Design of a DICOM image-based program for estimating patient exposure dose in computed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, there has been a notable worldwide increase in the number of computed tomographic (CT) examinations. Since the radiation exposure to the patient during CT examinations is relatively high, it is important to optimize the dose so ... Keywords: DICOM, computed tomography (CT), effective dose

Shuji Yamamoto; Tetsuya Horiuchi; Junko Sekiguchi; Shigeo Wada; Mitsuru Komizu; Takami Yamaguchi

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Analysis of Heart Rate Variability Using Time-Varying Filtering of Heart Transplanted Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Heart Rate Variability Using Time-Varying Filtering of Heart Transplanted Patients the heart rate variability (HRV), obtained by using the time-varying integral pulse frequency modulation (TVIPFM) which is well adapted to the exercise stress testing. We consider that the mean heart period

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Fully Bayesian Blind Source Separation of Astrophysical Images Modelled by Mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveyor homepage," http://www.rssd.esa.int/index.php?project=PLANCK. [3] C. Baccigalupi, L. Bedini, C. Maino, A. Farusi, C. Baccigalupi, F. Perotta, A. J. Banday, L. Bedini, C. Burigana, G. D. Zotti, K. M. 15, pp. 2437­2454, 2005. [9] E. E. Kuruoglu, L. Bedini, M. T. Paratore, E. Salerno, and A. Tonazzini

O'Mahony, Donal E.

327

A Blind Search for Bursts of Very High Energy Gamma Rays with Milagro.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Milagro is a water-Cherenkov detector that observes the extended air showers produced by cosmic gamma rays of energies E>100GeV. The effective area of Milagro peaks… (more)

Vasileiou, Vlasios

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Image to Haptic Data Conversion: A First Step to Improving Blind People's Accessibility to Printed Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yu,W. Guffie,K. Brewster,S.A. Proceedings of Eurohaptics 2001 (Birmingham, UK) pp 87-89 Academic Press

Yu, W.; Guffie, K.; Brewster, S.A.

329

Office worker response to an automated venetian blind and electric lighting system: A pilot study  

SciTech Connect

A prototype integrated, dynamic building envelope and lighting system designed to optimize daylight admission and solar heat gain rejection on a real-time basis in a commercial office building is evaluated. Office worker response to the system and occupant-based modifications to the control system are investigated to determine if the design and operation of the prototype system can be improved. Key findings from the study are: (1) the prototype integrated envelope and lighting system is ready for field testing, (2) most office workers (N=14) were satisfied with the system, and (3) there were few complaints. Additional studies are needed to explain how illuminance distribution, lighting quality, and room design can affect workplans illuminance preferences.

Vine, E.; Lee, E.; Clear, R.; DiBartolomeo, D.; Selkowitz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Yes, But Will They Let Us Blind: The Feasibility of Secondary Units in the East Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

setback  requirements  for  secondary  units;  does  not  does  not  comply  with  current  parking  requirements,  does  not   need  to  come  into   conformance  with  parking   requirement.  

Nemirow, Alison; Chapple, Karen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Multichannel blind signal separation in semiconductor-based GAS sensor arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional approaches to gas sensing are usually related with gas identification and classification, i.e., recognition of aromas. In this work we propose an innovative approach to determine the concentration of the single species in a gas mixture by ...

Guillermo Bedoya; Sergi Bermejo; Joan Cabestany

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Blind and pointed Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and such observations reveal the variation in the scale factor as a function of redshift. The redshift is determined from supernovae emission/absorption lines from 1 + z = ?obs ?em = a(tobs) a(tem) , (1.24) where ?em is the wavelength of emitted light, ?obs... is the wavelength of observed light, a(tem) and a(tobs) are the scale factors at the redshift of the emitting object and the observer respectively. For a flat Universe luminosity distance, dL, is given by dL = c(1 + z) H0 ? z 0 dz ? ?M (1 + z)3 + ?? , (1...

Shimwell, Timothy William

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

Blind chance: on potential trust friends query in mobile social networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential-Trust-Friends-Query is an important query in mobile social network, as it enables users to discover and interact with others happen to be in their physical vicinity. In our context, we attempt to find top-k mobile users for such query. ... Keywords: check-in history, mobile social network, potential friends, trust

Jinzeng Zhang, Xiaofeng Meng

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Blind benchmark predictions of the NACOK air ingress tests using the CFD code FLUENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The JAERI and NACOK experiments examine the combined effects of natural convection during an air ingress event: diffusion, onset of natural circulation, graphite oxidation and multicomponent chemical reactions. MIT has ...

Brudieu, Marie-Anne V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Underdetermined blind separation of speech signals with delays in different time-frequency domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the problem of speech signal separation from a set of observables, when the mixing system is underdetermined and static with unknown delays. The approaches appeared in the literature so far have shown that algorithms based on ...

Alessandro Bastari; Stefano Squartini; Francesco Piazza

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Non-redundant precoding and PAPR reduction in MIMO OFDM systems with ICA based blind equalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a non-redundant linear precoding scheme and three peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) reduction schemes for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems with independent component analysis ... Keywords: independent component analysis (ICA), multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), orthogonal frequency domain equalization (OFDM), peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR), precoding

Jingbo Gao; Xu Zhu; Asoke K. Nandi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Preventing Blindness: A Vision of Technology | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

using automated technology and Internet connectivity. Acknowledgments This work was led by Ken Tobin of ORNL and Edward Chaum, an ophthalmologist and Plough Foundation...

338

Blind parametric identification of non-Gaussian FIR systems using higher order cumulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two approaches are introduced for the identification of linear time-invariant systems when only output data are available. The input sequences are independent and must be non-Gaussian. To estimate the parameters of the system, we use only the fourth-order ...

S. Safi; A. Zeroual

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The epidemiology of low vision and blindness associated with trichiasis in southern Sudan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 3Christian Mission Aid, Nairobi, Kenya, Africa, 4Family Health International, Nairobi, Kenya, Africa, 5Lighthouse For Christ Eye Centre, Mombasa, Kenya, Africa, 6Ministry of Health, Government of Southern Sudan, Juba, Sudan, Africa and 7The Carter... was done in persons with VA < 3/60 by counting fingers, hand movement and light perception as appropriate. All participants then underwent basic eye examination. Using a torch and a ×2.5 magnifying binoc- ular loupe, each eye was examined first for in...

Ngondi, Jeremiah; Reacher, Mark; Matthews, Fiona E; Ole-Sempele, Francis; Onsarigo, Alice; Matende, Ibrahim; Baba, Samson; Brayne, Carol; Emerson, Paul M

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Blind Adaptive Weighted Aggregation Scheme for Event Detection in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of decision fusion for event detection in Wireless Sensor Networks is the prime focus of this paper. Our proposed algorithm focuses on single hop (star) and multihop (tree) topologies, which are commonly deployed wireless sensor network topologies. ... Keywords: Adaptive aggregation, Distributed detection, Sensor network

Bhushan G. Jagyasi; Deepthi Chander; U. B. Desai; S. N. Merchant; Bikash K. Dey

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Blind Analyses "The Answer's Not in the Back of the Book"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. His German spelling was much better than mine. #12;4 Was Hans a fraud? Seemingly not. Hans answered: scientific fraud? Gregor Mendel is the father of genetics, having discovered the laws of genetic inheritance were levitated in a magnetic field in a modern version of the Millikan oil-drop experiment, resulting

Karczmarek, Joanna

342

Prospective Assessment of Optimal Individual Position (Prone Versus Supine) for Breast Radiotherapy: Volumetric and Dosimetric Correlations in 100 Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Damage to heart and lung from breast radiotherapy is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and lung cancer development. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate which position is best to spare lung and heart from radiotherapy exposure. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive Stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients consented to participate in a research trial that required two computed tomography simulation scans for planning both supine and prone positions. The optimal position was defined as that which best covered the contoured breast and tumor bed while it minimized critical organ irradiation, as quantified by the in-field heart and lung volume. The trial was designed to plan the first 100 patients in each position to study correlations between in-field volumes of organs at risk and dose. Results: Fifty-three left and 47 right breast cancer patients were consecutively accrued to the trial. In all patients, the prone position was optimal for sparing lung volume compared to the supine setup (mean lung volume reduction was 93.5 cc for right and 103.6 cc for left breast cancer patients). In 46/53 (87%) left breast cancer patients best treated prone, in-field heart volume was reduced by a mean of 12 cc and by 1.8 cc for the other 7/53 (13%) patients best treated supine. As predicted, supine-prone differences in in-field volume and mean dose of heart and lung were highly correlated (Spearman's correlation coefficient for left breast cancer patients was 0.90 for heart and 0.94 for lung and 0.92 for right breast cancer patients for lung). Conclusions: Prone setup reduced the amount of irradiated lung in all patients and reduced the amount of heart volume irradiated in 87% of left breast cancer patients. In-field organ volume is a valid surrogate for predicting dose; the trial continued to the planned target of 400.

Lymberis, Stella C.; Wyngaert, John Keith de; Parhar, Preeti; Chhabra, Arpit M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Chang Jengwha [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hochman, Tsivia [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States) [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States) [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

Min, Sun Young [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Surgery, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Ju [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: radiat@ncc.re.kr [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Han-Sung [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: simonec@mail.nih.gov; Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online learning mechanism, the authors carried out a comparison between partial online update strategy and full online update strategy. Using the full online update strategy, the mean DSC was improved from 86.6% to 89.3% with 2.8% gain. On the basis of full online update strategy, the manual modification before online update strategy was introduced and tested, the best performance was obtained; here, the mean DSC and the mean ASD achieved 92.4% and 1.47 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed prostate segmentation method provided accurate and robust segmentation results for CT images even under the situation where the samples of patient under radiotherapy were limited. A conclusion that the proposed method is suitable for clinical application can be drawn.

Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang [Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou (China) and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou 510510 (China); Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Bifocal Intracranial Germinoma: A Retrospective Analysis of Treatment Outcomes in 20 Patients and Review of the Literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Bifocal germinoma (BFG) is a rare intracranial neoplasm for which the choice of radiation therapy (RT) field is controversial. Some believe that BFG represents disseminated disease requiring craniospinal irradiation (CSI), whereas others believe that BFG represents localized disease and advocate for more limited fields. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 20 BFG patients at our institutions with classic bifocal lesions (pineal gland and suprasellar region). In addition, we identified 60 BFG patients from the literature. The RT fields, use of chemotherapy and extent of disease were recorded and analyzed for each patient. Results: There were 55 patients with bifocal lesions only (Group I), and 25 with bifocal lesions plus ventricular and/or CSF positive disease (Group II). The 5-year progression-free survival was 95% for Group I and 80% for Group II. In Group I, there were no failures in patients receiving CSI (n = 11), two spinal failures in those treated with more limited RT fields without chemotherapy (n = 17), and one spinal failure with chemotherapy (n = 23). In Group II, there were no failures in patients receiving CSI (n = 11), but four spinal failures were observed in patients receiving more limited RT fields with chemotherapy (n = 13); 1 patient who received whole-brain RT without chemotherapy experienced failure in the spine and brain. Conclusions: CSI is associated with excellent PFS in BFG. In Group I BFG patients, omission of spinal irradiation appears to be a reasonable approach, especially when chemotherapy is used. Patients with Group II BFG are best treated with CSI.

Weksberg, David C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Shibamoto, Yuta [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Paulino, Arnold C., E-mail: apaulino@tmhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with GCT.

Odagiri, Kazumasa, E-mail: t086016a@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan) [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Omura, Motoko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan) [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Hata, Masaharu [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu [Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Kigasawa, Hisato [Division of Hemato-oncology/Regeneration Medicine, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)] [Division of Hemato-oncology/Regeneration Medicine, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ito, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Adachi, Masataka [Department of Endocrinology, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)] [Department of Endocrinology, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effect of Anticholinergic Medication on Positive and Negative Symptoms in Medication-Free Schizophrenic Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. It is generally assumed that anticholinergic drugs have no effects on schizophrenic symptomatology. A few studies, however, indicate that anticholinergic agents aggravate psychotic symptoms and antagonize therapeutic effects of neuroleptics in schizophrenic patients; more recently, some investigators have observed that these agents appear to benefit negative symptoms. In an effort to resolve this issue, we studied the effects of 2 days of treatment with biperiden on positive and negative symptoms in 15 medication-free schizophrenic patients. Positive symptoms increased significantly, while there was a trend toward a decrease in negative symptoms. The implications of these findings for the role of the cholinergic system in schizophrenia are discussed. Key Words. Biperiden, cholinergic system, schizophrenia, positive symptoms. Anticholinergic drugs are commonly used in the treatment of extrapyramidal side effects, which frequently accompany neuroleptic treatment in schizophrenia. It is assumed that anticholinergic drugs do not affect schizophrenic symptomatology, and

Rajiv Tandon; Nancy A. Mann; William H. Eisner

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Analysis of Crossovers in the Interbeat Sequences of Elderly Individuals and Heart Failure Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many physical and biological systems exhibit complex behavior characterized by long?range power?law correlations. Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a scaling analysis method that provides a scaling parameter to represent the correlation properties of a signal. The study of interbeat sequences with the DFA method has revealed the presence of crossovers associated with physiological aging and heart with failure; the hinges present in the crossover region from both the elderly healthy individuals and the patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are in opposite directions. The interbeat sequences of healthy young persons do not show crossovers. In this paper we study interbeat time series of healthy young and elderly persons and patients with CHF. We use the DFA?m method

A. Muñoz?Diosdado; J. L. del Río Correa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Preoperative Versus Postoperative Radiotherapy in Soft-Tissue Sarcoma: Multi-Institutional Analysis of 821 Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the impact of radiotherapy (RT) sequencing with surgery on overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), local failure, and distant failure in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the National Oncology Database, a proprietary database of aggregated tumor registries owned by IMPAC Medical Systems (Sunnyvale, CA). Patients with STS of all major anatomic sites who received definitive surgery and either preoperative (preop) or postoperative (postop) RT were included. Patients were also required to have known stage and grade. Prognostic factors for survival were identified using multivariate techniques. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and compared for statistical significance (p < 0.05) using the log-rank test. Results: A total of 821 patients met inclusion criteria. The median follow-up time was 63 months. Age, stage, histology, gender, tumor size, and RT sequence were independent predictors for OS (p < 0.05). Preop RT was associated with significantly improved OS and CSS compared with postop RT (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.91, p < 0.01, and HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46-0.88, p < 0.01, respectively). The 5-year CSS was 79% and 74%, in favor of preop RT (log-rank, p < 0.05). Preop RT was also significantly associated with a reduced risk for local and distant relapse compared with postop RT. Conclusion: Preoperative RT is associated with a reduced cancer-specific mortality compared with postoperative RT in STS. The results of this study may serve as motivation to conduct future prospective studies with larger patient numbers.

Sampath, Sagus, E-mail: sagus.sampath@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Randall, R. Lor [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shrieve, Dennis C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Application of intelligent technologies to safety and medical services in Japan: a patient-centric issue?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines selected wireless/mobile intelligent technologies services in Japan, such as Intelligent Transport Systems (ITSs) (available today or in the pipeline), where a 'ubiquitous society' has become a common goal. One of the ways to reach ... Keywords: EMSs, ITS, Japan, driving safety, emergency medical services, intelligent technologies, intelligent transport systems, mobile communications, patient-user perspective, pedestrians, precrash safety, sensor networks, walking safety, wireless networks

Sed S. Saad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade {>=}2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

De Ruyck, Kim, E-mail: kim.deruyck@UGent.be [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Sabbe, Nick [Department of Applied Mathematics, Biometrics and Process Control, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Research Institute of Growth and Development, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Vandecasteele, Katrien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Thas, Olivier [Department of Applied Mathematics, Biometrics and Process Control, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Research Institute of Growth and Development, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Meerbeeck, Jan [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Thierens, Hubert [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Dose Escalation for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Relatively Radioresistant Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors such as renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and malignant melanoma. However, the results of the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy/10 fractions need to be improved with respect to functional outcome. This study investigated whether a dose escalation beyond 30 Gy can improve treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients receiving 30 Gy/10 fractions were retrospectively compared to 115 patients receiving higher doses (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 40 Gy/20 fractions) for motor function and local control of MSCC. Ten further potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, visceral or other bone metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 18% of patients after 30 Gy and in 22% after higher doses (p = 0.81). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.030), interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.010), and time developing motor deficits (p < 0.001). The 1-year local control rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 80% after higher doses, respectively (p = 0.64). On multivariate analysis, local control was significantly associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.029) and number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, escalation of the radiation dose beyond 30 Gy/10 fractions did not significantly improve motor function and local control of MSCC in patients with relatively radioresistant tumors.

Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Bajrovic, Amira [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Hamburg (Germany); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Wildfang, Ingeborg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siloah Hospital Hannover (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Enhancing the Utility of ProstaScint SPECT Scans for Patient Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project investigated reducing the artifact content of In-111 ProstaScint SPECT scans for use in treatment planning and management. Forty-one patients who had undergone CT or MRI scans and simultaneous Tc-99m RBC/In-111 ProstaScint SPECT scans were ... Keywords: ProstaScint SPECT artifact elimination, Prostate cancer treatment planning., Reconstruction algorithms, Volume fusion, Volume subtraction

Marilyn E. Noz; Grace Chung; Benjamin Y. Lee; Gerald Q. Maguire, Jr.; J. Keith Dewyngaert; Jay V. Doshi; Elissa L. Kramer; Antoinette D. Murphy-Walcott; Michael P. Zeleznik; Noeun G. Kwak

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Use of Palliative Radiotherapy Among Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anecdotally, RT is believed to be commonly used in this setting, but limited population-based data are available. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization patterns of palliative RT among elderly patients with Stage IV NSCLC and, in particular, to identify factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify 11,084 Medicare beneficiaries aged {>=}65 years who presented with Stage IV NSCLC in the 11 SEER regions between 1991 and 1996. The primary outcome was receipt of RT. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with receipt of RT. Results: A total of 58% of these patients received RT, with its use decreasing over time (p = 0.01). Increasing age was negatively associated with receipt of treatment (p <0.001), as was increasing comorbidities (p <0.001). Factors positively associated with the receipt of RT included income (p = 0.001), hospitalization (p <0.001), and treatment with chemotherapy (p <0.001). Although the use varied across the SEER regions (p = 0.001), gender, race/ethnicity, and distance to the nearest RT facility were not associated with treatment. Conclusions: Elderly patients with metastatic NSCLC frequently receive palliative RT, but its use varies, especially with age and receipt of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to determine whether this variability reflects good quality care.

Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)], E-mail: hayman@umich.edu; Abrahamse, Paul H.; Lakhani, Indu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Earle, Craig C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Wearable wireless sensor network for the monitorisation of Parkinsonian patients using a novel mobility algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in the field of wireless sensor networks (WSN) include the creation of a new kind of these networks, called body sensor networks (BSN). These systems have been proven to be an enabling technology for the application domain ... Keywords: Parkinson', bioinformatics, body sensor networks, force sensors, gait analysis, healthcare technology, medical monitoring, monitorisation, network mobility, patient gaits, s disease, wearable WSNs, wearable computing, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Gonzalo Solas; Paul Bustamante; Karol Grandez; Erlantz Uriarte

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi Strains in Tissues of Lyme Disease Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant and animal biodiversity are essential to ecosystem health and can provide benefits to humans ranging from aesthetics to maintaining air quality. Although the importance of biodiversity to ecology and conservation biology is obvious, such measures have not been applied to strains of an invasive bacterium found in human tissues during infection. In this study, we compared the strain biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi found in tick populations with that found in skin, blood, synovial fluid or cerebrospinal fluid of Lyme disease patients. The biodiversity of B. burgdorferi strains is significantly greater in tick populations than in the skin of patients with erythema migrans. In turn, strains from skin are significantly more diverse than strains at any of the disseminated sites. The cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurologic Lyme disease harbored the least pathogen biodiversity. These results suggest that human tissues act as niches that can allow entry to or maintain only a subset of the total pathogen population. These data help to explain prior clinical observations on the natural history of B. burgdorferi infection and raise several questions that may help to direct future research to better understand the pathogenesis of this infection.

Dustin Brisson; Nilofer Baxamusa; Ira Schwartz; Gary P. Wormser

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Risk associated with hospital rooms contaminated with 131I by patients being treated for thyroid carcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iodine-131 contamination is known to be present in hospital rooms that are used to confine patients being treated with quantities of 1311 in excess of 1. 1 GBq. These activities of 13 'I are used as a post-surgical follow-up procedure to a thyroidectomy as a means of treating thyroid cancer. Previous studies have indicated the extent of contamination in hospital rooms being used during these procedures. However, contamination has not been related to risk. This paper quantifies the risk in terms of effective dose equivalent to members of the public and personnel from 1311 contamination when only minimal precautions are taken to contain the contamination during the 1311 thyroid cancer treatment procedure. Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) calculations using the NRC published dose models for surface contamination results in public exposures of less than 2.7 uSv per patient and personnel exposures of less than 2.1 uSv yr-1. Maximum TEDE to the public considering the detectable limits of portable area survey equipment indicated a worst case exposure of 340 uSv per patient. As a result, conservative protective measures utilized by many institutions, such a lining the room with plastic, appear not to be warranted.

Jones, David Maurice

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max} underestimated the accumulated heart D{sub max} for 9.1% patients using online and 13.6% patients using offline bony anatomy setup correction, which validated that PRV margin size was adequate. Conclusion: Considerable cardiac position variability relative to the bony anatomy was observed in breast cancer patients. A PRV margin can be used during treatment planning to take these uncertainties into account.

Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

VMAT QA: Measurement-guided 4D dose reconstruction on a patient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop and validate a volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) tool that takes as input a time-resolved, low-density ({approx}10 mm) cylindrical surface dose map from a commercial helical diode array, and outputs a high density, volumetric, time-resolved dose matrix on an arbitrary patient dataset. This first validation study is limited to a homogeneous 'patient.'Methods: A VMAT treatment is delivered to a diode array phantom (ARCCHECK, Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear) derives the high-density volumetric dose using measurement-guided dose reconstruction (MGDR). MGDR cylindrical phantom results are then used to perturb the three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning dose on the patient dataset, producing a semiempirical volumetric dose grid. Four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction on the patient is also possible by morphing individual sub-beam doses instead of the composite. For conventional (3D) dose comparison two methods were developed, using the four plans (Multi-Target, C-shape, Mock Prostate, and Head and Neck), including their structures and objectives, from the AAPM TG-119 report. First, 3DVH and treatment planning system (TPS) cumulative point doses were compared to ion chamber in a cube water-equivalent phantom ('patient'). The shape of the phantom is different from the ARCCHECK and furthermore the targets were placed asymmetrically. Second, coronal and sagittal absolute film dose distributions in the cube were compared with 3DVH and TPS. For time-resolved (4D) comparisons, three tests were performed. First, volumetric dose differences were calculated between the 3D MGDR and cumulative time-resolved patient (4D MGDR) dose at the end of delivery, where they ideally should be identical. Second, time-resolved (10 Hz sampling rate) ion chamber doses were compared to cumulative point dose vs time curves from 4D MGDR. Finally, accelerator output was varied to assess the linearity of the 4D MGDR with global fluence change. Results: Across four TG-119 plans, the average PTV point dose difference in the cube between 3DVH and ion chamber is 0.1 {+-} 1.0%. Average film vs TPS {gamma}-analysis passing rates are 83.0%, 91.1%, and 98.4% for 1%/2 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 3%/3 mm threshold combinations, respectively, while average film vs 3DVH {gamma}-analysis passing rates are 88.6%, 96.1%, and 99.5% for the same respective criteria. 4D MGDR was also sufficiently accurate. First, for 99.5% voxels in each case, the doses from 3D and 4D MGDR at the end of delivery agree within 0.5%local dose-error/1 mm distance. Moreover, all failing voxels are confined to the edge of the cylindrical reconstruction volume. Second, dose vs time curves track between the ion chamber and 4D MGDR within 1%. Finally, 4D MGDR dose changes linearly with the accelerator output: the difference between cumulative ion chamber and MGDR dose changed by no more than 1% (randomly) with the output variation range of 10%. Conclusions: Even for a well-commissioned TPS, comparison metrics show better agreement on average to MGDR than to TPS on the arbitrary-shaped measurable 'patient.' The method requires no more accelerator time than standard QA, while producing more clinically relevant information. Validation in a heterogeneous thoracic phantom is under way, as is the ultimate application of 4D MGDR to virtual motion studies.

Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Robinson, Joshua; Wolf, Theresa K.; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Live Oak Technologies LLC, Kirkwood, Missouri 63122 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Magnetic Resonance Lymphography Findings in Patients With Biochemical Recurrence After Prostatectomy and the Relation With the Stephenson Nomogram  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate the occurrence of positive lymph nodes on magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) in patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after prostatectomy and to investigate the relation between score on the Stephenson nomogram and lymph node involvement on MRL. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five candidates for salvage radiation therapy were referred for an MRL to determine their lymph node status. Clinical and histopathologic features were recorded. For 49 patients, data were complete to calculate the Stephenson nomogram score. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine how well this nomogram related to the MRL result. Analysis was done for the whole group and separately for patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL to determine the situation in candidates for early salvage radiation therapy, and for patients without pathologic lymph nodes at initial lymph node dissection. Results: MRL detected positive lymph nodes in 47 patients. ROC analysis for the Stephenson nomogram yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.93). Of 29 patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL, 18 had a positive MRL. Of 37 patients without lymph node involvement at initial lymph node dissection, 25 had a positive MRL. ROC analysis for the Stephenson nomogram showed AUCs of 0.84 and 0.74, respectively, for these latter groups. Conclusion: MRL detected positive lymph nodes in 72% of candidates for salvage radiation therapy, in 62% of candidates for early salvage radiation therapy, and in 68% of initially node-negative patients. The Stephenson nomogram showed a good correlation with the MRL result and may thus be useful for identifying patients with a PSA recurrence who are at high risk for lymph node involvement.

Meijer, Hanneke J.M., E-mail: H.Meijer@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Span, Paul N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Witjes, J. Alfred [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Timing of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patients Undergoing Total Hip or Knee Replacement A Nationwide Cohort Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Limited evidence suggests that the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may be increased shortly after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. However, risk of AMI in these patients has not been compared against matched controls who have not undergone surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the timing of AMI in patients undergoing THR or TKR surgery compared with matched controls. Methods: Retrospective, nationwide cohort study within the Danish national registries. All patients who underwent a primary THR or TKR (n=95 227) surgery from

Arief Lalmohamed; Pharmd Peter Vestergaard; Dmsc Corinne Klop; Tjeerd P. Van Staa

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ullrich-Turner phenotype with unusual manifestation in a patient with mosaicism 45,X/47,XX,+18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a girl with Ullrich-Turner phenotype and 45,X/47,XX,+18 chromosomal mosaicism. Only two other patients with similar mosaicism have been reported, both girls with XY sex chromosome constitution. The face of the patient was highly asymmetric, the right side being almost normal, the left showing a typical Ullrich-Turner syndrome appearance. This clinical impression was strengthened by photographic doubling of both hemifaces. The patient had normal intelligence and did not show any stigmata of trisomy 18. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Franceschini, P.; Guala, A.; Camerano, P.; Franceschini, D.; Vardeu, M.P.; Signorile, F. [Universita di Torino (Italy)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

Yang, Tzu-I. J. [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.ed [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

On the use of biomathematical models in patient-specific IMRT dose QA  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the use of biomathematical models such as tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) as new quality assurance (QA) metrics.Methods: Five different types of error (MLC transmission, MLC penumbra, MLC tongue and groove, machine output, and MLC position) were intentionally induced to 40 clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient plans (20 H and N cases and 20 prostate cases) to simulate both treatment planning system errors and machine delivery errors in the IMRT QA process. The changes in TCP and NTCP for eight different anatomic structures (H and N: CTV, GTV, both parotids, spinal cord, larynx; prostate: CTV, rectal wall) were calculated as the new QA metrics to quantify the clinical impact on patients. The correlation between the change in TCP/NTCP and the change in selected DVH values was also evaluated. The relation between TCP/NTCP change and the characteristics of the TCP/NTCP curves is discussed.Results:{Delta}TCP and {Delta}NTCP were summarized for each type of induced error and each structure. The changes/degradations in TCP and NTCP caused by the errors vary widely depending on dose patterns unique to each plan, and are good indicators of each plan's 'robustness' to that type of error.Conclusions: In this in silico QA study the authors have demonstrated the possibility of using biomathematical models not only as patient-specific QA metrics but also as objective indicators that quantify, pretreatment, a plan's robustness with respect to possible error types.

Zhen Heming [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Montefiore Medical Center and Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Award Review Analysis of Food Allergen Structures and Development of Foods for Allergic Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food allergy is one of the important health problems, and countermeasures are socially required. We have been undertaking studies on wheat allergens and their epitopes, and have developed a method for producing hypoallergenic wheat flour by enzymatic modification. The hypoallergenic products are now provided to patients. More noteworthy, by taking hypoallergenic cupcakes over a long period, more than half of patients are hyposensitized and become able to eat normal wheat products. This suggests that the hypoallergenic wheat flour can act as anti-allergenic via allergen-specific immunotolerance. This series of studies was followed by expansive research on food allergy: analysis of epitopes of bovine serum albumin (the major beef allergen), isolation and identification of inhibitory peptides for allergen absorption at the intestine, evaluation of hesperetin as an inhibitor of degranulation of mast cells, and the development of PCR detection methods for verifying allergen labeling and for identifying hidden allergic ingredients in processed foods. Key words: food allergy; epitope; hypoallergenic wheat flour; allergen permeation; Caco-2 The worldwide prevalence of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis has increased during the last two decades, 1) and it is assumed that in Japan more than one-third of the population is now suffering from at least one of these diseases. Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Hen’s egg, 2) cow’s milk, 3) wheat 4) and peanuts 5) are generally known allergens for food-allergic patients. Allergens are proteins characterized by their ability to induce a pathogenic IgE response in susceptible individuals, giving rise to asthma, atopic dermatitis, and rhinitis. Although the reasons that certain individuals suffer particular hypersensitivities are unclear, there is evidence that both genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility. 6)

Soichi Tanabe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

their Natural Regulators Production by PMN and PBMC in Patients with Lyme Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, it has been reported that TLR2 on macrophages plays a unique role in the inflammatory response and host defense to infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) which is an etiologic agent of Lyme disease. Experimental studies show that PMNs also play an essential role in infection control by Bb. However, there is no available data about TLR2 expression on PMN in the course of Lyme disease. In the present study, TLR2 expression and production of IL-1? and IL-6 as well as their natural regulators (sIL-1RII, IL-1Ra and sIL-6R?, sgp130, resp) by PMN of peripheral blood in patients with Lyme disease were examined. For the purpose of comparison, the same activity of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was estimated. An effect of rhIL-15 on TLR2 and cytokine secretion was also studied. Increased TLR2 expression in unstimulated neutrophils suggests an important role of these cells in mechanism recognition of Bburgdorferiin patients with Lyme disease. The relationship between IL-1? and IL-6 as well as their regulators by unstimulated PMN and PBMC, observed in the present study, may lead to enhanced IL-6and to inhibition of IL-1?-mediated reactions in this patient group. Changes in the TLR2 expression after rhIL-15 stimulation appear to have a favorable effect on mechanism recognition of Bb. The relations between IL-6 and its regulators (sIL-6R? and sgp130) as well as between IL-1? and its regulators (IL-1Ra and sIL-1RII) after rhIL-15 stimulation may lead to enhanced IL-1?and IL-6-mediated inflammatory reactions in the course of Lyme disease. Copyright © 2006 E. Jablonska and M. Marcinczyk. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Ewa Jablonska; Magdalena Marcinczyk

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Single- and Multivoxel Proton Spectroscopy in Pediatric Patients With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of two magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for treating pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) and to evaluate the relationship of metabolic profiles determined by each technique. Utility of each technique for improving patient management is also discussed. Methods and Materials: Children with DIPG (n = 36) were evaluated using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) during the same imaging session. Patients were followed longitudinally (n = 150 total studies). Technical feasibility was defined by sufficient water and lipid suppression for detection of metabolites. Correlation of metabolic data obtained by SVS and MRSI was determined using the Spearman rank method. Metabolite ratios, including choline:N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho:NAA) and Cho:creatine (Cho:Cr), were obtained from SVS and MRSI. Results: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible in >90% of studies. Maximum Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr from MRSI analysis were strongly associated with Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr obtained by SVS (r = 0.67 and 0.76, respectively). MRSI Cho:NAA values were more heterogeneous than Cho:Cr values within the same lesion, and a strong linear relationship between the range and maximum Cho:NAA values was observed. Conclusions: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible, with a strong correlation in metabolic data. Both techniques may improve diagnostic evaluation and management of DIPG. SVS is recommended for global assessment of tumor metabolism before and after therapy. MRSI showed heterogeneous patterns of metabolic activity within these tumors and is recommended for planning and monitoring targeted therapies and evaluating nearby tissue for tumor invasion.

Steffen-Smith, Emilie A. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Venzon, David J. [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bent, Robyn S. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Hipp, Sean J. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States) [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Warren, Katherine E., E-mail: warrenk@mail.nih.gov [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Comparison of doses to normal brain in patients treated with boron neuron capture therapy at Brookhaven National Laboratory and MIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) clinical trials are currently underway around the world. Due to the small number of patients at each of the individual centers, it is desirable to pool the clinical data ...

Turcotte, Julie Catherine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Real-time analysis of physiological data and development of alarm algorithms for patient monitoring in the Intensive Care Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of effective data integration and knowledge representation in patient monitoring limits its utility to clinicians. Intelligent alarm algorithms that use artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to ...

Zhang, Ying, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A Micro-power EEG acquisition SoC with integrated seizure detection processor for continuous patient monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous on-scalp EEG monitoring provides a non-invasive means to detect the onset of seizures in epilepsy patients, but cables from the scalp pose a severe strangulation hazard during convulsions. Since the power of ...

Verma, Naveen

372

IL-17A is increased in the serum and in spinal cord CD8 and mast cells of ALS patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motor neuron degeneration in ALS. Annu Rev Neurosci 2004, 3.in Familial and Sporadic ALS. Antioxid Redox Signal 2009, 4.non-native SOD1 in sporadic ALS patients. PLoS One 5-e11552.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Method and system for the diagnosis of disease using retinal image content and an archive of diagnosed human patient data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for diagnosing diseases having retinal manifestations including retinal pathologies includes the steps of providing a CBIR system including an archive of stored digital retinal photography images and diagnosed patient data corresponding to the retinal photography images, the stored images each indexed in a CBIR database using a plurality of feature vectors, the feature vectors corresponding to distinct descriptive characteristics of the stored images. A query image of the retina of a patient is obtained. Using image processing, regions or structures in the query image are identified. The regions or structures are then described using the plurality of feature vectors. At least one relevant stored image from the archive based on similarity to the regions or structures is retrieved, and an eye disease or a disease having retinal manifestations in the patient is diagnosed based on the diagnosed patient data associated with the relevant stored image(s).

Tobin, Kenneth W; Karnowski, Thomas P; Chaum, Edward

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Training Residents to Employ Self-efficacy-enhancing Interviewing Techniques: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standardized Patient Intervention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single SP instructor training visit and persisted withoutour findings suggest that training primary care physiciansJ, et al. Self-efficacy training for patients with end-stage

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A systems approach to improving patient safety through medical device purchasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service (NHS) were out of date by over a decade, compared to the newer digital ones available in private practice. In response to growing pressure from patients and the public, the NHS secured a contract to buy new digital aids in bulk, providing... has been shown, however, is that not all standards may imply the same level of safety when it comes to device use. A study on applying standards to the design of nuclear medical devices claims that because the directives were misleading, some...

Hinrichs, Saba

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective trials with high-dose radiation therapy for unresectable lung cancer.

Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to dose-limiting toxicities. Future efforts will focus on whether further dose escalation with CY/VP16 is safe, with the goal of improving disease control in this high-risk population.

Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States) [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Outcomes of Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With Bexxar With or Without External-Beam Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the efficacy and toxicity of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to sites of bulky lymphadenopathy in patients with chemotherapy-refractory low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) immediately before receiving Bexxar (tositumomab and {sup 131}I) vs. in patients receiving Bexxar alone for nonbulky disease. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with chemotherapy-refractory NHL were treated with Bexxar at our institution (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL) from 2005 to 2008. Seventeen patients had Grade 1-2 follicular lymphoma. Ten patients received a median of 20 Gy in 10 fractions to the areas of clinical involvement, immediately followed by Bexxar (EBRT + Bexxar); 9 patients received Bexxar alone. The median tumor sizes before EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone were 4.8 cm and 3.3 cm, respectively. All 5 patients with a tumor diameter >5 cm were treated with EBRT + Bexxar. A univariate analysis of prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 2.3 years for all patients and 3.1 years for 12 patients alive at last follow-up. Of all patients, 79% had a partial or complete response; 4 of the 8 responders in the EBRT + Bexxar group achieved a durable response of over 2 years, including 3 of the 5 with tumors >5 cm. Three of 9 patients treated with Bexxar alone achieved a durable response over 2 years. Actuarial estimates of 3-year overall survival and PFS for EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone were 69% and 38% and 62% and 33%, respectively. The median time to recurrence after EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone was 9 months. Having fewer than 4 involved lymph-node regions was associated with superior PFS at 3 years (63% vs. 18%). There was no Grade 4 or 5 complications. Conclusions: Adding EBRT immediately before Bexxar produced PFS equivalent to that with Bexxar alone, despite bulkier disease. Hematologic toxicity was not worsened. EBRT combined with Bexxar adds a safe and effective therapeutic treatment for managing recurrent low-grade follicular NHL.

Smith, Kristy; Byer, Gracie; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Lightsey, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hoppe, Bradford S.; Lynch, James [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Olivier, Kenneth [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Effect of Socioeconomic Factors on Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the effect of socioeconomic factors on quality of life (QoL) after treatment in patients with head and neck carcinoma (HNC). Patients and Methods: The study population included 50 HNC patients seen in their control examinations after radiotherapy during a 2-month interval and who were willing to complete the Short-Form 36 QoL questionnaire. Socioeconomic, demographic, and tumor- and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their effect on physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: All patients received radiotherapy, and 33 patients (66%) underwent surgery for the primary tumor and/or neck disease. Chemotherapy was given in 9 patients (18%). Mean PCS and MCS were 47.9 (range, 24.8-59.3) and 46.7 (range, 22-63.3) for the whole patient population. There was no significant factor affecting PCS. Education level of 'middle school or higher,' perceived economic status of 'medium or higher,' social security status of not being 'absent or minimally covered,' and unilateral type of neck surgery were found to increase MCS significantly. According to separate linear regression analyses performed for three socioeconomic variables, the most significant factor for MCS was social security status compared with education level and perceived economic status. It was the only parameter that retained its significance when all five parameters were combined in a linear regression model. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that educational status, perceived economic status, and social security status showed a significant effect on the QoL of HNC patients after radiotherapy. When all variables were taken into account, only 'social security status' remained significant.

Demiral, Ayse Nur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dokuz Eyluel University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ayse.demiral@deu.edu.tr; Sen, Mehmet [Cookridge Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Demiral, Yuecel [Department of Public Health, Dokuz Eyluel University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Kinay, Muenir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dokuz Eyluel University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121-1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0-29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

Korreman, Stine, E-mail: korreman@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States); Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Juhler-Nottrup, Trine [Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

Bjerregaard, Jon K., E-mail: jon.bjerregaard@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Mortensen, Michael B. [Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Jensen, Helle A.; Nielsen, Morten [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Pfeiffer, Per [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Recurrent pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland: Long-term outcome of patients treated with radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the role of radiation therapy in the management of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 34 patients were treated with postoperative radiation therapy for recurrent pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland to a median dose of 5000 cGy (range, 4,500-6,000 cGy). Median age was 48 years (range, 24-72 years). Gross total resection at the time of surgery before radiation was achieved in 30 patients (88%), and histologic analysis demonstrated multifocal disease in 16 patients (47%). Radiation was delivered for a first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth local recurrence in 24%, 21%, 24%, 24%, 6%, and 3% of patients, respectively. Results: With a median follow-up of 17.4 years (range, 2.3-28.9 years), 2 patients had local recurrences at a median of 3.4 years after completion of radiation. The 20-year actuarial local control rate was 94%. One patient developed a second malignancy at approximately 14 years after completion of therapy. Conclusion: The use of postoperative radiation therapy leads to excellent long-term local control for the treatment of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma with acceptable late toxicity. Although the incidence of second malignancy was low in this population, continued follow-up is warranted.

Chen, Allen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: achen@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Garcia, Joaquin [Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bucci, M. Kara [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eisele, David W. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Artificial Retina Implant Eligibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Participate to Participate February 14, 2013: BREAKING NEWS FDA Approves Argus II After more than 20 years of research and development, Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., has announced that it's Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System ("Argus II") has received U.S. market approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat individuals with late stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This announcement followed receipt of the European approval in 2011, and a unanimous recommendation by the FDA's Ophthalmic Devices Advisory Panel in September 2012 that this revolutionary product be made available to treat this patient population in the U.S. With approval from the FDA, the Argus II is slated to be available later in 2013 in clinical centers across the country. Second Sight will be actively adding sites to make the therapy more readily available and encourages interested facilities and patients to contact them.

384

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Multiple Myeloma: Prospective Long-Term Follow-Up in 106 Consecutive Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure involving the injection of bone cement within a collapsed vertebral body. Although this procedure was demonstrated to be effective in osteoporosis and metastases, few studies have been reported in cases of multiple myeloma (MM). We prospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of PV in the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) resulting from MM. Materials and Methods: PV was performed in 106 consecutive MM patients who had back pain due to VCFs, the treatment of which had failed conservative therapies. Follow-up (28.2 {+-} 12.1 months) was evaluated at 7 and 15 days as well as at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and every 6 months after PV. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, opioid use, external brace support, and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score were recorded. Results: The median pretreatment VAS score of 9 (range 4-10) significantly (P < 0.001) decreased to 1 (range 0-9) after PV. Median pre-ODI values of 82% (range 36-89%) significantly improved to 7% (range 0-82%) (P < 0.001). Differences in pretreatment and posttreatment use of analgesic drug were statistically significant (P < 0.001). The majority of patients (70 of 81; 86%) did not use an external brace after PV (P < 0.001). Conclusion: PV is a safe, effective, and long-lasting procedure for the treatment of vertebral compression pain resulting from MM.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.it; Manca, Antonio, E-mail: anto.manca@gmail.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Montemurro, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.montemurro@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Oncology Unit (Italy); Hirsch, Joshua, E-mail: jahirschmd@yahoo.com [Massachusetts General Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology (United States); Chiara, Gabriele, E-mail: chiaragabriele@gmail.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Grignani, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.grignani@ircc.it; Carnevale Schianca, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.carnevale@ircc.it; Capaldi, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.capaldi@ircc.it; Rota Scalabrini, Delia, E-mail: delia.rotascalabrini@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Oncology Unit (Italy); Sardo, Elena, E-mail: elena.sardo@ircc.it; Debernardi, Felicino, E-mail: felicino.debernardi@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Anesthesiology Unit (Italy); Iussich, Gabriella, E-mail: gabriellaiussich@yahoo.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Regge, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.regge@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Radiology Unit (Italy)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Lipid fluidity at different regions in LDL and HDL of {beta}-thalassemia/Hb E patients  

SciTech Connect

Atherosclerosis-related vascular complications in {beta}-thalassemia/hemoglobin E ({beta}-thal/Hb E) patients may result from iron induced oxidation of lipoproteins. To identify the specific site of oxidative damage, changes in lipid fluidity at different regions in LDL and HDL particle were investigated using two fluorescence probes and two ESR spin probes. The magnitude of increased lipid fluidity in thalassemic lipoproteins was dependent on the location of the probes. In hydrophobic region, the rotational correlation times for 16-doxyl stearic acid and DPH anisotropy were markedly changed in LDL and HDL of the patients. In the surface region, there was only a slight change in the order parameter (S) for 5-doxyl stearic acid and TMA-DPH anisotropy. Lipid fluidity at the core of LDL and HDL showed good correlation with oxidative stress markers, the ratio of CL/CO, and the level of {alpha}-tocopherol, suggesting that hydrophobic region of thalassemic lipoprotein was a target site for oxidative damage.

Morales, Noppawan Phumala [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)]. E-mail: scnpm@mahidol.ac.th; Charlermchoung, Chalermkhwan [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Luechapudiporn, Rataya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Yamanont, Paveena [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center, Institute of Science and Technology for Research and Development, Mahidol University, Salaya Campus, Nakornpathom (Thailand); Chantharaksri, Udom [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

386

The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma  

SciTech Connect

During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation.

Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI{sub vol}- and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose differences up to several-fold when organs were partially included in the scan coverage. Second, selected organ doses from our calculations agreed to within 20% of values derived from empirical formulae based upon measured patient abdominal circumference. Third, the existing DLP-to-effective dose conversion coefficients tended to be smaller than values given in the present study for all examinations except head scans. Conclusions: A comprehensive organ/effective dose database was established to readily calculate doses for given patients undergoing different CT examinations. The comparisons of our results with the existing studies highlight that use of hybrid phantoms with realistic anatomy is important to improve the accuracy of CT organ dosimetry. The comprehensive pediatric dose data developed here are the first organ-specific pediatric CT scan database based on the realistic pediatric hybrid phantoms which are compliant with the reference data from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The organ dose database is being coupled with an adult organ dose database recently published as part of the development of a user-friendly computer program enabling rapid estimates of organ and effective dose doses for patients of any age, gender, examination types, and CT scanner model.

Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do, 446906 (Korea, Republic of); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

Fortuin, Ansje S., E-mail: A.Fortuin@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meijer, Hanneke J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J. [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Treatment Outcomes in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients With Ultra-High Prostate-Specific Antigen  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: It is commonly believed that prostate cancer patients with very high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are unlikely to benefit from definitive local treatment, and patients with very high PSA are often underrepresented in, or excluded from, randomized clinical trials. Consequently, little is known about their optimal treatment or prognosis. We performed a registry-based analysis of management and outcome in this population of patients. Methods and Materials: Our provincial Cancer Registry was used to identify all men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1990 to 2001. A retrospective chart review provided information on stage, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis, and treatment. In this study, ultra-high PSA was defined as PSA of {>=}50 ng/ml. For a more complete perspective, treatment outcomes of patients with PSA of 20 to 49.9 ng/ml were also studied. Results: Of the 8378 men diagnosed with prostate cancer during this period, 6,449 had no known nodal or distant metastatic disease. The median follow-up of this group was 67.2 months (range, 0-192 months). A total of 1534 patients had PSA of {>=}20 ng/ml. Among the 995 patients with PSA 20 to 49.9 ng/ml, 85 had radical prostatectomy (RP), and their 5- and 10-year cause-specific survivals (CSS) were 95% and 84%, respectively. The 497 patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) had 5- and 10-year CSS of 92% and 71%. For the 332 patients with PSA 50-99.9 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 81% and 55%. For the 207 patients with PSA of {>=}100 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 80% and 54%. Conclusions: This is the largest series in the world on non metastatic cancer patients with ultra-high PSA at diagnosis. Even in the setting of a very high presenting PSA level, prostatectomy and radiotherapy are often associated with prolonged survival.

Tai, Patricia, E-mail: ptai2@yahoo.com [Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Regina, SK (Canada); Tonita, Jon; Woitas, Carla; Zhu Tong [Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Regina, SK (Canada); Joseph, Kurian [Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Calgary, AB (Canada); Skarsgard, David [Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Center, University of Alberta, Calgary, AB (Canada)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Microchip developed by UCSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

engineer Wentai Liu has been engineer Wentai Liu has been working on an artificial retina to restore vision to the blind for 20 years. Photo by Jim MacKenzie. June 24, 2008 By Tim Stephens (831) 459-2495; stephens@ucsc.edu Last year, Wentai Liu watched as surgeons implanted a microchip he had designed into the eye of a blind patient. For Liu, a professor of electrical engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, it was a major milestone in two decades of work on an artificial retina to restore vision to the blind. Ten patients are now enrolled in a clinical trial of the device based on Liu's microchip at four leading ophthalmic centers in the United States. Patients are also enrolled in trials in Mexico, Switzerland, France, and the United Kingdom. Developed through a large

391

Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0-2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

Lee, Heon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gong Yong, E-mail: gyjin@chonbuk.ac.kr; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Keun Sang [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Preventive Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lynch, David [National Jewish Health, Interstitial and Autoimmune Lung Disease Program, Department of Radiology (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

3. General Medical Council. Consent: patients and doctors making decisions together. General Medical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disclosure prior to bronchoscopy’dBianchi et al We are grateful to Dr Bianchi and colleagues for their interest in our study. 1 They argue that ‘knowledge of local and even personal bronchoscopic practice and performance’ is necessary to determine the level of risk to the patient from the procedure and hence the degree of information that must be provided. 2 This is certainly true if there is reason to believe that the risks in an institution or for an individual differ significantly from the normdin either direction. A database, such as that used in the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, for recording complications following bronchoscopy is a valuable resource for auditing outcomes and quality assurance. However, one must be cautious when interpreting the absence of a serious complication in any given series. Hanley and Lippman-Hand, in a now-classic paper, described the ‘rule of three ’ for such series: if none of n patients showed the event of interest, we can be 95 % confident that the chance of this event is at most 3/n. 3 For example, the Sheffield data showing no death with 1261 fibreoptic bronchoscopies translate into a 95 % confidence limit ranging from zero to an upper limit of 1 death in 420 procedures (Clinicians may find the other implication of using CIdthat occurrence of an uncommon complication is not of itself an evidence of poor performancedmore comforting). The absence of an uncommon complication in a personal or an institutional series will not of itself help the clinician strike the difficult balance between providing too much and too little risk information. 3. Hanley JA, Lippman-Hand A. If nothing goes wrong, is everything all right? Interpreting zero numerators.

Council Uk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Genomic structure of the choroideremia (CHM) gene and mutation analysis in CHM patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have isolated the complete open reading frame (ORF) of the choroideremia (CHM) gene and elucidated its exon-intron structure. The ORF of the CHM gene is located on 15 exons and encodes a protein of 653 amino acids. Among 75 CHM patients investigated for large structural abnormalities, 15 (20%) showed deletions of one or more exons of the gene. The deletions vary in size from a few kb spanning one exon to more than 10 megabases encompassing a large part of Xq21. In addition, we have positioned the X-chromosomal breakpoint in a CHM female with an X;7 translocation between exons 3 and 4. Fine mapping of the deletions indicates that there is no clustering of deletion breakpoints. Moreover, only 2 deletions are located entirely within the CHM gene, indicating that most deletions can be detected by PCR amplification of exons 1 and 15. From within the CHM gene we identified two microsatellite markers, a (CA){sub n}- and a [(TA){sub 4-12}C]{sub n}-like repeat, which should be very valuable for CHM diagnostics in clear-cut CHM families. In patients in which the diagnosis of choroideremia is less obvious, mutation analysis can be performed by PCR-SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. The feasibility of this approach was illustrated by the finding of 10 causative mutations in 12 Danish CHM families investigated. Interestingly, all CHM gene mutations detected thus far give rise to the introduction of a premature stop codon. Missense mutations thus far have not been found.

Bokhoven, H. van; Hurk, J. van den; Bogerd, L. [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Sensory study in restaurant interior design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??According to five senses, sight, smell, taste, hearing, and haptic, sight receives the most attention in restaurant interior design; however, the other senses are significant… (more)

Yu, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Previous Meetings: Artificial Retina Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Previous Meetings Second DOE International Symposium on Artificial Sight, Sponsored by DOE, April 18, 2005 First DOE International Symposium on Artificial Sight, Sponsored by DOE,...

396

Artificial Retina Video & Audio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multimedia Presentations PBS logo NY Times: The FDA approves bionic eye February 2013 Video and article Second Sight logo Second Sight 2012 Argus II retinal prosthesis system...

397

Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

Rothschild, Sacha [Radiation Oncology, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bucher, Stephan E. [BioConsult GmbH, Statistical and Language Services, Rickenbach (Switzerland); Bernier, Jacques [Radio-Oncologie, Clinique de Genolier, Genolier (Switzerland); Aebersold, Daniel M. [Radiation Oncology, Inselspital and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Zouhair, Aberrahim [Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ries, Gerhard [Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Lombrieser, Norbert [Klinik fuer Radiotherapie, Stadtspital Triemli, Zuerich (Switzerland); Lippuner, Thomas [Radiology, Kantonsspital, 8400 Winterthur (Switzerland); Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph [Radiation Oncology, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Ciernik, I. Frank, E-mail: ilja.ciernik@usz.c [Center for Clinical Research, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Patterns of Care and Locoregional Treatment Outcomes in Older Esophageal Cancer Patients: The SEER-Medicare Cohort  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Optimal management of elderly patients with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer is unclear. Outcomes data after locoregional treatment are lacking for this group. Methods: We assessed outcomes associated with standard locoregional treatments in 2,626 patients (age > 65 years) from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort diagnosed with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer from 1992 to 2002. In patients treated with radiotherapy alone (RT), surgery alone (S), chemoradiotherapy (CRT), or preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery (CRT + S), overall and disease-free survival were compared using proportional hazards regression. Postoperative complications were compared using logistic regression. Results: Mean age was 76 {+-} 6 years. Seven percent underwent CRT + S, 39% CRT, 30% S, and 24% RT. One-year survival was 68% (CRT + S), 52% (CRT), 53% (S), and 16% (RT), respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent CRT + S demonstrated improved overall survival compared with S alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.98; p = 0.03) and RT (HR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.35-0.55; p < 0.0001); and comparable survival to CRT (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-1.01; p = 0.06). Patients who underwent CRT + S also had comparable postoperative mortality (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.87-1.07; p = 0.45) and complications (OR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.70-1.14; p = 0.36) compared with S alone. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy may be an acceptable treatment option in appropriately selected older esophageal cancer patients. This treatment modality did not appear to increase surgical complications and offered potential therapeutic benefit, particularly compared with surgery alone.

Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Radiation Oncology Flight, Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A.; Liao Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. M.D.; Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary F.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: jcox@mdanderson.org

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Rapid Automated Treatment Planning Process to Select Breast Cancer Patients for Active Breathing Control to Achieve Cardiac Dose Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate a rapid automated treatment planning process for the selection of patients with left-sided breast cancer for a moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique using active breathing control (ABC); and to determine the dose reduction to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and the heart using mDIBH. Method and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using an automated method for patients undergoing left-sided breast radiotherapy (n = 53) with two-field tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy. All patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, defined as having >10 cm{sup 3} of the heart receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 50}) on the free-breathing automated treatment plan, underwent repeat scanning on a protocol using a mDIBH technique and ABC. The doses to the LAD and heart were compared between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans. Results: The automated planning process required approximately 9 min to generate a breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan. Using the dose-volume criteria, 20 of the 53 patients were selected for ABC. Significant differences were found between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans for the heart V{sub 50} (29.9 vs. 3.7 cm{sup 3}), mean heart dose (317 vs. 132 cGy), mean LAD dose (2,047 vs. 594 cGy), and maximal dose to 0.2 cm{sup 3} of the LAD (4,155 vs. 1,507 cGy, all p <.001). Of the 17 patients who had a breath-hold threshold of {>=}0.8 L, 14 achieved a {>=}90% reduction in the heart V{sub 50} using the mDIBH technique. The 3 patients who had had a breath-hold threshold <0.8 L achieved a lower, but still significant, reduction in the heart V{sub 50}. Conclusions: A rapid automated treatment planning process can be used to select patients who will benefit most from mDIBH. For selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, the mDIBH technique using ABC can significantly reduce the dose to the LAD and heart, potentially reducing the cardiac risks.

Wang Wei; Purdie, Thomas G. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rahman, Mohammad; Marshall, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Liu Feifei [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fyles, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.fyles@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

Taremi, Mojgan, E-mail: mojgan.taremi@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Pearson, Shannon [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, Sharon [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Purdie, Thomas [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brade, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "blind patient sight" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A support vector machine (SVM) for predicting preferred treatment position in radiotherapy of patients with breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: NYU 05-181 protocol compared the CT simulation in both supine and prone positions for 400 patients with breast cancer (200 left-breast and 200 right-breast) to identify which setup is better at sparing heart and lung involvement in the treatment process. The results demonstrated that all right-breast patients benefited from the prone treatment position, while for left-breast patients, 85% were better treated prone and 15% were better treated supine. Using the clinical data collected from this protocol, the authors aimed at developing an automated tool capable of identifying which of the left-breast cancer patients are better treated supine without obtaining a second CT scan in the supine position. Methods: Prone CT scans from 198 of the 200 left-breast cancer patients enrolled in NYU 05-181 protocol were deidentified and exported to a dedicated research planning workstation. Three-dimensional geometric features of the organs at risk and tumor bed were extracted. A two-stage classifier was used to classify patients into the prone class or the supine class. In the first stage, the authors use simple thresholding to divide the patients into two groups based on their in-field heart volume. For patients with in-field heart volume {<=}0.1 cc, the prone position was chosen as the preferred treatment position. Patients with in-field heart volume >0.1 cc will be further classified in the second stage by a weighted support vector machine (SVM). The weight parameters of the SVM were adjusted to maximize the specificity [true-supine/(true-supine+false-prone)] at the cost of lowering but still maintaining reasonable sensitivity [true-prone/(true-prone+false-supine)]. The authors used K-fold cross validations to test the performance of the SVM classifier. A feature selection algorithm was also used to identify features that give the best classification performance. Results: After the first stage, 49 of the 198 left-breast cancer patients were found to have >0.1 cc of in-field heart volume. The three geometric features of heart orientation, distance between heart and tumor, and in-field lung were selected by the feature selection algorithm in the second stage of the two-stage classifier to give the best predefined weighted accuracy. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were found to be 90.4% and 99.3%, respectively. Using two-stage classification, the authors reduced the proportion of prone-treated patients that need a second supine CT scan down to 16.3/170 or 9.6%, as compared to 21/170 or 12.4% when the authors use only the first stage (thresholding) for classification. Conclusions: The authors' study showed that a feature-based classifier is feasible for predicting the preferred treatment position, based on features extracted from prone CT scans. The two-stage classifier achieved very high specificity at an acceptable expense of sensitivity.

Zhao Xuan; Wong, Edward K.; Wang Yao; Lymberis, Stella; Wen Bixiu; Formenti, Silvia; Chang Jenghwa [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Quality of Life After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Results of an International Study Validating the EORTC QLQ-BM22  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is an effective method of palliating painful bone metastases and can improve function and reduce analgesic requirements. In advanced cancer patients, quality of life (QOL) is the primary outcome of interest over traditional endpoints such as survival. The purpose of our study was to compare bone metastasis-specific QOL scores among patients who responded differently to palliative RT. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving RT for bone metastases across 6 countries were prospectively enrolled from March 2010-January 2011 in a trial validating the QLQ-BM22 and completed the QLQ-BM22 and the core measure (QLQ-C30) at baseline and after 1 month. Pain scores and analgesic intake were recorded, and response to RT was determined according to the latest published guidelines. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric and Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes in QOL among response groups. A Bonferroni-adjusted P<.003 indicated statistical significance. Results: Of 79 patients who received palliative RT, 59 were assessable. Partial response, pain progression, and indeterminate response were observed in 22, 8, and 29 patients, respectively; there were no patients with a complete response. Patients across all groups had similar baseline QOL scores apart from physical functioning (patients who progressed had better initial functioning). One month after RT, patients who responded had significant improvements in 3 of 4 QLQ-BM22 domains (painful site, P<.0001; painful characteristic, P<.0001; and functional interference, P<.0001) and 3 QLQ-C30 domains (physical functioning, P=.0006; role functioning, P=.0026; and pain, P<.0001). Patients with progression in pain had significantly worse functional interference (P=.0007) and pain (P=.0019). Conclusions: Patients who report pain relief after palliative RT also have better QOL with respect to bone metastasis-specific issues. The QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C30 are able to discriminate among patients with varying responses and are recommended for use in future bone metastasis clinical trials.

Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt); Jesus-Garcia, Reynaldo [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kumar, Aswin [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India)] [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India); Forges, Fabien [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France) [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Unit of Clinical Research, Innovation, and Pharmacology, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Tseng, Ling-Ming [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hou, Ming-Feng [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chie, Wei-Chu [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bottomley, Andrew [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)] [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NOTE: This list was prepared as a courtesy to assist students in finding local dentists who are: accepting new patients, accept Delta Dental, have hygiene services and are available for emergency care.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: accepting new patients, accept Delta Dental, have hygiene services and are available for emergency care

California at Santa Cruz, University of

404

A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival.

Blackstock, A. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States)]. E-mail: ablackst@wfubmc.edu; Farmer, Michael R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Mishra, Girish [Division of Gastroenterology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Melin, Susan A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Oaks, Timothy [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Aklilu, Mabea [Division of Medical Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Clark, Paige B. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Levine, Edward A. [Department of Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Variable serum immunoglobulin responses against different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species in a population at risk for and patients with Lyme disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variable serum immunoglobulin responses against different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species in a population at risk for and patients with Lyme disease.

J Bunikis; B Olsén; G Westman; S Bergstroöm; J. Clin Microbiol; Jonas Bunikis; Björn Olsén; Göran Westman; Sven Bergström

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The relationship of cognitive, emotional, and interpersonal factors to screening and health-promoting behaviors among sisters of breast cancer patients.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??While sisters of breast cancer patients are at increased risk for developing breast cancer due to their family cancer history and age, little research with… (more)

Hartman, Sheri Jacobs

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Pilot Study Of Impedance-controlled Microcurrent Therapy For Managing Radiation-induced Fibrosis In Head-and-neck Cancer Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pilot Study Of Impedance-controlled Microcurrent Therapy For Managing Radiation-induced Fibrosis In Head-and-neck Cancer Patients

Lennox, A J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy in 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results obtained with {sup 192}Ir low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma. Patients and Methods: Between December 1979 and January 1998, 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma were treated by exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy, with or without neck dissection. {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy was performed according to the 'Paris system' with a median total dose of 60 Gy (median dose rate, 0.5 Gy/h). Results: Overall survival was 74.3% and 46.6% at 2 and 5 years. Local control was 79.1% at 2 years and regional control, respectively, 75.9% and 69.5% at 2 and 5 years (Kaplan-Meier method). Systematic dissection revealed 44.6% occult node metastases, and histologic lymph node involvement was identified as the main significant factor for survival. Complication rate was 16.5% (Grade 3, 2.9%). Half of the patients presented previous and/or successive malignant tumor (ear-nose-throat, esophagus, or bronchus). Conclusion: Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for T2 tongue carcinoma. Regional control and survival are excellent in patients undergoing systematic neck dissection, which is mandatory in our experience because of a high rate of occult lymph node metastases.

Bourgier, Celine [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Coche-Dequeant, Bernard [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Fournier, Charles [Department of Biostatistics, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Castelain, Bernard [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Prevost, Bernard [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Lefebvre, Jean-Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Lartigau, Eric [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France)]. E-mail: e-lartigau@o-lambret.fr

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Dual Role of IT-Assisted Communication in Patient Care: A Validated Structure-Process-Outcome Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the fact that about 90 percent of information transactions in hospitals are communications between patients, doctors, nurses, and other staff, little research has addressed the role that information technology IT plays in improving the efficiency ... Keywords: Business Value Of It, Health Information Technology, Operational It, Strategic It, Structure-Process-Outcome

Corey Angst; Sarv Devaraj; John D'Arcy

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Effects of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs Evaluated Using Markov Modelling for Northern Ireland Chronic Kidney Disease Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to use Markov modelling to investigate survival for particular types of kidney patients in relation to their exposure to anti-hypertensive treatment drugs. In order to monitor kidney function an intuitive three point assessment ... Keywords: Markov Modelling, Chronic Kidney Disease, Anti-Hypertensive Drugs

Andrea Rainey; Karen Carins; Adele Marshall; Michael Quinn; Gerard Savage; Damian Fogarty

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The British Journal of Radiology, 80 (2007), 362–366 Patient dose from 3D rotational neurovascular studies 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT. The use of image-guided interventional radiological techniques is increasing in prevalence and complexity. Imaging system developments have helped improve the information available to interventionalists to plan and guide procedures. Information on doses to patients resulting from alternative imaging techniques or protocols is useful for both the process of justifying particular procedures and in optimizing the resultant exposures. Such information is not always available, especially for new or developing imaging techniques. We have undertaken a study of doses to patients associated with two alternative imaging methods for pre-intervention assessment of intracranial aneurysms. In the first technique the aneurysm is assessed from a series of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) runs taken at different imaging projections. The second technique involved acquiring images from one single image run while the imaging system rotated 180 ? around the patient’s head. In this technique, the aneurysm was then evaluated from a 3D reconstruction of the projection images. Effective doses were calculated using a computer model to simulate the exposure geometry and parameters. The mean dose from the DSA protocol used at our centre was 3.4 mSv and from the 3D rotational angiography (RA) technique was 0.20 mSv.

R R Bridcut; E Murphy; A Workman; R J Winder

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Effect of Recombinant Human Endostatin on Radiosensitivity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To observe the effects of recombinant human endostatin (RHES) on the radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: First, 10 hypoxia-positive cases of pathology-diagnosed NSCLC selected from 15 patients were used to determine the normalization window, a period during which RHES improves NSCLC hypoxia. Second, 50 hypoxia-positive cases of pathology-diagnosed NSCLC (Stages I-III) were randomly divided into a RHES plus radiotherapy group (25 cases) and a radiotherapy-alone group (25 cases). Intensity = modulated radiotherapy with a total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions for 6 weeks was adopted in the two groups. The target area included primary foci and metastatic lymph nodes. In the RHES plus radiotherapy group, RHES (15 mg/day) was intravenously given during the normalization window. Results: After RHES administration, the tumor-to=normal tissue radioactivity ratio and capillary permeability surface were first decreased and then increased, with their lowest points on the fifth day compared with the first day (all p window is within about 1 week after administration. RHES combined with radiotherapy within the normalization window has better short-term therapeutic effects and local control rates and no severe adverse reactions in the treatment of NSCLC, but it failed to significantly improve the 1-year and 3-year overall survival rates.

Jiang Xiaodong; Dai Peng; Wu Jin; Song Daan [Department of Oncology, Lianyungang First People's Hospital, Lianyungang (China); Yu Jinming, E-mail: jxdysy@sohu.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Thyroid V30 Predicts Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism in Patients Treated With Sequential Chemo-Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Hypothyroidism (HT) is a frequent late side effect of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) therapy. The purpose of this study is to determine dose-volume constraints that correlate with functional impairment of the thyroid gland in HL patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 consecutive patients undergoing antiblastic chemotherapy and involved field radiation treatment (median dose, 32 Gy; range, 30-36 Gy) for HL were retrospectively considered. Their median age was 28 years (range, 14-70 years). Blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodo-thyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroglobulin antibody (ATG) were recorded basally and at different times after the end of therapy. For the thyroid gland, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), dosimetric parameters, and the percentage of thyroid volume exceeding 10, 20, and 30 Gy (V10, V20, and V30) were calculated in all patients. To evaluate clinical and dosimetric factors possibly associated with HT, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: Eight of 61 (13.1%) patients had HT before treatment and were excluded from further evaluation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 6-99 months), 41.5% (22/53) of patients developed HT after treatment. Univariate analyses showed that all dosimetric factors were associated with HT (p 62.5%, the risk was 70.8% (p < 0.0001). A Cox regression curve stratified by two levels of V30 value was created (odds ratio, 12.6). Conclusions: The thyroid V30 predicts the risk of developing HT after sequential chemo-radiotherapy and defines a useful constraint to consider for more accurate HL treatment planning.

Cella, Laura [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Conson, Manuel; Caterino, Michele; De Rosa, Nicola [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Liuzzi, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Counc