Sample records for blend canadian lloydminster

  1. Biodiesel Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2-page fact sheet discussing general biodiesel blends and the improvement in engine performance and emissions.

  2. Canadian River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

  3. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association, Canadian Pulp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association

  4. Optimal Blending Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.P.

    2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a functional program developed for product blending. The program is installed at a Savannah River Plant production site on their VAX computer. A wide range of blending choices is available. The program can be easily changed or expanded. The technology can be applied at other areas where mixing or blending is done.

  5. The Canadian Geotechnical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    Leod, I.D. Moore, and W.A. Take Re: 2011 R. M. Quigley Award ­ For your paper entitled: "Three the 2011 R. M. Quigley Award for the best paper in the Canadian Geotechnical Journal in 2010. You

  6. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  7. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basham, P.W.; Lyons, J.A.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Andersen, F.; Hayman, R.B.; Wetmiller, R.J.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ECTN network has remained stable over the past year; progress on the new concentrator software has been slow. Major developments have taken place in the Ottawa Data Laboratory including the installation of a new VAX system and further development of the Seismic Analysis Monitor software. A new initiative has been the development of hardware and software for the Sudbury Local Telemetered Network, which can be considered a prototype for a smart outstation. The performance of the ECTN over the past year is described along with a summary of eastern Canadian seismicity during the reporting period and a list of EPB research publications on eastern Canadian seismicity during the past year. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Canadian seismic agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C., Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Lapointe, S.P.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the twenty-first progress report under the agreement entitled Canadian Seismic Agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Canadian Commercial Corporation. Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1988 to June 30, 1989 and supported in part by the NRC agreement are described below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity. In this time period eastern Canada experienced its largest earthquake in over 50 years. This earthquake, which has been christened the Saguenay earthquake, has provided a wealth of new data pertinent to earthquake engineering studies in eastern North America and is the subject of many continuing studies, which are presently being carried out at GD and elsewhere. 41 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers' Association, Canadian Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers' Association, Canadian Data: Canadian Iron and Steel and Ferro-Alloy Manufacturing Industries, published by CIEEDAC annually

  10. CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT SECOND EDITION ISSUES PAPER, No. 2001-1 PUBLISHED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: North American Wetlands Conservation Council Committee Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Tourbe de and funding of: · Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association · Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada

  11. DPF Performance with Biodiesel Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DPF Performance with Biodiesel Blends Aaron Williams, Bob McCormick, Bob Hayes, John Ireland National Renewable Energy Laboratory Howard L. Fang Cummins, Inc. Diesel Engine...

  12. Ethanol-blended Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@EnergyErnestEthanol-Blended Fuels A Study

  13. BLENDED AND ONLINE LEARNING IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    ) "Flipped classroom" - focus on active learning and enhanced student engagement in the classroom #12;First dissatisfied with student learning experience #12;Blended Learning Initiative Large, first-year courses student engagement improve student learning outcomes improve knowledge retention #12;Framework for Blended

  14. Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

  15. QER- Comment of Canadian Gas Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SENT ON BEHALF OF TIMOTHY M. EGAN PRESIDENT AND CEO CANADIAN GAS ASSOCIATION Dear Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, Please find attached the submission from the Canadian Gas Association to the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) process.

  16. Canadian Unity Collection / Charles Connaghan (collector)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Canadian Unity Collection / Charles Connaghan (collector) University of British Columbia Archives Collector's Biographical Sketch o Scope and Content o Notes Series Descriptions o Council for Canadian) #12;Collection Description Canadian Unity Collection. - 1975-1980 39 cm of textual records. Collector

  17. Canadian Nuclear Society Socit Nuclaire Canadienne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    Canadian Nuclear Society Société Nucléaire Canadienne 480 University Avenue, Suite 200, Toronto-snc@on.aibn.com The Canadian Nuclear Society is pleased to offer a scholarship to promote nuclear science and engineering entering their second or third year of graduate research in nuclear science and engineering at a Canadian

  18. 4, 11811201, 2004 Canadian Meteor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , and M. Campbell-Brown 4 1 Department of Physics, The University of Western Ontario, Canada 2 Department identical, as part of a campaign to shed light on the initial radius problem (Campbell-Brown and Jones, 2003 Discussions Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) A. R. Webster 1, 2 , P. G. Brown 1 , J. Jones 1 , K. J. Ellis 3

  19. Polycarbonate blends having an improved impact strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, S.; Lazear, N.R.

    1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoplastic molding compositions characterized by their improved impact performance and deformation under load are disclosed comprising a homogeneous, intimate blend of a polycarbonate resin and a nuclear alkylated polycarbonate resin wherein blend dispersed is a polymeric modifier.

  20. Intrinsically safe moisture blending system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman Jr., Russell L.; Vanatta, Paul D.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing an adjustable blend of fluids to an application process is disclosed. The system uses a source of a first fluid flowing through at least one tube that is permeable to a second fluid and that is disposed in a source of the second fluid to provide the adjustable blend. The temperature of the second fluid is not regulated, and at least one calibration curve is used to predict the volumetric mixture ratio of the second fluid with the first fluid from the permeable tube. The system typically includes a differential pressure valve and a backpressure control valve to set the flow rate through the system.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: blending feedstock varieties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Transportation Energy Winemakers have long known that blending different grape varietals can favorably...

  2. Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian Fuel Cell...

  3. Canadian Environmental Protection Act 2012 (Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act of 1999 (CEPA 1999) provides the legislative framework for Environment Canada, and outlines the provisions for the prevention and management of risks posed...

  4. Canadian Oil Sands: Canada An Emerging Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    (collectively "statements") with respect to: expectations regarding crude oil production, global energy demand1 Canadian Oil Sands: Canada ­ An Emerging Energy Superpower 0 University of Alberta February 8 Oil Sands Limited ("Canadian Oil Sands"), Syncrude Canada Ltd. ("Syncrude") and the oil sands industry

  5. Chinese Canadian Research Collection / Edgar Wickberg (collector)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Chinese Canadian Research Collection / Edgar Wickberg (collector) Compiled by Christopher Hives Canadian Research Collection / Edgar Wickberg (collector). ­ 1885-1979, 1984-1996. 7.53 m of textual of Research projects undertaken by three UBC professors, Edgar Wickberg (History), Graham Johnson

  6. Fuel blending with PRB coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCartney, R.H.; Williams, R.L. Jr. [Roberts and Schaefer, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods exist to accomplish coal blending at a new or existing power plant. These range from a basic use of the secondary (emergency) stockout/reclaim system to totally automated coal handling facilities with segregated areas for two or more coals. Suitable choices for different sized coal plant are discussed, along with the major components of the coal handling facility affected by Powder River Basin coal. 2 figs.

  7. Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels ? Implementation Perspectives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation Perspectives William Woebkenberg - US Fuels Technical and Regulatory Affairs Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America July 25, 2013...

  8. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

  9. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Presentation given by Jay...

  10. Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the US today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations.

  11. Sandia Energy - Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic Liquids Effective for Pretreating Mixed Blends of Biofuel Feedstocks Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels...

  12. 27 Canadian Inuit throat-singing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 27 Length of track 30 minutes Title of track Canadian Inuit throat-singing Translation...

  13. Canadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Student Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    for environmental protection and conservation ­ what did you develop, co-create, or implement, and what took initiative and were a LEADER! - Your involvement in environmental protection, conservationCanadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Student Application Student Information Last

  14. Gender stereotypes in Canadian picture books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthelot, Jennifer Gail

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research sought to quantify gender representation in a sample of award winning Canadian picture books. A reliable content analysis was used to collect data pertaining to the visibility of genders in titles, main roles, secondary roles...

  15. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  16. Green emitting phosphors and blends thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Siclovan, Oltea Puica (Rexford, NY); Nammalwar, Prasanth Kumar (Bangalore, IN); Sathyanarayan, Ramesh Rao (Bangalore, IN); Porob, Digamber G. (Goa, IN); Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi (Bangalore, IN); Heward, William Jordan (Saratoga Springs, NY); Radkov, Emil Vergilov (Euclid, OH); Briel, Linda Jane Valyou (Niskayuna, NY)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphor compositions, blends thereof and light emitting devices including white light emitting LED based devices, and backlights, based on such phosphor compositions. The devices include a light source and a phosphor material as described. Also disclosed are phosphor blends including such a phosphor and devices made therefrom.

  17. According to the Canadian Electricity Association's (CEA) 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource Study (HR Study)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and increase within the electricity sector. The ability of educational and training institutions to adequatelyAccording to the Canadian Electricity Association's (CEA) 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource and grow the electricity supply. Other industry realities such as the need to build and replace

  18. Thermal characterization of polymer blends prepared by reactive blending of PC and PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiorini, M.; Marchese, P. [Univ. of Bologna (Italy); Pilati, F. [Univ. of Modena (Italy)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several Poly(ethylene terephthalate)-Bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC/PET) blends were prepared by reactive blending poly(ethylene terephthalate) and Bisphenol A polycarbonate in a batch mixer in the presence of ester exchange catalysts with different catalytic activity, such as Titanium, Terbium, Cerium, Samarium, Europium and Calcium/Antimony compounds. The catalytic activity and mixing time have been correlated with the extent of ester-carbonate exchange reactions and hence the influence of the PET/PC block copolymers formed during the blending on miscibility has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The results of the thermal characterization showed that blends with a single glass transition temperature can be prepared at different mixing time determined by the ester-carbonate exchange reaction activity of the different catalysts employed. In addition, the Tg`s values for the miscible blends were lower than those predicted by the widely used Flory-Fox equation, except from the blends prepared with the Titanium catalyst. Crystallization of PET in PC/PET blends was also investigated. Thermal analysis is a powerful technique that can be applied to the determination of miscibility in polymer blends. In this communication, the results of a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study on blends prepared by reactive blending PC and PET are reported.

  19. Two glass transitions in miscible polymer blends?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F. [The James Franck Institute and the Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Douglas, Jack F. [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to mixtures of two small molecule fluids, miscible binary polymer blends often exhibit two structural relaxation times and two glass transition temperatures. Qualitative explanations postulate phenomenological models of local concentration enhancements due to chain connectivity in ideal, fully miscible systems. We develop a quantitative theory that explains qualitative trends in the dynamics of real miscible polymer blends which are never ideal mixtures. The theory is a synthesis of the lattice cluster theory of blend thermodynamics, the generalized entropy theory for glass-formation in polymer materials, and the Kirkwood-Buff theory for concentration fluctuations in binary mixtures.

  20. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  1. QER - Comment of Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association QER - Comment of Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association From: Carolyn Bailey cbailey@chfca.ca Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 2:21...

  2. Continuous blending of dry pharmaceutical powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernenkil, Lakshman

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional batch blending of pharmaceutical powders coupled with long quality analysis times increases the production cycle time leading to strained cash flows. Also, scale-up issues faced in process development causes ...

  3. Imaginative play with blended reality characters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, David Yann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea and formative design of a blended reality character, a new class of character able to maintain visual and kinetic continuity between the fully physical and fully virtual; the technical underpinnings of its unique ...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ethanol can be combined with gasoline in blends ranging from E10 (10% or less ethanol, 90% gasoline) up to E85 (up to 85% ethanol, 15% gasoline). The Renewable Fuels Standard (under the Energy...

  5. Carnegie Mellon Multiperiod Blend Scheduling Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Department of Chemical Engineering Center for Advanced Process Decision-making Carnegie Mellon University frequently in the petrochemical industry. -Large cost savings can be achieved if the correct blending

  6. Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world://bee.oregonstate.edu/ecoe Ecological Engineering is: · Ecosystem restoration and habitat design at multiple scales · Watershed · Phytoremediation and bioremediation · Industrial ecology · Constructed wetlands and tidal marshlands · Mitigation

  7. Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    blended biodiesel does not qualify. The biodiesel tax credit is applied against the corporation income tax imposed under KRS 141.040 and/or the limited liability entity tax (LLET) imposed under KRS...

  8. A Roadmap for Canadian Submillimetre Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Tracy; Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda; Murray, Norm; Scott, Douglas; Wilson, Christine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey the present landscape in submillimetre astronomy for Canada and describe a plan for continued engagement in observational facilities to ~2020. Building on Canada's decadal Long Range Plan process, we emphasize that continued involvement in a large, single-dish facility is crucial given Canada's substantial investment in ALMA and numerous PI-led submillimetre experiments. In particular, we recommend: i) an extension of Canadian participation in the JCMT until at least the unique JCMT Legacy Survey program is able to realize the full scientific potential provided by the world-leading SCUBA-2 instrument; and ii) involvement of the entire Canadian community in CCAT, with a large enough share in the partnership for Canadian astronomers to participate at all levels of the facility. We further recommend continued participation in ALMA development, involvement in many focused PI-led submillimetre experiments, and partnership in SPICA.

  9. 2013 Canadian Team Mathematics Contest The Canadian Team Mathematics Contest (CTMC) is a fun and challenging team competition.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    #12;2013 Canadian Team Mathematics Contest The Canadian Team Mathematics Contest (CTMC) is a fun and challenging team competition. Audience Each team Wednesday, April 10, 2013 Format The competition consists of: · team questions

  10. Calculating Very Rough Market Share Using the Canadian Business Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Calculating Very Rough Market Share Using the Canadian Business Database If you cannot find market market share using the company information provided in the Canadian Business Database (CBD), an online - it should be considered a last resort for this information. STEP 1: ACCESS THE CANADIAN BUSINESS DATABASE 1a

  11. Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIEEDAC Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre Prospectus and Business Plan as part clearinghouse, part depository, and part analysis centre for energy data on the Canadian EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CIEEDAC ii Executive Summary 1. Background The Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data

  12. Viscoelastic properties of bidisperse homopolymer blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juliani

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF BIDISPKRSE HOMOPOLYMER BLENDS A Thesis by JULIANI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000... Major Subject. Chemical Engineering VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF BIDISPERSE HOMOPOLYMER BLENDS A Thesis by JULIANI Submitted to Texas A&M University m partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style...

  13. WI Biodiesel Blending Progream Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redmond, Maria E; Levy, Megan M

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wisconsin State Energy Office�¢����s (SEO) primary mission is to implement cost�¢���effective, reliable, balanced, and environmentally�¢���friendly clean energy projects. To support this mission the Wisconsin Biodiesel Blending Program was created to financially support the installation infrastructure necessary to directly sustain biodiesel blending and distribution at petroleum terminal facilities throughout Wisconsin. The SEO secured a federal directed award of $600,000 over 2.25 years. With these funds, the SEO supported the construction of inline biodiesel blending facilities at two petroleum terminals in Wisconsin. The Federal funding provided through the state provided a little less than half of the necessary investment to construct the terminals, with the balance put forth by the partners. Wisconsin is now home to two new biodiesel blending terminals. Fusion Renewables on Jones Island (in the City of Milwaukee) will offer a B100 blend to both bulk and retail customers. CITGO is currently providing a B5 blend to all customers at their Granville, WI terminal north of the City of Milwaukee.

  14. CIMS: An Integrated US-Canadian Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyboer, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CIMS: An Integrated US-Canadian Model John Nyboer, Simon Fraser University As the US addresses energy supply security and, at a state level, various environmental objectives, it is not clear what effect these will have on Canada's exports... technologies in both countries, one can obtain insight into economic and policy consequences for Canada of various US energy scenarios. ...

  15. Canadian Oil Sands: Canada's Energy Advantage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    crude oil production, global energy demand, the estimated reserves and resources at Syncrude, views that the world will need oil for decades to come, the expectations regarding oil sands productive capacityCanadian Oil Sands: Canada's Energy Advantage 0 #12;Forward looking information 1 In the interest

  16. Canadian Nuclear Astrophysics Institute Letter of Intent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herwig, Falk

    nuclear physics data as well as astronomical observations, both of which are critically needed in order 1 Canadian Nuclear Astrophysics Institute Letter of Intent Final version April 29, 2011), astrophysics and nuclear physics theory and computational simulation (TC) as well as nuclear physics

  17. of Canadian in the 20th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schramm, Laurier L.

    Milestones of Canadian Chemistry in the 20th Century Calgary, Alberta ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH SURFACTANT-STABILIZED FOAMS As western Canada's oil fields age,the importance of secondary and tertiary recovery technologies becomes greater. Any development that increases oil displacement is of immense

  18. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.

  19. Development of By-Pass Blending Station System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Barnes, D.; Bunz, K.; Rosenberry, N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new building blending station system named by-pass blending station (BBS) has been developed to reduce building pump energy consumption in both district heating and cooling systems. Theoretical investigation demonstrated that the BBS can...

  20. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues The United States has 11...

  1. Exploration of parameters for the continuous blending of pharmaceutical powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Ben Chien Pang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition from traditional batch blending to continuous blending is an opportunity for the pharmaceutical industry to reduce costs and improve quality control. This operational shift necessitates a deeper understanding ...

  2. Blended Shelf: Reality-based Presentation and Exploration of Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Blended library; shelf browsing; digital library ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2. [InformationBlended Shelf: Reality-based Presentation and Exploration of Library Collections Abstract We location of the library. Blended Shelf offers a 3D visualization of library collections

  3. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

  4. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  5. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  6. PETROLEUM SOCIETY CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF MINING, METALLURGY & PETROLEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    1 PETROLEUM SOCIETY CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF MINING, METALLURGY & PETROLEUM PAPER 2002-092 Effects of Alberta This paper is to be presented at the Petroleum Society's Canadian International Petroleum of the meeting. This paper and any discussion filed will be considered for publication in Petroleum Society

  7. Tough Blends of Polylactide and Castor Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Megan L.; Paxton, Jessica M.; Hillmyer, Marc A. (UMM)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) is a renewable resource polymer derived from plant sugars with several commercial applications. Broader implementation of the material is limited due to its inherent brittleness. We show that the addition of 5 wt % castor oil to PLLA significantly enhances the overall tensile toughness with minimal reductions in the modulus and no plasticization of the PLLA matrix. In addition, we used poly(ricinoleic acid)-PLLA diblock copolymers, synthesized entirely from renewable resources, as compatibilizers for the PLLA/castor oil blends. Ricinoleic acid, the majority fatty acid comprising castor oil, was polymerized through a lipase-catalyzed condensation reaction. The resulting polymers contained a hydroxyl end-group that was subsequently used to initiate the ring-opening polymerization of L-lactide. The binary PLLA/castor oil blend exhibited a tensile toughness seven times greater than neat PLLA. The addition of block copolymer allowed for control over the morphology of the blends, and even further improvement in the tensile toughness was realized - an order of magnitude larger than that of neat PLLA.

  8. Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heavin, Leonard J. (Olympia, WA); King, Edward E. (Gig Harbor, WA); Milliron, Dennis L. (Lacey, WA)

    1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

  9. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    117 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated February 2009 Prepared by Keith Knoll Brian West Wendy Clark...

  10. Detailed HCCI Exhaust Speciation - ORNL Reference Fuel Blends...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HCCI Exhaust Speciation - ORNL Reference Fuel Blends Accurately measure exhaust profile from an HCCI engine with a variety of fuels and create a better understanding of HCCI...

  11. Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate Filter Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Ireland, J.; Fang, H. L.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents results of tests of ultra-low sulfur diesel blended with soy-biodiesel at 5 percent using a Cummins ISB engine with a diesel particulate filter.

  12. Interface modification in an immiscible rod-coil polymer blend using functionalized copolymers and polyelectrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passinault, Robbie J

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -polymer specific interactions on interfacial properties and mechanical performance of the blend. Specifi cally, in uncompatibilized blends, the effect of vectra concentration and domain size on shear modulus is studied. While, in blends compatibilized with small...

  13. Purification Testing for HEU Blend Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Pierce, R.A.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is working to dispose of the inventory of enriched uranium (EU) formerly used to make fuel for production reactors. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has agreed to take the material after blending the EU with either natural or depleted uranium to give a {sup 235}U concentration of 4.8 percent low-enriched uranium will be fabricated by a vendor into reactor fuel for use in TVA reactors. SRS prefers to blend the EU with existing depleted uranium (DU) solutions, however, the impurity concentrations in the DU and EU are so high that the blended material may not meet specifications agreed to with TVA. The principal non-radioactive impurities of concern are carbon, iron, phosphorus and sulfur. Neptunium and plutonium contamination levels are about 40 times greater than the desired specification. Tests of solvent extraction and fuel preparation with solutions of SRS uranium demonstrate that the UO{sub 2} prepared from these solutions will meet specifications for Fe, P and S, but may not meet the specifications for carbon. The reasons for carbon remaining in the oxide at such high levels is not fully understood, but may be overcome either by treatment of the solutions with activated carbon or heating the UO{sub 3} in air for a longer time during the calcination step of fuel preparation.Calculations of the expected removal of Np and Pu from the solutions show that the specification cannot be met with a single cycle of solvent extraction. The only way to ensure meeting the specification is dilution with natural U which contains no Np or Pu. Estimations of the decontamination from fission products and daughter products in the decay chains for the U isotopes show that the specification of 110 MEV Bq/g U can be met as long as the activities of the daughters of U- 235 and U-238 are excluded from the specification.

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean Cities ReflectsElectricityEthanol Blends to

  15. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Environment Canada, Aluminium Association of Canada, Automotive Parts Manufactures' Association, Brewers Association of Canada, Canadian Construction Association, Canadian Energy Pipeline Association,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Environment Canada, Aluminium Association of Canada, Automotive Parts Manufactures' Association, Brewers Association of Canada, Canadian Construction Association, Canadian Energy Association of Canada, Chemistry Industry Association of Canada, Forest Products Association of Canada

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminate blend phosphate Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space Sciences Collection: Physics 42 Formation of Biomimetic Porous Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Surfaces of PolyethyleneZinc Stearate Blends Summary: -zinc stearate blends...

  17. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization...

  18. Anomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as well as interpenetrating and bicontinu- ous networks.7,8 Phase inversion occurs when the mi- norityAnomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical Alloying Archie P strategies for producing highly dis- persed multicomponent polymer blends. By their very nature

  19. CASIMIR EFFECT IN CROSSLINKED POLYMER BLENDS M. Benhamou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -potential. I. INTRODUCTION Interpenetrated polymer networks (IPNs) or crosslinked polymer blends constitute new interpenetrating networks used as electronic device encapsulants [3]. For certain practical realizations, the IPNsCASIMIR EFFECT IN CROSSLINKED POLYMER BLENDS M. Benhamou , M. Boughou, H. Ka¨idi M. El Yaznasni, H

  20. Achieving High Chilled Water Delta T Without Blending Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z.; Wang, G.; Xu, K.; Yu, Y.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the blending station performance. The results show that the blending station is not necessary in the building chilled water systems with 2-way modulation valves at end users. Actually the end user valve configuration and control mainly impacts building chilled...

  1. Canadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Student Application Student Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    for environmental protection and conservation ­ what did you develop, co-create, or implement, and what took initiative and were a LEADER! - Your involvement in environmental protection, conservationCanadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Student Application Student Information Last

  2. aboriginal canadian population: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is found to ... Stutz, R A; Kothes, R; Landecker, T 2014-01-01 477 National Industrial Hemp Strategy ii March 2008Executive Summary Growth of the Canadian Industrial Hemp Sector...

  3. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mallow, William A. (Helotes, TX); Dziuk, Jr., Jerome J. (San Antonio, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for calcination of a calcium carbonate material comprising heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a catalyst; said catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula MCO.sub.3.CaCO.sub.3.CaO.H.sub.2 O.sub.x, wherein M is an alkali metal and x is 0 to 1 and formed by fusing MCO.sub.3 and CaCO.sub.3 in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1, and a blend adapted to be heated to CaO comprising a calcium carbonate material and at least one such fused salt.

  4. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT MISSION ANALYSIS WASTE BLENDING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHUFORD DH; STEGEN G

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary evaluation for blending Hanford site waste with the objective of minimizing the amount of high-level waste (HLW) glass volumes without major changes to the overall waste retrieval and processing sequences currently planned. The evaluation utilizes simplified spreadsheet models developed to allow screening type comparisons of blending options without the need to use the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model. The blending scenarios evaluated are expected to increase tank farm operation costs due to increased waste transfers. Benefit would be derived from shorter operating time period for tank waste processing facilities, reduced onsite storage of immobilized HLW, and reduced offsite transportation and disposal costs for the immobilized HLW.

  5. Phosphor blends for high-CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Manivannan, Venkatesan (Clifton Park, NY); Beers, William Winder (Chesterland, OH); Toth, Katalin (Pomaz, HU); Balazs, Laszlo D. (Budapest, HU)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A phosphor blend comprises at least two phosphors each selected from one of the groups of phosphors that absorb UV electromagnetic radiation and emit in a region of visible light. The phosphor blend can be applied to a discharge gas radiation source to produce light sources having high color rendering index. A phosphor blend is advantageously includes the phosphor (Tb,Y,LuLa,Gd).sub.x(Al,Ga).sub.yO.sub.12:Ce.sup.3+, wherein x is in the range from about 2.8 to and including 3 and y is in the range from about 4 to and including 5.

  6. Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page 1 Lead Author L. Alexander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9

  7. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  8. Time phased alternate blending of feed coals for liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweigharett, Frank (Allentown, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Garg, Diwaker (Macungie, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for reducing process performance excursions during feed coal or process solvent changeover in a coal hydroliquefaction process by blending of feedstocks or solvents over time. ,

  9. Photonic polymer-blend structures and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, Michael D.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention comprises the formation of photonic polymer-blend structures having tunable optical and mechanical properties. The photonic polymer-blend structures comprise monomer units of spherical microparticles of a polymer-blend material wherein the spherical microparticles have surfaces partially merged with one another in a robust inter-particle bond having a tunable inter-particle separation or bond length sequentially attached in a desired and programmable architecture. The photonic polymer-blend structures of the present invention can be linked by several hundred individual particles sequentially linked to form complex three-dimensional structures or highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of 3D columns with 2D spacing.

  10. Evaluation of Ethanol Blends for PHEVs using Simulation and Engine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ethanol Blends for PHEVs using Simulation and Engine-in-the-Loop 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 10, 2011 Neeraj Shidore (PI) - Vehicle...

  11. ash blended cement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass blends Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: , low ash partially composted manure LAPC, high ash raw manure HARM, and high ash partially composted manure HAPC)...

  12. Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biodiesel Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impacts of Biodiesel Blends Bob McCormick (PI) With Teresa Alleman, Wendy Clark, Lisa Fouts, John Ireland, Mike Lammert, Jon Luecke, Dan Pedersen, Ken Proc, Matt Ratcliff, Matt...

  13. Alanna Fitzgerald-Husek | 2013-2014 Fulbright Student StudentsCanadian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at a Canadian university and who wish to pursue one year of independent research in the United States. Grantees

  14. Disease resistance and performance of blended populations of creepi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernathy, Scott David

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . Materials and Methods. . Results and Discussion. Conclusions. . . . 41 . . 41 . . 42 . . 45 . 74 SUMMARY REFERENCES. . 80 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Dollar spot progression in January, 1998 on single cultivar treatments. Page 32 Figure 2.... Dollar spot progression in January 1998 on Crenshaw, L-93 and Crenshaw / L-93 blended treatments. 33 Figure 3. Dollar spot progression in January, 1998 on Crenshaw, A-4 and Crenshaw / A-4 blended treatments. 34 Figure 4. Dollar spot progression...

  15. Canadian Museum for Human Rights & UWinnipeg Sign MOU May 6, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    News Canadian Museum for Human Rights & UWinnipeg Sign MOU May 6, 2011 Lloyd Axworthy, UWinnipeg. Stuart Murray, President & CEO, Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Marilou McPhederan, Principal, UWinnipeg Global College Mr. Stuart Murray, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Museum

  16. University of Calgary Press Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    University of Calgary Press Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies REDES DUARTE Source: Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies / Revue canadienne des études Press on behalf of Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies Stable URL: http

  17. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poindl, M., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Kunststofftechnik, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  18. Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

  19. Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

  20. The Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    The Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA) Building on 20 years of leadership in agricultural safety and rural health issues, CCHSA has evolved into a national centre of excellence in agricultural safety, rural health, research, delivery of training programs and knowledge translation

  1. Introducing the Canadian Crop Yield Forecaster Aston Chipanshi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    for crop yield forecasting and risk analysis. Using the Census Agriculture Region (CAR) as the unit Climate Decision Support and Adaptation, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1011, Innovation Blvd, Saskatoon, SK S7V 1B7, Canada The Canadian Crop Yield Forecaster (CCYF) is a statistical modelling tool

  2. Canadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Student Application Student Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    change for environmental protection and conservation ­ what did you develop, co-create, or implementCanadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Student Application Student Information Last. Tell us how you took initiative and were a LEADER! - Your involvement in environmental protection

  3. The Canadian Food System: A Community Development Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    management, food security, food safety and the regulation of genetically modified foods and pesticidesThe Canadian Food System: A Community Development Approach ERST/CAST 334 H -Fall 2008 Course Description: This interdisciplinary course examines agriculture and the food system in Canada, emphasizing

  4. Environmental and Resource Studies / Canadian Studies Trent University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    , supply management, food security, food safety and the regulation of genetically modified foods The Canadian Food System: A Community Development Approach Fall 2010, Peterborough Course Instructor: Paula: This interdisciplinary course examines agriculture and the food system in Canada, emphasizing community development

  5. Western Canadian coking coals -- Thermal rheology and coking quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leeder, W.R. [Teck Corp. (Canada); Price, J.T.; Gransden, J.F. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of predicting coke strength developed from the thermal rheological properties of Carboniferous coals frequently indicate that Cretaceous coals would not make high quality coke -- yet both types of coals produce coke suitable for the iron blast furnace. This paper will discuss the reasons why Western Canadian coals exhibit lower rheological values and how to predict the strength of coke produced from them.

  6. A metapopulation model for Canadian and West Greenland narwhals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    A metapopulation model for Canadian and West Greenland narwhals M. P. Heide-Jørgensen1 , P. R. Richard2 , R. Dietz3 & K. L. Laidre4 1 Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk, Greenland 2-Jørgensen, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Strandgade 91, 3, DK-1016 Copenhagen K, Denmark. Tel: +45 40257943

  7. CANADIAN METALLURGICAL QUARTERLY HOT WORKABILITY OF 2304 AND 2205 DUPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    339 CANADIAN METALLURGICAL QUARTERLY HOT WORKABILITY OF 2304 AND 2205 DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS E, 2002; in revised form December, 2003) Abstract -- The duplex stainless steels 2304 and 2205 were that the hot workability of 2304 and 2205 duplex stainless steels can be improved modestly by multistage

  8. SEISMIC DESIGN PROVISIONS -THE CANADIAN HIGHWAY BRIDGE DESIGN CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    in the 1994 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Load and Resistance Factor Code in the 1994 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Load and Resistance Factor CodeSEISMIC DESIGN PROVISIONS - THE CANADIAN HIGHWAY BRIDGE DESIGN CODE Denis MITCHELL Mc

  9. Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

  10. Controlled differential pressure system for an enhanced fluid blending apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for producing a controlled blend of two or more fluids. Thermally-induced permeation through a permeable tube is used to mix a first fluid from outside the tube with a second fluid flowing through the tube. Mixture ratios may be controlled by adjusting the temperature of the first fluid or by adjusting the pressure drop through the permeable tube. The combination of a back pressure control valve and a differential regulator is used to control the output pressure of the blended fluid. The combination of the back pressure control valve and differential regulator provides superior flow control of the second dry gas. A valve manifold system may be used to mix multiple fluids, and to adjust the volume of blended fluid produced, and to further modify the mixture ratio.

  11. Evaluation of bitumen by realization of bitumen/polymer blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogneau, P.; Goosse, S. [Parc Industriel, Perwez (Belgium)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, if we want to guarantee the durability of bitumen/polymer blends and membranes, characterization of bitumen by penetration hardness and softening point is not enough. Bitumen which is a {open_quotes}residue{close_quotes} of distillation is a poor relation of the petrochemistry. It will tend to become more so in view of the more sophisticated treatment units of the heavy components coming from refining. This paper will present the correlation existing between generic composition of bitumen and the characteristics of the bitumen/polymers (atatic polypropylene) blends. The generic composition of the bitumen is determined by thin layer chromatography associated with a detection flame ionization (Iatroscan method). More than 20 bitumens of different origins have been studied. The quality of the blends done with an EPP batch for each of these bitumens is acquired by using determination trials of viscosity, cold bending (new state and after aging), segregation, and morphological analyses.

  12. Blended learning through the eyes of Malagasy students Hoby ANDRIANIRINA Anne-Laure FOUCHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Clermont-Ferrand, France Keywords: blended learning ; experience of students ; didactics French in a blended learning environment. This is part of a wider action research study in the Didactics of Languages

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigation of particle interactions in pharmaceutical powder blending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Yu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In pharmaceutical manufacturing practices, blending of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) with excipients is a crucial step in that homogeneity of active ingredient after blending is a key issue for the quality assurance ...

  14. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines June 22,...

  15. Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson III, George R. (Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin (United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)); Freerks, Robert L. (Rentech, Incorporated, 1331 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States))

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

  16. Solid State Blending of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) with Polystyrene: Extent of PET Amorphization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Brian S.

    Solid State Blending of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) with Polystyrene: Extent of PET Amorphization.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: Polystyrene (PS) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were blended to- gether in the solid. CMA PS/PET blend morphologies were characterized both qualitatively and quantitatively through

  17. Designing Polymer Blends Using Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms, and Markov Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Don

    1 Designing Polymer Blends Using Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms, and Markov Chains N. K. Roy1 potential candidates for blending using Neural Networks. Generally the parent polymers of the blend need systems like branched polymers, high molecular weight polymer mixtures, block copolymers, interpenetrating

  18. ccsd00000932 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00000932 (version 1) : 10 Dec 2003 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN P. (December 10, 2003) Abstract The electronic structure of AlN in wurtzite and zinc-blende phases is studied in the calculations. Di#11;erences 1 #12; between the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases are small and re ect the slight

  19. Puddle Dynamics and Air-to-Fuel Ratio Compensation for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    1 Puddle Dynamics and Air-to-Fuel Ratio Compensation for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Flex-Fuel flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) can operate on a blend of gasoline and ethanol in any concentration of up for gasoline-ethanol blends is, thus, necessary for the purpose of air-to-fuel ratio control. In this paper, we

  20. Fuel Puddle Model and AFR Compensator for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Flex-Fuel Engines*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Fuel Puddle Model and AFR Compensator for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Flex-Fuel Engines* Kyung for gasoline-ethanol blends is, thus, necessary for the purpose of air-to-fuel ratio control. In this paper, we- ration, air-to-fuel ratio control, gasoline-ethanol blend, flex-fuel vehicles I. INTRODUCTION Currently

  1. Conjugated-Polymer Blends for Optoelectronics By Christopher R. McNeill* and Neil C. Greenham*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Conjugated-Polymer Blends for Optoelectronics By Christopher R. McNeill* and Neil C. Greenham* 1. Introduction Blending of polymers has long been established as a technique to tune their physical properties the microstructure of the blend has new properties not present in either component. In the field of polymer

  2. HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU UNH for commercial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form that is more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UNH blending HEU disposition option. Process requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste/emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

  3. Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials Barzin Mobasher1. A simplified model is presented which used cement chemistry, concrete physics, and mechanics to develop of hardened concrete, principally the cement paste, caused by exposure of concrete to sulfates and moisture

  4. NOx, SOx & CO{sub 2} mitigation using blended coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labbe, D.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of potential CO{sub 2} reduction achievable through the use of a mixture of bituminous and subbituminous (PRB) coals, whilst attaining NOx and SOx compliance are presented. The optimization considerations to provide satisfactory furnace, boiler and unit performance with blended coal supplies to make such operation feasible are discussed. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  6. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity and methods for manufacturing such blends

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje (East Patchogue, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  7. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Oxide blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for commercial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the oxide blending HEU disposition option. This option provides for a yearly HEU throughput of 1 0 metric tons (MT) of uranium metal with an average U235 assay of 50% blended with 165 MT of natural assay triuranium octoxide (U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) per year to produce 177 MT of 4% U235 assay U{sub 3} O{sub 8}, for LWR fuel. Since HEU exists in a variety of forms and not necessarily in the form to be blended, worst case scenarios for preprocessing prior to blending will be assumed for HEU feed streams.

  8. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  9. Review Of Rheology Models For Hanford Waste Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste - waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ''One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant'' that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes. The equations described in Meacham's report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 ?m diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 ?m in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations; Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction; Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualification process for each campaign; o From single source tanks that feed the qualification tanks; o Blends from the qualification tanks; Predictive rheological models must be used with caution, due to the lack of data to support such models and the utilization of the results that come from these models in making process decisions (e.g. the lack of actual operation experience). As experience is ga

  10. Year in Review--2008-09 Canadian Studies Center, Bowling Green State University 1 www.bgsu.edu/cast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Year in Review--2008-09 Canadian Studies Center, Bowling Green State University 1 www, University of Windsor. #12;Year in Review--2008-09 Canadian Studies Center, Bowling Green State University 2

  11. KEEPING THE FUTURE BRIGHT 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource Sector Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply 8 Electricity consumption 9 Supply and demand projections 9 Electricity exports and importsKEEPING THE FUTURE BRIGHT 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource Sector Study #12;This project Electricity Association The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA), founded in 1891, is the national forum

  12. An economical and market analysis of Canadian wood pellets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study systematically examined the current and future wood pellet market, estimated the cost of Canadian torrefied pellets, and compared the torrefied pellets with the conventional pellets based on literature and industrial data. The results showed that the wood pellet industry has been gaining significant momentum due to the European bioenergy incentives and the rising oil and natural gas prices. With the new bioenergy incentives in USA, the future pellets market may shift to North America, and Canada can potentially become the largest pellet production centre, supported by the abundant wood residues and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested trees.

  13. Canadian Council of Chief Executives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS Letter -SeptemberWorkshop | DepartmentCanadian

  14. Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

  15. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

  16. Effect of Organoclay on Compatibilization, Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Polycarbonate/Polystyrene Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, A K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pristine and organoclay modified polycarbonate/polystyrene (PC/PS) blends are prepared using melt-mixing technique. These blends are characterized for their morphology, structural, thermal and mechanical properties. Though our FTIR and XRD results show weak interactions between PC and PS phases, however, DSC and morphological study reveals that pristine PC/PS blends are immiscible. On other hand, introduction of organoclay results compatibilization of two polymer phases which is supported by significant shift in glass transition temperatures of the component phases and a distinct morphology having no phase segregation on sub-micron scale. Intercalation of polymers inside the clay gallery is achieved and is supported by XRD studies. A better thermal stability and higher value of modulus of the compatibilized blends compared to pristine PC/PS blends also support the reinforcement effect of organoclay to the PC/PS blend matrix.

  17. Multi-scale analysis and simulation of powder blending in pharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngai, Samuel S. H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Multi-Scale Analysis methodology was developed and carried out for gaining fundamental understanding of the pharmaceutical powder blending process. Through experiment, analysis and computer simulations, microscopic ...

  18. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IMPACT OF LOW OCTANE HYDROCARBON BLENDING STREAMS ON "E85" ENGINE OPTIMIZATION Jim Szybist and Brian West Oak Ridge National Laboratory October 19, 2012 Acknowledgement This...

  19. BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

  20. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  1. Electrical Conductivity in Polymer Blends/ Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Ajit R.; Bose, Suryasarathi; Bhattacharyya, Arup R. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India)

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) based polymer composites have emerged as the future multifunctional materials in view of its exceptional mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. One of the major interests is to develop conductive polymer composites preferably at low concentration of CNT utilizing their high aspect ratio (L/D) for numerous applications, which include antistatic devices, capacitors and materials for EMI shielding. In this context, polymer blends have emerged as a potential candidate in lowering the percolation thresholds further by the utilization of 'double-percolation' which arises from the synergistic improvements in blend properties associated with the co-continuous morphology. Due to strong inter-tube van der Waals' forces, they often tend to aggregate and uniform dispersion remains a challenge. To overcome this challenge, we exploited sodium salt of 6-aminohexanoic acid (Na-AHA) which was able to assist in debundlling the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) through 'cation-{pi}' interactions during melt-mixing leading to percolative 'network-like' structure of MWNT within polyamide6 (PA6) phase in co-continuous PA6/acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) blends. The composite exhibited low electrical percolation thresholds of 0.25 wt% of MWNT, the lowest reported value in this system so far. Retention of 'network-like structure' in the solid state with significant refinement was observed even at lower MWNT concentration in presence Na-AHA, which was assessed through AC electrical conductivity measurements. Reactive coupling was found to be a dominant factor besides 'cation-{pi}' interactions in achieving low electrical percolation in PA6/ABS+MWNT composites.

  2. Emissions mitigation of blended coals through systems optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Labbe [IOM Invensys Operations Management (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For coal fired power stations, such as those located in the US, that have installed NOx and SOx emissions abatement equipment substantial carbon dioxide reduction could be achieved by shifting from pure PRB coal to blended coals with local bituminous coal. Don Labbe explains how. The article is based on a presentation at Power-Gen Asia 2009, which takes place 7-9 October in Bangkok, Thailand and an ISA POWID 2009 paper (19th Annual Joint ISA POWID/EPRI Controlls and Instrumentation Conference, Chicago, Illinois, May 2009). 4 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Hydrogen effects on materials for CNG/H2 blends.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farese, David (Air Products, USA); Keller, Jay O.; Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No concerns for Hydrogen-Enriched Compressed Natural gas (HCNG) in steel storage tanks if material strength is < 950 MPa. Recommend evaluating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in higher strength steels at H{sub 2} partial pressure in blend. Limited fatigue testing on higher strength steel cylinders in H{sub 2} shows promising results. Impurities in Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) (e.g., CO) may provide extrinsic mechanism for mitigating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in steel tanks.

  4. INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

  5. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4 AcquisitionO 231.1B ChgMicrosoft WordBlends

  6. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan [ORNL; Darling, Seth B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  7. Interface modification in an immiscible rod-coil polymer blend using functionalized copolymers and polyelectrolytes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passinault, Robbie J

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blends of rod-like and flexible-coil polymers are attractive for synthesizing molecular composites. In this study, a blend of a rod-like polymer (Vectra B950) and a flexible polymer (polystyrene) is used to investigate the influence of polymer-polymer...

  8. Blended Interaction Toward a Framework for the Design of Interactive Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Blended Interaction ­ Toward a Framework for the Design of Interactive Spaces Hans-Christian Jetter, Florian Geyer, Tobias Schwarz, Harald Reiterer Human-Computer Interaction Group, University of Konstanz In this paper, we propose Blended Interaction as a conceptual framework for the design of interactive spaces. We

  9. Probing Water Phases in Cement Blends using 1 Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Probing Water Phases in Cement Blends using 1 H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry Jean)114 222 5973 Fax: +44 (0)114 222 5943 E-Mail: j.gorce@sheffield.ac.uk Extended Abstract: Cement and Concrete Science, Warwick, 16th + 17th September 2004 Introduction The nuclear industry uses blended cement

  10. In vitro analysis of biodegradable polymer blend/hydroxyapatite composites for bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lee E.

    In vitro analysis of biodegradable polymer blend/hydroxyapatite composites for bone tissue engineering Kacey G. Marra,1 Jeffrey W. Szem,2 Prashant N. Kumta,3 Paul A. DiMilla,4 Lee E. Weiss5 1 14 April 1999 Abstract: Blends of biodegradable polymers, poly(capro- lactone) and poly

  11. Calculation of critical dimensions for wurtzite and cubic zinc blende coaxial nanowire heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Calculation of critical dimensions for wurtzite and cubic zinc blende coaxial nanowire-shell heterostructures in 111 zinc blende and 0001 wurtzite geometries. These calculations reveal that critical wurtzite nanowire systems. In this article we extend this methodology to explore and contrast coherency

  12. Phase controlled synthesis of ZnS nanobelts: zinc blende vs wurtzite Yong Ding a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Phase controlled synthesis of ZnS nanobelts: zinc blende vs wurtzite Yong Ding a , Xu Dong WangS nanostructures normally take the metastable wurtzite structure. This Letter investigates the conditions under which the formed phase can be con- trolled between zinc blende and wurtzite in nanomaterials synthesis

  13. Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires between pure zinc blende (ZB) NWs and wurtzite (WZ) NWs containing stacking faults and small ZB segments their growth-direction axis while wurtzite (WZ) InAs NWs grown on InAs (111)B substrates have numerous stacking

  14. Theoretical study of nonpolar surfaces of aluminum nitride: Zinc blende ,,110... and wurtzite ,,1010...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Theoretical study of nonpolar surfaces of aluminum nitride: Zinc blende ,,110... and wurtzite ,,101 structure and electronic properties of the nonpolar surfaces, namely zinc blende 110 and wurtzite (10 1 and small ther- mal expansion coefficient. At ambient conditions, AlN crys- tallizes in the wurtzite phase

  15. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other Ethanol-Gasoline Blends (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document serves as a guide for blenders, distributors, sellers, and users of E85 and other ethanol blends above E10. It provides basic information on the proper and safe use of E85 and other ethanol blends and includes supporting technical and policy references.

  16. X-ray Microscopy of Photovoltaic Polyfluorene Blends: Relating Nanomorphology to Device Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-ray Microscopy of Photovoltaic Polyfluorene Blends: Relating Nanomorphology to Device Performance no features on the length scale of 50 nm or greater. Additionally, the performance of photovoltaic devices evaluated and compared to the performance of chloroform blends with varied weight ratio. By studying

  17. "Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xibin Wang "Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends" Abstract : Combustion, performance and emission were studied for DI diesel engine fuelled with DMM/diesel fuel blends for DMM content from 0 to 50%. Results showed that, for diesel engine with fuel

  18. Synergistic Effect of coal blends on thermoplasticity evaluated using a temperature-variable dynamic viscoelastic measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito; Kensuke Masaki; Atsushi Dobashi; Kiyoshi Fukada [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To maximize the conversion of low-quality coal into good coke, we investigated the thermoplasticity of various binary blends of caking coals with slightly or noncaking coals using a dynamic viscoelastic technique with a temperature-variable rheometer. Coal blend samples were prepared by mixing two coals (1:1 by weight), which were heated from room temperature to 600 C at a rate of 3-80{sup o}C/min. At the slow rate of 3{sup o}C/min, the blends had a tan {delta} that was generally lower than the calculated value, showing that a negative interaction caused a loss of thermoplasticity. In contrast, at the rapid heating rate of 80{sup o}C/min, the tan {delta} of some blends was higher than the calculated value, indicating a positive interaction that enhanced the thermoplasticity. With rapid heating, the thermoplasticity of each coal itself increased, and their thermoplastic temperature ranges widened with rapid heating. Therefore, rapid heating was effective at converting these coal blends into good cokes. Moreover, even with slow heating, when a combination of coals (Gregory:Enshu, 1:1) showing some thermoplasticity in nearly the same temperature range was blended, a desirable synergistic effect of the blend was obtained. This suggests that blending coal with an overlapping thermoplastic temperature range is important for the synergistic effect, regardless of the heating rate. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Effects of HyperCoal addition on coke strength and thermoplasticity of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashless coal, also known as HyperCoal (HPC), was produced by thermal extraction of three coals of different ranks (Gregory caking coal, Warkworth steam coal, and Pasir subbituminous coal) with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) at 360, 380, and 400{sup o}C. The effects of blending these HPCs into standard coal blends were investigated. Blending HPCs as 5-10% of a standard blend (Kouryusho:Goonyella:K9) enhanced the thermoplasticity over a wide temperature range. For blends made with the Pasir-HPC, produced from a noncaking coal, increasing the extraction temperature from 360 to 400{sup o}C increased the thermoplasticity significantly. Blends containing Warkworth-HPC, produced from a slightly caking coal, had a higher tensile strength than the standard blend in semicoke strength tests. The addition of 10% Pasir-HPC, extracted at 400{sup o}C, increased the tensile strength of the semicokes to the same degree as those made with Gregory-HPC. Furthermore, all HPC blends had a higher tensile strength and smaller weight loss during carbonization. These results suggest that the HPC became integrated into the coke matrix, interacting strongly with the other raw coals. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Relatively low-cost solutions could improve reliability while making biodiesel blends an affordable option.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relatively low-cost solutions could improve reliability while making biodiesel blends an affordable option. While biodiesel has very low production costs and the potential to displace up to 10% of petroleum diesel, until now, issues with cold weather performance have prevented biodiesel blends from being

  1. HIGH-TEMPERATURE STEAM-TREATMENT OF PEEK, PEKK, PBI, AND THEIR BLENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluemel, Janet

    1 HIGH-TEMPERATURE STEAM-TREATMENT OF PEEK, PEKK, PBI, AND THEIR BLENDS: A SOLID-STATE NMR AND IR and their pure components after treating them with liquid water and steam at elevated temperatures and pressures. The pure polymer components and the PAEK-PBI (50 : 50 wt%) blends are steam-treated at 150 °C (302 °F

  2. Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks

  3. 28 Canadian Inuit throat-singing (part 2 – end of discussion)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 28 Length of track 8 minutes Title of track Canadian Inuit throat-singing (part 2 – end...

  4. Technologies, markets and challenges for development of the Canadian Oil Sands industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacombe, Romain H.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the current status of development of the Canadian oil sands industry, and considers possible paths of further development. We outline the key technology alternatives, critical resource ...

  5. Variability and change in the Canadian cryosphere C. Derksen & S. L. Smith & M. Sharp & L. Brown &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Variability and change in the Canadian cryosphere C. Derksen & S. L. Smith & M. Sharp & L. Brown-mail: Chris.Derksen@ec.gc.ca S. L. Smith :J. Bourgeois Geological Survey of Canada, Natural Resources Canada

  6. Building skills : a construction trades training facility for the eastern Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roszler, Sarah Katherine, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 1, 1999, the Inuit of the Eastern Canadian Arctic achieved sovereignty over a new territory, Nunavut, envisioning economic self-reliance, political self-determination, and renewal of confidence in Inuit community. ...

  7. The Canadian Energy Information System - An Aid and Opportunity for Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, C. S. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than ever before, industry needs sound, succinct information on energy options and opportunities. As one answer to this need, the Canadian Energy Information System provides comprehensive continent-wide distribution of information and fast...

  8. Air quality over the Canadian oil sands: A first assessment using satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boersma, Folkert

    to as "oil sands" (or "tar sands")­ are located in the Canadian province of Alberta (see Figure 1a). The oil development and operations [e.g., Kelly et al., 2010], including air quality and acid deposition. Combustion

  9. Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    other Archaea in high Arctic peat. ISME J 2: 37–48. 38. Højmethanogenic pathways in a peat from subarctic permafrost.Canadian Arctic tundra leads to peat erosion and slumping in

  10. Modeling the Auto-Ignition of Biodiesel Blends with a Multi-Step Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toulson, Dr. Elisa [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Allen, Casey M [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Miller, Dennis J [Michigan State University, East Lansing; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Schock, Harold [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Lee, Tonghun [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest in using biodiesel in place of or in blends with petrodiesel in diesel engines; however, biodiesel oxidation chemistry is complicated to directly model and existing surrogate kinetic models are very large, making them computationally expensive. The present study describes a method for predicting the ignition behavior of blends of n-heptane and methyl butanoate, fuels whose blends have been used in the past as a surrogate for biodiesel. The autoignition is predicted using a multistep (8-step) model in order to reduce computational time and make this a viable tool for implementation into engine simulation codes. A detailed reaction mechanism for n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends was used as a basis for validating the multistep model results. The ignition delay trends predicted by the multistep model for the n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends matched well with that of the detailed CHEMKIN model for the majority of conditions tested.

  11. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO): System overview R.J. Weryk a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegert, Paul

    The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO): System overview R.J. Weryk a, , M.D. Campbell-Brown a,b , P.A. Wiegert a,b , P.G. Brown a,b , Z. Krzeminski a , R. Musci a a Dept. of Physics and Brown, 2012, 2013) using the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and a number of Gen-III image

  12. ccsd-00000932(version1):10Dec2003 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00000932(version1):10Dec2003 Electronic structure of wurtzite and zinc-blende AlN P. Jonnard) Abstract The electronic structure of AlN in wurtzite and zinc-blende phases is studied experimentally. Differences 1 #12;between the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases are small and reflect the slight variations

  13. Conducting polymer blends: Polypyrrole and polythiophene blends with polystyrene, polycarbonate resin, poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinyl methyl ketone)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various aromatic compounds can be polymerized by electrochemical oxidation in solution containing a supporting electrolyte. Most studies have been devoted to polypyrrole and polythiophene. In situ doping during electrochemical polymerization yields free standing conductive polymer film. One major approach to making conducting polymer blends is electrochemical synthesis after coating the host polymer on a platinum electrode. In the electrolysis of pyrrole or thiophene monomer, using (t-Bu[sub 4]N)BF[sub 4] as supporting electrolyte, and acetonitrile as solvent, monomer can diffuse through the polymer film, to produce a polypyrrole or polythiophene blend in the film. Doping occurs along with polymerization to form a conducting polymer alloy. The strongest molecular interaction in polymers, and one that is central to phase behavior, is hydrogen bonding. This mixing at the molecular level enhances the degree of miscibility between two polymers and results in macroscopic properties indicative of single phase behavior. In this dissertation, the authors describes the syntheses of conducting polymer blends: polypyrrole and polythiophene blends with polystyrene, poly(bisphenol-A-carbonate), polyvinyl alcohol and poly(vinyl methyl ketone). The syntheses are performed both electrochemically and chemically. Characterization of these blends was carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Percolating threshold conductivities occur from 7% to 20% for different polymer blends. The low threshold conductivity is attributed to blend homogeneity enhanced by hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl group in the insulating polymer and the N-H group in polypyrrole. Thermal stability, environmental stability, mechanical properties, crystallinity and morphological structure are also discussed. The authors have also engaged in the polymerization of imidazoles.

  14. Measurement of biodiesel blend and conventional diesel spray structure using x-ray radiography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y. J.; IM, K. S.; Wang, J.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-nozzle structure of several nonevaporating biodiesel-blend sprays has been studied using X-ray radiography. Radiography allows quantitative measurements of the fuel distribution in sprays to be made with high temporal and spatial resolution. Measurements have been made at different values of injection pressure, ambient density, and with two different nozzle geometries to understand the influences of these parameters on the spray structure of the biodiesel blend. These measurements have been compared with corresponding measurements of Viscor, a diesel calibration fluid, to demonstrate the fuel effects on the spray structure. Generally, the biodiesel-blend spray has a similar structure to the spray of Viscor. For the nonhydroground nozzle used in this study, the biodiesel-blend spray has a slightly slower penetration into the ambient gas than the Viscor spray. The cone angle of the biodiesel-blend spray is generally smaller than that of the Viscor spray, indicating that the biodiesel-blend spray is denser than the Viscor spray. For the hydroground nozzle, both fuels produce sprays with initially wide cone angles that transition to narrow sprays during the steady-state portion of the injection event. These variations in cone angle with time occur later for the biodiesel-blend spray than for the Viscor spray, indicating that the dynamics of the injector needle as it opens are somewhat different for the two fuels.

  15. Removing the Microlensing Blending-Parallax Degeneracy Using Source Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assef, R J; Afonso, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Charlot, X; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Graff, D; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; Hamadache, C; De Kat, J; Le Guillou, Laurent; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Rahal, Y R; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Tisserand, P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Zylberajch, S; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Griest, K; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L; Udalski, A; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Wyrzykowski, L

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microlensing event MACHO 97-SMC-1 is one of the rare microlensing events for which the source is a variable star, simply because most variable stars are systematically eliminated from microlensing studies. Using observational data for this event, we show that the intrinsic variability of a microlensed star is a powerful tool to constrain the nature of the lens by breaking the degeneracy between the microlens parallax and the blended light. We also present a statistical test for discriminating the location of the lens based on the \\chi^2 contours of the vector \\Lambda, the inverse of the projected velocity. We find that while SMC self lensing is somewhat favored, neither location can be ruled out with good confidence.

  16. Influence of Substrate on Crystallization in Polythiophene/fullerene Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C He; D Germack; J Kline; D Delongchamp; D Fischer; C Snyder; M Toney; J Kushmerick; L Richter

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nanoscale morphology of the active layer in organic, bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is crucial to device performance. Often a combination of casting conditions and post deposition thermal treatment is used to optimize the morphology. In general, the development of microscopic crystals is deleterious, as the exciton diffusion length is {approx}10 nm. We find that the microscopic crystallization behavior in polythiophene/fullerene blends is strongly influenced by the substrate on which the BHJ is cast. With a silicon oxide substrate, the crystal nucleation density is high and significant crystallization occurs at a temperature of 140 C. On more hydrophobic substrates, significantly higher temperatures are required for observable crystallization. This difference is attributed to the interfacial segregation of the PCBM, controlled by the substrate surface energy. The substrate dependence of crystallization has significant implications on the fullerene crystal growth mechanisms and practical implications for device studies.

  17. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  18. HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UF{sub 6} blending alternative to produce LEU UF{sub 6} for commercial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials; the nuclear material will be converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed; blending as UF{sub 6} to produce a UF{sub 6} product for commercial use is one of them. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UF{sub 6} blending HEU disposition option. Resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

  19. The development of nanoscale morphology in polymer:fullerene photovoltaic blends during solvent casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travis, Adrian

    The development of nanoscale morphology in polymer:fullerene photovoltaic blends during solventsm00343c The power conversion efficiency in a conjugated polymer-functionalized fullerene bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) device is dependent both on the electronic properties

  20. Characterization and Combustion Performance of Corn Oil-Based Biofuel Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savant, Gautam Sandesh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    into biodiesel. It is well known vegetable oil to biodiesel conversion involves many processes including transesterification, which makes biodiesel costly and time-consuming to produce. In this study, the effects of blending high-viscosity fresh and used corn...

  1. Knock limits in spark ignited direct injected engines using gasoline/ethanol blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasseris, Emmanuel P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct Fuel Injection (DI) extends engine knock limits compared to Port Fuel Injection (PFI) by utilizing the in-cylinder charge cooling effect due to fuel evaporation. The use of gasoline/ethanol blends in DI is therefore ...

  2. Morphological effects on glass transition behavior in selected immiscible blends of amorphous and semicrystalline polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the systems polystyrene/polypropylene (PS/PP), polystyrene/high density polyethylene (PS/PE) and polycarbonate were conducted to study these effects by preparing blends with various polymers that varied

  3. Leaching and standing water characteristics of bottom ash and composted manure blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, James Gregory

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in significantly higher concentrations of total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), P, and potassium (K). Generally, a higher CM content in acidic and alkaline blends resulted in higher leachate concentrations for total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), total...

  4. Evaluation of Ethanol Blends for PHEVs using Simulation andEngine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engine-in-the-Loop Evaluation of Ethanol Blends for PHEVs using Simulation and Engine-in-the-Loop 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

  5. Exciton localization mechanisms in wurtzite/zinc-blende GaAs nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Alexandra; Corfdir, Pierre; Heiss, Martin; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Uccelli, Emanuele; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Phillips, Richard

    We investigate the emission properties of excitons in GaAs nanowires containing quantum disks formed by structural alternation between the zinc-blende and wurtzite phases, by means of temperature-dependent photoluminescence. At 10 K the emission...

  6. Glass Transition Phenomena in Melt-Processed Polystyrene/Polypropylene Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The presence of a rigid polycarbonate matrix as PET cools through its glass transition gives rise to a "wall" effect, causing the Tg of PET to increase [6]. The Tg of polybutadiene in polycarbonate/ABS blends

  7. Influence of branch content on the microstructure of blends of linear and octene-branched polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    experimental densities of the two polymer melts. Initially, chains of LLDPE and HDPE were completely mixed POLYMER JOURNAL #12;short chain branching (SCB) [26]. Few studies have made use of m-LLDPE in blend

  8. Process simulation, integration and optimization of blending of petrodiesel with biodiesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ting

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    strategies to meet these requirements. The primary objective of this work is to analyze alternatives for producing ULSD. In addition to the conventional approach of revamping existing hydrotreating facilities, the option of blending petrodiesel with biodiesel...

  9. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Keywords: Methyl decanoate; Methyl decenoate; Surrogate; Oxidation; Biodiesel fuels; Kinetic modeling; Engine; Low

  10. Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

  11. Characterization of Jeffamine (polyoxypropyleneamine) based compatibilizers and bisphenol-a polycarbonate blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Gerhard Kurt

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IEFFAMINE (POLYOXYPROPYLENEAMINE) BASED COMPATIBILIZERS AND BISPHENOL-A POLYCARBONATE BLENDS A Thesis by GERHARD KURT GUENTHER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CHARACTERIZATION OF JEFFAMINE (POLYOXYPROPYLENEAMINE) BASED COMPATIBILIZERS AND BISPHENOL-A POLYCARBONATE BLENDS A Thesis by GERHARD KURT GUENTHER...

  12. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  13. Empirical Study of the Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Westbrook, S. R.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to develop a database that supports specific proposals for a stability test and specification for biodiesel and biodiesel blends. B100 samples from 19 biodiesel producers were obtained in December of 2005 and January of 2006 and tested for stability. Eight of these samples were then selected for additional study, including long-term storage tests and blending at 5% and 20% with a number of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels.

  14. Export of Canadian Meteorites Reporting of a meteorite found in Canada is not mandatory. Meteorites found in Canada can be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Export of Canadian Meteorites Reporting of a meteorite found in Canada is not mandatory. Meteorites found in Canada can be sold in Canada. The export Under the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (S.C. 1985, c.52), which came into force 1977 September 6, a Canadian find cannot be exported without

  15. A state-of-practice survey of policy, plan, and program assessment in Canadian provinces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, Bram F

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the introduction of the 1999 Canadian Cabinet Directive on the environmental assessment of policies, plans, and programs (PPPs), higher-order environmental assessment has been receiving increased attention in Canada. However, while practices and systems are advancing at the federal level, there has been very little attention given to recent developments in PPP assessment at the provincial level. This paper presents the results of a Canada-wide survey of PPP assessment principles and practices in 10 Canadian provincial EA jurisdictions. The findings indicate that there exists considerable variability in the provisions for and practice of PPP assessment amongst Canadian provinces, with only Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Quebec identifying recent practice experience. Included amongst the main barriers to effective implementation at the provincial level are the lack of legislative requirements for strategic EA, and the limited understanding of the nature and benefits of higher-order impact assessment.

  16. Canadian Seismic Agreement. Annual report, July--June 1990: Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  17. Feedstock blending studies with laboratory indirectly heated gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, A.E.S.; Mullin, J.P.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the further development of indirectly heated gasifiers intended to provide fuels for advanced gas turbines, several indirectly heated laboratory gasifiers were constructed. During many comparative tests, advantages and problems with each system were observed. The most useful systems make use of laboratory tube furnaces in conjunction with temperature, time and pressure or volume yield measuring systems and a gas chromatograph with a thermal conductivity detector. In this paper, high temperature pyrolysis results obtained with the latest system are presented. Contrasting feedstocks suitable for commercial systems separately or in blends are used. Yield versus time measurements are used to determine relevant rate constants and outputs. Since the rate constants are mainly reflective of heat transfer effects, cylindrical dowel sticks of varying radii were volatilized. The data set leads to an analytic heat transfer model that considers the hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin components of the dowels. Also developed from the dowel experiments is an approximate procedure for estimating the proportionate releases of CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} for any type of biomass whose component proportions are known.

  18. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)] [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); León-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)] [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain) [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  19. A Study of the Use of Jatropha Oil Blends in Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary: This project investigated the combustion performance of blends of unrefined Jatropha oil and its blends in laboratory boilers. Although a very limited amount of testing blends in distillate oil, ASTM No. 2 oil or heating oil was conducted, the primary interest was in testing the performance of blends with residual ASTM No. 6 oil. The basic idea is to provide a renewable fuel option to residual oil used in space heating and in industrial applications. The intent also was to explore the use of non-edible plant oil and one that might be potentially cheaper than biodiesel. The characteristics of No. 6 oil, such as high viscosity at ambient temperature, which requires it to be kept heated, make the blending with such oils feasible. Jatropha oil is one such oil and there is currently considerable interest building up in its use as a source for making biodiesel and jet fuel. A 10% blend of Jatropha oil with heating oil was burned using a standard burner in a residential boiler. Combustion performance was shown to be comparable with that of burning heating oil by itself with some noticeable differences. Typical heating oil has about 2000 ppm of sulfur, while the Jatropha oil has about 50 ppm leading to lower levels of sulphur dioxide emissions. Stack measurements also showed that the NOx emission was lower with the blend. We have previously reported similar reductions in NOx with blends of biodiesel in heating oil as well as slight reductions in PM2.5, particulates below 2.5 microns in size. Long term tests were not part of this project and hence deleterious effects on pumps, seals etc., if any, were not measured. The majority of the work involved testing blends of Jatropha oil with residual oil in a 1.5 million Btu/hr boiler with a burner modified to burn residual oil. Blends of 20 and 60% Jatropha oil and 100% Jatropha oil were burned in the combustion performance tests. The residual oil used had a sulfur content of over 2000 ppm and hence dramatic reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions are measured with the blends. Again, consistent with our past experience with biodiesel blends, significant reductions in nitrogen oxide emissions nearing 50% with 100% Jatropha oil, were also measured. This is in contrast with the use of biodiesel in diesel engines, where the NOx has a tendency to increase. In addition to the gaseous emission measurements, particulate emissions were measured using an EPA CTM-39 system to obtain both particulates, of sizes below 2.5 microns, so-called PM2.5, and of sizes larger than 2.5 microns. The results show that the particulate emissions are lower with the blending of Jatropha oil. Overall, one can conclude that the blending of Jatropha oil with residual oil is a feasible approach to using non-edible plant oil to provide a renewable content to residual oil, with significant benefits in the reduction of pollutant emissions such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulates.

  20. Gas and hydrocarbon vapor permeation in poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne)/poly(1-phenyl-1-propyne) blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morisato, A.; Shen, H.C.; Toy, L.G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeation properties of phase-separated blends prepared from glassy poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) and poly(1-phenyl-1-propyne) (PPP) were determined as a function of blend composition with pure hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and butane. Blend permeabilities decrease significantly with increasing PPP concentration and suggest the occurrence of a phase inversion at low PPP content (5 to 20 wt%). Based on TEM analysis high-aspect-ratio (extended) PPP ellipsoidal dispersions are found in a PTMSP matrix, indicating that the phase inversion is closely related to dispersed-phase connectivity in the blends.

  1. Synoptic weather typing applied to air pollution mortality among the elderly in 10 Canadian cities$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Synoptic weather typing applied to air pollution mortality among the elderly in 10 Canadian cities 2013 Accepted 12 August 2013 Keywords: Air pollutants Acute health effects Relative mortality risk (large-scale weather systems) affect ambient levels of air pollution, as well as the relationship between

  2. Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction A.E. FINAN, K. MIU, A.C. KADAK Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Nuclear Science the technical aspects and the economics of utilizing nuclear reactors to provide the energy needed

  3. GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian Aquatic Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (6 scientists) and 3 major hydroelectric companies (Nalcor, Manitoba Hydro. Power (U. of Waterloo, m3power@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca) and R. Randall (DFO-Burlington) Effects

  4. The Canadian Journal of Statistics Vol. 40, No. 4, 2012, Pages 663678

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjan, Pritam

    improvement; global optimization; nonstation- ary simulators; tidal power model. MSC 2010: Primary 62L05. A number of illustrations of the approach are given, including a tidal power application. The Canadian abrupts. Notre approche est illustr´ee `a l'aide de nombreux exemples, incluant une application sur l'´energie

  5. The Canadian Boreal Forest, which stretches across most of the country, is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timber Companies in Landmark Environmental Deal A coalition of the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC)-- representing 21 Canadian forest companies--and nine environmental organizations has signed forest management for an area roughly the size of Texas. The plan immediately halts all logging on nearly

  6. The Canadian Plug-in Electric Vehicle Survey (CPEVS 2013): Anticipating Purchase, Use, and Grid Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Canadian Plug-in Electric Vehicle Survey (CPEVS 2013): Anticipating Purchase, Use, and Grid investigates consumer interest in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), summarizing preliminary results from ownership, electricity use, familiarity with PEV technology, and personal values and lifestyle; vehicle

  7. The biology of Canadian weeds. 117. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    The biology of Canadian weeds. 117. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers S. M. Stewart-Wade1 officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers. Can. J. Plant Sci. 82: 825­853. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex. Weber ex Wiggers. Can. J. Plant Sci. 82: 825­853. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers (pissenlit

  8. Submitted to Energy Policy, 16 November 2009 Eastern Canadian crude oil supply and its implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    with declining production. This paper examines crude oil production, supply, and its refining in eastern Canada shortages, or both. Keywords: Energy security, NAFTA, Canadian crude oil production 1 Introduction In 2007 Canada's crude oil supply and growing reliance on imports from countries with declining production

  9. Price Competition in Canadian Bought Deal Equity Offerings Nancy D. Ursel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    the cost of raising capital, thereby promoting corporate investment and economic growth. I study- competitive, leading to higher than necessary issue costs. One estimate sets this cost at $400 million per of Canadian firms, as inflated fees raise the corporate cost of capital, decreasing the attractiveness

  10. Altitudinal Gradients of Stable Isotopes in Lee-Slope Precipitation in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , this isotopic fractionation and distillation can be driven by vapor transport to higher altitudes, higher of the Canadian Rockies at the Continental Divide and receives precipitation from both westerly (Pacific) air altitudes. Surface and upper-air meteorological data were analyzed to classify the type of weather systems

  11. Canadian oil market review shows growing influence of heavy oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Canadian oil demand and consumption, crude oil received at refineries, oil well productivity including shut-in production, and exports and imports are discussed. Both light and heavy oil, natural gas, and bitumen are included in the seasonally-adjusted data presented.

  12. Volume 48 2006 CANADIAN BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING 3.1 Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Volume 48 2006 CANADIAN BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING 3.1 Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of timothy hay A. Opoku, L.G. Tabil*, B. Crerar and M.D. Shaw DepartmentofAgriculturaland BioresourceEngineering, L.G., Crerar, B. and Shaw, M.D. 2006. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of timothy hay

  13. Participant Name: McGill University Canadian Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    http://kb.mcgill.ca/it/easylink/article.html?id=1018 Other identity management documents exist Participant Name: McGill University Canadian Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD) 1 on "best effort" and transparency of practice. Each Participant documents, for other Participants

  14. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

  15. Chain ordering of regioregular polythiophene films through blending with a nickel bisdithiolene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, D. [CNRS, LCC (Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination), 205 Route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France) [CNRS, LCC (Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination), 205 Route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LCC, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Ramos, B.; Bedel-Pereira, E.; Séguy, I. [LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France) [LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LCC, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Villeneuve-Faure, C. [LAPLACE, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France)] [LAPLACE, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Sournia-Saquet, A.; Moineau-Chane Ching, K. I., E-mail: kathleen.chane@lcc-toulouse.fr [CNRS, LCC (Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination), 205 Route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Alary, F.; Heully, J. L. [LCPQ-IRSAMC, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)] [LCPQ-IRSAMC, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An “annealing-free” strategy consisting of using a planar nickel bisdithiolene complex nickel bis[1,2-di(3?,4?-di-n-decyloxyphenyl)ethene-1,2-dithiolene] ([Ni(4dopedt){sub 2}]) is proposed for structuring poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) (P3HT). Photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectroscopies, in conjunction with electronic absorption, have been used for evidencing P3HT changes due to blending. PL and absorption observations are consistent and show a correlation between polymer chain organization and increasing amounts of [Ni(4dopedt){sub 2}]. Blending with [Ni(4dopedt){sub 2}] do not modify the Raman ring-breathing modes energies indicating that blending does not induce strongly disorder in P3HT chains. Atomic force microscopic measurements show that blends nanoscale morphology presents a homogeneous matrix and small fibrils related to [Ni(4dopedt){sub 2}] concentration, especially for blends with a [Ni(4dopedt){sub 2}] weight ratio lower than 50%.

  16. Concentration fluctuations in miscible polymer blends: Influence of temperature and chain rigidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F. [The James Franck Institute and the Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [The James Franck Institute and the Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Douglas, Jack F. [The James Franck Institute and the Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States) [The James Franck Institute and the Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to binary mixtures of small molecule fluids, homogeneous polymer blends exhibit relatively large concentration fluctuations that can strongly affect the transport properties of these complex fluids over wide ranges of temperatures and compositions. The spatial scale and intensity of these compositional fluctuations are studied by applying Kirkwood-Buff theory to model blends of linear semiflexible polymer chains with upper critical solution temperatures. The requisite quantities for determining the Kirkwood-Buff integrals are generated from the lattice cluster theory for the thermodynamics of the blend and from the generalization of the random phase approximation to compressible polymer mixtures. We explore how the scale and intensity of composition fluctuations in binary blends vary with the reduced temperature ? ? (T ? T{sub c})/T (where T{sub c} is the critical temperature) and with the asymmetry in the rigidities of the components. Knowledge of these variations is crucial for understanding the dynamics of materials fabricated from polymer blends, and evidence supporting these expectations is briefly discussed.

  17. Analysis Of Exhaust Emission Of Internal Combustion Engine Using Biodiesel Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suvendu Mohanty; Dr. Om Prakash; Reasearch Scholar

    Abstract-The main purpose of this research is to study the effect of various blends of an environmental friendly alternative fuel such as biodiesel on the performance of diesel engine. In the Present investigation experimental work has been carried out to analyze the performance and exhaust emission characteristics of a single cylinder internal combustion engine fuelled with biodiesel blend at the different load. In this experiment the biodiesel which is use as a waste cooking oil (WCO) biodiesel.To investigation of the emission characteristics of the engine loads, which is supplied from the alternator. The experiment was carried out different load i.e. (NO LOAD, 100W 200W, 500W, 1000W, 1500W, 2000W, 2500W & 3000Watt) at engine speed 1500 rpm/min. A test was applied in which an engine was fuel with diesel and seven different blends of diesel. Biodiesel (B5, B10, B20, B40, B60, B80, B100) made from waste cooking oil and the results were analyzed.The emission of were measured carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon carbon(HC), Oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and oxygen ().The experimental results will be compared with biodiesel blends and diesel. The biodiesel results of (WCO) in lower emission of hydro carbon (HC) and (CO) and increase emission of (NO2). This study showed that the results of exhaust emission of biodiesel blends were lower than the diesel fuel. Keyword- Biodiesel (WCO), diesel engine, gas analyzer, Exhaust emission. I.

  18. Drive cycle analysis of butanol/diesel blends in a light-duty vehicle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miers, S. A.; Carlson, R. W.; McConnell, S. S.; Ng, H. K.; Wallner, T.; LeFeber, J.; Energy Systems; Esper Images Video & Multimedia

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential exists to displace a portion of the petroleum diesel demand with butanol and positively impact engine-out particulate matter. As a preliminary investigation, 20% and 40% by volume blends of butanol with ultra low sulfur diesel fuel were operated in a 1999 Mercedes Benz C220 turbo diesel vehicle (Euro III compliant). Cold and hot start urban as well as highway drive cycle tests were performed for the two blends of butanol and compared to diesel fuel. In addition, 35 MPH and 55 MPH steady-state tests were conducted under varying road loads for the two fuel blends. Exhaust gas emissions, fuel consumption, and intake and exhaust temperatures were acquired for each test condition. Filter smoke numbers were also acquired during the steady-state tests.

  19. The relationship between the thermoplastic behavior of blends and their component coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakurovs, R.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoplastic behaviors of a number of coking coal blends were measured using proton magnetic resonance thermal analysis (PMRTA) to determine to what extent they were affected by interactions between the component coals. Most blends showed evidence that at temperatures near their temperatures of maximum fluidity the extent to which they fused was different to that expected if the coals did not interact. Only blends of coking coals of different rank fused to a greater extent than expected in the absence of interactions. Semi-anthracite, low rank coals and charcoal reduced the extent of fusion of coking coals to values below those expected if they were acting as inert diluents. These interactions are interpreted as being mediated by transfer of volatile material between the coals on heating.

  20. Study of Performance Characteristics of Diesel Engine Fuelled with Diesel, Yellow Grease Biodiesel and its Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virender Singh; Shubham Saxena; Shibayan Ghosh; Ankit Agrawal

    Abstract — The feedstock used in our experiment for the production of biodiesel was Yellow Grease. The whole experiment was divided into two parts: Production and Testing. Production involves Transesterification of free fatty acids in yellow grease to form yellow grease alkyl esters. The process of testing involved calculation of the physio – chemical properties, acid value, density, kinematics viscosity and various performance characteristics. The properties obtained were similar to the standards of biodiesel set by ASTM D6751. The conclusions derived from the experiments conducted were that the break thermal efficiency with biodiesel blends was little lower than that of diesel. The break specific energy consumption for B20, B40, B60, B80 and B100 is slightly higher than neat diesel. At all loads, diesel was found to have the lowet exhaust tempearture and the temperature for the different blends showed the upward trend with increasing concentration of biodiesel in the blends.

  1. The Effect of the Di-Tertiary Butyl Peroxide (DTBP) additive on HCCI Combustion of Fuel Blends of Ethanol and Diethyl Ether

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Buchholz, Bruce A; Flowers, Daniel L; Dibble, Robert W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diethyl ether (DEE) in ethanol fuel blends for a range ofbio-derived fuel components (ethanol) in emission productsHCCI Combustion of Fuel Blends of Ethanol and Diethyl Ether

  2. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  3. A novel reactive processing technique: using telechelic polymers to reactively compatibilize polymer blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashcraft, Earl C [ORNL; Ji, Haining [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Difunctional reactive polymers, telechelics, were used to reactively form multiblock copolymers in situ when melt-blended with a blend of polystyrene and polyisoprene. To quantify the ability of the copolymer to compatibilize the blends, the time evolution of the domain size upon annealing was analyzed by SEM. It was found that the most effective parameter to quantify the ability of the copolymer to inhibit droplet coalescence is Kreltstable, the relative coarsening constant multiplied by the stabilization time. These results indicate that intermediate-molecular-weight telechelic pairs of both highly reactive Anhydride-PS-Anhydride/NH2-PI-NH2 and slower reacting Epoxy-PS-Epoxy/COOH-PI-COOH both effectively suppress coalescence, with the optimal molecular weight being slightly above the critical molecular weight of the homopolymer,Mc. The effects of telechelic loading were also investigated, where the optimal loading concentration for this system was 0.5 wt %, as higher concentrations exhibited a plasticizing effect due to the presence of unreacted low-molecular-weight telechelics present in the blend. A determination of the interfacial coverage of the copolymer shows that a conversion of 1.5-3.0% was required for 20% surface coverage at 5.0 wt % telechelic loading, indicating a large excess of telechelics in this system. At the optimal loading level of 0.5 wt %, a conversion of 15% was required for 20% surface coverage. The results of these experiments provide a clear understanding of the role of telechelic loading and molecular weight on its ability to reactively form interfacial modifiers in phase-separated polymer blends and provide guidelines for the development of similar reactive processing schemes that can use telechelic polymers to reactively compatibilize a broad range of polymer blends.

  4. Numerical Model Investigation for Potential Methane Explosion and Benzene Vapor Intrusion Associated with High-Ethanol Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    ABSTRACT: Ethanol-blended fuel releases usually stimulate methanogenesis in the subsurface, which could conditions exist. Ethanol- derived methane may also increase the vapor intrusion potential of toxic fuel to be modified when dealing with some high ethanol blend fuel (i.e., E20 up to E95) releases. INTRODUCTION

  5. Prediction of metallurgical coke strength from the petrographic composition of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutcu, H.; Toroglu, I.; Piskin, S. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turkey, especially Zonguldak on the West Coast of Black Sea region, has large reserves of bituminous coal that can be used either directly or in blends with other coals for metallurgical coke production. It is possible to predict the coking properties of these coals by petrographic analysis. In this study, semi- and non-coking coals were blended with coking bituminous coals in varying proportions and an estimation was made as to their stability factors through petrographic techniques. It was established that semi- and non-coking bituminous coals could be used in the production of metallurgical coke.

  6. A review of chromatographic characterization techniques for biodiesel and biodiesel blends.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauls, R. E. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review surveys chromatographic technology that has been applied to the characterization of biodiesel and its blends. Typically, biodiesel consists of fatty acid methyl esters produced by transesterification of plant or animal derived triacylglycerols. Primary attention is given to the determination of trace impurities in biodiesel, such as methanol, glycerol, mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols, and sterol glucosides. The determination of the fatty acid methyl esters, trace impurities in biodiesel, and the determination of the biodiesel content of commercial blends of biodiesel in conventional diesel are also addressed.

  7. 548 THE CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING VOLUME 84, OCTOBER 2006 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Ajay K.

    of a static mixer. Static or motionless mixers have been adopted for a large number of blending and disper, Newark, DE, U.S. 19716 for a photograph of a static mixer). A typical inlet geometry to the static mixer clumps of the injected liquid. Because static mixers are less Two-dimensional simulations of flow

  8. The Effects of Mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling on Canadian/U.S. Live Hog and Feeder Pig Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thevenaz, Shad Arthur Michel

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The final implementation of Mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling has caused some U.S. packing plants and finishing operations to discontinue using Canadian live hogs and feeder pigs in their operations thereby reducing trade. Using a system...

  9. Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran [Department of Politics and Public Policy, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Brisbane, Nathan, Queensland 4111 (Australia)]. E-mail: Ciaran.Ofaircheallaigh@griffith.edu.au

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade a number of environmental agreements (EAs) have been negotiated in Canada involving industry, government and Aboriginal peoples. This article draws on the Canadian experience to consider the potential of such negotiated agreements to address two issues widely recognised in academic and policy debates on environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental management. The first relates to the need to secure indigenous participation in environmental management of major projects that affect indigenous peoples. The second and broader issue involves the necessity for specific initiatives to ensure effective follow-up of EIA. The Canadian experience indicates that negotiated environmental agreements have considerable potential to address both issues. However, if this potential is to be realized, greater effort must be made to develop structures and processes specifically designed to encourage Aboriginal participation; and EAs must themselves provide the financial and other resource required to support EIA follow-up and Aboriginal participation.

  10. Effect of thermal history on the molecular orientation in polystyrene/poly(vinyl methyl ether) blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezolet, Michel

    ether) (PS/PVME) has been studied using polarization modulation infrared linear dichroism (PM to an increased orientation if the heating time at 51 8C is kept short. Moreover, PS and PVME develop a larger) blends; Thermal history; Polarization modulation infrared linear dichroism 1. Introduction The influence

  11. Ultrasonic and microscopic investigation of blends of polydimethylsiloxane and polyisobutylene at all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    it would be important to control the mixing of two polymers during blend processing, in an extruder in different fields of application, in particular to characterize solid and molten polymers [Bridge (1987 50 years back. In 1948, Urick reported data of the ultrasonic attenuation in aqueous kaolin and sand

  12. Co-firing of coal and biomass fuel blends M. Sami, K. Annamalai*, M. Wooldridge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    Co-firing of coal and biomass fuel blends M. Sami, K. Annamalai*, M. Wooldridge1 Department; accepted 6 June 2000 Abstract This paper reviews literature on co-firing of coal with biomass fuels. Here of coal and biomass fuels are presented. Different classes of co-firing methods are identified

  13. TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I -PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    coal or by ex- haust clean up technology. For the power plants, the simplest solution is the preventive- ity well into the 21st century. This dependency on coal calls for better technologies to reduceTURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I - PRELIMINARY RESULTS

  14. Relationship between MTBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzawa, Takumi; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Kashiwabara, Kimito [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Fujisawa, Norihiro; Matsubara, Michiro

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between MBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability is investigated by focusing on the transient combustion air-fuel ratio that strongly relates to the combustion state of the engine. As a result, although warm-up driveability of MTBE-free gasoline has a high correlation with 50% distillation temperature (T50) and a high correlation with 100 C distillation volume (E100), the correlation is found to be low when blended with MTBE. Various formulas that improve correlation with peak excess air ratio ({lambda}) by correcting T50 and E100 for the amount of MTBE blended are examined. The formula for which the highest determination coefficient is obtained is proposed as a new driveability index (DI) that can also be applied to MTBE-blended gasoline. In addition, the effect on driveability by gasoline base materials using this new DI also is investigated. The results indicate that the new DI worsen when heavy reformate containing large amounts of aromatics or MTBE, an oxygen-containing compound, is used for the octane improver, leaving the balance of the volatility out of consideration.

  15. Detonations in Hydrocarbon Fuel Blends J.M. Austin and J.E. Shepherd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    in high-molecular weight hydrocarbon fuels of interest to pulse detonation engine applications of thermally decomposed JP-10 was studied at 295 K. This blend consisted of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane to be comparable. The addition of lower molecular weight fuels (hydrogen, acetylene, ethylene, 1 #12;and carbon

  16. Wood plastic composites based on microfibrillar blends of high density polyethylene/poly(ethylene terephthalate)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood plastic composites based on microfibrillar blends of high density polyethylene January 2010 Keywords: Wood plastic composites Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Polyethylene Extrusion a b into wood plastic composites through a two-step reactive extrusion technology. Wood flour was added into pre

  17. Zinc-blende ZnO and its role in nucleating wurtzite tetrapods and twinned nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Zinc-blende ZnO and its role in nucleating wurtzite tetrapods and twinned nanowires Yong Ding of wurtzite WZ ZnO tetrapods. The formation of the wurtzite 011¯3 twined nanowires is proposed based on the ZB core. Simple bonding density calculation shows that the wurtzite nanowires with 011¯0 side surfaces

  18. Using blends of cerambycid beetle pheromones and host plant volatiles to simultaneously attract a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    ethanol and a-pinene to determine whether such blends could be effective lures for detecting and moni-(undecyloxy)-ethanol, and race- mic 2-methyl-1-butanol. Bioassays in east-central Illinois captured 3070 to ethanol, with a-pinene enhancing attraction only for the pine specialist M. carolinensis. The optimal

  19. Kinetic effects of toluene blending on the extinction limit of n-decane diffusion flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Yiguang

    analyses of kinetic path ways and species transport on flame extinction were also conducted. The results and emission properties, such as the ignition delay times, extinction limits, flame speeds, species profilesKinetic effects of toluene blending on the extinction limit of n-decane diffusion flames Sang Hee

  20. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje (East Patchogue, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  1. Optimization of Crude-Oil Blending Operations Sylvain Mouret Ignacio E. Grossmann Pierre Pestiaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    refinery Crude-oil blending scheduling Scheduling formulations 2 Proposed approach Basic idea MINLP model Proposed approach Results and comparisons Conclusion Oil refinery A typical oil refinery Refining crude definition Given Refinery configuration Logistics constraints Initial tank inventory and composition Vessel

  2. Femtosecond electron-transfer holography in C{sub 60}/polymer blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniloff, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vacar, D. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Inst. for Polymers and Organic Solids; McBranch, D.; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heeger, A.J. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Inst. for Polymers and Organic Solids

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Holographic recording has recently been demonstrated in conducting polymer/C{sub 60} blends. Results are presented that demonstrate an improved signal-to-noise ratio is obtained when holographic detection is used to observe the dynamics of photo-induced absorption.

  3. Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-icing Performance and Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-icing Performance and Cost Effectiveness Stephen J in Method? #12;Deicing and Anti-icing Treatments ·Sodium Chloride (NaCl) ·Cargill, NA Salt ·Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) w/additives ·Envirotech Serv., Scotwood Ind., NA Salt ·Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) ·Tiger

  4. Molecular Packing and Solar Cell Performance in Blends of Polymers with a Bisadduct Fullerene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Molecular Packing and Solar Cell Performance in Blends of Polymers with a Bisadduct Fullerene States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We compare the solar cell performance of several polymers the efficiency of the solar cells only when they do not intercalate between the polymer side chains. When

  5. The Blend Down Monitoring System Demonstration at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benton, J.; Close, D.; Johnson, W., Jr.; Kerr, P.; March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Moss, C.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, R.; Wright, P.D.

    1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Agreements between the governments of the US and the Russian Federation for the US purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons calls for the establishment of transparency measures to provide confidence that nuclear nonproliferation goals are being met. To meet these transparency goals, the agreements call for the installation of nonintrusive US instruments to monitor the down blending of HEU to LEU. The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) has been jointly developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continuously monitor {sup 235}U enrichments and mass flow rates at Russian blending facilities. Prior to its installation in Russian facilities, the BDMS was installed and operated in a UF{sub 6} flow loop in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant simulating flow and enrichment conditions expected in a typical down-blending facility. A Russian delegation to the US witnessed the equipment demonstration in June, 1998. To conduct the demonstration in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the BDMS was required to meet stringent Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing, safety and operational requirements. The Paducah demonstration was an important milestone in achieving the operational certification for the BDMS use in Russian facilities.

  6. Vapour Phase Hydration of Blended Oxide Magnox Waste Glasses Neil C. Hyatt,1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Vapour Phase Hydration of Blended Oxide ­ Magnox Waste Glasses Neil C. Hyatt,1* William E. Lee,1 BNFL Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG. UK. ABSTRACT Vapour phase hydration across the alteration layer. Vapour phase hydration leads to formation of surface alteration products

  7. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  8. Concours Cayley Canada Canadian Team Honour Roll / Palmars des quipes l'chelle nationale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Concours Cayley ­ Canada Canadian Team Honour Roll / Palmarès des équipes à l'échelle nationale Cayley Contest ­ Canada 11 There were 1011 three-student teams. Il y avait 1011 équipes de trois élèves UPPER CANADA COLLEGE TORONTO ON 374 17 GLENFOREST S.S. MISSISSAUGA ON 373 18 LOWER CANADA COLLEGE

  9. Concours Fermat Canada Canadian Team Honour Roll / Palmars des quipes l'chelle nationale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Concours Fermat ­ Canada Canadian Team Honour Roll / Palmarès des équipes à l'échelle nationale Fermat Contest ­ Canada Rank / Position 53 - 97 100 - 193 203 - 292 302 - 397 410 - 496 509 - 591 603 CHURCHILL H.S. CALGARY AB 381 9 WESTERN CANADA H.S. CALGARY AB 380 10 EARL HAIG S.S. NORTH YORK ON 377

  10. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on Ethanol Engine Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is a very attractive fuel from an end-use perspective because it has a high chemical octane number and a high latent heat of vaporization. When an engine is optimized to take advantage of these fuel properties, both efficiency and power can be increased through higher compression ratio, direct fuel injection, higher levels of boost, and a reduced need for enrichment to mitigate knock or protect the engine and aftertreatment system from overheating. The ASTM D5798 specification for high level ethanol blends, commonly called E85, underwent a major revision in 2011. The minimum ethanol content was revised downward from 68 vol% to 51 vol%, which combined with the use of low octane blending streams such as natural gasoline introduces the possibility of a lower octane E85 fuel. While this fuel is suitable for current ethanol tolerant flex fuel vehicles, this study experimentally examines whether engines can still be aggressively optimized for the resultant fuel from the revised ASTM D5798 specification. The performance of six ethanol fuel blends, ranging from 51-85% ethanol, is compared to a premium-grade certification gasoline (UTG-96) in a single-cylinder direct-injection (DI) engine with a compression ratio of 12.9:1 at knock-prone engine conditions. UTG-96 (RON = 96.1), light straight run gasoline (RON = 63.6), and n-heptane (RON = 0) are used as the hydrocarbon blending streams for the ethanol-containing fuels in an effort to establish a broad range of knock resistance for high ethanol fuels. Results show that nearly all ethanol-containing fuels are more resistant to engine knock than UTG-96 (the only exception being the ethanol blend with 49% n-heptane). This knock resistance allows ethanol blends made with 33 and 49% light straight run gasoline, and 33% n-heptane to be operated at significantly more advanced combustion phasing for higher efficiency, as well as at higher engine loads. While experimental results show that the octane number of the hydrocarbon blend stock does impact engine performance, there remains a significant opportunity for engine optimization when considering even the lowest octane fuels that are in compliance with the current revision of ASTM D5798 compared to premium-grade gasoline.

  11. NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

  12. Recycling of rubber tires in electric arc furnace steelmaking: simultaneous combustion of metallurgical coke and rubber tyres blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdalena Zaharia; Veena Sahajwalla; Byong-Chul Kim; Rita Khanna; N. Saha-Chaudhury; Paul O'Kane; Jonathan Dicker; Catherine Skidmore; David Knights [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study investigates the effect of addition of waste rubber tires on the combustion behavior of its blends with coke for carbon injection in electric arc furnace steelmaking. Waste rubber tires were mixed in different proportions with metallurgical coke (MC) (10:90, 20:80, 30:70) for combustion and pyrolysis at 1473 K in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), respectively. Under experimental conditions most of the rubber blends indicated higher combustion efficiencies compared to those of the constituent coke. In the early stage of combustion the weight loss rate of the blends is much faster compared to that of the raw coke due to the higher volatile yield of rubber. The presence of rubber in the blends may have had an impact upon the structure during the release and combustion of their high volatile matter (VM) and hence increased char burnout. Measurements of micropore surface area and bulk density of the chars collected after combustion support the higher combustion efficiency of the blends in comparison to coke alone. The surface morphology of the 30% rubber blend revealed pores in the residual char that might be attributed to volatile evolution during high temperature reaction in oxygen atmosphere. Physical properties and VM appear to have a major effect upon the measured combustion efficiency of rubber blends. The study demonstrates that waste rubber tires can be successfully co-injected with metallurgical coke in electric arc furnace steelmaking process to provide additional energy from combustion. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Development of shape memory polymer (SMP) blend for biomedical and clinical applications Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of responsive stimuli materials that are able to respond to external stimulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of shape memory polymer (SMP) blend for biomedical and clinical applications Shape properties of this shape memory biopolymers and blends. The bio-compatible SMP blend will be fabricated by melt-blending and gas foaming. The various shape memory and mechanical properties of the foam and solid

  14. Mode-of-Action of Self-Extinguishing Polymer Blends Containing Organoclays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pack, S.; Si, M; Koo, J; Sokolov, J; Koga, T; Kashiwagi, T; Rafailovich, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have shown that the addition of nanoclays is an effective means for enhancing the flame retardant properties of polymer blends. Polymer blends are difficult to render flame retardant even with the addition of flame retardant agents due to dispersion and phase segregation during the heating process. We show that the addition of 5% functionalized Cloisite 20A clays in combination with 15% decabromodiphenyl ether and 4% antimony trioxide to a polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) blend can render the compound flame resistant within the UL-94-V0 standard. Using a variety of micro-characterization methods, we show that the clays are concentrated at the interfaces between the polymers in this blend and completely suppress phase segregation. The flame retardant (FR) is absorbed onto the clay surfaces, and the exfoliation of the clays also distributes the FR agent uniformly within the matrix. TGA of the nanocomposite indicates that prior to the addition of clay, the dissociation times of the individual components varied by more than 20 C, which complicated the gas-phase kinetics. Addition of the clays causes all the components to have a single dissociation temperature, which enhanced the efficacy of the FR formula in the gas phase. Cone calorimetry also indicated that the clays decreased the heat release rate (HRR) and the mass loss rate (MLR), due to the formation of a robust char. In contrast, minimal charring occurred in blends containing just the FR. SEM examination of the chars showed that the clay platelets were curved and in some cases tightly folded into nanotube-like structures. These features were only apparent in blends, indicating that they might be associated with thermal gradients across the polymer phase interface. SEM and SAXS examinations of the nanocomposites after partial exposure to the flame indicated that the clays aggregated into ribbon-like structures, approximately microns in length, after the surfactant thermally decomposed. Thermal modeling indicated that these ribbons might partially explain the synergy due to better distribution of the heat and improve the mechanical properties of the melt at high temperatures, in a manner similar to the one reported for carbon nanotubes.

  15. Viscoelastic Properties and Phase Behavior of 12-tert-Butyl Ester Dendrimer/Poly(methyl methacrylate) Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    with bis- phenol A polycarbonate (PC), resulting in an in- crease in free volume with increasing dendrimer hyperbranched polyester/bisphenol A PC blends with respect to pure PC. Studies were conducted by Carr et al.24

  16. Particulate Matter Emissions from a Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engine under Cold Fast Idle Conditions for Ethanol-Gasoline Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimou, Iason

    The engine out particular matter number (PN) distributions at engine coolant temperature (ECT) of 0° C to 40° C for ethanol/ gasoline blends (E0 to E85) have been measured for a direct-injection spark ignition engine under ...

  17. Modeling The NOx Emissions In A Low NOx Burner While Fired With Pulverized Coal And Dairy Biomass Blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uggini, Hari

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    by themselves already require cleanup technology; newer regulations will require development of new and economical technologies. Using a blend of traditional fuels & biomass is a promising technology to reduce NOX emissions. Experiments conducted previously...

  18. Organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Kenneth

    The organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends have been assessed under warmed-up and cold idle conditions. The speciated emissions show that the ...

  19. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Clark, W.; Graves, R.; Orban, J.; Przesmitzki, S.; Theiss, T.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intended for policymakers and others who make decisions about, and set guidelines for, the proper use of intermediate ethanol blends such as E20 in both vehicle engines and other engine types.

  20. Nanowire-Induced Wurtzite InAs Thin Film on Zinc-Blende InAs Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Jiming

    Nanowire-Induced Wurtzite InAs Thin Film on Zinc-Blende InAs Substrate By Jiming Bao, David C. Bell as that of their substrates. Here, we report on the observation of a wurtzite InAs thin-film structure on a zinc-blende In the wurtzite crystal structure. The bandgap of wurtzite InAs, obtained by low-temperature photoluminescence

  1. Solubility of carbon dioxide in an aqueous blend of diethanolamine and piperazine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondal, M.K. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous blends of diethanolamine (DEA) and piperazine (PZ), from mixtures of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, was measured for temperatures and CO{sub 2} partial pressures ranging from (303.14 to 353.14) K and (10.133 to 20.265) kPa, respectively. Measurements were made by a saturation method using a laboratory scale bubble column. The results of CO{sub 2} solubility in liquid are expressed as {alpha}(CO{sub 2}) (mol CO{sub 2}/mol amine) for all experimental runs. A solubility model is developed to correlate and predict the solubility data of CO{sub 2} in aqueous blends of DEA and PZ. There is all acceptable degree of agreement between the experimental data of the present study and predictions of the solubility model with an average absolute deviation of less than 4.5%.

  2. Finite element analysis on the fracture of rubber toughened polymer blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Mai, Y.W. [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wu, J. [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of rubber particle volume fraction on the constitutive relation and fracture toughness of polymer blends was studied using elastic-plastic Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The effect of rubber particle cavitation on the stress-strain state at a crack tip was also investigated. Stress analysis reveals that because of the high rubber bulk modulus, the hydrostatic stress inside the rubber particle is close to that in the adjacent matrix material element. As a result, the rubber particle imposes a severe plastic constraint to the surrounding matrix and limits its plastic strain. Rubber particle cavitation can effectively release the constraint and enable large scale plastic strain to occur. Different failure criteria were used to determine the optimum rubber particle volume fraction for the polymer blends studied in this paper.

  3. Growth of epitaxial iron nitride ultrathin film on zinc-blende gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, J.; Lin, W.; Wang, K.; Chinchore, A.; Shi, M.; Ingram, D. C.; Smith, A. R.; Sun, K.; Lucy, J. M.; Hauser, A. J.; Yang, F. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride using molecular beam epitaxy. First, zinc-blende GaN is grown on a magnesium oxide substrate having (001) orientation; second, an ultrathin layer of FeN is grown on top of the GaN layer. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the surface during growth, and a well-defined epitaxial relationship is observed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to reveal the epitaxial continuity at the gallium nitride-iron nitride interface. Surface morphology of the iron nitride, similar to yet different from that of the GaN substrate, can be described as plateau valley. The FeN chemical stoichiometry is probed using both bulk and surface sensitive methods, and the magnetic properties of the sample are revealed.

  4. Disk-cylinder and disk-sphere nanoparticles from block copolymer blend solution construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jiahua [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Shiyi [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Zhang, Ke [Northeastern University] [Northeastern University; Wang, Xiaojun [ORNL] [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL] [ORNL; Wooley, Karen L [ORNL] [ORNL; Pochan, Darrin [University of Delaware] [University of Delaware

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers strive to produce nanoparticles with complexity in composition and structure. Although traditional spherical, cylindrical and membranous, or planar, nanostructures are ubiquitous, scientists seek more complicated geometries for potential functionality. Here we report the simple solution construction of multigeometry nanoparticles, disk-sphere and diskcylinder, through a straightforward, molecular-level, blending strategy with binary mixtures of block copolymers. The multigeometry nanoparticles contain disk geometry in the core with either spherical patches along the disk periphery in the case of disk-sphere particles or cylindrical edges and handles in the case of the disk-cylinder particles. The portions of different geometry in the same nanoparticles contain different core block chemistry, thus also defining multicompartments in the nanoparticles. Although the block copolymers chosen for the blends are important for the definition of the final hybrid particles, the control of the kinetic pathway of assembly is critical for successful multigeometry particle construction.

  5. Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Carbon in the Emissions of a Compression-Ignition Engine Fueled with Biodiesel Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchholz, B A; Cheng, A S; Dibble, R W

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental tests were conducted on a Cummins 85.9 direct-injected diesel engine fueled with biodiesel blends. 20% and 50% blend levels were tested, as was 100% (neat) biodiesel. Emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), hydrocarbons (HC) and CO were measured under steady-state operating conditions. The effect of biodiesel on PM emissions was mixed; however, the contribution of the volatile organic fraction to total PM was greater for the higher biodiesel blend levels. When only non-volatile PM mass was considered, reductions were observed for the biodiesel blends as well as for neat biodiesel. The biodiesel test fuels increased NO{sub x}, while HC and CO emissions were reduced. PM collected on quartz filters during the experimental runs were analyzed for carbon-14 content using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMs). These measurements revealed that carbon from the biodiesel portion of the blended fuel was marginally less likely to contribute to PM, compared to the carbon from the diesel portion of the fuel. The results are different than those obtained in previous tests with the oxygenate ethanol, which was observed to be far less likely contribute to PM than the diesel component of the blended fuel. The data suggests that chemical structure of the oxygen- carbon bonds in an oxygenate affects the PM formation process.

  6. Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) or uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 3}), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study`s scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO{sub 2} or UF{sub 6}, blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM).

  7. Ab initio study of phase transition of boron nitride between zinc-blende and rhombohedral structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishida, S.; Funashima, H.; Sato, K.; Katayama-Yoshida, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Boron nitride has polymorphs such as zinc-blende (c-BN), wurtzite (w-BN), rhombohedral (r-BN), and graphite-like (h-BN) forms. We simulate the direct conversion of r-BN to c-BN through electronic excitation. In our calculation, the conversion is made possible by increasing the hole concentration to over 0.06/atom. This conversion should be experimentally possible by hole-doping via an electric double layer transistor (EDLT) or capacitor.

  8. Novel Characterization of GDI Engine Exhaust for Gasoline and Mid-Level Gasoline-Alcohol Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL] [ORNL; Eibl, Mary A [ORNL] [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Kaul, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer improved fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet more stringent fuel economy standards. GDI engines typically emit the most particulate matter (PM) during periods of rich operation such as start-up and acceleration, and emissions of air toxics are also more likely during this condition. A 2.0 L GDI engine was operated at lambda of 0.91 at typical loads for acceleration (2600 rpm, 8 bar BMEP) on three different fuels; an 87 anti-knock index (AKI) gasoline (E0), 30% ethanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel (E30), and 48% isobutanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel. E30 was chosen to maximize octane enhancement while minimizing ethanol-blend level and iBu48 was chosen to match the same fuel oxygen level as E30. Particle size and number, organic carbon and elemental carbon (OC/EC), soot HC speciation, and aldehydes and ketones were all analyzed during the experiment. A new method for soot HC speciation is introduced using a direct, thermal desorption/pyrolysis inlet for the gas chromatograph (GC). Results showed high levels of aromatic compounds were present in the PM, including downstream of the catalyst, and the aldehydes were dominated by the alcohol blending.

  9. Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A-3 Page 1 Lead Author J. Gardner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A UNCLOS Article 76 and the year each area has been mapped. #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A-3 Page 2 Lead Author J. Gardner Ocean Mapping

  10. Intermediate Alcohol-Gasoline Blends, Fuels for Enabling Increased Engine Efficiency and Powertrain Possibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in mid-level alcohol-gasoline blends with 24% vol./vol. iso-butanol-gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol./vol. ethanol-gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with a low and high compression ratio of 9.2:1 and 11.85:1 respectively. The engine is equipped with hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and is capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All fuels are operated to full-load conditions with =1, using both 0% and 15% external cooled EGR. The results demonstrate that higher octane number bio-fuels better utilize higher compression ratios with high stoichiometric torque capability. Specifically, the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with the 11.85:1 compression ratio using E30 as compared to 87 AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg at =1 (with 15% EGR, 18.5 bar with 0% EGR). EGR was shown to provide thermodynamic advantages with all fuels. The results demonstrate that E30 may further the downsizing and downspeeding of engines by achieving increased low speed torque, even with high compression ratios. The results suggest that at mid-level alcohol-gasoline blends, engine and vehicle optimization can offset the reduced fuel energy content of alcohol-gasoline blends, and likely reduce vehicle fuel consumption and tailpipe CO2 emissions.

  11. Recovery and Blend-Down Uranium for Beneficial use in Commercial Reactors - 13373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, Virginia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2001 the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) signed an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 33 MT of off-specification (off-spec) highly enriched uranium (HEU) from DOE to TVA for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. Since that time additional surplus off-spec HEU material has been added to the program, making the total approximately 46 MT off-spec HEU. The disposition path for approximately half (23 MT) of this 46 MT of surplus HEU material, was down blending through the H-canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The HEU is purified through the H-canyon processes, and then blended with natural uranium (NU) to form low enriched uranium (LEU) solution with a 4.95% U-235 isotopic content. This material was then transported to a TVA subcontractor who converted the solution to uranium oxide and then fabricated into commercial light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This fuel is now powering TVA reactors and supplying electricity to approximately 1 million households in the TVA region. There is still in excess of approximately 10 to 14 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for use in either currently designed light water reactors, ?5% enriched LEU, or be made available for use in subsequent advanced 'fast' reactor fuel designs, ?19% LEU. (authors)

  12. Low-temperature pyrolysis of coal to produce diesel-fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, T.B.; Jett, O.J.; Wu, J.S.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-temperature (623 to 773/sup 0/K) coal pyrolysis was investigated in a bench-scale retort. Factorially designed experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature, coal-particle size, and nitrogen flow rate on the yield of liquid products. Yield of condensable organic products relative to the proximate coal volatile matter increased by 3.1 and 6.4 wt % after increasing nitrogen purge flow rate from 0.465 to 1.68 L/min and retort temperature from 623 to 723/sup 0/K, respectively. The liquid product may be suitable for blending with diesel fuel. The viscosity and density of coal liquids produced at 723/sup 0/K were compared with those of diesel fuel. The coal liquids had a higher carbon-to-hydrogen ratio and a lower aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio than premium quality No. 2 diesel fuel. It was recommended that liquids from coal pyrolysis be blended with diesel fuel to determine stability of the mixture and performance of the blend in internal combustion engines.

  13. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: RECOVERY AND DOWN BLEND URANIUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    For over fifty years, the H Canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has performed remotely operated radiochemical separations of irradiated targets to produce materials for national defense. Although the materials production mission has ended, the facility continues to play an important role in the stabilization and safe disposition of proliferable nuclear materials. As part of the US HEU Disposition Program, SRS has been down blending off-specification (off-spec) HEU to produce LEU since 2003. Off-spec HEU contains fission products not amenable to meeting the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) commercial fuel standards prior to purification. This down blended HEU material produced 301 MT of ~5% enriched LEU which has been fabricated into light water reactor fuel being utilized in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors in Tennessee and Alabama producing economic power. There is still in excess of ~10 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for beneficial use as either ~5% enriched LEU, or for use in subsequent LEU reactors requiring ~19.75% enriched LEU fuel.

  14. EA-189 PanCanadian Energy Services Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E TDrewFindingMitigationEA-189 PanCanadian Energy

  15. EA-189 PanCanadian Energy Services Inc | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-Wide ConstellationORder authorizing PanCanadian

  16. NMOG Emissions Characterization and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sluder, Scott [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

  17. NMOG Emissions Characterizations and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sluder, Scott [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

  18. Low-Temperature Biodiesel Research Reveals Potential Key to Successful Blend Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relatively low-cost solutions could improve reliability while making biodiesel blends an affordable option. While biodiesel has very low production costs and the potential to displace up to 10% of petroleum diesel, until now, issues with cold weather performance have prevented biodiesel blends from being widely adopted. Some biodiesel blends have exhibited unexplained low-temperature performance problems even at blend levels as low as 2% by volume. The most common low-temperature performance issue is vehicle stalling caused by fuel filter clogging, which prevents fuel from reaching the engine. Research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reveals the properties responsible for these problems, clearing a path for the development of solutions and expanded use of energy-conserving and low-emissions alternative fuel. NREL researchers set out to study the unpredictable nature of biodiesel crystallization, the condition that impedes the flow of fuel in cold weather. Their research revealed for the first time that saturated monoglyceride impurities common to the biodiesel manufacturing process create crystals that can cause fuel filter clogging and other problems when cooling at slow rates. Biodiesel low-temperature operational problems are commonly referred to as 'precipitates above the cloud point (CP).' NREL's Advanced Biofuels team spiked distilled soy and animal fat-derived B100, as well as B20, B10, and B5 biodiesel blends with three saturated monoglycerides (SMGs) at concentration levels comparable to those of real-world fuels. Above a threshold or eutectic concentration, the SMGs (monomyristin, monopalmitin, and monostearin) were shown to significantly raise the biodiesel CP, and had an even greater impact on the final melting temperature. Researchers discovered that upon cooling, monoglyceride initially precipitates as a metastable crystal, but it transforms over time or upon slight heating into a more stable crystal with a much lower solubility and higher melting temperature - and with increased potential to cause vehicle performance issues. This explains why fuel-filter clogging typically occurs over the course of long, repeated diurnal cooling cycles. The elevated final melting points mean that restarting vehicles with clogged filters can be difficult even after ambient temperatures have warmed to well above CP. By examining how biodiesel impurities affect filtration and crystallization during warming and cooling cycles, NREL researchers uncovered an explanation for poor biodiesel performance at low temperatures. The observation of a eutectic point, or a concentration below which SMGs have no effect, indicates that SMGs do not have to be completely removed from biodiesel to solve low-temperature performance problems.

  19. Computation of a Canadian SCWR unit cell with deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrisson, G.; Marleau, G. [Inst. of Nuclear Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian SCWR has the potential to achieve the goals that the generation IV nuclear reactors must meet. As part of the optimization process for this design concept, lattice cell calculations are routinely performed using deterministic codes. In this study, the first step (self-shielding treatment) of the computation scheme developed with the deterministic code DRAGON for the Canadian SCWR has been validated. Some options available in the module responsible for the resonance self-shielding calculation in DRAGON 3.06 and different microscopic cross section libraries based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluated nuclear data file have been tested and compared to a reference calculation performed with the Monte Carlo code SERPENT under the same conditions. Compared to SERPENT, DRAGON underestimates the infinite multiplication factor in all cases. In general, the original Stammler model with the Livolant-Jeanpierre approximations are the most appropriate self-shielding options to use in this case of study. In addition, the 89 groups WIMS-AECL library for slight enriched uranium and the 172 groups WLUP library for a mixture of plutonium and thorium give the most consistent results with those of SERPENT. (authors)

  20. Trends in the draft and extent of seasonal pack ice, Canadian Beaufort Humfrey Melling and David A. Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gedalof, Ze'ev

    Trends in the draft and extent of seasonal pack ice, Canadian Beaufort Sea Humfrey Melling] Continuous observations by sub-sea sonar form a 12-year draft record for seasonal pack ice in the Beaufort of warming climate on seasonal pack ice. Citation: Melling, H., D. A. Riedel, and Z. Gedalof (2005), Trends

  1. 794 The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 82, August 2004 Rate of Bitumen Film Transfer from a Quartz Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

    794 The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 82, August 2004 Rate of Bitumen Film be addressed. E-mail address: jdmiller@mines.utah.edu The rate of bitumen transfer from a bitumen-coated quartz bitumen spreading, a bulk layer followed the formation of thin bitumen films (precursor films). The bulk

  2. All Other Retired Employees Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer. Great-West Life's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to you and your family. The Plan is underwritten by #12;Protecting Your Personal Information At Great as life, disability and critical illness insurance for individuals and families. As a leading providerAll Other Retired Employees #12;Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer

  3. Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 -June 1962: Temperature, salinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    1 Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 and silicate) were measured at five depths (2, 10, 25, 50 and 80 m) beneath the ice through the winter of 1961 the north side of the sound off Grise Fiord, Ellesmere Island, on 13 May 1962 and 12 May 1969. The over-winter

  4. Technical Issues Associated With the Use of Intermediate Ethanol Blends (>E10) in the U.S. Legacy Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, Bechtold [Alliance Technical Services; Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Timbario, Tom [Alliance Technical Services; Goodman, Marc [Alliance Technical Services

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in assessing the impact of using intermediate ethanol blends (E10 to E30) in the legacy fleet of vehicles in the U.S. fleet. The purpose of this report is to: (1) identify the issues associated with intermediate ethanol blends with an emphasis on the end-use or vehicle impacts of increased ethanol levels; (2) assess the likely severity of the issues and whether they will become more severe with higher ethanol blend levels, or identify where the issue is most severe; (3) identify where gaps in knowledge exist and what might be required to fill those knowledge gaps; and (4) compile a current and complete bibliography of key references on intermediate ethanol blends. This effort is chiefly a critical review and assessment of available studies. Subject matter experts (authors and selected expert contacts) were consulted to help with interpretation and assessment. The scope of this report is limited to technical issues. Additional issues associated with consumer, vehicle manufacturer, and regulatory acceptance of ethanol blends greater than E10 are not considered. The key findings from this study are given.

  5. Numerical study of the effect of oxygenated blending compounds on soot formation in shock tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, H. [Physikalische Chemie I, Universitaet Bielefeld (Germany); Braun-Unkhoff, M. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This numerical study deals with the influence of blends on the amount of soot formed in shock tubes, which were simulated by assuming a homogeneous plug flow reactor model. For this purpose, first, the reaction model used here was validated against experimental results previously obtained in the literature. Then, the soot volume fractions of various mixtures of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-benzene, isobutene-benzene, methanol-benzene, and ethanol-benzene diluted in argon were simulated and compared to the results of benzene-argon pyrolysis at 1721 K and 5.4 MPa. For MTBE, isobutene, methanol, and ethanol, small amounts of additives to benzene-argon mixtures promoted soot formation, for the shock tube model assumed, while higher concentrations of these additives led to smaller soot volume fractions in comparison to pure benzene-argon pyrolysis. The most significant soot promotion effect was found for the additives MTBE and isobutene. The channel for MTBE decomposition producing isobutene and methanol is very effective at temperatures beyond 1200 K. Thus, both MTBE-benzene and isobutene-benzene mixtures diluted in argon showed rather similar behavior in regard to soot formation. Special emphasis was directed toward the causes for the concentration-dependent influence of the blends on the amount of soot formed. Aromatic hydrocarbons and acetylene were identified as key gas-phase species that determine the trends in the formation of soot of various mixtures. From reaction flux analysis for phenanthrene, it was deduced that the combinative routes including phenyl species play a major role in forming PAHs, especially at early reaction times. It is found that the additives play an important role in providing material to grow side chains, such as by reaction channels including phenylacetylene or benzyl, which are confirmed to form aromatic hydrocarbons and thus to influence the amount of soot formed, particularly when the concentrations of the blends are increased. (author)

  6. Correlation between speciated hydrocarbon emissions and flame ionization detector response for gasoline/alcohol blends .

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallner, T. (Energy Systems)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. renewable fuel standard has made it a requirement to increase the production of ethanol and advanced biofuels to 36 billion by 2022. Ethanol will be capped at 15 billion, which leaves 21 billion to come from other sources such as butanol. Butanol has a higher energy density and lower affinity for water than ethanol. Moreover, alcohol fueled engines in general have been shown to positively affect engine-out emissions of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide compared with their gasoline fueled counterparts. In light of these developments, the variety and blend levels of oxygenated constituents is likely to increase in the foreseeable future. The effect on engine-out emissions for total hydrocarbons is less clear due to the relative insensitivity of the flame ionization detector (FID) toward alcohols and aldehydes. It is well documented that hydrocarbon (HC) measurement using a conventional FID in the presence of oxygenates in the engine exhaust stream can lead to a misinterpretation of HC emissions trends for alcohol fuel blends. Characterization of the exhaust stream for all expected hydrocarbon constituents is required to accurately determine the actual concentration of unburned fuel components in the exhaust. In addition to a conventional exhaust emissions bench, this characterization requires supplementary instrumentation capable of hydrocarbon speciation and response factor independent quantification. Although required for certification testing, this sort of instrumentation is not yet widely available in engine development facilities. Therefore, an attempt is made to empirically determine FID correction factors for oxygenate fuels. Exhaust emissions of an engine fueled with several blends of gasoline and ethanol, n-butanol and iso-Butanol were characterized using both a conventional FID and a Fourier transform infrared. Based on these results, a response factor predicting the actual hydrocarbon emissions based solely on FID results as a function of alcohol type and content is presented. Finally, the correlation derived from data presented in this study is compared with equations and results found in the literature.

  7. ETBE as a gasoline blending component. The experience of Elf Aquitaine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatin, L.; Fombarlet, C.; Bernasconi, C.; Gauthier, A.; Schmelzle, P.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, led by Elf Aquitaine for several years, shows the possibility to use ETBE instead of MTBE as a gasoline component and compares properties of these two ethers regarding different parameters like octanes, volatility, engine cleanliness, stability of the ethers themselves and of gasoline blends, lubricant compatibility and toxicological data. ETBE appears at least as good as MTBE and sometimes better, as ETBE is chemically more similar to hydrocarbons than MTBE and can be used advantageously as a gasoline oxygenated component. 9 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Exhaust particle characterization for lean and stoichiometric DI vehicles operating on ethanol-gasoline blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL] [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet the U.S. fuel economy standards for 2016. Furthermore, lean-burn GDI engines can offer even higher fuel economy than stoichiometric GDI engines and have overcome challenges associated with cost-effective aftertreatment for NOx control. Along with changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the current 10% due to the recent EPA waiver allowing 15% ethanol. In addition, the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the use of biofuels in upcoming years. GDI engines are of environmental concern due to their high particulate matter (PM) emissions relative to port-fuel injected (PFI) gasoline vehicles; widespread market penetration of GDI vehicles may result in additional PM from mobile sources at a time when the diesel contribution is declining. In this study, we characterized particulate emissions from a European certified lean-burn GDI vehicle operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. Particle mass and particle number concentration emissions were measured for the Federal Test Procedure urban driving cycle (FTP 75) and the more aggressive US06 driving cycle. Particle number-size distributions and organic to elemental carbon ratios (OC/EC) were measured for 30 MPH and 80 MPH steady-state operation. In addition, particle number concentration was measured during wide open throttle accelerations (WOTs) and gradual accelerations representative of the FTP 75. Fuels included certification gasoline and 10% (E10) and 20% (E20) ethanol blends from the same supplier. The particle mass emissions were approximately 3 and 7 mg/mile for the FTP75 and US06, respectively, with lower emissions for the ethanol blends. The data are compared to a previous study on a U.S.-legal stoichiometric GDI vehicle operating on the same ethanol blends. The lean-burn GDI vehicle emitted a higher number of particles, but had an overall smaller average size. Particle number per mile decreased with increasing ethanol content for the transient tests. For the 30 and 80 mph tests, particle number concentration decreased with increasing ethanol content, although the shape of the particle size distribution remained the same. Engine-out OC/EC ratios were highest for the stoichiometric GDI vehicle with E20, but tailpipe OC/EC ratios were similar for all vehicles.

  9. Powertrain Component Inspection from Mid-Level Blends Vehicle Aging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoffner, Brent [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio; Johnson, Ryan [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio; Heimrich, Martin J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio; Lochte, Michael [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 calls on the nation to significantly increase its use of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law expands the renewable fuel standard to require use of 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel by 2022. Given that ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the U.S. market, ethanol will likely make up a significant portion of the 36-billion-gallon requirement. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10-gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85 - a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). Consumption of E85 is at present limited by both the size of the FFV fleet and the number of E85 fueling stations. Gasoline consumption in the United States is currently about 140 billion gallons per year; thus the maximum use of ethanol as E10 is only about 14 billion gallons. While the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market represented less than 1% of the ethanol consumed in 2010 and will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Because of these factors, DOE and others have been assessing the viability of using mid-level ethanol blends (E15 or E20) as a way to accommodate growing volumes of ethanol. The DOE Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program has been under way since 2007, supported jointly by the Office of the Biomass Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program. One of the larger projects, the Catalyst Durability Study, or Vehicle Aging Study, will be completed early in calendar year 2011. The following report describes a subproject of the Vehicle Aging Study in which powertrain components from 18 of the vehicles were examined at Southwest Research Institute under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  10. The Use of Triangular-Shaped PV Arrays to Better Blend into Historical Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When considering the installation of a solar PV array on a designated historical structure, placement of each solar panel requires extra attention to aesthetic considerations. If the solar array cannot be installed behind the structure or “hidden” on a roof plane that is not visible from the public street or sidewalk, it can sometimes be installed as an architectural feature that blends into the historical structure. One way to do this is to utilize triangular-shaped PV panels that conform with the building’s roof lines.

  11. Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc.

  12. Canadian seismic agreement. Technical report covering, 1979-1985. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basham, P.W.; Lyons, J.A.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Andersen, F.; Hayman, R.B.; Wetmiller, R.J.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report provides a comprehensive summary of the activities of the Earth Physics Branch (EPB) in eastern Canada, particularly with respect to the Eastern Canadian Telemetered Network (ECTN). The report describes the seismographic system developed by EPB to monitor the regional seismicity. There are detailed descriptions of the logic used to select the various physical components of the system, the hardware and software that constitute the recording system, and the data flow from detection to archive. In addition to the engineering details, there is a discusssion of the scientific results from the analysis of the regional seismicity during the reporting period. Particular emphasis has been placed on the Miramichi, New Brunswick earthquakes of January 1982. 35 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Canadian seismic agreement. Annual report, 1 July 1981 to 30 June 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, J.A.; Wetmiller, R.J.; Andersen, F.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Hayman, R.B.; Basham, P.W.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities undertaken by the Earth Physics Branch (EPB) during the past year are described. Data concentrators were established at Hauterive and Riviere-du-Loup in Quebec and St. John in New Brunswick to handle new stations in eastern Quebec and the Maritimes. Six new stations have been installed at Hauterive and Grosses-Roches, Quebec and Edmunston, Caledonia Mountain, St. George and Mount McKendrick, New Brunswick. Network developments are outlined. A more sophisticated version of the multiplexing outstation software developed under contract and currently being tested is outlined. Version 1 of the Seismic Analysis Monitor (SAM) software package (formerly DISDAP) has just gone into production. A summary of the performance of ECTN over the past year is given. A summary of eastern Canadian seismicity during the reporting period is included.

  14. Energy policy modeling: United States and Canadian experiences. Volume II. Integrative energy policy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemba, W.T.; Schwartz, S.L. (eds.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Energy Policy Modeling Conference, held in North Vancouver, May 18-20, 1978, was organized to assess the state of the art in energy modeling in North America. A major aim of the conference was to determine the extent to which energy modeling had and could make a contribution to the energy-policy decision-making process. Two volumes contain revised and updated versions of the major papers presented at the conference plus edited transcripts of the panel discussions and several additional papers aimed at particular topics deemed worthy of further study. For this volume, Vol. II, a separate abstract was prepared for each of 17 papers, 2 panel discussions, and three session-introduction commentaries for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 7 abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  15. MegaPipe: the MegaCam image stacking pipeline at the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen. D. J. Gwyn

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the MegaPipe image processing pipeline at the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre. The pipeline combines multiple images from the MegaCam mosaic camera on CFHT and combines them into a single output image. MegaPipe takes as input detrended MegaCam images and does a careful astrometric and photometric calibration on them. The calibrated images are then resampled and combined into image stacks. The astrometric calibration of the output images is accurate to within 0.15 arcseconds relative to external reference frames and 0.04 arcseconds internally. The photometric calibration is good to within 0.03 magnitudes. The stacked images and catalogues derived from these images are available through the CADC website:

  16. Mass measurements near the $r$-process path using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Van Schelt; D. Lascar; G. Savard; J. A. Clark; S. Caldwell; A. Chaudhuri; J. Fallis; J. P. Greene; A. F. Levand; G. Li; K. S. Sharma; M. G. Sternberg; T. Sun; B. J. Zabransky

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of 40 neutron-rich nuclides from Z = 51 to 64 were measured at an average precision of $\\delta m/m= 10^{-7}$ using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer at Argonne National Laboratory. The measurements, of fission fragments from a $^{252}$Cf spontaneous fission source in a helium gas catcher, approach the predicted path of the astrophysical $r$ process. Where overlap exists, this data set is largely consistent with previous measurements from Penning traps, storage rings, and reaction energetics, but large systematic deviations are apparent in $\\beta$-endpoint measurements. Differences in mass excess from the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation of up to 400 keV are seen, as well as systematic disagreement with various mass models.

  17. Fixed Bed Countercurrent Low Temperature Gasification of Dairy Biomass and Coal-Dairy Biomass Blends Using Air-Steam as Oxidizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordillo Ariza, Gerardo

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    W) countercurrent fixed bed gasifier was rebuilt to perform gasification studies under quasisteady state conditions using dairy biomass (DB) as feedstock and various air-steam mixtures as oxidizing sources. A DB-ash (from DB) blend and a DB-Wyoming coal blend were...

  18. Fuel-Cycle energy and emission impacts of ethanol-diesel blends in urban buses and farming tractors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Lee, H.

    2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    About 2.1 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was used in the United States in 2002, mainly in the form of gasoline blends containing up to 10% ethanol (E10). Ethanol use has the potential to increase in the U.S. blended gasoline market because methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), formerly the most popular oxygenate blendstock, may be phased out owing to concerns about MTBE contamination of the water supply. Ethanol would remain the only viable near-term option as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline production and to meet a potential federal renewable fuels standard (RFS) for transportation fuels. Ethanol may also be blended with additives (co-solvents) into diesel fuels for applications in which oxygenation may improve diesel engine emission performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark-ignition engine vehicles (see Wang et al. 1997; Wang et al. 1999; Levelton Engineering et al. 1999; Shapouri et al. 2002; Graboski 2002). Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of ethanol-diesel (E-diesel or ED) blends relative to those of petroleum diesel fuel in diesel engine vehicles. The energy and emission effects of E-diesel could be very different from those of ethanol-gasoline blends because (1) the energy use and emissions generated during diesel production (so-called ''upstream'' effects) are different from those generated during gasoline production; and (2) the energy and emission performance of E-diesel and petroleum diesel fuel in diesel compression-ignition engines differs from that of ethanol-gasoline blends in spark-ignition (Otto-cycle-type) engine vehicles. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a full fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and emission effects of E-diesel blends relative to those of petroleum diesel when used in the types of diesel engines that will likely be targeted first in the marketplace. This report documents the results of our study. The draft report was delivered to DCCA in January 2003. This final report incorporates revisions by the sponsor and by Argonne.

  19. Effect of Blending on High-Pressure Laminar Flame Speed Measurements, Markstein Lengths, and Flame Stability of Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowry, William Baugh

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hydrocarbon blends of methane, ethane, and propane make up a large portion of natural gas and it has been shown that dimethyl ether can be used as a supplement or in its pure form for gas turbine combustion. Because of this, a fundamental understanding... include the flame speeds for binary blends of methane, ethane, propane, and dimethyl ether performed at elevated pressures, up to 10-atm initial pressure, using a spherically expanding flame in a constant-volume vessel. Also included in this thesis is a...

  20. Transition between wurtzite and zinc-blende GaN: An effect of deposition condition of molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, B. M.; Xie, M. H.; Wu, H. S.; Wang, N.; Tong, S. Y. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tang, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN exists in both wurtzite and zinc-blende phases and the growths of the two on its (0001) or (111) surfaces are achieved by choosing proper deposition conditions of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). At low substrate temperatures but high gallium fluxes, metastable zinc-blende GaN films are obtained, whereas at high temperatures and/or using high nitrogen fluxes, equilibrium wurtzite phase GaN epilayers resulted. This dependence of crystal structure on substrate temperature and source flux is not affected by deposition rate. Rather, the initial stage nucleation kinetics plays a primary role in determining the crystallographic structures of epitaxial GaN by MBE.

  1. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Neubauer, Jürgen [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  2. Experimental investigation of burning rates of pure ethanol and ethanol blended fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parag, Shintre; Raghavan, Vasudevan [Thermodynamics and Combustion Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu, 600036 (India)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental experimental study to determine the burning rates of ethanol and ethanol-blended fossil fuels is presented. Pure liquid ethanol or its blends with liquid fossil fuels such as gasoline or diesel, has been transpired to the surface a porous sphere using an infusion pump. Burning of the fuel takes place on the surface of the porous sphere, which is placed in an air stream blowing upwards with a uniform velocity at atmospheric pressure and temperature under normal gravity conditions. At low air velocities, when ignited, a flame envelopes the sphere. For each sphere size, air stream velocity and fuel type, the fuel feed rate will vary and the same is recorded as the burning rate for that configuration. The flame stand-off distances from the sphere surface are measured by post-processing the digital image of the flame photograph using suitable imaging software. The transition velocity at which the flame moves and establishes itself at the wake region of the sphere has been determined for different diameters and fuel types. Correlations of these parameters are also presented. (author)

  3. Exploiting Photo-induced Reactions in Polymer Blends to Create Hierarchically Ordered, Defect-free Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balazs, Anna (U of Pittsburgh) [U of Pittsburgh

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations reveal how photo-induced chemical reactions can be exploited to create long-range order in binary and ternary polymeric materials. The process is initiated by shining a spatially uniform light over a photosensitive AB binary blend, which undergoes both a reversible chemical reaction and phase separation. We then introduce a well-collimated, higher-intensity light source. Rastering this secondary light over the sample locally increases the reaction rate and causes formation of defect-free, spatially periodic structures. These binary structures resemble either the lamellar or hexagonal phases of microphase-separated di-block copolymers. We measure the regularity of the ordered structures as a function of the relative reaction rates for different values of the rastering speed and determine the optimal conditions for creating defect-free structures in the binary systems. We then add a non-reactive homo-polymer C, which is immiscible with both A and B. We show that this component migrates to regions that are illuminated by the secondary, higher-intensity light, allowing us to effectively write a pattern of C onto the AB film. Rastering over the ternary blend with this collimated light now leads to hierarchically ordered patterns of A, B, and C. The findings point to a facile, non-intrusive process for manufacturing high-quality polymeric devices in a low-cost, efficient manner.

  4. 95 Production and Testing of Coconut Oil Biodiesel Fuel and its Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oguntola J Alamu; Opeoluwa Dehinbo; Adedoyin M Sulaiman; Oguntola J. Alamu; Opeoluwa Dehinbo; Adedoyin M. Sulaiman

    Many researchers have successfully worked on generating energy from different alternative sources including solar and biological sources such as the conversion of trapped energy from sunlight to electricity and conversion of some renewable agricultural products to fuel. This work considers the use of coconut oil for the production of alternative renewable and environmental friendly biodiesel fuel as an alternative to conventional diesel fuel. Test quantities of coconut oil biodiesel were produced through transesterification reaction using 100g coconut oil, 20.0 % ethanol (wt % coconut oil), 0.8% potassium hydroxide catalyst at 65°C reaction temperature and 120 min. reaction time. The experiment was carried out three times and average results evaluated. Low yield of the biodiesel (10.4%) was obtained. The coconut oil biodiesel produced was subsequently blended with petroleum diesel and characterized as alternative diesel fuel through some ASTM standard fuel tests. The products were further evaluated by comparing specific gravity and viscosity of the biodiesel blend, the raw coconut oil and conventional petroleum diesel.

  5. 2012-13 Report on the Indirect Costs of Research Program Since 2003 the Federal Indirect Costs of Research Program provides Canadian universities with annual funding to help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    2012-13 Report on the Indirect Costs of Research Program Since 2003 the Federal Indirect Costs of Research Program provides Canadian universities with annual funding to help pay for a portion of the hidden or "indirect" costs

  6. Small-angle scattering investigations of poly([epsilon]-caprolactone)/polycarbonate blends -- 2: Small-angle X-ray and light scattering study of semicrystalline/semicrystalline and semicrystalline/amorphous blend morphologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y.W.; Stein, R.S. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering); Lin, J.S.; Wignall, G.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline morphologies of poly([epsilon]-caprolactone) (PCL) and polycarbonate (PC) blends were probed with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle light scattering (SALS). Quantitative SAXS analysis suggested that random mixing of PCL and PC lamellae occurred in the semicrystalline/semicrystalline state. Two distinct regions of incorporation were identified in the semicrystalline/amorphous state. It was found that PCL was rejected from the PC interlamellar region in the PCL-rich blends. In contrast, PCL was incorporated into the amorphous phase between the crystalline lamellae in the PC-rich blends. This transition from interlamellar exclusion to interlamellar inclusion may be related to the glass transition temperatures or the mobility of the blends. It is proposed that the mode of incorporation or exclusion is governed by the competition between entropy and diffusion. Additionally, SALS coupled with optical microscopy indicated that PC is an effective nucleating agent for PCL crystallization as manifested by the reduction of PCL spherulitic size with the addition of PC.

  7. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  8. Excitonic properties of strained wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNAlxGa1xN quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    Excitonic properties of strained wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNÕAlxGa1ÀxN quantum dots Vladimir A 2003 We investigate exciton states theoretically in strained GaN/AlN quantum dots with wurtzite WZ of GaN QDs.1­8 Molecu- lar beam epitaxial growth in the Stranski­Krastanov mode of wurtzite WZ Ga

  9. Optical properties of wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNAlN quantum dots Vladimir A. Fonoberova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    Optical properties of wurtzite and zinc-blende GaNÕAlN quantum dots Vladimir A. Fonoberova; published 20 August 2004 We investigate theoretically and compare optical properties of wurtzite and zincN/AlN interface governs optical properties of wurtzite quantum dots while having a small effect on zinc

  10. Excitonic complexes in single zinc-blende GaN/AlN quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    -assembled wurtzite GaN QDs1 and up to 300 K in site-controlled wurtzite nanowire QDs.2 Less mature than their wurtzite counterparts, single self-assembled zinc- blende (ZB) GaN QDs already show good prospects in terms to 100 K.5 They even present several advantages over self-assembled wurtzite GaN QDs: shorter radiative

  11. Universality of electron accumulation at wurtzite c-and a-plane and zinc-blende InN surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    Universality of electron accumulation at wurtzite c- and a-plane and zinc- blende InN surfaces P. D 27 August 2007 Electron accumulation is found to occur at the surface of wurtzite 112¯0 , 0001.6 Experimental studies to date have focused on wurtzite c-plane surfaces,1­3,7 although pre- vious

  12. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ethanol/gasoline blends over a silver/alumina catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL] [ORNL; Fisher, Galen [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean gasoline engines running on ethanol/gasoline blends and equipped with a silver/alumina catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ethanol provide a pathway to reduced petroleum consumption through both increased biofuel utilization and improved engine efficiency relative to the current stoichiometric gasoline engines that dominate the U.S. light duty vehicle fleet. A pre-commercial silver/alumina catalyst demonstrated high NOx conversions over a moderate temperature window with both neat ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends containing at least 50% ethanol. Selectivity to NH3 increases with HC dosing and ethanol content in gasoline blends, but appears to saturate at around 45%. NO2 and acetaldehyde behave like intermediates in the ethanol SCR of NO. NH3 SCR of NOx does not appear to play a major role in the ethanol SCR reaction mechanism. Ethanol is responsible for the low temperature SCR activity observed with the ethanol/gasoline blends. The gasoline HCs do not deactivate the catalyst ethanol SCR activity, but they also do not appear to be significantly activated by the presence of ethanol.

  13. Modeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels: Effect of ethanol content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Modeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels: Effect of ethanol content on the lifespan and maximum length of benzene plumes Diego E. Gomez1 and Pedro 10 March 2009. [1] A numerical model was used to evaluate how the concentration of ethanol

  14. Physical and chemical characteristics of an interesterified blend of butterfat and cottonseed oil with possible industrial applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashidi, Nabil

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interest in milkfat research in other parts of the world. In 1984, a symposium was held in Sweden that dealt exclusively with milkfat and its modification. Emphasis was placed on milkfat-vegetable oil blends. These products are legally sold now in some...

  15. Susceptibility of Aluminum Alloys to Corrosion in Simulated Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined was accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  16. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

  17. Comparison of Simulated and Experimental Combustion of Biodiesel Blends in a Single Cylinder Diesel HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of biodiesel content on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine performance has been investigated both experimentally and by computer simulation. Combustion experiments were performed in a single cylinder HCCI engine using blends of soy biodiesel in ultra low sulfur diesel, with concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 vol% and equivalence ratios ( ) from 0.38 to 0.48. Data from the engine tests included combustion analysis and exhaust composition analysis with standard gaseous emissions equipment. The engine utilized a custom port fuel injection strategy to provide highly premixed charges of fuel and air, making it possible to compare the results with single zone chemical kinetics simulations that were performed using CHEMKIN III, with a reaction set including 670 species and over 3000 reactions. The reaction mechanism incorporated equations for the combustion of a paraffinic fuel, n-heptane, and an oxygenated component, methyl butanoate, as well as reactions for the formation of NOx. The zero-dimensional model did a reasonably good job of predicting the HCCI combustion event, correctly predicting intake temperature effects on the phasing of both low temperature heat release (LTHR) and the main combustion event. It also did a good job of predicting the magnitude of LTHR. Differences between the simulation and experimental data included the dependence on biodiesel concentration and the duration of both LTHR and the main combustion event. The probable reasons for these differences are the changing derived cetane number (DCN) of the model fuel blend with biodiesel concentration, and the inability of the model to account for stratification of temperature and . The simulation also showed that concentrations of intermediate species produced during LTHR are dependent on the magnitude of LTHR, but otherwise the addition of biodiesel has no discernable effect.

  18. Inventory of current environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C.S.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Chapman, E.G.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of a study commissioned to survey and summarize major environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region. Projects with field sites located within 400 km (250 mi) of the border and active after 1980 were reviewed. The types of projects included: ambient air-quality monitoring, ambient water-quality monitoring, deposition monitoring, forest/vegetation monitoring and research, soil studies, and ecosystem studies. Ecosystem studies included projects involving the measurement of parameters from more than one monitoring category (e.g., studies that measured both water and soil chemistry). Individual descriptions were formulated for 184 projects meeting the spatial and temporal criteria. Descriptions included the official title for the project, its common abbreviation, program emphasis, monitoring site locations, time period conducted, parameters measured, protocols employed, frequency of sample collection, data storage information, and the principal contact for the project. A summary inventory subdivided according to the six monitoring categories was prepared using a computerized data management system. Information on major centralized data bases in the field of environmental monitoring was also obtained, and summary descriptions were prepared. The inventory and data base descriptions are presented in appendices to this document.

  19. Energy policy modeling: United States and Canadian experiences. Volume I. Specialized energy policy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemba, W.T.; Schwartz, S.L.; Koenigsberg, E. (eds.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Energy Policy Modeling Conference held in North Vancouver, May 18-20, 1978, was organized to assess the state of the art in energy modeling in North America. A major aim of the conference was to determine the extent to which energy modeling had and could make a contribution to the energy-policy decision-making process. Two volumes contain revised and updated versions of the major papers presented at the conference plus edited transcripts of the panel discussions and several additional papers aimed at particular topics deemed worthy of further study. This volume, Vol. I, is concerned with specialized models and contains the following sections: (a) Energy Demand Modeling (7 papers); (b) Energy Supply Modeling (5 papers); (c) Coal and Transportation Modeling (6 papers); and (d) Problems and Interactions of Energy, Environment, and Conservation (4 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 22 papers for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 5 abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  20. Varve deposition and the sediment yield record at three small lakes of the southern Canadian Cordillera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desloges, J.R. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lacustrine sediments deposited in three small glacier-fed lakes of the southern Canadian Cordillera are derived primarily from subglacial erosion and delivered via short proglacial streams or by direct melting and calving of cirque glaciers. Sediment transport and deposition during early summer is controlled by runoff-generated bottom currents and in the late summer through winter by settling from suspension. This forms distinct rhythmic laminations of silt and clay in distal lake areas. Cesium-137 content in all three lakes indicates that these are varve sediments. Time series of varve thickness covering the interval 1863 to present show distinct declines in sediment yield from 310 to less than 150 t km[sup [minus]2] a[sup [minus]1]. The decline is related to sediment exhaustion following glacier retreat from Little Ice Age maxima and the opening of intervening sediment storage sites. Annual varve thickness is significantly related to fluctuations in summer or late summer temperature highlighting the importance of ice ablation, melt-water runoff, and subglacial sediment sources in controlling deposition rates. Singular climate events, such as autumn storms provide distinctive sedimentary signatures in the varve record. Reconstructed sediment yield for the Little Ice Age is as much as 100% greater than the average Holocene rate. 39 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Brown snow: A long-range transport event in the Canadian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, H.E.; Muir, D.C.G.; Billeck, B.N.; Lockhart, W.L.; Brunskill, G.J.; Kling, H.J. (Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg (Canada)); Olson, M.P. (Atmospheric Environment Service, Downsview, Ontario (Canada)); Lemoine, R.M. (Hardy BBT Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors document the occurrence of a long-range transport event that deposited thousands of tons of fine particulates on the District of Keewatin, central Canadian Arctic, {approximately}63 N. Air mass trajectories, clay mineral composition, soot particles, and visible organic remains point to Asian sources for the brown snow material, probably western China. Semivolatile organic pollutants detected in the brown snow included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ({Sigma}PAH), PCB congeners, and DDT-related compounds ({Sigma}DDT), polychlorinated camphenes (PCCs), as well as the herbicide trifuluralin and insecticides methoxychlor, endosulfan, and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH). {Sigma}PAH, PCB, and PCC concentrations were within the range reported in other studies of Arctic snow but {Sigma}DDT levels were 2-10 times higher than previous reports. High molecular weight PAH may have been associated with soot particles in the brown snow but evidence for Asian sources of the pesticides was not strong because of unknown source signal strengths and possible atmospheric transformations of the compounds. Fluxes of these pollutants were also determined by analyzing sediment cores from two small headwater lakes near the sampling site. The quantities of pollutants deposited in this single event may have comprised a significant fraction (>10%) of total annual input {Sigma}PAH and {Sigma}DDT, as determined from lake sedimentation records.

  2. Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 1: Refrigerant Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark O. McLinden; Arno Laesecke; Eric W. Lemmon; Joseph W. Magee; Richard A. Perkins

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of measuring thermodynamic properties R125, R410A and R507A, measuring viscosity and thermal conductivity of R410A and R507A and comparing data to mixture models in NIST REFPROP database. For R125, isochoric (constant volume) heat capacity was measured over a temperature range of 305 to 397 K (32 to 124 C) at pressures up to 20 MPa. For R410A, isochoric heat capacity was measured along 8 isochores with a temperature range of 303 to 397 K (30 to 124 C) at pressures up to 18 MPa. Pressure-density-temperature was also measured along 14 isochores over a temperature range of 200 to 400 K (-73 to 127 C) at pressures up to 35 MPa and thermal conductivity along 6 isotherms over a temperature range of 301 to 404 K (28 to 131 C) with pressures to 38 MPa. For R507A, viscosity was measured along 5 isotherms over a temperature range of 301 to 421 K (28 to 148 C) at pressures up to 83 MPa and thermal conductivity along 6 isotherms over a temperature range of 301 to 404 K (28 to 131 C) with pressures to 38 MPa. Mixture models were developed to calculate the thermodynamic properties of HFC refrigerant mixtures containing R32, R125, R134a and/or R125. The form of the model is the same for all the blends considered, but blend-specific mixing functions are required for the blends R32/125 (R410 blends) and R32/134a (a constituent binary of R407 blends). The systems R125/134a, R125/143a, R134a/143a, and R134a/152a share a common, generalized mixing function. The new equation of state for R125 is believed to be the most accurate and comprehensive formulation of the properties for that fluid. Likewise, the mixture model developed in this work is the latest state-of-the-art for thermodynamic properties of HFC refrigerant blends. These models were incorporated into version 7 of NIST REFPROP database.

  3. Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002--September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Toro, A.; Frailey, M.; Lynch, F.; Munshi, S.; Wayne, S.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report covers literature and laboratory analyses to identify modification requirements of a Cummins Westport B Gas Plus engine for transit buses using a hydrogen/compressed natural fuel blend.

  4. Valence band density of states of zinc-blende and wurtzite InN from x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    Valence band density of states of zinc-blende and wurtzite InN from x-ray photoemission for wurtzite InN 112¯0 are shown to yield a VB-DOS similar to that of zinc-blende InN, although the nonzero the thermodynamically stable phase is the wurtzite 2H polymorph4 wz-InN , judicious choice of substrate material

  5. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF BLENDING RESIDUAL SOLIDS FROM TANKS 18/19 MOUNDS WITH TANK 7 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R; Erich Hansen, E; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    High level waste tanks 18F and 19F have residual mounds of waste which may require removal before the tanks can be closed. Conventional slurry pump technology, previously used for waste removal and tank cleaning, has been incapable of removing theses mounds from tanks 18F and 19F. A mechanical cleaning method has been identified that is potentially capable of removing and transferring the mound material to tank 7F for incorporation in a sludge batch for eventual disposal in high level waste glass by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been requested to evaluate whether the material transferred from tanks 18F/19F by the mechanical cleaning technology can later be suspended in Tank 7F by conventional slurry pumps after mixing with high level waste sludge. The proposed mechanical cleaning process for removing the waste mounds from tanks 18 and 19 may utilize a high pressure water jet-eductor that creates a vacuum to mobilize solids. The high pressure jet is also used to transport the suspended solids. The jet-eductor system will be mounted on a mechanical crawler for movement around the bottom of tanks 18 and 19. Based on physical chemical property testing of the jet-eductor system processed IE-95 zeolite and size-reduced IE-95 zeolite, the following conclusions were made: (1) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite has a mean and median particle size (volume basis) of 115.4 and 43.3 microns in water. Preferential settling of these large particles is likely. (2) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite rapidly generates settled solid yield stresses in excess of 11,000 Pascals in caustic supernates and will not be easily retrieved from Tank 7 with the existing slurry pump technology. (3) Settled size-reduced IE-95 zeolite (less than 38 microns) in caustic supernate does not generate yield stresses in excess of 600 Pascals in less than 30 days. (4) Preferential settling of size-reduced zeolite is a function of the amount of sludge and the level of dilution for the mixture. (5) Blending the size-reduced zeolite into larger quantities of sludge can reduce the amount of preferential settling. (6) Periodic dilution or resuspension due to sludge washing or other mixing requirements will increase the chances of preferential settling of the zeolite solids. (7) Mixtures of Purex sludge and size-reduced zeolite did not produce yield stresses greater than 200 Pascals for settling times less than thirty days. Most of the sludge-zeolite blends did not exceed 50 Pascals. These mixtures should be removable by current pump technology if sufficient velocities can be obtained. (8) The settling rate of the sludge-zeolite mixtures is a function of the ionic strength (or supernate density) and the zeolite- sludge mixing ratio. (9) Simulant tests indicate that leaching of Si may be an issue for the processed Tank 19 mound material. (10) Floating zeolite fines observed in water for the jet-eductor system and size-reduced zeolite were not observed when the size-reduced zeolite was blended with caustic solutions, indicating that the caustic solutions cause the fines to agglomerate. Based on the test programs described in this report, the potential for successfully removing Tank 18/19 mound material from Tank 7 with the current slurry pump technology requires the reduction of the particle size of the Tank 18/19 mound material.

  6. Effect of simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cell blended with organic salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabri, Nasehah Syamin; Yap, Chi Chin; Yahaya, Muhammad [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the influence of simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment on the performance of organic solar cell blended with organic salt. The organic solar cells were composed of indium tin oxide as anode, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene]: (6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester: tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate blend as organic active layer and aluminium as cathode. The devices underwent a simultaneous fixed-voltage electrical and thermal treatment at different temperatures of 25, 50 and 75 °C. It was found that photovoltaic performance improved with the thermal treatment temperature. Accumulation of more organic salt ions in the active layer leads to broadening of p-n doped regions and hence higher built-in electric field across thin intrinsic layer. The simultaneous electrical and thermal treatment has been shown to be able to reduce the electrical treatment voltage.

  7. Photo-response of a P3HT:PCBM blend in metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devynck, M.; Rostirolla, B.; Watson, C. P.; Taylor, D. M., E-mail: d.m.taylor@bangor.ac.uk [School of Electronic Engineering, Bangor University, Dean Street, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 1UT (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors are investigated, in which the insulator is cross-linked polyvinylphenol and the active layer a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, and the electron acceptor [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Admittance spectra and capacitance-voltage measurements obtained in the dark both display similar behaviour to those previously observed in P3HT-only devices. However, the photo-capacitance response is significantly enhanced in the P3HT:PCBM case, where exciton dissociation leads to electron transfer into the PCBM component. The results are consistent with a network of PCBM aggregates that is continuous through the film but with no lateral interconnection between the aggregates at or near the blend/insulator interface.

  8. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Zinc-Blende FeN(111) on Wurtzite GaN(0001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Zinc-Blende FeN(111) on Wurtzite GaN(0001) Wenzhi Lin, Jeongihm], but not hexagonal (wurtzite) GaN, a fast-developing semiconductor material with important technological applicationsN on wurtzite GaN(0001), by employing e-beam evaporation in an ultra-high vacuum MBE cham- ber. The FeN films

  9. Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: Exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian Rural Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, B.R.; Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Jones, L.; Kearney, J.; Franklin, C.A. (Environmental Health Directorate, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities in areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV[sub 1.0]), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF[sub 25-75]), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V[sub 50]max). After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P < 0.01) mean decrements of 1.7% in FVC and 1.3% in FEV[sub 1.0] compared with Saskatchewan children, after adjusting for age, sex, weight, standing height, parental smoking, and gas cooking. There were no statistically significant regional differences in the pulmonary flow parameters (P > 0.05). 54 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  10. Respiratory health effects associated with ambient sulfates and ozone in two rural Canadian communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, B.; Jones, L.; Raizenne, M.; Burnett, R.; Meranger, J.C.; Franklin, C.A.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cross-sectional epidemiological study investigating the respiratory health of children in two Canadian communities was conducted in 1983-1984 in Tillsonburg, Ontario, located in a region of moderately elevated concentrations of transported air pollutants, and in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, situated in a low pollution area. There were no significant local sources of industrial emissions in either community. Seven hundred and thirty-five children aged 7-12 were studied in the first town and 895 in the second. Respiratory health was assessed by the measurement of the forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0) of each child, and by evaluation of the child's respiratory symptoms and illnesses using a parent-completed questionnaire. Sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfate, and particulate nitrate levels were significantly higher in Tillsonburg than in Portage la Prairie (P less than 0.05), but nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and inhalable particles (PM10) differed little between the communities. Historical data in the vicinity of Tillsonburg indicated that average annual levels of sulfates, total nitrates, and ozone (O3) did not vary markedly in the 9-year period preceding the study. The results show that Tillsonburg children had statistically significant (P less than 0.001) lower levels of 2% for FVC and 1.7% for FEV1.0 as compared with children in Portage la Prairie. These differences could not be explained by parental smoking or education, the use of gas cooking or wood heating fuels, pollution levels on the day of testing, or differences in age, sex, height, or weight. With the exception of inhalant allergies, which occurred more frequently in Tillsonburg children, the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and illnesses was similar in the two communities.

  11. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  12. Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Likewise, it is expected that changes to the domestic gas supply may also introduce changes in natural gas composition. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from conventional domestic natural gas supplies. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 588 K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx or CO emissions. These results are different from data collected on some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences will be described.

  13. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

  14. Correlations of Polyimides and Blended Polyimides for High Temperature Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Klaehn; Christopher J. Orme; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance polymers are of interest for high temperature gas separations, especially for the sequestration of carbon dioxide. A new family of high performance imide polymers has been identified as a successful membrane capture material. VTEC polyimides possess desired thermal properties (up to 500 °C) along with being robust and flexible even after multiple thermal cycles (up to 400 °C). Polyimides (PI) are excellent materials for high selectivity for smaller kinetic diameter gases such as H2 and CO2; however, they have low fluxes. We blended small amounts of different polymers with VTEC polyimide, which changes the fluxes. Another critical problem when working with glassy polymers is their moisture content. It has been found that water entrapped within the polymer matrix (left over from the solvent, or physisorbed) can also cause the polymer to change dramatically. Additionally presence of molecular water in the polymer’s void volume has been validated through Positron Annihilation Lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy. In this presentation, polymer characterization and gas-separation testing results will be discussed.

  15. Estimating Impacts of Diesel Fuel Reformulation with Vector-based Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2003-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the refining cost, investment, and operating impacts of specifications for reformulated diesel fuel (RFD) produced in refineries of the U.S. Midwest in summer of year 2010. The study evaluates different diesel fuel reformulation investment pathways. The study also determines whether there are refinery economic benefits for producing an emissions reduction RFD (with flexibility for individual property values) compared to a vehicle performance RFD (with inflexible recipe values for individual properties). Results show that refining costs are lower with early notice of requirements for RFD. While advanced desulfurization technologies (with low hydrogen consumption and little effect on cetane quality and aromatics content) reduce the cost of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel, these technologies contribute to the increased costs of a delayed notice investment pathway compared to an early notice investment pathway for diesel fuel reformulation. With challenging RFD specifications, there is little refining benefit from producing emissions reduction RFD compared to vehicle performance RFD. As specifications become tighter, processing becomes more difficult, blendstock choices become more limited, and refinery benefits vanish for emissions reduction relative to vehicle performance specifications. Conversely, the emissions reduction specifications show increasing refinery benefits over vehicle performance specifications as specifications are relaxed, and alternative processing routes and blendstocks become available. In sensitivity cases, the refinery model is also used to examine the impact of RFD specifications on the economics of using Canadian synthetic crude oil. There is a sizeable increase in synthetic crude demand as ultra low sulfur diesel fuel displaces low sulfur diesel fuel, but this demand increase would be reversed by requirements for diesel fuel reformulation.

  16. Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Operating with In-Cylinder Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced combustion regimes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer benefits of reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, these combustion strategies often generate higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. In addition, aldehydes and ketone emissions can increase in these modes. In this study, the engine-out emissions of a compression-ignition engine operating in a fuel reactivity- controlled PCCI combustion mode using in-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuel have been characterized. The work was performed on a 1.9-liter, 4-cylinder diesel engine outfitted with a port fuel injection system to deliver gasoline to the engine. The engine was operated at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with the ratio of gasoline to diesel fuel that gave the highest engine efficiency and lowest emissions. Engine-out emissions for aldehydes, ketones and PM were compared with emissions from conventional diesel combustion. Sampling and analysis was carried out following micro-tunnel dilution of the exhaust. Particle geometric mean diameter, number-size distribution, and total number concentration were measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For the particle mass measurements, samples were collected on Teflon-coated quartz-fiber filters and analyzed gravimetrically. Gaseous aldehydes and ketones were sampled using dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid phase extraction cartridges and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In addition, emissions after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) were also measured to investigate the destruction of CO, HC and formaldehydes by the catalyst.

  17. The Canadian Public Policy Collection holds over 30,000 titles. The following steps will guide you to the collection from ebrary's homepage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    criteria from the drop down menu and then enter in a new search term. This will help you to narrow your" was entered as a Text and Key Fields (default field) search. This search resulted in over 7,000 documents you to the collection from ebrary's homepage. Canadian Public Policy Collection ­ searching steps

  18. CANADIAN RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (CRM) The CRM designation is awarded to students who have successfully completed the three core courses in Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    CANADIAN RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (CRM) The CRM designation is awarded to students who have successfully completed the three core courses in Risk Management. These core courses also comprise the Risk Management major for the Fellow-Chartered Insurance Professional (FCIP/FIIC) RISK MANAGEMENT COURSES: · Risk

  19. Application of Image And X-Ray Microtomography Technique To Quantify Filler Distribution In Thermoplastic-Natural Rubber Blend Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Sahrim; Rasid, Rozaidi; Mouad, A. T. [Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Aziz Mohamed, A.; Abdullah, Jaafar; Dahlan, M.; Mohamad, Mahathir; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Hamzah Harun, M. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Yazid, Hafizal [Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Hafizal Yazid, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Abdullah, W. Saffiey W.

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray microtomography and ImageJ 1.39 u is used as a tool to quantify volume percentage of B{sub 4}C as fillers in thermoplastic-natural rubber blend composites. The use of percentage of area occupied by fillers as obtain from ImageJ from the microtomography sliced images enables the proposed technique to easily obtain the amount volume percentage of B{sub 4}C in the composite non-destructively. Comparison with other technique such as density measurement and chemical analysis proves the proposed technique as one of the promising approach.

  20. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non?Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, Keith [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); West, Brian H [ORNL; Clark, Wendy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Graves, Ronald L [ORNL; Orban, John [Battelle, Columbus; Przesmitzki, Steve [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In summer 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program is to assess the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals in the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20--gasoline blended with 15 and 20% ethanol--on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This first report provides the results available to date from the first stages of a much larger overall test program. Results from additional projects that are currently underway or in the planning stages are not included in this first report. The purpose of this initial study was to quickly investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the following: (1) Regulated tailpipe emissions for 13 popular late model vehicles on a drive cycle similar to real-world driving and 28 small non-road engines (SNREs) under certification or typical in use procedures. (2) Exhaust and catalyst temperatures of the same vehicles under more severe conditions. (3) Temperature of key engine components of the same SNREs under certification or typical in-use conditions. (4) Observable operational issues with either the vehicles or SNREs during the course of testing. As discussed in the concluding section of this report, a wide range of additional studies are underway or planned to consider the effects of intermediate ethanol blends on materials, emissions, durability, and driveability of vehicles, as well as impacts on a wider range of nonautomotive engines, including marine applications, snowmobiles, and motorcycles. Section 1 (Introduction) gives background on the test program and describes collaborations with industry and agencies to date. Section 2 (Experimental Setup) provides details concerning test fuels, vehicle and SNRE selection, and test methods used to conduct the studies presented in this report. Section 3 (Results and Discussion) summarizes the vehicle and SNRE studies and presents data from testing completed to date. Section 4 (Next Steps) describes planned future activities. The appendixes provide test procedure details, vehicle and SNRE emissions standards, analysis details, and additional data and tables from vehicle and SNRE tests.

  1. Low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol and ethanol-PRF blends: An experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Francis M.; Chaos, Marcos; Dryer, Frederick L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this brief communication, we present new experimental species profile measurements for the low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol under knock-prone conditions. These experiments show that ethanol exhibits no global low temperature reactivity at these conditions, although we note the heterogeneous decomposition of ethanol to ethylene and water. Similar behavior is reported for an E85 blend in n-heptane. Kinetic modeling results are presented to complement these experiments and elucidate the interaction of ethanol and primary reference fuels undergoing cooxidation. (author)

  2. Evolution of crystalline structures of poly([epsilon]-caprolactone)/polycarbonate blends; 1: Isothermal crystallization kinetics as probed by synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y.W.; Stein, R.S. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering); Chu, B.; Wu, G. (State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Long Island, NY (United States))

    1994-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of the poly([epsilon]-caprolactone) (PCL) lamellae in blends of PCL/PC (polycarbonate) was monitored by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The effects of crystallization temperature, PC concentration, and PC crystallinity on the PCL lamellar growth in the PCL-rich blends were investigated. The half-crystallization time derived from the temporal change of the peak intensity increased with crystallization temperature and generally increased with the addition of PC. For a given blend composition, the lamellar growth rate increased with increasing PC crystallinity. The interlamellar spacing initially varied with time and then approached a plateau value at the later stage of crystallization. An insertion mechanism is proposed in which the PCL is crystallized in the amorphous intralamellar phase. This model is also consistent with the quantitative SAXS results, which suggested that random mixing of PCL and PC lamellae occurred in the semicrystalline (PCL)/semicrystalline (PC) state.

  3. Study of the Crystalline Morphology Evolution of PET and PET/PC Blends by Time-resolved Synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and DSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa, Irineu; Larocca, Nelson M.; Hage, Elias [Dep. de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Plivelic, Tomas S.; Torriani, Iris L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mantovani, Gerson L. [Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09090-400 Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal melt crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate)(PET) and PET/PC (polycarbonate) blend, with and without a transesterification catalyst, was studied by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in order to achieve the variation of the morphological parameters throughout the whole crystallization time. For neat PET, the catalyst promotes a decrease of the crystal lamellar thickness but for the blend no variations were observed. The effect of incorporation of catalyst in crystallization kinetics was very distinct in PET pure and the blend: in the former the catalyst leads to an increase of this kinetics while for the latter it was observed a decreasing.

  4. Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguel C. Diaz; Karen M. Steel; Trevor C. Drage; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Combustion properties of coal-char blends: NO{sub x} emission characteristics. Interim final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Khan, L.; Khan, S. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Germane, G.J.; Eatough, C.N. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under pulverized coal combustion conditions, NO{sub x} formed during the release of volatile matter far exceed NO{sub x} formed from combustion of the resulting char. It is believed that interactions of NO{sub x} with char is responsible for the reduced NO{sub x} formation from the combustion of char. The goal of this research is to assess the potential technical and economical benefits of co-firing coal-char blends in pulverized coal boilers to reduce NO{sub x}. The rationale for the proposed research is that the presence of char in the flame during the initial stages of combustion may provide catalytic activity for reduction of NO{sub x} produced from volatile nitrogen. This project is a cooperative effort between the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) and BYU/ACERC. Seven hundred and fifty pounds of three coal-char blends containing 12.5%, 25%, and 50% char and 125 pounds of a coal-activated carbon blend containing 12.5% activated carbon were prepared. The volatile matter contents of the blends ranged from 27.3 to 35.6% (dry basis). Char (16.2 wt% volatile matter) was made from an Illinois No. 6 coal (Peabody Coal Company) in a continuous feed charring oven under mild gasification conditions. Nine combustion tests will be performed with the coal and blends in a 0.5--1.0 MBtu/hr combustor located at BYU. Combustion data will be analyzed to determine the effect of blend type, stoichiometry, and flame temperature on NO{sub x} formation, ignition characteristics, flame stability, and combustion efficiency. A four month no-cost extension has been requested for the project. The results of the combustion tests will be reported in the final technical report in December 1993.

  6. A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

  7. User's guide to a data base of current environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Defferding, J.; Chapman, E.G.; Bettinson, M.D.; Glantz, C.S.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes how to use a data base of current transboundary region environmental monitoring projects. The data base was prepared from data provided by Glantz et al. (1986) and Concord Scientific Corporation (1985), and contains information on 226 projects with monitoring stations located within 400 km (250 mi) of the US-Canadian border. The data base is designed for use with the dBASE III PLUS data management systems on IBM-compatible personal computers. Data-base searches are best accomplished using an accompanying command file called RETRIEVE or the dBASE command LIST. The user must carefully select the substrings on which the search is to be based. Example search requests and subsequent output are presented to illustrate substring selections and applications of the data base. 4 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Speciation of chromium in feed coals and ash byproducts from Canadian power plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fariborz Goodarzi; Frank E. Huggins [Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chromium species in the feed coals and ash byproducts from seven Canadian coal-fired power plants were examined using Cr X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Chromium in the Canadian feed coals is always found as Cr{sup 3+} but generally has a dual occurrence, as Cr{sup 3+} is distributed to varying degrees between the clay mineral illite and a poorly crystallized chromium oxyhydroxide phase associated with the organic fraction. In two subbituminous feed coals from Alberta, chromium is present largely as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas in two other such coals, it is present predominantly as CrOOH. Chromium in a low-sulfur bituminous feed coal from Alberta is found mostly as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas for feed coals from Nova Scotia with high sulfur contents, chromium is distributed between both Cr{sup 3+}/illite and CrOOH. Very little chromium was found in the limestone used in a fluidized-bed combustor. The chromium species in most bottom ash samples from all seven combustion units is predominantly, if not entirely, Cr{sup 3+} associated with aluminosilicate phases. Chromium speciation for subbituminous electrostatic precipitator fly ash is mostly Cr{sup 3+}, but in some cases, it is slightly lessand varies by sampling location at the plant. Chromium in fly ash from the combustion of bituminous feed coals is predominantlyCr{sup 3+}. A unique species of chromium found in one feed coal and an unrelated fly ash is metallic chromium, similar to that in stainless steel. The occurrence of this form of chromium in these materials indicates contamination from machinery, such as the coal milling machine or possibly wearing down of stainless steel parts by the coal or ash. The observation of this unexpected contamination demonstrates the power and usefulness of X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy for speciation determination. 35 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Characterization of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Fueled with Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Amar Patil

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source not only because it is abundant and renewable but also because it produces almost zero regulated emissions. Internal combustion engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) are operated throughout a variety of industries in a number of mobile and stationary applications. While CNG engines offer many advantages over conventional gasoline and diesel combustion engines, CNG engine performance can be substantially improved in the lean operating region. Lean operation has a number of benefits, the most notable of which is reduced emissions. However, the extremely low flame propagation velocities of CNG greatly restrict the lean operating limits of CNG engines. Hydrogen, however, has a high flame speed and a wide operating limit that extends into the lean region. The addition of hydrogen to a CNG engine makes it a viable and economical method to significantly extend the lean operating limit and thereby improve performance and reduce emissions. Drawbacks of hydrogen as a fuel source, however, include lower power density due to a lower heating value per unit volume as compared to CNG, and susceptibility to pre-ignition and engine knock due to wide flammability limits and low minimum ignition energy. Combining hydrogen with CNG, however, overcomes the drawbacks inherent in each fuel type. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. The experiment and data analysis included evaluation of engine performance, efficiency, and emissions along with detailed in-cylinder measurements of key physical parameters. This provided a detailed knowledge base of the impact of using hydrogen/natural gas blends. A four-stroke, 4.2 L, V-6 naturally aspirated natural gas engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer was used to measure the impact of hydrogen/natural gas blends on performance, thermodynamic efficiency and exhaust gas emissions in a reciprocating four stroke cycle engine. The test matrix varied engine load and air-to-fuel ratio at throttle openings of 50% and 100% at equivalence ratios of 1.00 and 0.90 for hydrogen percentages of 10%, 20% and 30% by volume. In addition, tests were performed at 100% throttle opening, with an equivalence ratio of 0.98 and a hydrogen blend of 20% to further investigate CO emission variations. Data analysis indicated that the use of hydrogen/natural gas fuel blend penalizes the engine operation with a 1.5 to 2.0% decrease in torque, but provided up to a 36% reduction in CO, a 30% reduction in NOX, and a 5% increase in brake thermal efficiency. These results concur with previous results published in the open literature. Further reduction in emissions can be obtained by retarding the ignition timing.

  10. The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 81, October 2003 913 n recent years, the static mixer has been adopted for a large number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Ajay K.

    , the static mixer has been adopted for a large number of blending and dispersion operations. Static mixers process industry. Static mixers offer attractive features such as closed-loop operation, and no moving geometry. A typical inlet geometry to the static mixer is the centerline injector as depicted schematically

  11. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Fehsenfeld, F. C. : Emission sources and ocean uptake ofand No- vakov, T. : Emissions of trace gases and particlesGroot, W. J. : Future emissions from Canadian boreal forest

  12. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  13. Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL] [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

  14. Biodiesel Production From Animal Fats And Its Impact On The Diesel Engine With Ethanol-Diesel Blends: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darunde Dhiraj S; Prof Deshmukh Mangesh M

    Abstract — Mainly animal fats and vegetable oils are used for the production of biodiesel. Several types of fuels can be derived from triacylglycerol-containing feedstock. Biodiesel which is defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats. Biodiesel is produced by transesterifying the oil or fat with an alcohol (methanol/ethanol) under mild conditions in the presence of a base catalyst. This paper discuses fuel production, fuel properties, environmental effects including exhaust emissions and co-products. This also describes the use of glycerol which is the by-product in esterification process along with biodiesel. The impact of blending of biodiesel with ethanol and diesel on the diesel engine has described.

  15. Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

  16. Miscibility of blends of poly(methyl methacrylate) and oligodiols based on a bisphenol A nucleus and ethylene oxide or propylene oxide branches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jaffrennou; E. R. Soule; F. Mechin; J. Borrajo; J. P. Pascault; R. J. J. Williams

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud-point curves of blends of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with a series of oligodiols based on a bisphenol A nucleus and short branches of poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(propylene oxide) (BPA-EO or BPA-PO), and with PEO and PPO oligomers, were obtained using a light transmission device. Experimental results were fitted with the Flory- Huggins model using an interaction parameter depending on both temperature and composition. For PMMA/PEO and PMMA/PPO blends, the miscibility increased when increasing the size of the diol, due to the significant decrease in the entropic and enthalpic terms contributing to the interaction parameter. This reflected the decrease in the selfassociation of solvent molecules and in the contribution of terminal OH groups to the mismatching of solubility parameters. For PMMA/BPA-EO blends, a decrease of the entropic contribution to the interaction parameter when increasing the size of the oligodiol was also found. However, the effect was counterbalanced by the opposite contribution of combinatorial terms leading to cloud-point curves located in approximately the same temperature range. For PMMA/BPA-PO blends, the interaction parameter exhibited a very low value. In this case, the effect of solvent size was much more important on combinatorial terms than on the interaction parameter, leading to an increase in miscibility when decreasing the oligodiol size. For short BPA-PO oligodiols no phase separation was observed. The entropic contribution of the interaction parameter exhibited an inverse relationship with the size of the oligodiols, independent of the nature of the chains bearing the hydroxyls and the type of OH groups (primary or secondary). This indicates that the degree of self-association of solvent molecules through their OH terminal groups, was mainly determined by their relative sizes.

  17. Selective Catalytic Reduction of Oxides of Nitrogen with Ethanol/Gasoline Blends over a Silver/Alumina Catalyst on Lean Gasoline Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is a very effective reductant of nitrogen oxides (NOX) over silver/alumina (Ag/Al2O3) catalysts in lean exhaust environment. With the widespread availability of ethanol/gasoline-blended fuel in the USA, lean gasoline engines equipped with an Ag/Al2O3 catalyst have the potential to deliver higher fuel economy than stoichiometric gasoline engines and to increase biofuel utilization while meeting exhaust emissions regulations. In this work a pre-commercial 2 wt% Ag/Al2O3 catalyst was evaluated on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOX with ethanol/gasoline blends. The ethanol/gasoline blends were delivered via in-pipe injection upstream of the Ag/Al2O3 catalyst with the engine operating under lean conditions. A number of engine conditions were chosen to provide a range of temperatures and space velocities for the catalyst performance evaluations. High NOX conversions were achieved with ethanol/gasoline blends containing at least 50% ethanol; however, higher C1/N ratio was needed to achieve greater than 90% NOX conversion, which also resulted in significant HC slip. Temperature and HC dosing were important in controlling selectivity to NH3 and N2O. At high temperatures, NH3 and N2O yields increased with increased HC dosing. At low temperatures, NH3 yield was very low, however, N2O levels became significant. The ability to generate NH3 under lean conditions has potential for application of a dual SCR approach (HC SCR + NH3 SCR) to reduce fuel consumption needed for NOX reduction and/or increased NOX conversion, which is discussed in this work.

  18. Ambipolar blends of CuPc and C60: charge carrier mobility, electronic structure and its implications for solar cell applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bruetting; M. Bronner; M. Goetzenbrugger; A. Opitz

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ambipolar transport has been realised in blends of the molecular hole conductor Cu-phthalocyanine (CuPc) and the electron conducting fullerene C60. Charge carrier mobilities and the occupied electronic levels have been analyzed as a function of the mixing ratio using field-effect transistor measurements and photoelectron spectroscopy. These results are discussed in the context of photovoltaic cells based on these materials.

  19. Color tuning of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce phosphor and their blend for white LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kottaisamy, M. [Materials Research Laboratory, Kalasalingam University, Krishnankoil 626 190 (India)], E-mail: mmksamy66@yahoo.com; Thiyagarajan, P.; Mishra, J.; Ramachandra Rao, M.S. [Materials Science Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gadolinium or lanthanum co-doped (0.5 mole) yttrium aluminum garnet doped with cerium phosphors were synthesized by a citric acid gel method and the effect of co-dopants on the structural and luminescent properties were studied. A significant peak shift in the photoluminescence spectra of yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium was observed from 535 to 556 and 576 nm for gadolinium or lanthanum co-doped phosphors, respectively. The color tuned phosphor were blended with yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium which showed a considerable improvement in the Commission International De Eclairage chromaticity co-ordinate values of gallium nitride based blue light emitting diode pumped white light. White light emitted from yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium shows a Commission International De Eclairage value of (0.229, 0.182) whereas the yttrium aluminum garnet doped cerium phosphor blended with gadolinium or lanthanum co-doped phosphor shows (0.262, 0.243) and (0.295, 0.282), respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility to use these phosphor blends to enhance the white light generation in the field of white-light emitting diode solid-state lighting.

  20. Hardgrove grindability study of Powder River Basin and Appalachian coal components in the blend to a midwestern power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, P.L.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Five coals representing four distinct coal sources blended at a midwestern power station were subjected to detailed analysis of their Hardgrove grindability. The coals are: a low-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal (Pike County, KY); a medium-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Pittsburgh coal (southwestern PA); a low-sulfur, subbituminous Wyodak coal from two mines in the eastern Powder River Basin (Campbell County, WY). The feed and all samples processed in the Hardgrove grindability test procedure were analyzed for their maceral and microlithotype content. The high-vitrinite Pittsburgh coal and the relatively more petrographically complex Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal exhibit differing behavior in grindability. The Pittsburgh raw feed, 16x30 mesh fraction (HGI test fraction), and the {minus}30 mesh fraction (HGI reject) are relatively similar petrographically, suggesting that the HGI test fraction is reasonably representative of the whole feed. The eastern Kentucky coal is not as representative of the whole feed, the HGI test fraction having lower vitrinite than the rejected {minus}30 mesh fraction. The Powder River Basin coals are high vitrinite and show behavior similar to the Pittsburgh coal.

  1. Determination of photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation using spectroscopic techniques as applied to polymer: Fullerene blend films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanemoto, Katsuichi, E-mail: kkane@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Hitomi; Domoto, Shinya [Department of Physics, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to determine the density of photocarrier under continuous photoirradiation in conjugated polymers using spectroscopic signals obtained by photoinduced absorption (PIA) measurements. The bleaching signals in the PIA measurements of polymer films and the steady-state absorption signals of oxidized polymer solution are employed to determine the photocarrier density. The method is applied to photocarriers of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a blended film consisting of P3HT and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation of 580 mW/cm{sup 2} is determined to be 3.5?×?10{sup 16?}cm{sup ?3}. Using a trend of the carrier density increasing in proportion to the square root of photo-excitation intensity, we provide a general formula to estimate the photocarrier density under simulated 1 sun solar irradiation for the P3HT: PCBM film of an arbitrary thickness. We emphasize that the method proposed in this study enables an estimate of carrier density without measuring a current and can be applied to films with no electrodes as well as to devices.

  2. Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanol blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one or more components of the elastomers (by the solvent). This extraction of additives can negatively change the properties of the elastomer, leading to reduced performance and durability. For a seal application, some level of volume swell is acceptable, since the expansion will serve to maintain a seal. However, the acceptable level of swell is dependent on the particular application of the elastomer product. It is known that excessive swell can lead to unacceptable extrusion of the elastomer beyond the sealed interface, where it becomes susceptible to damage. Also, since high swell is indicative of high solubility, there is a heightened potential for fluid to seep through the seal and into the environment. Plastics, on the other hand, are used primarily in structural applications, such as solid components, including piping and fluid containment. Volume change, especially in a rigid system, will create internal stresses that may negatively affect performance. In order to better understand and predict the compatibility for a given polymer type and fuel composition, an analysis based on Hansen solubility theory was performed for each plastic and elastomer material. From this study, the solubility distance was calculated for each polymer material and test fuel combination. Using the calculated solubility distance, the ethanol concentration associated with peak swell and overall extent of swell can be predicted for each polymer. The bulk of the material discussion centers on the plastic materials, and their compatibility with Fuel C, CE25a, CE50a, and CE85a. The next section of this paper focuses on the elastomer compatibility with the higher ethanol concentrations with comparison to results obtained previously for the lower ethanol levels. The elastomers were identical to those used in the earlier study. Hansen solubility theory is also applied to the elastomers to provide added interpretation of the results. The final section summarizes the performance of the metal coupons.

  3. TIME-VARYING FLAME IONIZATION SENSING APPLIED TO NATURAL GAS AND PROPANE BLENDS IN A PRESSURIZED LEAN PREMIXED (LPM) COMBUSTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Straub; B. T. Chorpening; E. D. Huckaby; J. D. Thornton; W. L. Fincham

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ monitoring of combustion phenomena is a critical need for optimal operation and control of advanced gas turbine combustion systems. The concept described in this paper is based on naturally occurring flame ionization processes that accompany the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. Previous work has shown that flame ionization techniques may be applied to detect flashback, lean blowout, and some aspects of thermo-acoustic combustion instabilities. Previous work has focused on application of DC electric fields. By application of time-varying electric fields, significant improvements to sensor capabilities have been observed. These data have been collected in a lean premixed combustion test rig operating at 0.51-0.76 MPa (5-7.5 atm) with air preheated to 588 K (600°F). Five percent of the total fuel flow is injected through the centerbody tip as a diffusion pilot. The fuel composition is varied independently by blending approximately 5% (volume) propane with the pipeline natural gas. The reference velocity through the premixing annulus is kept constant for all conditions at a nominal value of 70 m/s. The fuel-air equivalence ratio is varied independently from 0.46 – 0.58. Relative to the DC field version, the time-varying combustion control and diagnostic sensor (TV-CCADS) shows a significant improvement in the correlation between the measured flame ionization current and local fuel-air equivalence ratio. In testing with different fuel compositions, the triangle wave data show the most distinct change in flame ionization current in response to an increase in propane content. Continued development of this sensor technology will improve the capability to control advanced gas turbine combustion systems, and help address issues associated with variations in fuel supplies.

  4. BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

  5. "As I delve further into the complexities of the Canadian Healthcare System through JSGS's comprehensive MHA program, I find myself looking at its political, social and financial elements through a new lens. This new program is innovative, exciting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    and complexities of a dynamic health care system. The online MHA graduate program is administered through 817 - Health Policy - The course reviews the historical development of the Canadian health care system, pharmaceuticals, regional health boards, and health reform in a comparative context will be examined. Continued

  6. The Royal Society of Canada (RSC), the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) have collaborated to organize a fascinating symposium on the topic of "Brain Plasticity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    The Royal Society of Canada (RSC), the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, and the Canadian at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada. Currently, Canada and Israel have a number of groups will feature two days of discussions by leading researchers from Canada and Israel who will present the latest

  7. [The Journal of Geology, 2002, volume 110, p. 437456] 2002 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved. 0022-1376/2002/11004-0005$15.00 Epeirogenic Controls on Canadian River Incision and Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pazzaglia, Frank J.

    rights reserved. 0022-1376/2002/11004-0005$15.00 437 Epeirogenic Controls on Canadian River Incision and Landscape Evolution, Great Plains of Northeastern New Mexico Paul A. Wisniewski1 and Frank J. Pazzaglia2 Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114, U

  8. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF SINGLE CYLINDER FOUR STROKE DI DIESEL ENGINE OPERATING ON NEEM OIL BIODIESEL AND ITS BLENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Res; Dharmendra Yadav; Nitin Shrivastava; Vipin Shrivastava

    Increasing oil prices, and global warming activates the research and development of substitute energy resources to maintain economic development. The methyl esters of vegetable oil, known as biodiesel are becoming popular because of their low ecological effect and potential as a green substitute for compression ignition engine. The main objective of this study is to investigate the performance of neem oil methyl ester on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, and 8 HP capacity diesel engine. The Experimental research has been performed to analyze the performance of different blends 20 % (BD20), 50 % (BD50), and 100 % (BD100) of neem oil biodiesel. Biodiesel, when compared to conventional diesel fuel, results showed that the brake specific fuel consumption and brake specific energy consumption are higher and brake thermal efficiency less during testing of engine. The brake specific energy consumption is increased by 0.60 % to 8.25 % and brake thermal efficiency decreased by 0.57 % to 7.62 % at 12 kg engine brake load as compared to diesel fuel. When the fuel consumption of biodiesel is compared to diesel fuel it observed that the fuel consumption was increased by 2.5 % to 19.5 % than that of diesel fuel for B20, B50 and B100 bends at 12 kg engine brake load. It is observed that the performance of biodiesel blends is less as compared to plain diesel and during testing of diesel engine run normally for all engine loads. It is investigated that the neem oil biodiesel 20 % blend showed very close performance when compared to plain diesel and hence can be used as an alternative fuel for conventional diesel in the future.

  9. The performance of blended conventional and novel binders in the in-situ stabilisation/solidification of a contaminated site soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hailing; Jin, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPONSE: Thank you for your comment. [9, 43] was added in page 3 line 49. [44] was added in page 3 line 54. “[43] D. G. Snelsona, S. Wilda, M. O'Farrellb, Heat of hydration of Portland Cement–Metakaolin–Fly ash (PC–MK–PFA) blends, Cem. Concr. Res. 38... ] . In -situ S/S has three main advantages: 1) it is well established as efficient and cost-effective; 2) it produces no spoil and, hence no landfill waste and 3) there is no risk to site workers of exposure to contamination. Portland cement (PC) and lime...

  10. Canadian seismic agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of this report, the contract resources were spent on operation and maintenance of the Eastern Canada Telemetred Network (ECTN), development of special purpose local network systems, servicing and maintenance of the strong-motion seismograph network in eastern Canada, operation of the Ottawa data lab and earthquake monitoring and reporting. Of special note in this period was the final completion of the Sudbury (SLTN) and Charlevoix (CLTN) local networks and the integration of their data processing and analysis requirements in the regular analysis stream for ECTN data. These networks now acquire high quality digital data for detailed analysis of seismic activity and source properties from these two areas, thus effectively doubling the amount of seismic data being received by the Ottawa data lab. 37 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Canadian Journal of Physics-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    by nmr and specific heat techniques, and more directly by near infrared, neutron, and Raman scattering

  12. CANADIAN APPLIED MATHEMATICS QUARTERLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arino, Julien

    AL. officials in Canada. This team became the Centre for Disease Modelling, hosted by York University and human population. Both the OAG (Official Airline Guide) and IATA (International Air Transport types of letter codes to identify airports. The IATA (airport) code is a three letter identifier used

  13. CANADIAN APPLIED MATHEMATICS QUARTERLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Greg

    (AFTS) is a robotic system designed to replicated the movement and loading of a shoe as it contacts the ground during common human movements [3]. By doing so, the AFTS can serve as a system for the functional of those that would be generated during the stride of some `typical' human. This movement path could

  14. Absence of Structural Impact of Noble Nanoparticles on P3HT: PCBM Blends for Plasmon Enhanced Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells Probed by Synchrotron Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuele Lilliu; Mejd Alsari; Oier Bikondoa; J. Emyr Macdonald; Marcus S. Dahlem

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of noble metal nanoparticles, displaying localized surface plasmon resonance, in the active area of donor-acceptor bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices is an industrially compatible light trapping strategy, able to guarantee better absorption of the incident photons and give an efficiency improvement between 12% and 38%. In the present work, we investigate the effect of Au and Ag nanoparticles blended with P3HT: PCBM on the P3HT crystallization dynamics by synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. We conclude that the presence of (1) 80nm Au, (2) mix of 5nm, 50nm, 80nm Au, (3) 40nm Ag, and (4) 10nm, 40nm, 60nm Ag colloidal nanoparticles, at different concentrations below 0.3 wt% in P3HT: PCBM blends, does not affect the behaviour of the blends themselves.

  15. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository:2. Application to a Canadian Shield environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Y -J; Normani, S D; Sykes, J F; Sudicky, E A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cornaton et al. [2007] introduced the concept of lifetime expectancy as a performance measure of the safety of subsurface repositories, based upon the travel time for contaminants released at a certain point in the subsurface to reach the biosphere or compliance area. The methodologies are applied to a hypothetical but realistic Canadian Shield crystalline rock environment, which is considered to be one of the most geologically stable areas on Earth. In an approximately 10\\times10\\times1.5 km3 hypothetical study area, up to 1000 major and intermediate fracture zones are generated from surface lineament analyses and subsurface surveys. In the study area, mean and probability density of lifetime expectancy are analyzed with realistic geologic and hydrologic shield settings in order to demonstrate the applicability of the theory and the numerical model for optimally locating a deep subsurface repository for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. The results demonstrate that, in general, groundwater lifetime exp...

  16. Effectiveness of organoclays as compatibilizers for multiphase polymer blends – A sustainable route for the mechanical recycling of co-mingled plastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causa, Andrea; Acierno, Domenico; Filippone, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio, 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Mistretta, Maria Chiara [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, Aerospaziale, dei Materiali, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, ed. 6, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We prepare and characterize multiphase systems in which small amounts of recycled polymer, namely polyethylene terephtalate (PET) ground from waste bottles, are dispersed in a co-continuous blend of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP). Some of such ternary systems are also filled with plate-like clay nanoparticles with different polarities, in order to assess their influence on the morphology and mechanical behaviour of the blends. On the basis of preliminary wettability considerations and inspections by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the PET is found to preferentially locate within the PP phase. Such a positioning is desirable in order to minimize the presence of multiple interfaces, which is one of the major issues in the recycling process of co-mingles plastics. By means of SEM, dynamic-mechanical analysis and tensile tests we show that the addition of a filler with low polarity, which locates at the PET-matrix interface, has relevant implications on the structure and properties of the ternary systems, refining their morphology at the micro-scale and enhancing their high-temperature mechanical behaviour.

  17. Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

  18. The photospheric solar oxygen project: III. Investigation of the centre-to-limb variation of the 630nm [OI]-NiI blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caffau, E; Steffen, M; Livingston, W; Bonifacio, P; Malherbe, J -M; Doerr, H -P; Schmidt, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar photospheric abundance of oxygen is still a matter of debate. For about ten years some determinations have favoured a low oxygen abundance which is at variance with the value inferred by helioseismology. Among the oxygen abundance indicators, the forbidden line at 630nm has often been considered the most reliable even though it is blended with a NiI line. In Papers I and Paper II of this series we reported a discrepancy in the oxygen abundance derived from the 630nm and the subordinate [OI] line at 636nm in dwarf stars, including the Sun. Here we analyse several, in part new, solar observations of the the centre-to-limb variation of the spectral region including the blend at 630nm in order to separate the individual contributions of oxygen and nickel. We analyse intensity spectra observed at different limb angles in comparison with line formation computations performed on a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical simulation of the solar atmosphere. The oxygen abundances obtained from the forbidden line at differe...

  19. Combustion properties of coal-char blends: NO{sub x} emission characteristics. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Khan, L.; Khan, S. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Germane, G.J.; Eatough, C.N. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests under pulverized coal combustion conditions suggest that NO{sub x} formed during release of volatile matter far exceed NO{sub x} formed during combustion of the resulting char. This is attributed to char/NO{sub x} interactions by both direct reduction of NO{sub x} by carbon and char-catalyzed reduction by CO. This implies combustion of char not only produces substantially lower NO{sub x} but the presence of char in the flame during initial stages of combustion may potentially provide catalytic activity for reduction of NO{sub x} produced from volatile nitrogen. The goal of the project is to determine if the concept of NO{sub x} reduction by char/NO{sub x} interactions, while maintaining a high combustion efficiency by co-firing coal with char, is a technically feasible way to reduce NO{sub x}, emissions. The project will provide important combustion data required to establish the feasibility of utilizing chars in industrial combustion applications and the advantages of burning coal-char blends in reducing NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions. During the reporting period, 19 runs were made with a continuous feed charring oven (CFCO) to produce 237 pounds of char(about 16%vm) required for preparing coal-char blends.

  20. Zinc-blende (Cubic) GaN and AlGaN Layers, Structures and Bulk Crystals by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, Sergei V.; Zainal, Norzaini; Akimov, Andrey V.; Staddon, Chris R.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Kent, Anthony J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the growth of zinc-blende GaN and AlGaN layers, structures and bulk crystals by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We have developed a process for growth by MBE of free-standing cubic GaN layers. Undoped thick cubic GaN films were grown on semi-insulating GaAs (001) substrates by a modified plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) method and were removed from the GaAs substrate after the growth. The resulting free-standing GaN wafers with thicknesses in the 30-100 {mu}m range may be used as substrates for further epitaxy of cubic GaN-based structures and devices. We have developed procedures to cleave the wafers into 10x10 mm{sup 2} square substrates and to polish them to produce epi-ready surfaces. The first GaN/InGaN LEDs on our zinc-blende GaN substrates have been demonstrated by our collaborators at Sharp Laboratories of Europe.

  1. Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels; Phase 3: Effects of Winter Gasoline Volatility and Ethanol Content on Blend Flammability; Flammability Limits of Denatured Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; Clark, W.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assessed differences in headspace flammability for summertime gasolines and new high-ethanol content fuel blends. The results apply to vehicle fuel tanks and underground storage tanks. Ambient temperature and fuel formulation effects on headspace vapor flammability of ethanol/gasoline blends were evaluated. Depending on the degree of tank filling, fuel type, and ambient temperature, fuel vapors in a tank can be flammable or non-flammable. Pure gasoline vapors in tanks generally are too rich to be flammable unless ambient temperatures are extremely low. High percentages of ethanol blended with gasoline can be less volatile than pure gasoline and can produce flammable headspace vapors at common ambient temperatures. The study supports refinements of fuel ethanol volatility specifications and shows potential consequences of using noncompliant fuels. E85 is flammable at low temperatures; denatured ethanol is flammable at warmer temperatures. If both are stored at the same location, one or both of the tanks' headspace vapors will be flammable over a wide range of ambient temperatures. This is relevant to allowing consumers to splash -blend ethanol and gasoline at fueling stations. Fuels compliant with ASTM volatility specifications are relatively safe, but the E85 samples tested indicate that some ethanol fuels may produce flammable vapors.

  2. Blackmore, K. and Kane, L., Blended Learning for Course Sharing A Case Study Proceedings of the 2010 AaeE Conference, Sydney, Copyright Blackmore, K. and Kane, L., 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackmore, Kim

    that has been employed in restructuring a Solar Energy Technology course at a major Australian university for Course Sharing ­ A Case Study Kim Blackmore Australian National University, Canberra, Australia Kim.Blackmore@anu.edu.au Lauren Kane Australian National University, Canberra, Australia Lauren.Kane@anu.edu.au Abstract: A blend

  3. Enhanced efficiency of p-type doping by band-offset effect in wurtzite and zinc-blende GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changsheng; Wang, Jiqing, E-mail: jqwang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Lin, Weixian; Mao, Huibing; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Pingxiong [Key Laboratory of Polarized Materials and Devices, East china Normal University, shanghai 200241 (China); Xing, Huaizhong [Department of Applied Physics, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first principles calculation based on density-functional theory, we investigated p-type electronic structures and the doping mechanism in wurtzite (WZ) and zinc-blende (ZB) GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires (NWs) along the [0001] and [111] directions, respectively. Comparing the doping in WZ and ZB core-shell NWs, we found it is easier and more stable to realize dopant in WZ NWs. Due to the type I band-offset, p-type doping in the GaAs-core of GaAs{sub core}/InAs{sub shell} for both WZ and ZB NWs makes that the valence band-edge electrons in the InAs-shell can spontaneously transfer to the impurity states, forming one-dimensional hole gas. In particular, this process accompanies with a reverse transition in WZ core-shell nanowire due to the existence of antibonding and bonding states.

  4. Hanford's 100-HX Pump and Treat Project - a Successful Blend of Science, Technology, Construction, and Project Management - 12412

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, Kenneth A.; Bachand, Marie T.; Biebesheimer, Fred H.; Neshem, Dean O.; Smoot, John L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) recently completed construction and start-up of the $25 million 100-HX Groundwater Pump and Treat Project for the Department of Energy (DOE) at its Hanford Reservation site in Washington State. From the onset, the 100-HX Project Leadership Team was able to successfully blend the science and technology of a state-of-the-art groundwater pump and treat system with the principles, tools, and techniques of traditional industrial-type construction and project management. From the 1940's through most of the 1980's, the United States used the Hanford Site to produce nuclear material for national defense at reactor sites located along the Columbia River. While the reactors were operational, large volumes of river water were treated with sodium dichromate (to inhibit corrosion of the reactor piping) and used as a coolant for the reactors. After a single pass through the reactor and before being discharged back to the river, the coolant water was sent to unlined retention basins to cool and to allow the short-lived radioactive contaminants to decay. As a result of these operations, hexavalent chromium was introduced to the vadose zone, and ultimately into the groundwater aquifer and the adjacent Columbia River. In addition, numerous leaks and spills of concentrated sodium dichromate stock solution over the lifetime of reactor operations led to higher concentrations of chromate in the vadose zone and groundwater in localized areas. As a result, the 100 Area was included in the National Priorities List sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The mission of the 100-HX Project is to significantly reduce the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the groundwater by treating up to 3.8 billion gallons (14,300 mega-liters) of contaminated water over its first nine years of operations. In order to accomplish this mission, groundwater scientists and geologists using sophisticated scientific modeling optimized the 100-HX's approximately 0.7 square mile (181 hecto-meters) extraction and injection well field to support continuous operation of a maximum of 800 gallons (3,028 liters) per minute, 24 hours per day, and 7 days per week. The use of traditional resin technology for the plant's ion exchange system required a change out of the resin every 12 weeks and shipment to an offsite facility 1,500 miles (2,414 kilometers) away for regeneration. Instead, the project leadership pursued newer technology with a disposable resin that could be disposed of on-site and would require less frequent change outs, reducing the project's life cycle costs by more than $16 million. Constructing the facility had its own challenges. The well field location overlapped ecologically sensitive lands where bald eagles and native wildlife use the land for their mating habitat for nearly half of the year. Building locations had to be planned around historically and culturally sensitive areas, and around another contractor's remediation work zones. Also, the size of the well field required a transfer (pumping) facility and installation of more than 60 miles (97 kilometers) of high-density polypropylene pipe, 23 miles (38 kilometers) of power cable, and 28 miles (46 kilometers) of control cable. Along with schedule and budget constraints typical of any fast-track project, the project team dealt with severe resource constraints due to competing projects across the Hanford Site caused by the influx of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding. In addition, the project team itself was stretched between completing another $25 million dollar construction project while designing and constructing this project. In order to save money, the project schedule was compressed by three months from the original baseline schedule. This was made possible by the strong use of project management principles throughout the design, construction, and testing phases, as well as implementation of many lessons learned from a similar construction project. In summary, the 100-HX

  5. Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

    2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

  6. EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

  7. Non-depleted sub-continental mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield: Nd-Sr isotopic and trace element evidence from Midcontinent Rift basalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paces, J.B. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton (USA)); Bell, K. (Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midcontinent Rift flood basalts represent a sample of the relatively shallow, sub-continental upper mantle beneath the Canadian Shield at 1.1 Ga. A thick sequence of olivine tholeiite lavas, including minor intermediate to rhyolitic lavas, from the Portage Lake Volcanics (PLV) in northern Michigan have initial Nd and Sr isotopic compositions which cluster near Bulk Earth values. The effects of assimilation of old LREE-enriched continental crust into mantle-derived fractionating liquids are isotopically discernible in evolved lavas as well as in olivine tholeiites from the lowest portion of the volcanic pile. However, the effects of crustal contamination decrease with stratigraphic height and are absent in more primitive lavas in the upper half of the section. The source for PLV tholeiites is substantially less depleted than previously reported mantle values from the Superior Province. An origin for the PLV source is compatible with either of several mantle evolution models. The PLV source may have been associated with upwelling of a LIL element-enriched, asthenospheric plume which emplaced non-depleted material from deeper sources into the shallow sub-continental mantle beneath the Midcontinent Rift during continental break-up. Alternatively, the PLV source may have originated by enrichment of refractory sub-continental lithospheric mantle which was previously depleted in incompatible trace elements during Archean-aged melt extraction and continental crust formation. Concurrent generation of carbonatite magmas in other areas beneath the Superior Province indicates the widespread presence of sub-continental mantle with substantially higher {epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) and lower {epsilon}{sub Sr}(T) than the PLV source.

  8. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemmi, T.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fusion Research and Development Directorate 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki, 311-0193 (Japan); Nishimura, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Fusion Engineering Research Center 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Nishijima, S. [Osaka University, Division of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering 1-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Shikama, T. [Tohoku University, Institute for Materials Research 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  9. Method of producing a diesel fuel blend having a pre-determined flash-point and pre-determined increase in cetane number

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waller, Francis Joseph; Quinn, Robert

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of producing a diesel fuel blend having a pre-determined flash-point and a pre-determined increase in cetane number over the stock diesel fuel. Upon establishing the desired flash-point and increase in cetane number, an amount of a first oxygenate with a flash-point less than the flash-point of the stock diesel fuel and a cetane number equal to or greater than the cetane number of the stock diesel fuel is added to the stock diesel fuel in an amount sufficient to achieve the pre-determined increase in cetane number. Thereafter, an amount of a second oxygenate with a flash-point equal to or greater than the flash-point of the stock diesel fuel and a cetane number greater than the cetane number of the stock diesel fuel is added to the stock diesel fuel in an amount sufficient to achieve the pre-determined increase in cetane number.

  10. Hg and Se capture and fly ash carbons from combustion of complex pulverized feed blends mainly of anthracitic coal rank in Spanish power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Surez-Ruiz; J.C. Hower; G.A. Thomas [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the petrology and chemistry of fly ashes produced in a Spanish power plant from the combustion of complex pulverized feed blends made up of anthracitic/meta-anthracitic coals, petroleum, and natural coke are investigated. It was found that the behavior of fly ash carbons derived from anthracitic coals follows relatively similar patterns to those established for the carbons from the combustion of bituminous coals. Fly ashes were sampled in eight hoppers from two electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows. The characterization of the raw ashes and their five sieved fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) showed that glassy material, quartz, oxides, and spinels in different proportions are the main inorganic components. As for the organic fraction, the dominant fly ash carbons are anisotropic carbons, mainly unburned carbons derived from anthracitic vitrinite. The concentration of Se and Hg increased in ashes of the second ESP row, this increase being related to the higher proportion of anisotropic unburned carbons, particularly those largely derived from anthracitic vitrinite in the cooler ashes of the ESP (second row) and also related to the decrease in the flue gas temperature. This suggests that the flue gas temperature plays a major role in the concentration of mercury for similar ratios of unburned carbons. It was also found that Hg is highly concentrated in the medium-coarser fractions of the fly ashes ({gt} 45 {mu}m), there being a positive relationship between the amount of these carbons, which are apparently little modified during the combustion process, in the medium-coarse fractions of the ashes and the Hg retention. According to the results obtained, further research on this type of fly ash could be highly productive. 28 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. The Effects of Trans-Esterification of Castor Seed Oil Using Ethanol, Methanol and their Blends on the Properties and Yields of Biodiesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Enontiemonria; Ayoola Ayodeji; Anawe Paul; Apeye Lucky; Oteri Ogheneofego

    The effects of ethanol, methanol and their blends at different percentage mixtures on the properties and yields of biodiesel at varied trans-esterification times and temperatures using sodium hydroxide as a base catalyst have been investigated. At 70 o C, the optimum yields were: for ethanol 88.4%, 94.2%, 94.8%, and 95.2 % and for methanol, 90.6%, 95.6%, 96.0%, and 96.4% at 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours and 4 hours respectively. The biodiesel yields increased as time of reaction progressed for both solvents but the yields obtained from methanol were generally higher than those from ethanol. A mixture of both solvents at 50 % each produced the overall highest of biodiesel yield of 98.6 % at 70 o C and in 4 hours compared to either solvent used alone at the same time and temperature. The properties such as densities, viscosities, flash points and pour points of the biodiesels tested were found to conform to ASTM standards. The average values were as follows: densities at 15 o C, were 0.8951, 0.8876 and 0.8832g/cm 3; viscosities (at 40 o C) were 4.7160cSt, 4.7380cSt and 4.5055cSt; flash points were 140.9 o C, 147.4 o C and 161.6 o C while for pour points they were-2.4375 o C,-1.6875 o C and-6 o C for ethyl, methyl and ethyl/methyl biodiesel respectively.

  12. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL] [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  13. TM Pacific Blue Cross, the registered trade-name of PBC Health Benefits Society, is an independent licensee of the Canadian Association of Blue Cross Plans. BC Life is the registered trade-name of British Columbia Life & Casualty Company, a wholly-owned s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TM® Pacific Blue Cross, the registered trade-name of PBC Health Benefits Society, is an independent licensee of the Canadian Association of Blue Cross Plans. BC Life is the registered trade-name of British Columbia Life & Casualty Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pacific Blue Cross. CARESnet

  14. Canadian Seismic Agreement: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Drysdale, J.A.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division (GD) of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) during the period June 1986 to June 1987 and supported in part by the NRC agreement. The activities include ECTN and portable network developments, datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity.

  15. Environmental Impact Assessment in Canadian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    to Know This? Why Do Project Engineers Need to Know This? As the Keystone Pipeline and Prosperity Gold ­ you may not have a "project" When approvals are given the basis for limits, design criteria the beginning to the end, should not be limited to problems of engineering and construction. Social, economic

  16. Optimization of blended battery packs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erb, Dylan C. (Dylan Charles)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reviews the traditional battery pack design process for hybrid and electric vehicles, and presents a dynamic programming (DP) based algorithm that eases the process of cell selection and pack design, especially ...

  17. Ashing properties of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, D.L.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion properties of sulfur materials present in coals were investigated. The treatment of the samples of eleven different coals is described. Thermal treatment of low temperature ashing (LTA) concentrates of eight of the coals was performed, and raw and wash ashing curves were examined to determine what quantitative correlations, if any, exist between ashing parameters and rank of coal. The actual form of the function which describes the ashing curve is derived.

  18. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLE OF CONTENTS 1of:Microsoft WordREMARKSMicrosoft

  19. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 14 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 APRIL 1998 Clean and As-Covered Zinc-Blende GaN (001) Surfaces: Novel Surface Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recently atomically resolved scanning tunneling micrographs have been obtained for wurtzite GaN surfaces [3 in a systematic way. The stable crystal phase of GaN is the wurtzite struc- ture. However, cubic (zinc-blende) Ga appealing for device applica- tions: It has a lower band gap than the wurtzite phase (by 0.2 eV) and can

  20. Sunco Oil manufactures three types of gasoline (gas 1, gas 2 and gas 3). Each type is produced by blending three types of crude oil (crude 1, crude 2 and crude 3). The sales price per barrel of gasoline and the purchase price per

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, David

    Sunco Oil manufactures three types of gasoline (gas 1, gas 2 and gas 3). Each type is produced by blending three types of crude oil (crude 1, crude 2 and crude 3). The sales price per barrel of gasoline and the purchase price per barrel of crude oil are given in following table: Gasoline Sale Price per barrel Gas 1

  1. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

  2. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumptionmore »by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.« less

  3. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bak, Seong Min [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Senanayake, Sanjaya D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering; Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering] (ORCID:0000000162786369); Zhang, Lulu [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  4. 2014 Canadian Computing Competition Regional Winners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Power-St Joseph Etobicoke, ON PARIKH KIERAN Toronto French School North York, ON LAU MICHELLE Toronto William Lyon Mackenzie C.I. North York, ON CLARKE FRAZIER William Lyon Mackenzie C.I. North York, ON CHEN

  5. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers' Association, Canadian Foundry Association, Canadian Gas Association, Canadian Petroleum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on energy in the industrial sector or publications by NRCan that reflect energy consumption in various des ressources naturelles, Québec. Ministry of Energy Mines and Petroleum Resource, BC. CIEEDAC An Inventory of Industrial Energy and Emissions Databases in Canada, 2007 Prepared for Natural Resources Canada

  6. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketovuori, Mikko Mr.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    educators consisted of: Didactics, learning, and evaluationassisted by the lecturer of didactics from the university.are working. The lecturer of didactics reported significant

  7. Canadian seismic agreement. Annual report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Drysdale, J.A.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division, Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) during the period June 1985 to June 1986 and supported in part by the NRC are described below under four headings; ECTN and portable network developments, datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity.

  8. Canadian Computing Competition 2007 Stage 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    that the contestant marked with (**) was the top-finisher. Gold Medallists First Name Last Name School Location Woburn Collegiate Institute TORONTO STEPHEN ZHANG Jarvis C.I. TORONTO Bronze Medallists First Name Last

  9. Microsoft Word - Canadian Hydropower Association QER Submission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0, 2 014 The C anadian H ydropower A ssociation ( CHA) a ppreciates t he o pportunity t o p rovide c omments t o t he Department o f E nergy u nder t he Q uadrennial E nergy R...

  10. Canadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Nomination Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    your student is a LEADER and INNOVATOR in their PASSION for environmental protection & conservation for environmental protection and conservation ­ what did your student develop, co-create, or implement, and what a LEADER? - Involvement in environmental protection, conservation or advocacy activities ­ This may include

  11. Canadian Youth Environmental Leadership Scholarship Nomination Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    in their PASSION for environmental protection & conservation: Nomination Letter: Attached Please attach a brief: - Leadership and innovation that catalyzes positive change for environmental protection and conservation ­ what in environmental protection, conservation or advocacy activities ­ This may include academics, campus club

  12. Microstructural characterization of a Canadian oil sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinh, Hong Doan; Nauroy, Jean-François; Tang, Anh-Minh; Souhail, Youssef; 10.1139/T2012-072

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of oil sand samples extracted at a depth of 75 m from the estuarine Middle McMurray formation (Alberta, Canada) has been investigated by using high resolution 3D X-Ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) and Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy (CryoSEM). $\\mu$CT images evidenced some dense areas composed of highly angular grains surrounded by fluids that are separated by larger pores full of gas. 3D Image analysis provided in dense areas porosity values compatible with in-situ log data and macroscopic laboratory determinations, showing that they are representative of intact states. $\\mu$CT hence provided some information on the morphology of the cracks and disturbance created by gas expansion. The CryoSEM technique, in which the sample is freeze fractured within the SEM chamber prior to observation, provided pictures in which the (frozen) bitumen clearly appears between the sand grains. No evidence of the existence of a thin connate water layer between grains and the bitumen, frequently mentioned in th...

  13. Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gemme, Marie-Claude

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

  14. EIS-0197: Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement was prepared to aid the decisionmaking process the United States must make on how best to meet the United States' Treaty obligations to deliver Canada's share of the downstream power benefits.

  15. Canadian Solar Inc CSI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits Manual JumpEnergyPhotonics Fabrication Center

  16. Canadian Solar Japan KK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits Manual JumpEnergyPhotonics Fabrication CenterJapan

  17. Canadian Hills (Mitsubishi) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind II CECCanada-NRELHydrogen and

  18. Canadian Hills (Repower) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind II CECCanada-NRELHydrogen

  19. US Canadian Biofuels Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypefor Africa |Green Bay, Wisconsin Zip:

  20. Viscoelastic properties of bidisperse homopolymer blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juliani

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristic feature of well entangled polymer systems, and that type A damping is a special case of type C, applicable only in marginally entangled polymer liquids....

  1. Evaluation of polyethylene-modified asphalt blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consuegra Granger, Fernando

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aggregate and asphalt modified with LDPE (binder contents of 4. 8%%u and 5. 87'). 42 Table 9. Summary of statistical parameters derived from IDT testing on crushed granite mixtures bound with AC-20 + LDPE (4. 8%, and 5. 8/ binder). 46 Table 10. Summary... of creep to rupture data for crushed granite mixtures. 71 Table 11. Summary of the results of IDT repeated load fatigue testing of river gravel mixtures bound with Texaco asphalt: AC- 10, AC-10 + LDPE and AC-20. Table 12. K, ' and n, values of river...

  2. Brake blending strategy for a hybrid vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI)

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including a transmission for driving a pair of wheels of a vehicle and a heat engine and an electric motor/generator coupled to the transmission. A friction brake system is provided for applying a braking torque to said vehicle. A controller unit generates control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system for controllably braking the vehicle in response to a drivers brake command. The controller unit determines and amount of regenerative torque available and compares this value to a determined amount of brake torque requested for determining the control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system.

  3. Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels – Implementation Perspectives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–B: End Use and Fuel Certification Bill Woebkenberg, Fuels Technical and Regulatory Affairs Senior Engineer, Mercedes-Benz

  4. Carnegie Mellon Multiperiod Blend Scheduling Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Department of Chemical Engineering Center for Advanced Process Decision-making Carnegie Mellon University operations arises frequently in the petrochemical industry. - Although simple to represent, these models

  5. Phase Behavior in Asymmetric Polymer Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nedoma, Alisyn Jenise

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1065-1067. Sanchez, I. C. ; Lacombe, R. H. Macromolecules117, 481-500. Sanchez, I. C. ; Lacombe, R. H. Macromolecules

  6. EFFECTS OF BIODIESEL BLENDING ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jing

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising fuel costs and energy demands, combined with growing concern over health related and environmental concerns, have led to increased interest in the use of biodiesel. Biodiesel can be utilized as a direct replacement for conventional petroleum...

  7. Tropexx - Blending System - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z SiteManhattan ProjectMay 29,

  8. Intermediate Ethanol Blends: Plans and Status

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States inFederal Waters |Activities)

  9. Performance of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 TermoelectricaPaving the pathPeople'sTransientFleet in the

  10. Stocks of Motor Gasoline Blending Components

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO) Highlights 2008DeutscheState470,6036,190

  11. South Texas Blending | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolarSolkarTopicsSouthNew Jersey:

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blends

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C.Tier 2 andIndependenceFuelsas aBenefits

  13. Simulation of industrial coking -- Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todoschuk, T.W.; Price, J.T.; Gransden, J.F.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two statistically designed experimental programs using an Appalachian and a Western Canadian coal blend were run in CANMET`s 460mm (18 inch) movable wall oven. Factors included coal grind, moisture, oil addition, carbonization rate and final coke temperature. Coke quality parameters including CSR, coal charge characteristics and pressure generation were analyzed.

  14. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, Vaishali; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatiotemporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust aerosols showing a large vertical spread, and other continental and marine aerosols which are confined in the boundary layer. From this compilation, we propose a 4-D blended product from model and satellite data, consisting in monthly time series of 3-D aerosol distribution at a 50 km horizontal resolution over the Euro-Mediterranean marine and continental region for the 2003–2009 period. The product is based on the total AOD from AQUA/MODIS, apportioned into sulfates, black and organic carbon from the MACC reanalysis, and into dust and sea-salt aerosols from RegCM-4 simulations, which are distributed vertically based on CALIOP climatology.We extend the 2003–2009 reconstruction to the past up to 1979 using the 2003–2009 average and applying the decreasing trend in sulfate aerosols from LMDz-OR-INCA, whose AOD trends over Europe and the Mediterranean are median among the ACCMIP models. Finally optical properties of the different aerosol types in this region are proposed from Mie calculations so that this reconstruction can be included in regional climate models for aerosol radiative forcing and aerosolclimate studies.

  15. Environmental and Resource Studies -Canadian Studies 250 Environmental and Resource Management: Canadian Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    in the ground, or what level of "harvesting" is the highest that can be sustained without damage to the resource to human beings? The course combines a discussion of theoretical approaches to managing renewable and non-renewable resources: energy, agriculture, parks, forests, water and watersheds, fisheries, and wildlife. The course

  16. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Environment Canada Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers' Association, Canadian Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of making more transparent data available to the public; · initiating the historical GHG emissions review ++ ­ + Prices + ­ + Crude oil -use Energy Data and Analysis Centre Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC February, 2008 #12;GHG Emissions

  17. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Aluminium Association of Canada, Automobile Parts Manufacturing Association, Brewers Association of Canada, Canadian Fertilizer Institute, Canadian Foundry Association, Canadian Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Aluminium Association) ........................................................................................ 3 1.3.2 Medium Term (25 years ................................................................................................... 14 3.2.2 Medium Term

  18. Research Intensity of Canadian Universities T. Tiedje, August 16, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and total volume of research output than with the quality or productivity. Rankings have been based on a variety of criteria, including for example total research funding, research output, and the quality of their students' experience

  19. Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , Kropp, S. , Jager, B. , Bartsch, H. , Risch, A. 2002.13, 399-407. Vineis, P. , Bartsch, H. , Caporaso, N. ,

  20. PETROLEUM SOCIETY CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF MINING, METALLURGY & PETROLEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schramm, Laurier L.

    of magnitude reduction in primary oil recovery is obtained, suggesting that one or more key process variables or primary oil recovery obtained. When the process temperature is further reduced to 25 °C however, an order have undergone a substantial change. Our studies with process additives suggest that several key

  1. american canadian australian: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES QUALITY AGENCY Report of an Audit of Swinburne; AUQA Audit Report Number 61 ISBN 978 1 877090 90 5 Australian...

  2. The Canadian Mineralogist Vol. 46, pp. 000 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soja, Constance M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -phase brine inclusions lacking daughter crystals, brine inclusions "packed" with daughter crystals, and vapor that the native lead formed by precipitation from low- temperature (270­300°C) brines in a near-surface, low

  3. Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement Final Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    acid precipitation). In addition, the contribution of CO2 emissions to the "greenhouse effect"-a global concern-would occur wherever the emission is located. Visual...

  4. A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify promising locations for both demonstration and pilot-scale algal cultivation projects, including the production potential of using wastewater, and potential land use considerations.

  5. Subatomic (Particle) Physics in Canada The Canadian particle physics community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a half-life of about 1.8 × 1021y. The neutrinoless double beta decay Ge76 32 Se76 34e-e- would violate

  6. The Canadian Mineralogist Vol. 42, pp. 1331-1355 (2004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pseudosecondary inclusions in pegmatitic core-zone quartz were analyzed using microthermometry and laser-ablation- tative analyses were made using a combination of a constricted laser beam, a traversed opening technique

  7. DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY CANADIAN UNION OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES, LOCAL 3912

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotze, Heike K.

    ...................................................................................................................22 24 No Strike/Lockout

  8. Modeled climate change effects on distributions of Canadian butterfly species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Gonzá lez-Salazar, Constantino; Hall, Peter W.

    2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Climate change effects on biodiversity are being documented now frequently in the form of changes in phenology and distributional shifts. However, the form that these effects will take over a longer timespan is ...

  9. President's Address Geoscience for the Needs of Canadians 97

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Mineral Deposit-Forming Environments Snowball Earth: the Story of the Global Catastophe that Spawned Life on the article "Geological, Ocean and Mineral CO2 Sequestration Options: 136 A Technical Review" by D.A. Voormeij and G.J. Simandl E. Morris Reviews 137 Geochemistry: An Introduction World Water Resources

  10. Energy Use and Savings in the Canadian Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The changing role of energy as a production input in the industrial sector in Canada is examined. Energy use patterns are reviewed in terms of the energy input types, both purchased and self-produced, the actual energy form and quality requirements...

  11. The Role of the Canadian Government in Industrial Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godin, M. A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Canada has undertaken to become self sufficient in energy by 1990. To buy the necessary time to develop domestic supplies, energy transport systems and to extend the time life of energy reserves, we have embarked on an energy conservation program...

  12. annual meeting canadian: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 93rd Annual General Meeting - June 4, 2009 Marianne asked - 10 Review Engagement Report - Dr. Bryan Harvey, President Elect Dr. Bryan Harvey reviewed Saskatchewan,...

  13. Energy Use and Savings in the Canadian Industrial Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The changing role of energy as a production input in the industrial sector in Canada is examined. Energy use patterns are reviewed in terms of the energy input types, both purchased and self-produced, the actual energy form and quality requirements...

  14. Foreign Fishery Developments The U.S.-Canadian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 million and per capita consumption of edible fishery products is only 6.4 kg. The Government is actively 7-8 per- cent of the world fisheries trade. Over half of Canada's fishery exports are shipped promoting increased fish consumption and has designated November as the "Fish and Seafood Month." In January

  15. Working with compressed gas Canadian Centre for Occupational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    chemical supplier to find out about substitutes · E.g. propylene, propane can be substituted way of securing cylinders #12;Storage · Wellventilated and dry · Fireresistant, supply with suitable ones #12;Storage Temperature · Store in dry, cool areas, out of direct sunlight, away from steam pipes

  16. Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board APS News Archives: 2014 | 2013 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 |...

  17. Canadian offshore oil production solution gas utilization alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil and gas development in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador is in its early stage and the offshore industry emphasis is almost exclusively on oil production. At the Hibernia field, the Gravity Base Structure (GBS) is installed and the first wells are in production. The Terra Nova project, based on a Floating Production Storage Offloading (FPSO) ship shaped concept, is in its engineering and construction stage and first oil is expected by late 2000. Several other projects, such as Husky's White Rose and Chevron's Hebron, have significant potential for future development in the same area. It is highly probably that these projects will employ the FPSO concept. It is also expected that the solution gas disposal issues of such second generation projects will be of more significance in their regulatory approval process and of such second generation projects will be of more significance in their regulatory approval process and the operators may be forced to look for alternatives to gas reinjection. Three gas utilization alternatives for a FPSO concept based project have been considered and evaluated in this paper: liquefied natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG), and gas-to-liquids conversion (GTL). The evaluation and the relative ranking of these alternatives is based on a first pass screening type of study which considers the technical and economical merits of each alternative. Publicly available information and in-house data, compiled within Fluor Daniel's various offices, was used to establish the basic parameters.

  18. Estimating DEA Confidence Intervals for Canadian Urban Paratransit Agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    focuses on performance measurement. John M. Gleason, Creighton University (jgleason's true efficiency. Second, it uses Panel Data Analysis methodology, a set of statistical procedures method of identifying and adjusting for environmental effects that has more power than conventional

  19. 1. INTRODUCTION In the past, the Canadian mine wastes were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    to form acid mine drainage (AMD). This acidified water may also lead to the leaching of heavy metals which, etc) and water (e.g. mine process water, rainwater, lake water, etc.) to fill underground mine development within in situ paste backfill. The basis for this study was observations made by ground control

  20. CANADIAN GEOTECHNICAL CONFERENCE JOINT IAH-CNC/CGS CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Jorge G. Zornberg, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX ABSTRACT: Variability in geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) internal and GCL-geomembrane (GM) interface shear strength measured using large-scale direct

  1. Multi-jurisdictional environmental impact assessment: Canadian experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, Patricia, E-mail: p.fitzpatrick@uwinnipeg.c [Department of Geography, The University of Winnipeg 515 Portage Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Sinclair, A. John, E-mail: Jsincla@ms.umanitoba.c [Natural Resources Institute, Sinnott Building, 70 Dysart Rd., University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines complexities surrounding environmental impact assessment (EIA) in a multi-jurisdictional environment, with a specific focus on opportunities for public participation. With almost universal adoption of EIA, projects are increasingly subject to more than one assessment process. Thus there is demand to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination of EIAs. Canada has growing expertise with multijuristictional EIA that serves to illustrate the costs and opportunities associated with three different approaches to coordination: standardization, harmonization and substitution. Findings suggest that, although fraught with issues, harmonization is the most realistic approach for coordinating efforts. Harmonization has the potential to minimize duplication, avoid process uncertainty and increase efficiency and effectiveness in EIA. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrates that a bilateral agreement between jurisdictions is the best approach to harmonization, so long as negotiation of the agreement includes opportunities for meaningful participation, and implementation includes activities designed to communicate the assessment responsibilities of each jurisdiction, activities and schedules to the public. The experience of participants of different coordinated EIAs in Canada serves as counsel for on-going and future efforts to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination.

  2. Moving Canadian Oil to Markets: The Economic Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Handbook 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 Crude Oil and Condensate Oil Sands Natural Gas NGLs Sulphur Natural Gas Conventional Crude Oil Coal Bitumen Billionof2002$ PV of energy natural resouces in 2011 of the economy and prosperity · But this requires additional transportation infrastructure to access higher value

  3. Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement Final Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of wildlife habitat, altered land uses, degradation of air quality, and contributions to global warming. Many of these impacts would be site-specific and mitigable, and would be...

  4. Experience with Emergency Ultrasound Training by Canadian Emergency Medicine Residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel J; Theoret, Jonathan; Liao, Michael M; Kendall, John L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BMJ. 2003;16:361-367. Western Journal of Emergency MedicineEducation. Emergency Medicine Guidelines. 2010. Availableof Ultrasound in Medicine. AIUM officially recognizes 16.

  5. The Canadian Mineralogist Vol. 47, pp. 000 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (jarosite, epsomite, schwertmannite), Fe (oxy-)hydroxides (goethite, hematite and poorly crystalline Fe at both sites and correspond to a mixture of schwertmannite, goethite and jarosite containing some

  6. EM Hosts Successful Visit from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories at Hanford

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EM Highlights Advisory BoardEM Hosts

  7. May/June 2002 Canadian Antibiotic Update Beekeeping Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Submission) and 3) pres- cription of an "off-label" use of an existing product by a veterinarian. I will des of an existing veterinary pro- duct label to include honey bees, 2) registration of a new product (New Drug and each has an approved label indicating instructions to medicate bee colonies. The registered label means

  8. Moving Canadian Oil to Market March 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    (drilling) under many fish-bearing rivers "The proposed use of non-standard and, in the Panel's view legislation and currently existing on the west coast of British Columbia. They are based on international best practice and continual a

  9. Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cigarette smoking, and the risk of breast cancer. Cancerand breast cancer risk. JAMA Ambrosone, C.B. , Kropp, S. ,genotypes, and breast cancer risk: pooled analysis and meta-

  10. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Canadian Energy Demand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015YearYear Jan FebIssues in

  11. QER - Comment of Canadian Hydropower Association | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RM ExitProperty Transfer or TurnCompactInfographicQPierre

  12. Canadian Photonics Fabrication Center CPFC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits Manual JumpEnergyPhotonics Fabrication Center CPFC

  13. Canadian Valley Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits Manual JumpEnergyPhotonics Fabrication

  14. DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterialsDevelop Low-carbon Emission Coal

  15. QER - Comment of Canadian Electricity Association | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |ofDepartment ofPart|QuestionsVoyles, SethPatrick

  16. DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 ChairsEnergyawards contract for sludgeDOEto Transport

  17. Canadian Council of Chief Executives | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergy BushCalifornia Valley Solar RanchAwardFirst Report to

  18. Canadian County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind II CECCanada-NREL

  19. Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind II CECCanada-NRELHydrogen and Fuel

  20. Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallaway ElectricCambridge FundsCampa

  1. Canadian Wind Energy Atlas Potential Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallaway ElectricCambridge FundsCampaWind Energy

  2. Canadian Coastal Conference 1999 Conference Canadian sur la littoral 1999 SUSPENDED SEDlMENT TRANSPORT MODELING IN LAKE MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MENT TRANSPORT MODELING IN LAKE MICHIGAN IJ. Lou, ID.J. Schwab, and 2D. Beletsky INOAAlGreat Lakes Environmental and Marine Engineering, University of Michigan~ Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems ResearchfNOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and University of Michigan, 2205 Commonwealth Blvd., Ann

  3. CELLULOSE ESTER / POLYOLEFIN BINARY BLENDS : RHEOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY AND IMPACT PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by a chemical modification to bring new properties is one of the paths to produce a bioplastic. Progressively

  4. Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method Diesel Combustion Control with Closed-Loop Control of the Injection...

  5. NREL UL Fuel Dispensing Infrastructure Intermediate Blends Performance Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.; Clark, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation provides an overview of NREL's project to determine compatibility and safe performance of installed fuel dispensing infrastructure with E15.

  6. Settling of rubber particles in asphalt-rubber blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattanachai, Piyachat

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -rubber weights and the undissolved rubber weights of sample 10/27/97 . . . 38 II-8 Schematic of the Superpave~ test equipment. . . . . . . 40 11-9 The Superpave? performance grade specification. . . . . Ill-l The GPC chromatogram of neat Exxon AC-10... Corhett Results Asphaltenes Saturates Naphthene Aromatics Polar Aromatics Exxon AC-10 10 1% 11 6% 46. 2% 30. 7% Resin D 3. 5% 17. 8% 54. 8% 21. 6% Vacuum Tower Bottom 17. 3% 20. 2% 45. 2% 18 4o/(, SHRP ABM-1' 7. 1% 9, 0% 29 6% 52...

  7. Host-Guest Self-assembly in Block Copolymer Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Woon Ik

    Ultrafine, uniform nanostructures with excellent functionalities can be formed by self-assembly of block copolymer (BCP) thin films. However, extension of their geometric variability is not straightforward due to their ...

  8. anhydride ternary blend: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may be used in analysis of the closed (total reflux) multivessel batch distillation column. An indirect level control strategy is implemented that eliminates Skogestad, Sigurd...

  9. Using prismatic microstructured films for image blending in OLEDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haenichen, Lukas (Anspach, DE); Pschenitzka, Florian (San Francisco, CA)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a microstructured film disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The microstructured film contains features which diffuse light emitted by said OLED device and increase the luminance of the device.

  10. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infrastructure Pilot." General Motors News, May 11, 2010. Retrieved May 12, 2011: http:media.gm.commediausengmnews.detail.htmlcontentPagesnewsusen2010May051...

  11. A New Generation of Building Insulation by Foaming Polymer Blend...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    insulation technologies available on the market. Instead of hydroflurocarbon, it uses carbon dioxide as the blowing agent. This technology represents a highly valuable market...

  12. Achieving High Chilled Water Delta T Without Blending Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z.; Wang, G.; Xu, K.; Yu, Y.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . FACILITIES INFORMATION Figure 1 depicts a layout of three different buildings in Omaha. The miles in Figure 1 demonstrate the roughly pipeline distance between the central plant and the building. One common thing of the three buildings is that they have...

  13. Cracking blends of gas oil and residual oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.D.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking zone at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regeneration zone by burning coke of the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the cracking zone and the regeneration zone. The improvement is described for obtaining a naphtha product of improved octane number comprising introducing sufficient of a nickel and vanadium metals-containing heavy feedstock with the gas oil feed introduced into the cracking zone to deposit nickel and vanadium metals on the catalyst and raise the nickel and metals-content of the catalyst to a level ranging from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million of the metals expressed as equivalent nickel, based on the weight of the catalyst, and maintaining the nickel and vanadium metals level on the catalyst by withdrawing high nickel and vanadium metals containing catalyst and adding low nickel and vanadium metals-containing catalyst to the regeneration zone.

  14. WENO and Blended BDF Discretizations for Option Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oosterlee, Cornelis W. "Kees"

    values does not only depend on the stock price, but also on other functions of the price development

  15. aluminate cement blended: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    early stage hydration of different classes of oilwell cement Bentz, Dale P. 185 NISTIR 7232 CEMHYD3D: A Three-Dimensional Cement Hydration Engineering Websites Summary: NISTIR...

  16. alternatives blending private: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Fuels? Alternative Fuels, the Smart Choice: Alternative fuels - biodiesel, electricity, ethanol (E85), natural gas 168 Low cost private education in India...

  17. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  18. Legacy Vehicle Fuel System Testing with Intermediate Ethanol Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, G. W.; Hoff, C. J.; Borton, Z.; Ratcliff, M. A.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of E10 and E17 on legacy fuel system components from three common mid-1990s vintage vehicle models (Ford, GM, and Toyota) were studied. The fuel systems comprised a fuel sending unit with pump, a fuel rail and integrated pressure regulator, and the fuel injectors. The fuel system components were characterized and then installed and tested in sample aging test rigs to simulate the exposure and operation of the fuel system components in an operating vehicle. The fuel injectors were cycled with varying pulse widths during pump operation. Operational performance, such as fuel flow and pressure, was monitored during the aging tests. Both of the Toyota fuel pumps demonstrated some degradation in performance during testing. Six injectors were tested in each aging rig. The Ford and GM injectors showed little change over the aging tests. Overall, based on the results of both the fuel pump testing and the fuel injector testing, no major failures were observed that could be attributed to E17 exposure. The unknown fuel component histories add a large uncertainty to the aging tests. Acquiring fuel system components from operational legacy vehicles would reduce the uncertainty.

  19. Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Alleman, T. L.; Waynick, J. A.; Westbrook, S. R.; Porter, S.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an interim report for a study of biodiesel oxidative stability. It describes characterization and accelerated stability test results for 19 B100 samples and six diesel fuels.

  20. On-Road Use of Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigel Clark; Mridul Gautam; Donald Lyons; Chris Atkinson; Wenwei Xie; Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative compression ignition engine fuels are of interest both to reduce emissions and to reduce U.S. petroleum fuel demand. A Malaysian Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid fuel was compared with California No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from over the road Class 8 tractors with Caterpillar 3176 engines, using a chassis dynamometer and full scale dilution tunnel. The 5-Mile route was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 42,000 lb. Levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) were reduced by an average of 12% and particulate matter (PM) by 25% for the Fischer-Tropsch fuel over the California diesel fuel. Another distillate fuel produced catalytically from Fischer-Tropsch products originally derived from natural gas by Mossgas was also compared with 49-state No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from Detroit Diesel 6V-92 powered transit buses, three of them equipped with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, and three without. The CBD cycle was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 33,050 lb. For those buses with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, NO x was reduced by 8% and PM was reduced by 31% on average, while for those buses without, NO x was reduced by 5% and PM was reduced by 20% on average. It is concluded that advanced compression ignition fuels from non-petroleum sources can offer environmental advantages in typical line haul and city transit applications.