National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bldg floor suite

  1. Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 User ProgramBeam...

  2. PDock Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-03-01

    The PDock suite is a software package for performing molecular docking simulations. PDock was designed to bea modular and extensible software package that interfaces easily with third party codes to quickly evaluate and test different methods for moleuclar docking simulations. Docking calculations start with three dimensional atomistic models of two molecules (usually a protein and small molecule) and predict how they will bind to each other. This problem can be broken down into 2 mainmore » steps: 1) predicting various orientation/conformation combinations (called 'poses') of one molecule to "dock" into the other one and 2) scoring each possible pose. The best scoring pose is predicted to be the biological one. PDock has two main algoritms for performing the first step of docking. The first performs a biased search of poses using its own implementation of the published DOCK algorithm. The second is an evolutionary search algorithm. PDock uses a force-field based scoring scheme with an option of perform a more computationally expensive solvation correction. The PDock suite includes the following programs : PDock (main program); PGrid: for pre-processing input files; ProteinPDock (simplified main ()and input file for special case of protein-protein docking); and CombiPDock (simpliefied main() and input file for special case of combinatorial libraries).« less

  3. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance,more » roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.« less

  4. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua R; Garrett, Aaron; Erdem, Ender; Huang, Yu

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance, roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.

  5. CNP_TEST_SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002854MLTPL00 Automated Nuclear Data Test Suite file:///usr/gapps/CNP_src/us/RR/test_suite_cz/cnp_test_suite

  6. STAYS PNNL SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002851IBMPC00 STAYSL PNNL Suite http://radiochemscieng.pnnl.gov/research_areas/research_area_description.asp?id=283

  7. Demolition of Bldg. 9744 completed at Y-12 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demolition of Bldg. 9744 ... Demolition of Bldg. 9744 completed at Y-12 Posted: September 25, 2014 - 10:46am The Y-12 National Security Complex completed the demolition of Building 9744 this week. The facility was a deteriorated, former utilities and maintenance facility taking up more than 9,000 square feet in Y-12's high-security area. Despite challenges, the CNS demolition team was able to bring down the facility nearly two months ahead of schedule. The Y-12 National Security Complex recently

  8. Oracle Management Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-06-01

    The Oracle Management Tool Suite is used to automatically manage Oracle based systems. This includes startup and shutdown of databases and application servers as well as backup, space management, workload management and log file management.

  9. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business...

  10. Sierra Mechanics suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sierra Mechanics suite - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  11. STAYSL PNNL Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-12

    The STAYSL PNNL Suite of software provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of themore » reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations. The software suite consists of the STAYSL PNNL, SHIELD, BCF, and NJpp Fortran codes and the SigPhi Calculator spreadsheet tool. In addition, the development of this software suite and associated data libraries used the third-party NJOY99 Fortran code (http://t2.lanl.gov/nis/codes/njoy99/). The NJOY99 and NJpp codes are used to assemble cross section and covariance input data libraries (for both SHIELD and STAYSL PNNL) from the International Reactor Dosimetry File of 2002 (IRDF-2002; http://www-nds.iaea.org/irdf2002/) developed by the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Vienna, Austria). The BCF, SigPhi Calculator, and SHIELD software tools are used to calculate corrected activation rates and neutron self-shielding correction factors, which are inputs to the STAYSL PNNL code.« less

  12. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmons, J. Bruce; Blessing, Leonard J.

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  13. SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science SPOT Suite brings advanced algorithms, high performance computing and data management to the masses August 18, 2014 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov als.jpg Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley Lab (Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt) Some mysteries of science can only be explained on a nanometer scale -even smaller than a single strand of human DNA, which is about 2.5 nanometers wide. At this scale, scientists

  14. DC Pro Software Tool Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

  15. Real-Time Benchmark Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-17

    This software provides a portable benchmark suite for real time kernels. It tests the performance of many of the system calls, as well as the interrupt response time and task response time to interrupts. These numbers provide a baseline for comparing various real-time kernels and hardware platforms.

  16. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizationsmore » and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.« less

  17. Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-11-26

    The Data-Intensive Benchmark Suite is a set of programs written for the study of data-or storage-intensive science and engineering problems, The benchmark sets cover: general graph searching (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce breadth-first search), genome sequence searching, HTTP request classification (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce), low-level data communication, and storage device micro-beachmarking

  18. Mojo Application Monitoring Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-11

    Mojo is a software tool suite that can be used to monitor the progress of compute jobs on Linux Clusters and other high-performance computing platforms.Mojo is designed to allow system administrators to monitor the health and progress of computing jobs, and to allow users to view the progress and status of their own jobs. The facilities provided include the ability to notify users of job “hangs”, and to take an automated action (e.g killing themore » job) when something goes wrong. These operations can lead to a more efficient use of scarce resources.« less

  19. CXD 4600, 9103 Second Floor Refurbishment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9103 Second Floor Refurbishment (4600) Y-12 Site Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee The proposed action include: (1) development of the project baseline, design, and and...

  20. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the presentation delivered on the Pew Center on Global Climate Change's report From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency, which describes leading corporate energy efficiency programs.

  1. Contract carriage battles fought in antitrust suits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, M.

    1984-11-12

    Antitrust may be the approach natural gas end users need to gain access to gas transmission when pipelines or utilities allegedly resist carriage. Two pending suits could help ease the way for those who have trouble negotiating contract carriage of their self-help gas, and could help set precedents in similar antitrust suits. The cases involve a Colorade brick company's suit against Colorado Interstate Gas Co. and the State of Illinois' suit against Panhandle Eaton Pipeline Co. The issue is whether pipeline companies violate antitrust laws by refusing to carry fuel in competition with their own sales.

  2. Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BuildingFloorAreaResidential Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Residential Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaResidential"...

  3. Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BuildingFloorAreaHotels Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Hotels Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHotels" Showing 1 page...

  4. Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luszczek, Piotr; Dongarra, Jack J.; Koester, David; Rabenseifner,Rolf; Lucas, Bob; Kepner, Jeremy; McCalpin, John; Bailey, David; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2005-04-25

    The HPC Challenge benchmark suite has been released by the DARPA HPCS program to help define the performance boundaries of future Petascale computing systems. HPC Challenge is a suite of tests that examine the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with memory access patterns more challenging than those of the High Performance Linpack (HPL) benchmark used in the Top500 list. Thus, the suite is designed to augment the Top500 list, providing benchmarks that bound the performance of many real applications as a function of memory access characteristics e.g., spatial and temporal locality, and providing a framework for including additional tests. In particular, the suite is composed of several well known computational kernels (STREAM, HPL, matrix multiply--DGEMM, parallel matrix transpose--PTRANS, FFT, RandomAccess, and bandwidth/latency tests--b{sub eff}) that attempt to span high and low spatial and temporal locality space. By design, the HPC Challenge tests are scalable with the size of data sets being a function of the largest HPL matrix for the tested system.

  5. Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountabi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement Throughout the Organization Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency ...

  6. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    simulation suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The coyote universe III: simulation suite and ...

  7. Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Unheated but...

  8. Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 C)...

  9. Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property...

  10. Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the...

  11. Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaShops Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Shops Pages using the property...

  12. Property:Building/FloorAreaWarehouses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaWarehouses Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Warehouses Pages using the...

  13. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  14. Property:Building/FloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Theatres,...

  15. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Daytime health services Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime" Showing 4...

  16. Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaSportCenters" Showing 2 pages...

  17. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  18. Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5913 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2013 / Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite 10800, Arlington, Virginia 22202-4149. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603-7740, Fax: (703) 603-0655, or email CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Addition On 6/28/2013 (78 FR 38952-38953), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published notice of proposed addition to the Procurement List.

  19. The LLNL MPI_Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-10-25

    MPI_T is an interface for tools introduced in the 3.0 version of MPI. The interface provides mechanisms for tools to access and set performance and control variables that are exposed by an MPI implementation. We have developed an MPI_T tool suite to provide a first set of tools exploiting the new interface and to get tool writers started on the path to more sophisticated support.

  20. Acoustic Imaging Suite - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acoustic Imaging Suite Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL's acoustic imaging technology improves methods of capturing moving images of a specified object by using a photorefractive effect to produce a full-field image of the object without using a probe to perform a full scan of the object. INL technology includes a second device that produces an acoustic image of an object using acoustic wave results in the formation of at least one

  1. Breaking the silos: The art documentation suite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-23

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that themore » training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work, too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.« less

  2. Engineering Evaluation Report on K-311-1 Floor Subsidence (2008 Annual Report) at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott R.B.

    2008-11-13

    The purpose of this task is to evaluate the effect of floor settlement on building structure, piping, and equipment foundations between column lines 1 and 2 and B and K of Bldg. K-311-1 (see Fig. A-1 in Appendix A) at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 0 of this document covers the 2005 annual inspection. Revision 1 addresses the 2006 annual inspection, Revision 2 addresses the 2007 annual inspection, and Revision 3 covers the 2008 annual inspection, as indicated by the changed report title. A civil survey and visual inspection were performed. Only a representative number of points were measured during the 2008 survey. The exact location of a number of survey points in Table A-1 could not be accurately determined in the 2008 survey since these points had not been spray painted since 2003. The points measured are deemed adequate to support the conclusions of this report. Based on the survey and observations, there has been no appreciable change in the condition of the unit since the 2007 inspection. The subsidence of the floor presents concerns to the building structure due to the possible indeterminate load on the pipe gallery framing. Prior to demolition activities that involve the piping or removal of the equipment, such as vent, purge and drain and foaming, engineering involvement in the planning is necessary. The piping connected to the equipment is under stress, and actions should be implemented to relieve this stress prior to disturbing any of the equipment or associated piping. In addition, the load on the pipe gallery framing needs to be relieved prior to any activities taking place in the pipe gallery. Access to this area and the pipe gallery is not allowed until the stress is released.

  3. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  4. Suite of Cellulase Enzyme Technologies for Biomass Conversion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Suite of Cellulase Enzyme Technologies for Biomass Conversion National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  5. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System ... Demonstrations of Integrated Advanced Rooftop Unit Controls and Automated Fault Detection ...

  6. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings Depend on energy cost, R-value increase, and airtightness of newly insulated floor compared to existing. Time to Complete 4-8 hours Overall Cost $0.60 to $1.00 PER SQUARE FOOT FOR R-30 BATTS Careful air sealing and insulation between an unconditioned garage and the conditioned space above can increase comfort,

  7. Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the property "BuildingFloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 +...

  8. Repairing Walls & Floors: How To's for the Handy Homeowner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-09

    This brochure provides handy homeowners with tips on how to properly repair walls and floors in their homes that sustained damage during a hurricane. This publications is a part of the How To's for the Handy Homeowner Series.

  9. Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

  10. Floor-supply displacement air-conditioning: Laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, Takashi; Nobe, Tatsuo; Tanabe, Shinichi; Kimura, Kenichi

    1999-07-01

    The results of laboratory measurements on the performance of a floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system in comparison to a displacement ventilation system with a side-wall-mounted diffuser and a ceiling-based distribution system are described. Thermal stratification was observed, as there were greater vertical air temperature differences in both of the displacement systems than in the ceiling-based system. The floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system produced a uniformly low air velocity at each measurement height, while a rather high air velocity near the floor was observed for the displacement ventilation system with a sidewall-mounted diffuser. Local mean age of air of the floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system was lower than that of the other systems, especially in the lower part of the room. According to the simulation results, the floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system with outdoor air cooling requires 34% less energy than the conventional air-conditioning system with outdoor air cooling.

  11. Crowne Plaza Suites MSP Airport - Mall of America

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Crowne Plaza Suites MSP Airport - Mall of America Bloomington, Minnesota | May 13-15, 2014 ... While you're in Minnesota, you'll experience three days of dynamic programming - starting ...

  12. A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Authors: Leibly, David J. ; Arbing, Mark A. ; Pashkov, Inna ; DeVore, Natasha ; Waldo, Geoffrey S. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Yeates, Todd O. [1] ; LANL) [2] + Show Author Affiliations UCLA ( Publication Date: 2015-11-30 OSTI Identifier: 1227481 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:

  13. A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 31, 2016 Title: A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Authors: Leibly, David J. ; Arbing, Mark A. ; Pashkov, Inna ; DeVore, Natasha ; Waldo, Geoffrey S. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Yeates, Todd O. Publication Date: 2015-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1250980 Grant/Contract Number: FC02-02ER63421;

  14. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  15. DYNA3D/ParaDyn Regression Test Suite Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J I

    2011-01-25

    The following table constitutes an initial assessment of feature coverage across the regression test suite used for DYNA3D and ParaDyn. It documents the regression test suite at the time of production release 10.1 in September 2010. The columns of the table represent groupings of functionalities, e.g., material models. Each problem in the test suite is represented by a row in the table. All features exercised by the problem are denoted by a check mark in the corresponding column. The definition of ''feature'' has not been subdivided to its smallest unit of user input, e.g., algorithmic parameters specific to a particular type of contact surface. This represents a judgment to provide code developers and users a reasonable impression of feature coverage without expanding the width of the table by several multiples. All regression testing is run in parallel, typically with eight processors. Many are strictly regression tests acting as a check that the codes continue to produce adequately repeatable results as development unfolds, compilers change and platforms are replaced. A subset of the tests represents true verification problems that have been checked against analytical or other benchmark solutions. Users are welcomed to submit documented problems for inclusion in the test suite, especially if they are heavily exercising, and dependent upon, features that are currently underrepresented.

  16. Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Schools, including...

  17. Waste Assessment Baseline for the IPOC Second Floor, West Wing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel A

    2015-04-01

    Following a building-wide waste assessment in September, 2014, and subsequent presentation to Sandia leadership regarding the goal of Zero Waste by 2025, the occupants of the IPOC Second Floor, West Wing contacted the Materials Sustainability and Pollution Prevention (MSP2) team to guide them to Zero Waste in advance of the rest of the site. The occupants are from Center 3600, Public Relations and Communications , and Center 800, Independent Audit, Ethics and Business Conduct . To accomplish this, MSP2 conducted a new limited waste assessment from March 2-6, 2015 to compare the second floor, west wing to the building as a whole. The assessment also serves as a baseline with which to mark improvements in diversion in approximately 6 months.

  18. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  19. New Atmospheric Profiling Instrument Added to SGP CART Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 New Atmospheric Profiling Instrument Added to SGP CART Suite A new atmospheric profiling instrument at the SGP CART site is giving researchers an additional useful data stream. The new instrument is a microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) developed by Radiometrics Corporation. One ARM Program focus is improving the quality of simulations by global climate models, particularly models that deal with interactions between sunlight (solar radiation) and clouds. To support this improvement, ARM needs

  20. Suite of Photo-electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Suite of Photo-electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The primary fuel powering new fuel cell technologies is hydrogen. The market for fuel cells is expected

  1. NREL: Energy Storage - Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool Suite Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries used in EVs and stationary energy storage applications must be optimized to justify their high upfront costs. Given that batteries degrade with use and storage, strategies for optimization must factor in many years of use with a number of variables, including: Temperature State-of-charge histories Electricity current levels Cycle depth and frequency. These factors can all affect rates of battery degradation,

  2. pcircle - A Suite of Scalable Parallel File System Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-10-01

    Most of the software related to file system are written for conventional local file system, they are serialized and can't take advantage of the benefit of a large scale parallel file system. "pcircle" software builds on top of ubiquitous MPI in cluster computing environment and "work-stealing" pattern to provide a scalable, high-performance suite of file system tools. In particular - it implemented parallel data copy and parallel data checksumming, with advanced features such as asyncmore » progress report, checkpoint and restart, as well as integrity checking.« less

  3. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater sophistication or other physics regimes (e.g., energetic material response, magneto-hydrodynamics), would represent a scientifically desirable complement to the fundamental test cases discussed in this report. The authors believe that this document can be used to enhance the verification analyses undertaken at the DOE WP Laboratories and, thus, to improve the quality, credibility, and usefulness of the simulation codes that are analyzed with these problems.

  4. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

  6. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecularmore » dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.« less

  7. User antitrust suit alleges utility cabal limits buy-back

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efron, S.

    1984-10-15

    An antitrust suit against 90 Georgia electric utilities, charging that their monopoly of retail electricity sales should not preclude cogenerators and small power producers from selling surplus power to utilities elsewhere on the network, could set a national precedent allowing cogenerators to shop around for the best buy-back rate. Greensboro Lumber Co. charges that the utilities' refusal to wheel cogenerated power to potential purchasers represents a restraint of trade. The lumber company contends that cogenerators should sell to the wholesale market, where utilities have no state-granted monopoly. Attorneys for the two sides are unsure of the immediate outcome, but predict that antitrust action or threatened action could give cogenerators unfair leverage.

  8. User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-27

    The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  9. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  10. Experimental study on the floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, Takashi; Nobe, Tatsuo; Takebayashi, Yoshihisa

    1995-12-31

    These results are presented from a research project to investigate the effects of a floor-supply displacement ventilation system with practical indoor heat loads. The experiments were performed in an experimental chamber (35.2 m{sup 2}) located in a controlled environment chamber. Temperature distributions were measured at seven heights throughout the experimental chamber for each test condition. Data were analyzed to observe thermal stratification as affected by lighting, occupants, and heat loads (personal computers), and its disruption caused by walking and change of air volume. In addition, airflow characteristics and ventilation efficiencies were investigated using a smoke machine, tobacco smoke, dust for industrial testing, and a tracer gas (CO{sub 2}) step-up procedure.

  11. eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PDF icon eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  12. 120 Years of U.S. Residential Housing Stock and Floor Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto de Moura, Maria C.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.

    2015-08-11

    Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO2 emissions. Floor space is a major driver of building energy demand. This paper develops a historical time series of total residential floor space for 1891-2010 and examines the role of socio-economic drivers GDP, population and household size on floor space. Using primarily data from the U.S. Census Bureau, we develop new construction and vintage-disaggregated housing stock for three building types, and address various data inconsistency issues. An examination of the long-term relationship of GDP and total residential floor space shows a remarkably constant trend over the period. While population increases five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributes towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. Total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years.

  13. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  14. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million squaremore » feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.« less

  15. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits- Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to ...

  16. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for 24-hour health services Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Building...

  17. Notices Bldg., 901 Pilottown Road, Lewes, DE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    along with the new time and place of the meeting will be posted on the Commission's Web site at http: www.cftc.gov. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Sauntia S. Warfield,...

  18. 331_Bldg_Landscaping_Alterations.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. Dark matter vs. neutrinos: the effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jonathan H.

    2015-03-09

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments are said to run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that, using only spectral information, the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions it can still be surpassed using timing information, and so the neutrino floor is not an absolute limit on the sensitivity of Direct Detection experiments.

  20. Can an Iron Man Suit Be Made?: Science Behind Superheroes | GE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can an Iron Man Suit Be Made?: Science Behind Superheroes Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new...

  1. DC Pro Software Tool Suite, Data Center Fact Sheet, Industrial Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

  2. NREL: State and Local Governments - The Effect of State Policy Suites on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Development of Solar Markets The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets In the report The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets NREL analysts use statistical analysis and detailed case studies to describe why solar market policies are more successful in some states than others. Their findings indicate that while no standard formula for solar implementation exists, the combination of foundational policies and localized strategies can

  3. The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-04

    The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

  4. The Future of Technology Is Hiding on the Ocean Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Technology Is Hiding on the Ocean Floor Gizmodo editor Maddie Stone writes about the potential for mining rare earths from manganese nodules located on the deep sea floor. In the story, Stone talks with Critical Materials Director Alex King about the need and uses for rare earths. The story includes the improbable recruitment of billionaire industrialist and recluse Howard Hughes by the CIA to build a ship to supposedly harvest these nodules. In fact, that was just a cover story to

  5. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  6. Equation-of-State Test Suite for the DYNA3D Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Russell D.

    2015-11-05

    This document describes the creation and implementation of a test suite for the Equationof- State models in the DYNA3D code. A customized input deck has been created for each model, as well as a script that extracts the relevant data from the high-speed edit file created by DYNA3D. Each equation-of-state model is broken apart and individual elements of the model are tested, as well as testing the entire model. The input deck for each model is described and the results of the tests are discussed. The intent of this work is to add this test suite to the validation suite presently used for DYNA3D.

  7. Cleaning of the ocean floor near offshore platforms in the Gulf coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.S.; Smith, S.A. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    For decades in offshore drilling, the drill cuttings were separated from the circulating drilling fluid by the shale shaker and hydrocyclone, and discharged to the ocean. The drilling fluid itself was discharged to the ocean intermittently to maintain its required properties during the drilling process. These discharges contain many environmentally undesirable chemicals, such as hydrocarbons chemical additives and heavy metals. As a result, the ocean floor near some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico are covered by contaminated sediment. Ocean current is not as effective in washing out the discarded ocean muds as previously believed. An attempt was made to clean some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. The quantity and characteristics of the drilling discharges are estimated the technology used to clean the ocean floor near platforms is described, and advanced treatments for hydrocarbon removal, chemical oxidation and activated carbon adsorption, are discussed. 8 references.

  8. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  9. Innovative residential floor construction: Structural evaluation of steel joists with pre-formed web openings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elhajj, N.R.

    1999-03-01

    Since 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development has sponsored numerous studies to identify, evaluate, and implement innovative structural materials, such as cold-formed steel (CFS), in the residential market. The use of CFS is still very limited, partly because steel is not being effectively integrated into conventional home construction. One of the major barriers to the use of CFS floor joists is the impact it has on placement of large waste drains and ductwork installed in floor systems. This report provides an overview of tests conducted by the NAHB to integrate these systems with CFS. A brief literature review of relevant work followed by a detailed overview of the experimental and analytical approach are also provided. The report recommends adoption of the research findings in residential and commercial applications.

  10. NREL Finds Nanotube Semiconductors Well-suited for PV Systems - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL NREL Finds Nanotube Semiconductors Well-suited for PV Systems April 25, 2016 Graphic shows cellular nanotubes. Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered single-walled carbon nanotube semiconductors could be favorable for photovoltaic systems because they can potentially convert sunlight to electricity or fuels without losing much energy. The research builds on the Nobel Prize-winning work of Rudolph Marcus, who developed a

  11. RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment Charley Yu, PhD, CHP RESRAD Program Manager Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Presented at Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory Web Conference June 27, 2012 Presentation Outline  RESRAD Family of Codes Overview  Brief Overview of the RESRAD Methodology  RESRAD-BUILD Overview  RESRAD-OFFSITE Overview  RESRAD-BIOTA Overview  Summary 2 RESRAD

  12. Defending mining claims and mineral leases in environmental suits against federal land managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twelker, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Suits in the last 4-5 years jeopardize the title of thousands of mining claims and mineral leases. The cases presenting the most striking examples are National Wildlife Federation v. Burford, Connor v. Burford, Sierra Club V. Watt, and Bob Marshall Alliance v. Watt. From the claimants' and lessees' point of view, these decisions granted environmental groups sweeping, though somewhat ill-defined, relief. The challenges by environmental groups are based on statutes designed to bring environmental considerations before federal decision makers. The claimants and lessees are caught in the middle of the exchange between environmentalists and federal agencies. Lawsuits that indirectly challenge leases and claims are unlike environmental challenges to fixed projects such as highways or dams. Those affected often times do not know exactly what is at stake. When the challenge is indirect, unexplored, or partially explored, proper ties have only speculative value and the claimants and lessees are often unwilling or unable to engage in a fight with well-heeled environmental public interest law firms. While the federal government has defended the suits, their interests and those of the claimants and lessees may diverge. In the context of the four cases mentioned above, this paper addresses the rights and remedies of claimants and lessees before, during, and after environmental procedural suits that indirectly challenge federal mining claims and mineral leases.

  13. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more » in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  14. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes) in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.

  15. Method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate located on the ocean floor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyatt, Douglas E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate on the ocean floor includes a flexible cover, a plurality of steerable base members secured to the cover, and a steerable mining module. A suitable source for inflating the cover over the gas hydrate deposit is provided. The mining module, positioned on the gas hydrate deposit, is preferably connected to the cover by a control cable. A gas retrieval conduit or hose extends upwardly from the cover to be connected to a support ship on the ocean surface.

  16. The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets D. Steward and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP- 7A40-62506 November 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

  17. Moving target indicating radar applications in an integrated site security suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appenzeller, R.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The integration of a small, lightweight, low power consumption radar into a site security sensor suite can provide several key advantages in the ability to detect vehicles and personnel over large ground areas. This paper presents rationale for the inclusion of a man-portable Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar in several security scenarios and outlines the technical specifics of a candidate radar. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the effectiveness of a combination of optical sensors in concert with a scanning narrow beam radar at the Nevada Test Site in Mercury, Nevada. Demonstration results from these previous test activities are included herein. Of particular interest is the complimentary nature of this sensor suite where the large field of view achievable with radar allows the optical sensors to be used as pinpoint target classification devices. The inclusion of a radar minimizes operator fatigue caused by watching cameras scanning in azimuth and elevation. Advances in the areas of nuisance alarm rejection and improved range detection against single personnel targets were made in 1990 and this capability is included in the current production version.

  18. Suite of Software Objects for Arbitrary Spatial Partitioning of Modeling Dataset

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-04-30

    SpatialDataSet is an abstract superclass for a suite of object classes which associate data structures with specific regions (Cells) or points (PCells) in two or three-dimensional space. The data structure carried by these Cells/PCells are arbitrary in layout, but the same layout is used for every Cell/PCell within the SpatialDataSet. The SpatialDataSet objects are used within ANL''s Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) to carry spatially distributed attributes of terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric objects in amore » simulation domain. DIAS is a flexible object based software framework for concurrent, multidisciplinary modeling. The SpatialDataSet allows access to the information carried within them without requiring knowledge of the details of the spatial partitioning of the data on the part of the requesting agent. The suite of SpatialDataSet objects can be used within object based software architectures other than DIAS. SpatialDataSet has many subclasses covering different modes of partitioning two or three dimensional space, including various forms of grids, meshes, networks, patchworks, etc.« less

  19. Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated within biofuel development.

  20. Sm-Nd systematics of lunar ferroan anorthositic suite rocks: Constraints on lunar crust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyet, Maud; Carlson, Richard W.; Borg, Lars E.; Horan, Mary

    2014-09-28

    Here, we have measured Sm–Nd systematics, including the short-lived 146Sm–142Nd chronometer, in lunar ferroan anorthositic suite (FAS) whole rocks (15415, 62236, 62255, 65315, 60025). At least some members of the suite are thought to be primary crystallization products formed by plagioclase flotation during crystallization of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). Most of these samples, except 62236, have not been exposed to galactic cosmic rays for a long period and thus require minimal correction to their 142Nd isotope composition. These samples all have measured deficits in 142Nd relative to the JNdi-1 terrestrial standard in the range –45 to –21 ppm. The range is –45 to –15 ppm once the 62236 142Nd/144Nd ratio is corrected from neutron-capture effects. Analyzed FAS samples do not define a single isochron in either 146Sm–142Nd or 147Sm–143Nd systematics, suggesting that they either do not have the same crystallization age, come from different sources, or have suffered isotopic disturbance. Because the age is not known for some samples, we explore the implications of their initial isotopic compositions for crystallization ages in the first 400 Ma of solar system history, a timing interval that covers all the ages determined for the ferroan anorthositic suite whole rocks as well as different estimates for the crystallization of the LMO. 62255 has the largest deficit in initial 142Nd and does not appear to have followed the same differentiation path as the other FAS samples. The large deficit in 142Nd of FAN 62255 may suggest a crystallization age around 60–125 Ma after the beginning of solar system accretion. This result provides essential information about the age of the giant impact forming the Moon. The initial Nd isotopic compositions of FAS samples can be matched either with a bulk-Moon with chondritic Sm/Nd ratio but enstatite-chondrite-like initial 142Nd/144Nd (e.g. 10 ppm below modern terrestrial), or a bulk-Moon with superchondritic Sm/Nd ratio and initial 142Nd/144Nd similar to ordinary chondrites.

  1. Sm-Nd systematics of lunar ferroan anorthositic suite rocks: Constraints on lunar crust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boyet, Maud; Carlson, Richard W.; Borg, Lars E.; Horan, Mary

    2014-09-28

    Here, we have measured Sm–Nd systematics, including the short-lived 146Sm–142Nd chronometer, in lunar ferroan anorthositic suite (FAS) whole rocks (15415, 62236, 62255, 65315, 60025). At least some members of the suite are thought to be primary crystallization products formed by plagioclase flotation during crystallization of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). Most of these samples, except 62236, have not been exposed to galactic cosmic rays for a long period and thus require minimal correction to their 142Nd isotope composition. These samples all have measured deficits in 142Nd relative to the JNdi-1 terrestrial standard in the range –45 to –21 ppm. Themore » range is –45 to –15 ppm once the 62236 142Nd/144Nd ratio is corrected from neutron-capture effects. Analyzed FAS samples do not define a single isochron in either 146Sm–142Nd or 147Sm–143Nd systematics, suggesting that they either do not have the same crystallization age, come from different sources, or have suffered isotopic disturbance. Because the age is not known for some samples, we explore the implications of their initial isotopic compositions for crystallization ages in the first 400 Ma of solar system history, a timing interval that covers all the ages determined for the ferroan anorthositic suite whole rocks as well as different estimates for the crystallization of the LMO. 62255 has the largest deficit in initial 142Nd and does not appear to have followed the same differentiation path as the other FAS samples. The large deficit in 142Nd of FAN 62255 may suggest a crystallization age around 60–125 Ma after the beginning of solar system accretion. This result provides essential information about the age of the giant impact forming the Moon. The initial Nd isotopic compositions of FAS samples can be matched either with a bulk-Moon with chondritic Sm/Nd ratio but enstatite-chondrite-like initial 142Nd/144Nd (e.g. 10 ppm below modern terrestrial), or a bulk-Moon with superchondritic Sm/Nd ratio and initial 142Nd/144Nd similar to ordinary chondrites.« less

  2. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-20

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a fewmore » hundred m2 s−1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.« less

  3. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium–heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth system models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Abernathey, R.

    2015-07-27

    This paper uses a suite of Earth system models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science, each of which results from an inconsistency between theoretically motivated global energy balances and direct observations. The helium–heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in Earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedimore » that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s−1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere and thus exhibit large gradients along isopycnals while radiocarbon equilibrates slowly and thus exhibits smaller gradients along isopycnals. Thus it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox, by increasing the transport of mantle helium to the surface more than it would radiocarbon. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the southeastern Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi below the thermocline than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so-called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.« less

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

  5. Effects of different SSI parameters on the floor response spectra of a nuclear Reactor Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.; Malik, L.E.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of several critical soil-structure interaction (SSI) parameters on the floor response spectra (FRS) of a typical nuclear Reactor Building have been examined. These parameters are deconvolution effects (reductions in ground motion with depth), strain dependency of soil dynamic properties and calculation of impedance functions using different approaches. The significant conclusions of the study, which are applicable to a deeply embedded very rigid nuclear Reactor Building, are as follows: (1) FRS generated without considering scattering effects are highly conservative; (2) Differences between FRS, generated considering strain-dependency of soil dynamic properties, and those generated using low-strain values, are not significant; and (3) the lumped-parameter approach of SSI calculations, which only uses a single value of soil shear modulus in impedance calculations, may not be able to properly compute the soil impedances for a soil deposit with irregularly varying properties with depth. An SSI approach, which can explicitly consider these variations, needs to be used in FRS calculations in such cases.

  6. Effects of different SSI parameters on the floor response spectra of a nuclear Reactor Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.; Malik, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of several critical soil-structure interaction (SSI) parameters on the floor response spectra (FRS) of a typical nuclear Reactor Building have been examined. These parameters are deconvolution effects (reductions in ground motion with depth), strain dependency of soil dynamic properties and calculation of impedance functions using different approaches. The significant conclusions of the study, which are applicable to a deeply embedded very rigid nuclear Reactor Building, are as follows: (1) FRS generated without considering scattering effects are highly conservative; (2) Differences between FRS, generated considering strain-dependency of soil dynamic properties, and those generated using low-strain values, are not significant; and (3) the lumped-parameter approach of SSI calculations, which only uses a single value of soil shear modulus in impedance calculations, may not be able to properly compute the soil impedances for a soil deposit with irregularly varying properties with depth. An SSI approach, which can explicitly consider these variations, needs to be used in FRS calculations in such cases.

  7. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Matika, D.; Kollar, R.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  8. Nonlinear dynamic response of submarine pipelines in contact with the ocean floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamic response of a submarine pipeline to wave and current excitation is investigated by the finite-element method. The pipeline, in contact with soft clay on the ocean floor, is modeled as a continuous beam. Small-deflection theory with geometric stiffening is employed. Pipeline tension, used in the geometric stiffness matrix, is calculated using pipeline stretch. The hydrodynamic forces are calculated using the modified Morison equation. The excitation involves a long-crested regular wave propagating perpendicular to the pipeline axis with or with out the current. The distributed drag and lift forces are converted into multisegment concentrated forces by means of the beam shape functions, and the inertia force is treated as a uniformly distributed force on each element. The soil-resistance forces due to lateral sliding on a plane surface are calculated using either an elasto-plastic or a hysteretic pipeline-soil interaction model. The Newmark Method is used to integrate the nonlinear equations of dynamic equilibrium using an iterative scheme within each time step. It is found from this study that the use of geometric stiffness is necessary for pipelines in a marine environment. The significant effect of geometric stiffening on pipeline responses for cases involving current is demonstrated.

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  10. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

  11. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

  12. Continuous sea-floor spreading in Red Sea: an alternative interpretation of magnetic anomaly pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Brecque, J.L.; Zitellini

    1985-04-01

    The magnetic anomaly pattern over the Red Sea can be modeled as a continuous system of sea-floor spreading from the early Miocene to the present by using a timevarying process filter. The half spreading rate is approximately 1 cm/yr (0.4 in./yr) since initial rifting. The parameters that determine the process filter and development of the transition zone are the intrusion parameter (a measure of the dispersion of feeder dikes or horizontal strain about the rift axis), a flow parameter (a measure of the average flow width), and the effusion parameter (a measure of the volcanic effusion and thickness of layer 2). The authors estimate the flow parameter to be 2.7km(1.7 mi) and the intrusion parameter to be 7.5km(4.7 mi) at early rifting. These values suggest that a wide distribution of axial dikes or horizontal strain is the dominant factor in forming the magnetic anomaly pattern. Reduction in the width of the intrusion parameter and the effusion rate as rifting proceeded resulted in focusing of the strain, thinning of layer 2, and formation of the Red Sea deeps. Their modeling suggests that phase 2, or the stratoid phase, began about the time of anomaly 5C or chron C5C approximately 16 Ma. This age is compatible with geologic estimates of the initial rifting at the late Oligocene to early Miocene (Coleman, 1974; Gass, 1977). The opening rate for Africa-Arabia plate motion has remained relatively constant since early rifting although the African margin appears to be accreting faster than the Arabian plate.

  13. Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-07-24

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio and use hard constraints available from many sites and applications. External interest in the approach and method is high, and already commercial and DOE entities have requested technical work using the newly developed methodology for CO{sub 2} monitoring.

  14. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  15. DESCRIPTION BARCODE MANUFACTURER MODEL_NO COST SN BLDG ROOM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Privacy Awareness Training DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Privacy Awareness Training DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Privacy Awareness Training PDF icon DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Privacy Awareness Training More Documents & Publications PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Electronic Records Keeping System, Office of Legacy Management, LM Records Handling System-Freedom of Information/Privacy Act, Office of Legacy management

  16. CX-00079_CHPRC_Annual_Support_Bldg _Structure.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. CX-00080_CHPRC Annual Bldg Relocation.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  18. 331_Bldg_Aquatic_Research_Lab_Upgrades.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. Microsoft Word - N01747_Bldg 100 SAR.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Building 100 Area Site Assessment Report August 2012 LMS/PIN/N01747 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01747 Pinellas County, Florida, Site Building 100 Area Site Assessment Report August 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Site Assessment Report August 2012 Doc. No. N01747 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii 1.0

  20. Microsoft Word - Bldg 100 Pilot Test.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... iron present at relatively low concentrations, indicating ... Temperature C 23.5 23.78 24.61 24.56 24.83 24.72 24.11 24.11 ... well corresponds directly with an HRC treatment area. ...

  1. 272-AW_Bldg_Renovation_cx00017 (2).pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  2. Verification Test Suite (VERTS) For Rail Gun Applications using ALE3D: 2-D Hydrodynamics & Thermal Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najjar, F M; Solberg, J; White, D

    2008-04-17

    A verification test suite has been assessed with primary focus on low reynolds number flow of liquid metals. This is representative of the interface between the armature and rail in gun applications. The computational multiphysics framework, ALE3D, is used. The main objective of the current study is to provide guidance and gain confidence in the results obtained with ALE3D. A verification test suite based on 2-D cases is proposed and includes the lid-driven cavity and the Couette flow are investigated. The hydro and thermal fields are assumed to be steady and laminar in nature. Results are compared with analytical solutions and previously published data. Mesh resolution studies are performed along with various models for the equation of state.

  3. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  6. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  7. Implementation of Remaining Useful Lifetime Transformer Models in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Lybeck, Nancy J.; Pham, Binh; Rusaw, Richard; Bickford, Randall

    2015-02-01

    Research and development efforts are required to address aging and reliability concerns of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants. As most plants continue to operate beyond the license life (i.e., towards 60 or 80 years), plant components are more likely to incur age-related degradation mechanisms. To assess and manage the health of aging plant assets across the nuclear industry, the Electric Power Research Institute has developed a web-based Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite for diagnosis and prognosis. FW-PHM is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases, comprised of the Diagnostic Advisor, the Asset Fault Signature Database, the Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and the Remaining Useful Life Database, that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The main focus of this paper is the implementation of prognostic models for generator step-up transformers in the FW-PHM Suite. One prognostic model discussed is based on the functional relationship between degree of polymerization, (the most commonly used metrics to assess the health of the winding insulation in a transformer) and furfural concentration in the insulating oil. The other model is based on thermal-induced degradation of the transformer insulation. By utilizing transformer loading information, established thermal models are used to estimate the hot spot temperature inside the transformer winding. Both models are implemented in the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW-PHM Suite. The Remaining Useful Life Advisor utilizes the implemented prognostic models to estimate the remaining useful life of the paper winding insulation in the transformer based on actual oil testing and operational data.

  8. 3610 N. 44th Street, Suite 250, Phoenix, AZ 85018 ● Phone 602-808-2004 ●

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 N. 44th Street, Suite 250, Phoenix, AZ 85018 ● Phone 602-808-2004 ● Fax 602-808-2099 ● www.sunzia.net October 17, 2013 Transmitted via electronic mail to juliea.smith@hq.doe.gov and christopher.lawrence@hq.doe.gov Subject: SunZia Southwest Transmission Project comments on Department of Energy's August 29, 2013 Federal Register Notice regarding Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects. The following comments are provided to the Department of

  9. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  10. Using the Beopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar; Maguire, Jeff; Horowitz, Scott; Christensen, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures to follow when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important because a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes building models that isolate the impacts of specific components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models. These discrepancies are caused by differences in the algorithms used by the engines or coding errors.

  11. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

  12. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  13. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  14. Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.

    1996-12-30

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

  15. LANL Go Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    libraries, utilities, and software patches related to Google's Go programming language (http:www.golang.org). September 24, 2013 software Available for thumbnail of...

  16. VE-Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    an open source virtual engineering software toolkit that simplifies information management so users can simultaneously interact with engineering analyses and graphical models to create a virtual decision-making environment.

  17. LBNL LLRF Controls Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-18

    This package provides a complete set of FPGA logic and driver software for the LBNL Interim SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) LLRF (Low Level Radio Frequency) cavity control system, plus a hardware-software cosimulation framework that can demonstrate correct operation of the code. The controls are organized in a traditional three-tier layout. Tier 1 (hardware access): Verilog code targeted at the XC2S15O FPGA that lies at the center of the custom hardware, Includes a direct digital frequencymore » synthesizer (DDS), a low-latency vector PI feedback control loop, four-channel vector waveform capture, and support for on-board housekeeping circuitry. Tier 2 (network presentation): C code targeted at a 32-bit microcontroller, which has a direct connection to both the FPGA and to Ethemet. This layer is itself divided into a HAL (hardware abstraction layer) to mediate access to the FPGA registers, a driver to organize all the application-specific computations (including a waveform curve fit that determines cavity detuning), and a toy network access protocol. Tier 3 (operator interface): A Tcl program that exchanges data with tier 2, and gives the operator a virtual control panel for the hardware In the production SNS installation, the toy network access protocol and tier 3 are replaced with EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/). The code given here is dramatically smaller and simpler than EPICS, yet gives enough functionality to demonstrate proper operation of an RF cavity. The SNS facility now uses three generations of LLRF control hardware. This package is intended to be used in all of them, but is so far only tested on the second ("Interim") generation hardware. It may also be adaptable to future LLRF projects at LBNL, other National Labs, and worldwide.« less

  18. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  19. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project: Feasibility test of real-time radiation monitoring during removal of surface contamination from concrete floors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leino, R.; Corle, S.

    1995-10-01

    This feasibility test was conducted to determine if real-time radiation-monitoring instruments could be mounted on decontamination machines during remediation activities to provide useful and immediate feedback to equipment operators. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this field test under the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to identify a more efficient method to remove radiological contamination from concrete floor surfaces. This test demonstrated that project durations and costs may be reduced by combining radiation-monitoring equipment with decontamination machines. The test also demonstrated that a microprocessor-based instrument such as a radiation monitor can withstand the type of vibration that is characteristic of floor scabblers with no apparent damage. Combining radiation-monitoring equipment with a decontamination machine reduces the time and costs required to decontaminate concrete surfaces. These time and cost savings result from the reduction in the number of interim radiological surveys that must be conducted to complete remediation. Real-time radiation monitoring allows equipment operators to accurately monitor contamination during the decontamination process without support from radiological technicians, which also reduces the project duration and costs. The DOE Grand Junction Projects Office recommends more extensive and rigorous testing of this real-time radiation monitoring to include a variety of surfaces and decontamination machines. As opportunities arise, additional testing will be conducted under GJPORAP.

  20. Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji; Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi; Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi

    2013-07-01

    Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

  1. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Mark W.

    2013-07-01

    Throughout power generation, delivery and waste remediation, the ability to control process streams in difficult or impossible locations becomes increasingly necessary as the complexity of processes increases. Example applications include radioactive environments, inside concrete installations, buried in dirt, or inside a shielded or insulated pipe. In these situations, it is necessary to implement innovative solutions to tackle such issues as valve maintenance, valve control from remote locations, equipment cleaning in hazardous environments, and flow stream analysis. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to tackle some of the most challenging applications in hazardous environments which require flow stream control and monitoring. The Extended Sleeve family of products is defined in three groups: Extended Sleeve (ESV), Extended Bonnet (EBV) and Instrument Enclosure (IE). Each of the products provides a variation on the same requirements: to provide access to the internals of a valve, or to monitor the fluid passing through the pipeline through shielding around the process pipe. The shielding can be as simple as a grout filled pipe covering a process pipe or as complex as a concrete deck protecting a room in which the valves and pipes pass through at varying elevations. Extended Sleeves are available between roughly 30 inches and 18 feet of distance between the pipeline centerline and the top of the surface to which it mounts. The Extended Sleeve provides features such as ± 1.5 inches of adjustment between the pipeline and deck location, internal flush capabilities, automatic alignment of the internal components during assembly and integrated actuator mounting pads. The Extended Bonnet is a shorter fixed height version of the Extended Sleeve which has a removable deck flange to facilitate installation through walls, and is delivered fully assembled. The Instrument Enclosure utilizes many of the same components as an Extended Sleeve, yet allows the installation of process monitoring instruments, such as a turbidity meter to be placed in the flow stream. The basis of the design is a valve body, which, rather than having a directly mounted bonnet has lengths of concentric pipe added, which move the bonnet away from the valve body. The pipe is conceptually similar to an oil field well, with the various strings of casing, and tubing installed. Each concentric pipe provides a required function, such as the outermost pipes, the valve sleeve and penetration sleeve, which provide structural support to the deck flange. For plug valve based designs, the next inner pipe provides compression on the environmental seals at the top of the body to bonnet joint, followed by the innermost pipe which provides rotation of the plug, in the same manner as an extended stem. Ball valve ESVs have an additional pipe to provide compressive loading on the stem packing. Due to the availability of standard pipe grades and weights, the product can be configured to fit a wide array of valve sizes, and application lengths, with current designs as short as seven inches and as tall as 18 feet. Central to the design is the requirement for no special tools or downhole tools to remove parts or configure the product. Off the shelf wrenches, sockets or other hand tools are all that is required. Compared to other products historically available, this design offers a lightweight option, which, while not as rigidly stiff, can deflect compliantly under extreme seismic loading, rather than break. Application conditions vary widely, as the base product is 316 and 304 stainless steel, but utilizes 17-4PH, and other allows as needed based on the temperature range and mechanical requirements. Existing designs are installed in applications as hot as 1400 deg. F, at low pressure, and separately in highly radioactive environments. The selection of plug versus ball valve, metal versus soft seats, and the material of the seals and seats is all dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provides a platform which solves a variety of accessibility problems associated with controlling process flow streams in remote, hard to reach locations in harsh environments. Installation of the equipment described has shown to allow access to flow streams that otherwise would require exceptional means to access and control. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to both control and monitor process fluid flow through shielding, walls or floors when direct connection is advantageous. (authors)

  2. A combined Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic study of Mg-suite norite 78238: Further evidence for early differentiation of the Moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunson, J; E.Borg, L; Nyquist, L E; Asmerom, Y

    2008-11-17

    Lunar Mg-suite norite 78238 was dated using the Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic systems in order to constrain the age of lunar magma ocean solidification and the beginning of Mg-suite magmatism, as well as to provide a direct comparison between the three isotopic systems. The Sm-Nd isotopic system yields a crystallization age for 78238 of 4334 {+-} 37 Ma and an initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of -0.27 {+-} 0.74. The age-initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} (T-I) systematics of a variety of KREEP-rich samples, including 78238 and other Mg-suite rocks, KREEP basalts, and olivine cumulate NWA 773, suggest that lunar differentiation was completed by 4492 {+-} 61 Ma assuming a Chondritic Uniform Reservoir bulk composition for the Moon. The Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of 78238 were disturbed by post-crystallization processes. Nevertheless, selected data points yield two Rb-Sr isochrons. One is concordant with the Sm-Nd crystallization age, 4366 {+-} 53 Ma. The other is 4003 {+-} 95 Ma and is concordant with an Ar-Ar age for 78236. The {sup 207}Pb-{sup 206}Pb age of 4333 {+-} 59 Ma is concordant with the Sm-Nd age. The U-Pb isotopic systematics of 78238 yield linear arrays equivalent to younger ages than the Pb-Pb system, and may reflect fractionation of U and Pb during sample handling. Despite the disturbed nature of the U-Pb systems, a time-averaged {mu} ({sup 238}U/{sup 204}Pb) value of the source can be estimated at 27 {+-} 30 from the Pb-Pb isotopic systematics. Because KREEP-rich samples are likely to be derived from source regions with the highest U/Pb ratios, the relatively low {mu} value calculated for the 78238 source suggests the bulk Moon does not have an exceedingly high {mu} value.

  3. Golden Field Office Disability Awareness Month Event

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Come join us for a Disability Awareness Month program on Monday, October 29, 2012 in Bldg. 17, 4th floor, from 10:00-11:00 am.   We will have a couple  of performers from a Theatre group named...

  4. SensorNet Node Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-01

    The software in the SensorNet Node adopts and builds on IEEE 1451 interface principles to read data from and control sensors, stores the data in internal database structures, and transmits it in adapted Web Feature Services protocol packets to the SensorNet database. Failover software ensures that at least one available mode of communication remains alive.

  5. SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drive, import it to his computer and manually manipulate and reconstruct it. Because each image file was about 20 gigabytes, this process was very time-intensive. And while he was...

  6. Automated Nuclear Data Test Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-01-09

    Provides python routines to create a database of test problems in a user-defined directory tree, to query the database using user-defined parameters, to generate a list of test urns, to automatically run with user-defined particle transport codes. Includes natural isotope abundance data, and a table of benchmark effective for fast critical assemblies. Does not include input decks, cross-section libraries, or particle transport codes.

  7. Uterine Artery Embolization for Leiomyomata: Optimization of the Radiation Dose to the Patient Using a Flat-Panel Detector Angiographic Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapoval, Marc Pellerin, Olivier; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Houdoux, Nicolas; Rahmoune, Ghizlaine; Aubert, Bernard; Fitton, Isabelle

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography with a flat-panel detector angiographic suite to reduce the dose delivered to patients during uterine fibroid embolization (UFE). A two-step prospective dosimetric study was conducted, with a flat-panel detector angiography suite (Siemens Axiom Artis) integrating automatic exposure control (AEC), during 20 consecutive UFEs. Patient dosimetry was performed using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters placed on the lower posterior pelvis skin. The first step (10 patients; group A) consisted in UFE (bilateral embolization, calibrated microspheres) performed using the following parameters: standard fluoroscopy (15 pulses/s) and angiography (3 frames/s). The second step (next consecutive 10 patients; group B) used low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy (7.5 pulses/s for catheterization and 3 pulses/s for embolization) and angiography (1 frame/s). We also recorded the total dose-area product (DAP) delivered to the patient and the fluoroscopy time as reported by the manufacturer's dosimetry report. The mean peak skin dose decreased from 2.4 {+-} 1.3 to 0.4 {+-} 0.3 Gy (P = 0.001) for groups A and B, respectively. The DAP values decreased from 43,113 {+-} 27,207 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group A to 9,515 {+-} 4,520 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group B (P = 0.003). The dose to ovaries and uterus decreased from 378 {+-} 238 mGy (group A) to 83 {+-} 41 mGy (group B) and from 388 {+-} 246 mGy (group A) to 85 {+-} 39 mGy (group B), respectively. Effective doses decreased from 112 {+-} 71 mSv (group A) to 24 {+-} 12 mSv (group B) (P = 0.003). In conclusion, the use of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography, based on a good understanding of the AEC system and also on the technique during uterine fibroid embolization, allows a significant decrease in the dose exposure to the patient.

  8. DOE-CX-00140-PNNL-CX-B6.6-Bldg-325-HWTU.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  9. 272-AW_Bldg_Renovation_Mod1_CX-00017 r1.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. A summary of recent refinements to the WAKE dispersion model, a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambert, M.W.; Lombardi, D.A.; Goode, W.D. Jr.; Bloom, S.G.

    1998-08-01

    The original WAKE dispersion model a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite, is based on Shell Research Ltd.`s HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 and was developed by the US Department of Energy for use in estimating downwind dispersion of materials due to accidental releases from gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process buildings. The model is applicable to scenarios involving both ground-level and elevated releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant. Over the 2-year period since its creation, the WAKE model has been used to perform consequence analyses for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) associated with gaseous diffusion plants in Portsmouth (PORTS), Paducah (PGDP), and Oak Ridge. These applications have identified the need for additional model capabilities (such as the treatment of complex terrain and time-variant releases) not present in the original utilities which, in turn, has resulted in numerous modifications to these codes as well as the development of additional, stand-alone postprocessing utilities. Consequently, application of the model has become increasingly complex as the number of executable, input, and output files associated with a single model run has steadily grown. In response to these problems, a streamlined version of the WAKE model has been developed which integrates all calculations that are currently performed by the existing WAKE, and the various post-processing utilities. This report summarizes the efforts involved in developing this revised version of the WAKE model.

  11. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to conduct a full life cycle analysis of coal ... and improve ecosystem health - driven by water quality and biodiversity. ... on water quantity, quality, and ecosystem services. ...

  12. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy in Early Breast Cancer Using a Linear Accelerator Outside of the Operative Suite: An Image-Guided Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Simes Dornellas de Barros, Alfredo Carlos; Martins de Andrade, Felipe Eduardo; Barbosa Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz; Morales Piato, Jos Roberto; Lopes Pelosi, Edilson; Martella, Eduardo; Fernandes da Silva, Joo Luis; Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa de

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To present local control, complications, and cosmetic outcomes of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for early breast cancer, as well as technical aspects related to the use of a nondedicated linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: This prospective trial began in May of 2004. Eligibility criteria were biopsy-proven breast-infiltrating ductal carcinoma, age >40years, tumor <3cm, and cN0. Exclusion criteria were in situ or lobular types, multicentricity, skin invasion, any contraindication for surgery and/or radiation therapy, sentinel lymph node involvement, metastasis, or another malignancy. Patients underwent classic quadrantectomy with intraoperative sentinel lymph node and margins evaluation. If both free, the patient was transferred from operative suite to linear accelerator room, and IORT was delivered (21 Gy). Primary endpoint: local recurrence (LR); secondary endpoints: toxicities and aesthetics. Quality assurance involved using a customized shield for chest wall protection, applying procedures to minimize infection caused by patient transportation, and using portal films to check collimator-shield alignment. Results: A total of 152 patients were included, with at least 1year follow-up. Median age (range) was 58.3 (40-85.4) years, and median follow-up time was 50.7 (12-110.5) months. The likelihood of 5-year local recurrence was 3.7%. There were 3 deaths, 2 of which were cancer related. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year actuarial estimates of overall, disease-free, and local recurrence-free survivals were 97.8%, 92.5%, and 96.3%, respectively. The overall incidences of acute and late toxicities were 12.5% and 29.6%, respectively. Excellent, good, fair, and bad cosmetic results were observed in 76.9%, 15.8%, 4.3%, and 2.8% of patients, respectively. Most treatments were performed with a 5-cm collimator, and in 39.8% of the patients the electron-beam energy used was ?12MeV. All patients underwent portal film evaluation, and the shielding was repositioned in 39.9% of cases. No infection or anesthesia complications were observed. Conclusions: Local control with IORT was adequate, with low complication rates and good cosmetic outcomes. More than one-third of patients benefited from the image-guidance approach, and almost 40% benefited from the option of higher electron beam energies.

  13. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station/Seafloor Observatory is in danger of lapsing into disuse. However, for the present, interest in the site on the continental slope is healthy and The Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology continues to coordinate all activity at the MS/SFO as arranged through the BOEM in 2005. Field and laboratory research projects and findings are reviewed, new technologies and tests described. Many new sensors, systems and two custom ROVs have been developed specifically for this project. Characteristics of marine gas hydrates are dramatically more refined than when the project was initiated and include appear in sections entitled Accomplishments, Products and Publications.

  14. Acceptance test procedure bldg. 271-U remote monitoring of project W-059 B-Plant canyon exhaust system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDANIEL, K.S.

    1999-09-01

    The test procedure provides for verifying indications and alarms The test procedure provides for verifying indications and alarms associated with the B Plant Canyon Ventilation System as they are being displayed on a remote monitoring workstation located in building 271-U. The system application software was installed by PLCS Plus under contract from B&W Hanford Company. The application software was installed on an existing operator workstation in building 271U which is owned and operated by Bechtel Hanford Inc.

  15. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Email: Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 City: State: Zip: - Secure File Transfer: Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Questions? ...

  16. CODY: Continuum Dynamics Evaluation and Test Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computer architectures. Our goals are operating system, computer architecture, and programming language agnostic, however, so we expect evolution over time. CODY is designed...

  17. Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of waste from 177 underground radioactive waste storage tanks, including 149 SSTs and 28 ... and Washington State laws and DOE directives to protect human health and the environment. ...

  18. Ames Lab 101: VE-Suite

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bryden, Mark

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory scientist Mark Bryden talks about virtual engineering and the advantages it gives engineers when they can "walk through" designs visually.

  19. Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities - MRW Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-18

    The Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities consists the these three components: MAD: Utility designed to automate the deployment of java applications to multiple java application servers. The product contains a front end web utility and backend deployment scripts. MAR: Web front end to maintain and update the components inside database. MWR-Encrypt: Web utility to convert a text string to an encrypted string that is used by the Oracle Weblogic application server. The encryption is done usingmore » the built in functions if the Oracle Weblogic product and is mainly used to create an encrypted version of a database password.« less

  20. Extension arm for mobile travelers suit case

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byington, Gerald A.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus for adjusting a luggage handle in relation to a luggage frame utilized to transport luggage by a traveler. The handle is connected to two extendable and retractable slide tube assemblies, the assemblies allow for the telescoping of the luggage handle to multiple positions in relation to a pair of fixed frame tubes connected to a luggage shell with wheels, to accommodate the height and personal stride of traveler. The luggage handle incorporates triggering buttons that allow ambidextrous and single-handed control of the height of the handle and slide tube assembly in relation to the luggage. The handle and slide tube assembly are connected by interior filaments to pulleys and filaments within two concentric light-weight slide tubes, which are inserted respectively into two fixed frame tubes, to allow a multitude of positions for the slide tubes to lock into the fixed frame tubes. The apparatus can be pushed or pulled by the traveler, and the support shell can accommodate multiple pieces of luggage.

  1. COMET TA Floor Plan 100225.vc6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Hall Door Emg Exit W Trench Room 1107 S Structural Beam Rack Argus Chamber Interaction Chamber Work Station 8 3 0 2 - V B L as phere CL 420mm f rom N i nner wall. Lens h...

  2. Note: This form shall be protected as LANS Employment Sensitive and/or LANS Empl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    personal information is revealed in a LANS record: Education, salary, medical history, employment history, social security number, date and place of birth, or mother's maiden name. Form 1925a (5/14) Please photocopy this form for your records Form 1925a Declaration of Domestic Partnership Return completed form to: LANL Benefits Office TA-3 Otowi Bldg. 261 2nd Floor, MS P280 benefits@lanl.gov Fax:505-665-2156 Instructions: Use this form ("Declaration") to report your domestic

  3. Badging, Badge Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office Badging, Badge Office The central point where badges are issued to employees and official visitors. Contact Badge Office (505) 667-6901 Email Badge Office location As the central point where badges are issued to employees and official visitors, the Badge Office is located on the second floor of the Otowi Building (TA-3, Bldg. 261). Badge Office map Printable 2-page map to the Badge Office (pdf) More maps and directions Badge Office hours Monday-Friday: 7:30 am - 4 pm Wednesday: Closed

  4. Berkeley Lab Shower Locations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LBNL ShowerS Shower facilities are available at several locations: Bldg. 2-Main Entry Men's & Women's Bldg. 6-2204,2206 Men's & Women's (limited building access) Bldg. 46-143 Men's...

  5. PARC Open House | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PARC Open House PARC Open House Join us for food and refreshments April 10, 2015 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm Washington University in St. Louis, Seigle Hall 4th Floor, Suite 435 We welcome...

  6. Tips: Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    They are available in widths suited to standard spacing of wall studs and attic or floor joists: 2 inch x 4 inch walls can hold R-13 or R-15 batts; 2 inch x 6 inch walls can use ...

  7. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... - underground - bldg 2211 4. Waste Oil Storage - 550 gal - used oil - underground - ... tank - bldg 2211 6. Facility Backup Power Generator - 550 gal - underground - Fuel ...

  8. SecuritySmart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    House); * TA-00, Bldg. 760 (Legal Counsel); and * TA-3, Bldg. 1411 (Occupational Medicine). All other buildings in non-secure areas must be individually accounted for in...

  9. New Brunswick Laboratory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Brunswick Laboratory New Brunswick Laboratory New Brunswick Laboratory BLDG 350 | Photo courtesy of Michael Kappel, August 29, 2009 New Brunswick Laboratory BLDG 350 | Photo ...

  10. Crowne Plaza Suites MSP Airport - Mall of America

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Airport - Mall of America Bloomington, Minnesota * May 13-15, 2014 Revised Agenda Monday, ... Song Prairie Island Indian Community of Minnesota * Welcome to Minnesota Speaker to be ...

  11. Cloud Properties from Doppler Radar Spectra - a Growing Suite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory 2. McGill University 3. CIRESNOAAETL 4. Penn State University C F B A E D Lidar Prediction Algorithm Depolarization C F B A E D Backscatter DOPPLER RADAR SPECTRA...

  12. Managing Critical Infrastructures C.I.M. Suite

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    protect infrastructure during natural disasters, terrorist attacks and electrical outages. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We have recently shown that it is possible to obtain predictions for the nonlinear matter power spectrum at the level of one-percent accuracy and that we can build a precise ...

  14. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION Suite X00, 955 L'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of Rochester ;-Case School of Applied Science, Ohio State University University of ... on file in the DOE Richland Operations Office revealed five additional colleges and ...

  15. Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and tensile wall fractures, and were adequate to detect stratigraphic features. Density, photo-electric factor (PEF), neutron, and gamma ray (GR) logs provided sufficient...

  16. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  17. New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

    2006-09-30

    Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

  18. Monju Transparency Suite v. 1.0.0.4b

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    The software was developed achieve real-time detection and risk calculation by monitoring the sequence of operations from the Monju training model, as reported by intrinsic model sensors whose digital data is stored in XML files, and comparing these to a set of expectations based on previous declarations.

  19. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  20. Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountabi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... sustainability program in 2009 that placed new emphasis on the company's energy program. As part of this effort, the CEO tasked Rick Bowen with reporting energy-related metrics to ...

  1. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also, an unclad sapphire fiber was tested as a temperature sensor at moderate temperatures (up to 775 C).

  2. Microsoft Word - MHI Letterhead - 2111 Wilson Blvd, Suite 100.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 17, 2010 Office of the General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 Memorandum for the Record Ex Parte Communication Department of Energy Meeting- Wednesday, July 14, 20103:00 - 4:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting was to provide information to DOE staff on the Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Section 414 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 to establish energy standards for manufactured housing. In attendance

  3. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Quadsyear * The target market is all existing packaged ... of advanced controls * constant supply speed fan and ... Environment, Transformative Wave Technologies BPA cost-share ...

  4. Recycling Magnets from the Factory Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, recovers valuable rare-earth magnetic material from manufacturing waste and creates useful magnets out of it. Ames Laboratory...

  5. Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building 05K0019 + 24,000 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 2,761 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 5,100 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 16,900 + Sweden Building 05K0023 + 9,541 + Sweden Building...

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building 05K0019 + 24,000 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 2,761 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 5,100 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 17,000 + Sweden Building 05K0023 + 9,500 + Sweden Building...

  7. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Level Easy Energy Savings Depend on energy cost, R-value increase, and ... Calculate the amount and determine the R-value of the insulation you will need Gather all ...

  8. New CMI process recycles magnets from factory floor | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the rare-earth metals for reuse. But CMI scientist Ikenna Nlebedim said he and co-inventor Bill McCallum wanted to push further. "We decided to see if there is a possibility of...

  9. Directions to External Dosimetry Office | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions to External Dosimetry Office PDF icon Route to Bldg 202 for dosimeters

  10. ON E WA Y N E W L O N D O N R D R A Y ST C L E V E L A N D A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bldg. Gold 19 N. College (Hollingsworth)* Gold 20 Old CollegeCarpenter* Gold 21 Academy of Newark Bldg. Gate-Controlled 22 46 E. Delaware Avenue Gold 23 EvansDuPont...

  11. September 11 - 13, 2012 HAMMER Steering Committee Meeting - Agenda

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HAMMER, NIEHS, LANL EFCOG Representative, and Labor - located in the HAMMER Admin BldgCR 31 2:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. OSH Subcommittee Meeting - located in the HAMMER Admin BldgCR...

  12. NREL National Wind Technology Center Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Row 3 Site 3.4 Site 3.3 Site 4.4 Site 4.5 Site 4.1 Site 4.0 4.0 Met Tower Administration & Engineering Bldg. 251 Office Trailer Bldg. 250 Office Trailer Bldg. 249 Office Trailer Bldg. 248 251 Parking W. 120th Ave. W . 1 1 9 t h A v e . 4.1 Met Tower 4.4 Met Tower Site 3.1 5-MW Dyno Bldg. 258 Site 1.1 Site M1 Structural Testing Laboratory (STL) Bldg. 254 Modal Laboratory Bldg. 256 Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility (DERTF) Building A-60 Office Trailer Bldg. 257 Site 1.2 Site 1.3 Site

  13. CENNATEK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Address: 1086 Modeland Road, Bldg. 1010 Place: Sarnia, Ontario, Canada Sector: Bioenergy, Biofuels, Biomass, Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Phone Number:...

  14. Suite 4000. 9.5 L%nfcinr Pi& S. Ic:, W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Queen City Barre,lCompany Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Beryllium (Perkins Avenue) Clecon Metals, Inc. (Horizons, Inc.) DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  15. Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement Throughout the Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study details how corporate leaders at Alcoa established energy efficiency as a priority throughout the organization and achieved plant-wide performance improvements as a result.

  16. C/O HELP PLLC, 750 SEVENTEETH STREET N.W. SUITE 900 Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... and tribes" involved in siting and permitting by providing "a single point of contact ... performance standards and oversight requirements, and that most importantly lack any ...

  17. Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Doris, E.

    2014-11-01

    There are an increasing number of state and local policy initiatives with the goal of encouraging private investment and building robust solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. While some states have seen many-fold increases in solar PV installations over the last decade, many other states, some with very similar policies, have been less successful. The lack of a clear relationship between implementation of specific policies and increases in solar installations has been challenging to policymakers seeking to support such markets within their jurisdictions. This paper builds on recent work that has aimed at clarifying the relationships between policy implementation and successful solar PV markets.

  18. THE A.EROSPACE CORPORATION Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfk Plaza, S. W...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... chc and metallurgy of normal "tube alloy" (natural uranium). ... with all requirements of this contract ... or -leased land, buildings, utilities, I ...

  19. SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The S-R Project is an upgrade of an existing segment of the transmission grid that long pre-dates the establishment of the relevant federal lands crossed by the line (the "NPS ...

  20. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, T. Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M.; Sun, X.

    2014-11-15

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  1. Array2BIO: A Comprehensive Suite of Utilities for the Analysis of Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loots, G G; Chain, P G; Mabery, S; Rasley, A; Garcia, E; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-02-13

    We have developed an integrative and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data, named Array2BIO. It identifies groups of coexpressed genes using two complementary approaches--comparative analysis of signal versus control microarrays and clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on the Gene Ontology classification, and a detection of corresponding KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods to quantify the odds of observations, including the Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. Automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis of identified gene loci while the interconnection with Creme allows high-throughput analysis of human promoter regions and prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie the observed expression patterns. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  2. Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

    2012-03-12

    Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

  3. The GammeV suite of experimental searches for axion-like particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Upadhye, Amol; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI

    2009-08-01

    We report on the design and results of the GammeV search for axion-like particles and for chameleon particles. We also discuss plans for an improved experiment to search for chameleon particles, one which is sensitive to both cosmological and power-law chameleon models. Plans for an improved axion-like particle search using coupled resonant cavities are also presented. This experiment will be more sensitive to axion-like particles than stellar astrophysical models or current helioscope experiments.

  4. Browser Testing Suite for Websites Outside of the Energy.gov Drupal Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When developing an EERE website or application outside the Energy.gov Drupal environment, you are required to test its performance on the browsers most used by EERE's visitors.

  5. Ventilation rates per person and per unit floor area affect decision...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 13th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Hong Kong, July 7 - 12, 2014 Research Org: Ernest Orlando ...

  6. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and viscoelastic behavior as functions of pH; shear rate; polymer concentration; salinity, including divalent ion effects; polymer molecular weight; and degree of hydrolysis. A comprehensive rheological model was developed for HPAM solution rheology in terms of: shear rate; pH; polymer concentration; and salinity, so that the spatial and temporal changes in viscosity during the polymer flow in the reservoir can be accurately modeled. A series of acid coreflood experiments were conducted to understand the geochemical reactions relevant for both the near-wellbore injection profile control and for conformance control applications. These experiments showed that the use hydrochloric acid as a pre-flush is not viable because of the high reaction rate with the rock. The use of citric acid as a pre-flush was found to be quite effective. This weak acid has a slow rate of reaction with the rock and can buffer the pH to below 3.5 for extended periods of time. With the citric acid pre-flush the polymer could be efficiently propagated through the core in a low pH environment i.e. at a low viscosity. The transport of various HPAM solutions was studied in sandstones, in terms of permeability reduction, mobility reduction, adsorption and inaccessible pore volume with different process variables: injection pH, polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, salinity, degree of hydrolysis, and flow rate. Measurements of polymer effluent profiles and tracer tests show that the polymer retention increases at the lower pH. A new simulation capability to model the deep-penetrating mobility control or conformance control using pH-sensitive polymer was developed. The core flood acid injection experiments were history matched to estimate geochemical reaction rates. Preliminary scale-up simulations employing linear and radial geometry floods in 2-layer reservoir models were conducted. It is clearly shown that the injection rate of pH-sensitive polymer solutions can be significantly increased by injecting it at a pH below 3.5 (at a fixed bottom-hole pressure). This improvement in injectivity by a fa

  7. Ventilation rates per person and per unit floor area affect decision...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: 13th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Hong Kong, July 7 - 12, 2014 Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National ...

  8. THE ROLE OF DEAD WOOD IN MAINTAINING ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY ON THE FOREST FLOOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Wade, Dale D.

    2006-08-01

    AbstractDead wood is a major component of forests and contributes to overall diversity, primarily by supporting insects that feed directly on or in it. Further, a variety of organisms benefit by feeding on those insects. What is not well known is how or whether dead wood influences the composition of the arthropod community that is not solely dependent on it as a food resource, or whether woody debris influences prey available to generalist predators. One group likely to be affected by dead wood is ground-dwelling arthropods. We studied the effect of adding large dead wood to unburned and frequently burned pine stands to determine if dead wood was used more when the litter and understory plant community are removed. We also studied the effect of annual removal of dead wood from large (10-ha) plots over a 5-year period on ground-dwelling arthropods. In related studies, we examined the relationships among an endangered woodpecker that forages for prey on live trees, its prey, and dead wood in the forest. The results of these and other studies show that dead wood can influence the abundance and diversity of the ground-dwelling arthropod community and of prey available to generalist predators not foraging directly on dead trees.

  9. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  10. K Basins floor sludge retrieval system knockout pot basket fuel burn accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUNT, J.W.

    1998-11-11

    The K Basins Sludge Retrieval System Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report (HNF-2676) identified and categorized a series of potential accidents associated with K Basins Sludge Retrieval System design and operation. The fuel burn accident was of concern with respect to the potential release of contamination resulting from a runaway chemical reaction of the uranium fuel in a knockout pot basket suspended in the air. The unmitigated radiological dose to an offsite receptor from this fuel burn accident is calculated to be much less than the offsite risk evaluation guidelines for anticipated events. However, because of potential radiation exposure to the facility worker, this accident is precluded with a safety significant lifting device that will prevent the monorail hoist from lifting the knockout pot basket out of the K Basin water pool.

  11. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Availability Workshop | Department of Energy Indian Community Development Block Grant Program FY 2016 Notice of Funding Availability Workshop Indian Community Development Block Grant Program FY 2016 Notice of Funding Availability Workshop May 17, 2016 8:30AM MST to May 18, 2016 12:00PM MST Albuquerque, New Mexico HUD Training Room 500 Gold Avenue, 7th floor, Suite 7301 Albuquerque, NM 87103 Phoenix, Arizona HUD Training Room One North Central Ave, 6th floor Phoenix, AZ 85004 The U.S.

  12. Indian Community Development Block Grant Program FY 2016 Notice of Funding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Availability Workshop | Department of Energy Indian Community Development Block Grant Program FY 2016 Notice of Funding Availability Workshop Indian Community Development Block Grant Program FY 2016 Notice of Funding Availability Workshop May 17, 2016 8:30AM MST to May 18, 2016 12:00PM MST Albuquerque, New Mexico HUD Training Room 500 Gold Avenue, 7th floor, Suite 7301 Albuquerque, NM 87103 Phoenix, Arizona HUD Training Room One North Central Ave, 6th floor Phoenix, AZ 85004 The U.S.

  13. Cleaning Up the Hanford River Corridor and Improving Site Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doug Shoop, Deputy Manager April 13, 2016 2 3 Continue Cleanup of the Central Plateau * Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) - Completed last glove box (HA-9A) - Re-sequenced high-hazard work at PFP to focus on one project at a time using "Level B" suits - Grouted Plutonium Reclamation Facility canyon floor, began decontaminating walls Glove box HA-9A before (left) and after (right) Vacuuming "strongbacks" (left) and painting canyon floor (right) 4 K Basin Sludge Transfer * All

  14. bender | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bender Ames Laboratory Profile Lee Bendickson Lab Tech III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 3288 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-5682 Email Address: bender

  15. liza | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    liza Ames Laboratory Profile Liza Alexander Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 2242 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-6116 Email Address: liza

  16. Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    known as the computational research and theory (CRT) building (Bldg. 59)-on the campus of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. You can find...

  17. Microsoft Word - Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 SUBJECT: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Argonne National LaboratoryCentral Characterization Project,...

  18. Microsoft Word - 09-1581.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Savannah River Site Central Characterization Project...

  19. University of New Orleans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Facilities Name University of New Orleans Address School of Naval Architecture, Engineering Bldg UNO Lakefront Campus, 2000 Lakeshore Drive Place New Orleans,...

  20. Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events Monday, October 29, 2012 - 3:30am SSRL Bldg. 137, Rm. 322 Krish Seetah, Stanford University, Department of Anthropology...

  1. xinyufu | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    xinyufu Ames Laboratory Profile Xinyu Fu Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2238 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: xinyufu...

  2. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to reduce or eliminate gamma radiation exposure to personnel. Contact Information Dale Haas Commercialization Manager Savannah River National Laboratory Bldg. 773-41A, Room 238...

  3. Careers & the disABLED Career Expo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: Ronald Reagan Bldg, Washington, DCAttendees:  Terri Sosa (Science)POC:  Donna FriendWebsite: http://bit.ly/1tlHhNr

  4. Francois Tessier | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Francois Tessier Postdoctoral Appointee Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Bldg. 240 / Wkstn. 4E19 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-5068 ftessier

  5. George Rojas | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George Rojas Consultant/Software Engineer Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Bldg. 240 - Rm. 3122 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-5569 rojas

  6. Intranet | APS X-ray Science Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IT Helpdesk Stockroom Catalog | Shopping Cart | Stockroom (Bldg. 401) 2-9082 Key Request Phone Request Argonne Internal Resources: 401 Grill Inside Argonne AMOS, GatePass,...

  7. Washington State University Extension Energy Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Extension Energy Program Jump to: navigation, search Name: Washington State University Extension Energy Program Address: 905 Plum Street SE Bldg No 3 Place: Olympia,...

  8. Yasaman Ghadar | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yasaman Ghadar Postdoctoral Appointee Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Bldg. 240 - Wkstn. 1C7 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-1398 ghadar

  9. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 6 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 Subject: Final...

  10. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... the 690,000,000 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. * ... ORG CODE A-123INT CNTRL BLDG OCCUP COPY SVCS CORPORATE ... to the plan by Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation. ...

  11. Industrial Technology Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Industrial Technology Research Institute Name: Industrial Technology Research Institute Address: Rm. 112, Bldg. 24,...

  12. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Offices, to remove the heat treating equipment, and to install fire protectioncode upgrades. Sandia Site Office Bldg. 840 Office Relocation, Heat Treating Equipment ...

  13. Microsoft Word - DM_VA-#126832-v3-Smart_Grid_Comments_--_DOE_--_Policy_and_Logistical_Challenges.DOC

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Before the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability In the matter of: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation 75 FR 57006 COMMENTS OF VERIZON AND VERIZON WIRELESS Michael Glover Of Counsel Edward Shakin William H. Johnson VERIZON 1320 North Courthouse Road Ninth Floor Arlington, Virginia 22201 (703) 351-3060 John T. Scott, III William D. Wallace VERIZON WIRELESS 1300 I Street N.W. Suite 400 West

  14. Mr. Todd Mullins

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Todd Mullins Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office 1017 Majestic Drive, Suite 200 Lexington, Kentucky 40513 (859) 219-4000 NOV 1 4 1014 Federal Facility Agreement Manager Division of Waste Management Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection 200 Fair Oaks Lane, 2 nd Floor Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 Ms. Jennifer Tufts Federal Facility Agreement Manager U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 61 Forsyth Street Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Mullins and Ms. Tufts:

  15. Ms. Maggie Owen, Chair

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Todd Mullins Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office 1017 Majestic Drive, Suite 200 Lexington, Kentucky 40513 (859) 219-4000 NOV 1 4 1014 Federal Facility Agreement Manager Division of Waste Management Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection 200 Fair Oaks Lane, 2 nd Floor Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 Ms. Jennifer Tufts Federal Facility Agreement Manager U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 61 Forsyth Street Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Mullins and Ms. Tufts:

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis

    2003-07-01

    This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), Foster-Miller, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The DOE's contribution to this project is $572,525 out of a total of $772,525. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its third three-month period (from April 2003 through June 2003). The project was initiated with delay in February 2003 due to contractual issues that emerged between NGA and Foster-Miller, Inc. The two organizations are working diligently to maintain the program's pace and expect to complete it in time. The efforts of the project focused during this period in finalizing the assessment of the tether technology, which is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator. Results indicate that the tether is a viable option under certain pipeline operating conditions, but not all. Concerns also exist regarding the abrasion resistance of the tether, this issue being the last studied. Substantial work was also conducted on the design of the robotic platform, which has progressed very well. Finally, work on the MFL sensor, able to negotiate all pipeline obstacles (including plug valves), was initiated by PII following the successful completion of the subcontract negotiations between Foster-Miller and PII. The sensor design is at this point the critical path in the project's timetable.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis; Bill Leary

    2004-01-14

    This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), Foster-Miller, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The total cost of the project is $772,525, with the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US Department of Energy contributing $572,525, and the Northeast Gas Association contributing $200,000. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fourth three-month period (from July 2003 through September 2003). The efforts of the project focused during this period in completing the assessment of the tether technology, which is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator, in designing the MFL sensor module, in completing the kinematic studies, and in initiating tractor design. In addition, work on the ovality sensor progressed significantly, while work on system integration was initiated focusing at this point in time on module coupling. Results to date indicate that the robotic system under design will be able to meet most of the design specifications initially specified. Earlier concerns regarding the portability of the system are shown to be a non-issue, with new more detailed analysis showing that from a locomotor point of view an inspection of a 16 inch-24 inch pipe size range with a single platform is most likely possible However, the limitations imposed by the sensor are more restrictive, preliminary results indicating an inspection range of 16 inch-20 inch pipe sizes. In addition, tether use will most likely have to be limited to medium and low flow conditions in order to preserve tether integrity.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OR SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis

    2004-02-01

    This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), Foster-Miller, Inc., GE Oil & Gas (PII), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The total cost of the project is $772,525, with the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US Department of Energy contributing $572,525, and the Northeast Gas Association contributing $200,000. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fifth three-month period (from October 2003 through December 2003). The efforts of the project focused during this period in completing the assessment of the tether technology, which is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator, in completing the design of the MFL sensor modules, and in completing the kinematic studies and tractor design. In addition, work on the ovality sensor has been completed, while work on system integration is nearly complete. Results to date indicate that the robotic system under design will be able to meet most of the design specifications initially prescribed. The kinematic analysis shows that from a locomotor point of view an inspection of a 16 inch-24 inch pipe size range with a single platform is most likely possible. However, the limitations imposed by the sensor are more restrictive, final preliminary design results showing that in order to cover this pipe range, two different sensor systems will be needed; one for the 16 inch-20 inch pipe size range and one for the 20 inch-24 inch range. Finally, the analysis has shown that tether operation will be limited to flows of less than 30 ft/sec; these results will have to be confirmed experimentally during the next phase of work.

  19. Basement Fill Model Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Concentrations for Initial Suite of Radionuclides. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-10

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y⁻¹ as specified in 10 CFR 20 Subpart E. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on radionuclide concentrations in the fill material and the water in the interstitial spaces of the fill. (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use by ZSRP in selecting ROCs for detailed dose assessment calculations.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis; William Leary

    2004-03-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (under Award DE-FC26-02NT41645) and the NYSEARCH Committee of the Northeast Gas Association (previous the New York Gas Group), have sponsored research to develop a robotic pipeline inspection system capable of navigation through the typical physical and operational obstacles that make transmission and distribution pipelines unpiggable. The research contractors, Foster-Miller and GE Oil & Gas (PII North America) have performed an engineering study and developed a conceptual design that meets all the requirements for navigating and inspecting unpiggable transmission pipelines. Based on Foster-Miller's previous efforts developing the Pipe Mouse robot, the RoboScan inspection robot (Figure ES-1) meets the navigational and physical challenges of unpiggable pipelines through an innovative modular platform design, segmented MFL inspection modules and improvements to the inter-module coupling design.

  1. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System- 2013 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis

    2003-05-01

    The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its second three-month period (from January 2003 through March 2003). The project was initiated with delay in February 2003 due to contractual issues that emerged between the NGA and Foster-Miller, Inc. The two organizations are working diligently to maintain the program's pace so that it is completed in time. The efforts of the project focused during this period in the assessment of the tether technology that is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator. Preliminary results indicate that tether is a viable option under certain pipeline operating conditions but not all. The exact range of operating conditions that are viable for tether use are being determined as the study progresses. Work was also initiated regarding the design of the robotic platform.

  3. Fundamentals of Natural Gas and Species Flows from Hydrate Dissociation - Applications to Safety and Sea Floor Instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2006-09-30

    Semi-analytical computational models for natural gas flow in hydrate reservoirs were developed and the effects of variations in porosity and permeability on pressure and temperature profiles and the movement of a dissociation front were studied. Experimental data for variations of gas pressure and temperature during propane hydrate formation and dissociation for crushed ice and mixture of crushed ice and glass beads under laboratory environment were obtained. A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase liquid-gas flows trough porous media was developed. Numerical models for hydrate dissociation process in one dimensional and axisymmetric reservoir were performed. The computational model solved the general governing equations without the need for linearization. A detail module for multidimensional analysis of hydrate dissociation which make use of the FLUENT code was developed. The new model accounts for gas and liquid water flow and uses the Kim-Boshnoi model for hydrate dissociation.

  4. Microsoft Word - S06401_IC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Photos of T Building Rooms with Special ICs This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2010 Doc. No. S06401 Page D-1 Figure D-1. T Building Rooms with Special ICs Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S06401 June 2010 Page D-2 Figure D-2. T Bldg. Room 16 View A Figure D-3. T Bldg. Room 16 View B Figure D-4. T Bldg. Room 16 View

  5. Integrated separation scheme for measuring a suite of fission and activation products from a fresh mixed fission and activation product sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Shannon M.; Seiner, Brienne N.; Finn, Erin C.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Smith, Steven C.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Haney, Morgan M.; Lucas, Dawn D.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Beacham, Tere A.; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; Metz, Lori A.

    2015-05-01

    Mixed fission and activation materials resulting from various nuclear processes and events contain a wide range of isotopes for analysis spanning almost the entire periodic table. In some applications such as environmental monitoring, nuclear waste management, and national security a very limited amount of material is available for analysis and characterization so an integrated analysis scheme is needed to measure multiple radionuclides from one sample. This work describes the production of a complex synthetic sample containing fission products, activation products, and irradiated soil and determines the percent recovery of select isotopes through the integrated chemical separation scheme. Results were determined using gamma energy analysis of separated fractions and demonstrate high yields of Ag (76 6%), Au (94 7%), Cd (59 2%), Co (93 5%), Cs (88 3%), Fe (62 1%), Mn (70 7%), Np (65 5%), Sr (73 2%) and Zn (72 3%). Lower yields (< 25%) were measured for Ga, Ir, Sc, and W. Based on the results of this experiment, a complex synthetic sample can be prepared with low atom/fission ratios and isotopes of interest accurately and precisely measured following an integrated chemical separation method.

  6. The MSRC Ab Initio Methods Benchmark Suite: A measurement of hardware and software performance in the area of electronic structure methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feller, D.F.

    1993-07-01

    This collection of benchmark timings represents a snapshot of the hardware and software capabilities available for ab initio quantum chemical calculations at Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Molecular Science Research Center in late 1992 and early 1993. The ``snapshot`` nature of these results should not be underestimated, because of the speed with which both hardware and software are changing. Even during the brief period of this study, we were presented with newer, faster versions of several of the codes. However, the deadline for completing this edition of the benchmarks precluded updating all the relevant entries in the tables. As will be discussed below, a similar situation occurred with the hardware. The timing data included in this report are subject to all the normal failures, omissions, and errors that accompany any human activity. In an attempt to mimic the manner in which calculations are typically performed, we have run the calculations with the maximum number of defaults provided by each program and a near minimum amount of memory. This approach may not produce the fastest performance that a particular code can deliver. It is not known to what extent improved timings could be obtained for each code by varying the run parameters. If sufficient interest exists, it might be possible to compile a second list of timing data corresponding to the fastest observed performance from each application, using an unrestricted set of input parameters. Improvements in I/O might have been possible by fine tuning the Unix kernel, but we resisted the temptation to make changes to the operating system. Due to the large number of possible variations in levels of operating system, compilers, speed of disks and memory, versions of applications, etc., readers of this report may not be able to exactly reproduce the times indicated. Copies of the output files from individual runs are available if questions arise about a particular set of timings.

  7. Ca

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 FEB 2 3 2012 Subject: Transmittal of the...

  8. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, MS 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents...

  9. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit...

  10. Iran Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iran Oil and Gas Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Iran Oil and Gas Name: Iran Oil and Gas Address: Unit 16, 3rd Fl., Bldg. No. 2, 9th Narenjestan St., North Pasdaran Ave. Place:...

  11. UNEP-Risoe Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Risoe Centre Address: UNEP Risoe Centre, Risoe DTU, Bldg. 142, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O. Box 49, DK 4000 Place: Roskilde, Denmark Number of Employees: 11-50 Year Founded: 1990...

  12. Nobel Keynote Lecture Series at Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George Smoot, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics "The Universe & Computers" Berkeley Lab, Bldg. 66 auditorium, 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. Watch the video:...

  13. SSRL29 Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9:00 am - 12:45 pm Location: Bldg. 48, Redwood Rm. AB Experimental Opportunities with LCLS John Galayda & Jerry Hastings The LCLS Project is in its initial phase with a...

  14. SSRL 32nd Users' Meeting Oct 17 - 19, 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tues. Oct. 18th 3-5 pm, Wed. Oct. 19th 8am-5pm Soft X-Ray Science at LCLS Chairs: Jan Lning, Anders Nilsson, Jo Sthr Admin Contact: Michelle Montalvo Location: SLAC ROB Bldg....

  15. Shipping - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To ship equipment to the BASE Facility, send it to the following address: To: Mike Johnson (3rd Party No PO) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, Bldg 88...

  16. ARM - Evaluation Product - SACR2 pre-CGA Ingested Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indicator patterns, and at vertical incidence. Data Details Developed by Karen Johnson Contact Karen Johnson kjohnson@bnl.gov (631) 344-5952 Bldg. 490D-PO Box 5000...

  17. BPA-2012-01616-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Susan Drummond 5400 Carillon Point, Bldg 5000, Ste 476 Kirkland WA 98033 FOIA BPA-2012-01616-F Dear Ms. Drummond: Thank you for the request for records that you made to the...

  18. Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Soft X-ray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Soft X-ray and Hard X-ray, and its applications in electrochemistry Friday, December 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL, Bldg. 137, room 322...

  19. X X

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X X SUSB - BLDG.53 SSRL Beamlines 8th SSRL School on Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Techniques in Materials & Environmental Science June 21 - June 23, 2016 Building 53 & 120 (SSRL Beamlines) Gate 17 SLAC Main Gate

  20. Directions - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions The Laboratory is on the hillside directly above the campus of the University of California at Berkeley. Our address is 1 Cyclotron Rd. Bldg. 88, Berkeley, CA 94720. To...

  1. Energy Citations Database (ECD) - Availability

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vente des publications des Communautes Europeenes 37, rue Glesener-Luxembourg. FD U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 18th and C Streets, N.W., Mail Stop 1111, Arlington Square Bldg.,...

  2. Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated electron materials Friday, September 14, 2012 - 1:00pm SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Jun-Sik Lee Seminar One of the...

  3. Microsoft Word - 07-1647mpn ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-14...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6313 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-14 of the AMWTP Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the...

  4. Microsoft Word - 06-1531dsm ltr to Zappe SRS A-07-01 Report.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for SRS A-07-01 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Savannah...

  5. Microsoft Word - 07-1061.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the, INLCCP Audit A-07-19 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits...

  6. Microsoft Word - 07-1638dsm ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-03...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6313 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-03 of the ANLCCP Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the...

  7. Microsoft Word - 07-1090dsm ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-12...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the CH Waste Re-certification and RH Waste Certification Audit Report for the LANLCCP Audit A-07-12 Dear Mr....

  8. ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION SAN FRANCISCO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and 31 Office-AX -Cincinnati Area Office- 1955 Metallurgical Operations Bldg. 31 Savannah River Opera- AT(07-2)-l involving thorium tions Office - AEC 1955-1956 Metallurgical ...

  9. Upcoming Seminars | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upcoming Seminars Seminars are held at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Bldg. 737-A, in the Cypress Room. Snacks are provided 15 minutes prior to the beginning of each ...

  10. Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in Material Science Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Yijin Liu Seminar There was a...

  11. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    042007 Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request...

  12. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAY 2 2007 Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject:...

  13. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 2014 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg.1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for CBFO Audit A-14-26 , SNLCCP...

  14. Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 8221 JUN"1 G 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe,...

  15. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2014 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the...

  16. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 4, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject:...

  17. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25, 2014 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject:...

  18. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 19, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject:...

  19. Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau Departmen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departmen t of Energy Carlsbad Field Office . P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 8822 1 AY 2 () 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa...

  20. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau Departmen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departmen t of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 O C T 3 1 2012 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa...

  1. ALSNews Vol. 328

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Support Building Gets LEED Gold green bldg council The ALS User Support Building (USB) has earned a LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, the...

  2. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Evanston, Illinois From Condensed Matter Physics to Next Generation Quantum Devices Wednesday, December 9, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm IMSMPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg...

  3. MESA Other GFP.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MESA Other GFP BARCODE DESCRIPTION MFG MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT DATE S10345 REFRIGERATOR ABSOCOLD 0000 430308515 206.66 922 136 7222013 0000031174 HEADSET PLNM22 UNIVE...

  4. BPA-2012-01411-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2012 In reply refer to: DK-7 Law Offices of Susan Elizabeth Drummond, PLLC Attn: Susan Elizabeth Drummond 5400 Carillon Point, Bldg. 5000, Ste. 476 Kirkland, WA 98033 FOIA...

  5. BPA-2012-01258-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Susan Elizabeth Drummond. PLLC 5400 Carillon Point, Bldg. 5000, Ste. 476 Kirkland, Washington 98033 FOIA BPA-2012-01258-F Dear Ms. Drummond: Thank you for the request for records...

  6. BPA-2012-01135-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2012 In reply refer to: DK-7 Law Offices of Susan Elizabeth Drummond, PLLC Attn: Susan Elizabeth Drummond 5400 Carillon Point, Bldg. 5000, Ste. 476 Kirkland, WA 98033 FOIA...

  7. BPA-2012-01616-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 In reply refer to: DK-7 Law Offices of Susan Elizabeth Drummond, PLLC Attn: Susan Elizabeth Drummond 5400 Carillon Point, Bldg. 5000, Ste. 476 Kirkland, WA 98033 FOIA...

  8. BPA-2012-00810-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2012 In reply refer to: DK-7 Law Offices of Susan Elizabeth Drummond, PLLC Attn: Susan Elizabeth Drummond 5400 Carillon Point, Bldg. 5000, Ste. 476 Kirkland, WA 98033 FOIA...

  9. BPA-2012-01025-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2012 In reply refer to: DK-7 Law Offices of Susan Elizabeth Drummond, PLLC Attn: Susan Elizabeth Drummond 5400 Carillon Point, Bldg. 5000, Ste. 476 Kirkland, WA 98033 FOIA...

  10. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    28, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 322 SSRL Presents Kevin Stone X-ray absorption spectroscopy has become an important tool in understanding the electronic structure...

  11. ARM - PI Product - Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mjensen@bnl.gov (631) 344-7021 30 Bell Avenue, Bldg-490D Upton, NY 11973 US Resource(s) Data Directory ReadMe Site Information FKB GRW HFE NIM NSA PYE SGP TWP Content Time Range...

  12. Orientational Analysis of Molecules in Thin Films | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecules in Thin Films Monday, September 17, 2012 - 10:00am SSRL Bldg. 137, room 226 Daniel Kaefer The synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a very powerful tool to...

  13. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kisling. Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg. 1 Sanla Fe. New Mexico 87505-6303 SEP 2 0 2011 Subject Transmittal of...

  14. Photo Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in Bldg. 321. The KBO is used to obtain improved high-resolution images of the "hot spots" at the center of target capsules during NIF inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. ...

  15. Copy of Capitalized Property RO23_120213_1.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capitalized Property 1 RO BARCODE DESCRIPTION MANUF. MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVTDATE 23 C5508 PRECISION ION POLISH GATAN INC 691 UNIT 427 01070301 50,626.00 28 113 24-Sep-13 23...

  16. Naval Support Activity (NSA) in Bethesda Employment Education Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: NSA Bethesda Fitness Center (Gymnasium, Bldg 17), 8901 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD 20889Attendees: Donna Friend (HC) and Rauland Sharp (HC)POC: Donna FriendWebsite: http://bit.ly/1yTjTNu

  17. 2010 - 12 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab, Bldg.59 CLOSED For Holiday Shutdown Tue, 12212010 - 3:00pm Information on DOE Salary Freeze Tue, 12212010 - 3:00pm JLab Power Outage, Main Entrance Closed Over Shutdown...

  18. 2010 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab, Bldg.59 CLOSED For Holiday Shutdown Tue, 12212010 - 3:00pm Information on DOE Salary Freeze Tue, 12212010 - 3:00pm JLab Power Outage, Main Entrance Closed Over Shutdown...

  19. Mark R Fahey | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R Fahey Director of Operations Mark Fahey Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Bldg. 240 / Rm. 2120 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-1932 mfahey@anl.gov

  20. CSE Postdoc Seminar | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 10 a.m., Bldg. 241, Rm. D172. "Copper Supported on Porous Organic Polymers (POPs) for Catalytic Alcohol Oxidation" Theodore Helgert, CSE Catalysis and Energy Conversion "High...

  1. DOE Technical Standards List: Directory of DOE and Contractor...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... James W. Brosnahan Westinghouse Savannah River Company Bldg. 707H Aiken, SC 89808 IEEE-IAPSP-P1015 Nolan E. Brown Pantex Plant P.O. Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120-0020 CSI Curtis W. ...

  2. UESC Project Overview: NASA Ames Research Center

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Challenges High energy intensity at many of the center's key buildings * Median energy intensity for typical bldg. similar to ARC's (mix of lab and office) is 21.2 kWh...

  3. From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL, Bldg. 137, Rm 226 Dr. Frank Uwe Renner Max-Planck-Institut fr ...

  4. Spencer R. Pruitt | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spencer R. Pruitt Postdoctoral Appointee - HPC Spencer Pruitt Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Bldg. 240 - Wkstn. 1D19 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-0051 spruitt

  5. Mr. James Bearzi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PO Box 3090 Ca rl sbad , New Mexico 88221 MAY 20 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe , New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for...

  6. Mr. James Bearzi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 JUN 16 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313...

  7. Mr. James Bearzi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POBox 3090 Ca rl sbad , New Mexico 88221 JU 16 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for...

  8. Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 JUN 2 6 2012 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Annual Proposed...

  9. ALFPRINT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Routing Phone Routing Name Number Symbol Room/Bldg Name Number Symbol Room/Bldg AABY, Darrell K. ....................................541-548-4015 BPA 7K24/ AAKHUS, Knut C. ..................................720-962-7375 WAPA 2E/251B AASEN, Robert K...................................202-586-9192 EE-5B 6073/LENF950 ABADI, Ehud B. .....................................503-230-4243 BPA 6K20/905 ABBOTT, Kim V. ....................................510-486-7909 SC-BSO 1023/BERKELEY ABBOTT, Paul

  10. 03-08-2010 NNSA-B-10-0131

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3-08-2010 NNSA-B-10-0131 Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to install dewatering wells in the north and south atriums of SNL/NM Building 518, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), on Eubank Boulevard, SE. ✖ Sandia Site Office Dewatering Wells for CINT (Bldg. 518) Atriums Bldg 518-Atriums LACY,SUSAN DOYLENE 03/08

  11. Symmetry or asymmetry -- Comfort is the question. (A study of the second floor of the west office wing of the Water Pollution Control Laboratory in Portland, Oregon.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, A.F.; Gaba, P.; Kowitanupong, C.

    1999-07-01

    This article explores the effects of an asymmetric distribution of building components, and their relation to human comfort. The studied building was the Water Pollution Control Laboratory in Portland, Oregon. This project, designed by the Miller/Hull Partnership, provides the perfect conditions to do such a study since it has very different ceiling heights within the same space, and an asymmetric distribution of the fenestration as well. Findings show that: (a) Variable ceiling heights affect the quantity of daylight received, and also affect the quality and distribution of electric light; (b) An asymmetric distribution of the fenestration creates very different conditions in both the luminous and thermal environments; and (c) The design of lighting and HVAC systems must take into consideration variations in ceiling height and the position of the fenestration into the space.

  12. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 18 IN F TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, G.

    2009-12-14

    Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual floor material in Tank 18 prior to operational closure. Tank 18 is an 85-foot diameter, 34-foot high carbon steel tank with nominal operating volume of 1,300,000 gallons. It is a Type IV tank, and has been in service storing radioactive materials since 1959. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual material, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the material during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual floor material separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 18 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 18. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a practical impact on results. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the North hemisphere is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample obtained from a compact region near the center riser. A floor scrape sample was obtained from a compact region near the northeast riser and has been analyzed for a shortened list of key analytes. Since the unused portion of the floor scrape sample material is archived and available in sufficient quantity, additional analyses need to be performed to complete results for the full suite of constituents. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the South hemisphere is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample; there have been no floor scrape samples previously taken from the South hemisphere. The criterion to determine the number of additional samples was based on the practical reduction in the uncertainty when a new sample is added. This was achieved when five additional samples are obtained. In addition, two archived samples will be used if a contingency such as failing to demonstrate the comparability of the Mantis samples to the floor scrape samples occurs. To complete sampling of the Tank 18 residual floor material, three additional samples should be taken from the North hemisphere and four additional samples should be taken from the South hemisphere. One of the samples from each hemisphere will be archived in case of need. Two of the three additional samples from the North hemisphere and three of the four additional samples from the South hemisphere will be analyzed. Once the results are available, differences between the Mantis and three floor scrape samples (the sample previously obtained near NE riser plus the two additional samples that will be analyzed) results will be evaluated. If there are no statistically significant analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples, those results will be combined and then UCL95%s will be calculated. If the analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples are statistically significant, the UCL95%s will be calculated without the Mantis sample results. If further reduction in the upper confidence limits is needed and can be achieved by the addition of the archived samples, they will be analyzed and included in the stati

  13. Staff meeting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN?s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  14. Pacific Enewetak Atoll cratering exploration completion report. [PEACE Program - Pacific-Enewetak Atoll Cratering Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The primary objectives of this seaborne drilling operation were to obtain sufficient quantities of continuous, high quality carbonate core/samples, an integrated suite of geophysical logs, and other sub-sea floor data from within and adjacent to the KOA and OAK craters. This information is vital to refinement of previous interpretation and model studies detailing the dynamics of crater formation and to confirm residual postshot changes of the underlying formations. Specifically, the information obtained will provide an accurate understanding of the original dimensions of the transient craters and through precise analysis of material property samples will lead to an understanding of the response behavior of the lagoon sediments beneath the craters. All program objectives were accomplished. A total of 32 precisely positioned exploratory holes were completed in KOA and OAK craters from a drill ship in water depths of 30 to 200 ft. (Reference Appendix I for summary drilling curves of each borehole.)

  15. Technology Solutions Case Study: Air-To-Water Heat Pumps with Radiant Delivery in Low Load Homes, Tucson, Arizona and Chico, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump (AWHP) systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

  16. Nobel Keynote Lecture Series at Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nobel Keynote Lecture Series Nobel Keynote Lecture Series at Berkeley Lab June 4, 2014 27415NERSC 40 YR MarkFinal In honor of its 40th Anniversary, NERSC is sponsoring a series of lectures describing the research behind four Nobel Prizes. The Laureates are also long-time users of NERSC's supercomputing resources. All talks will be held at Berkeley Lab in Bldg. 66, except for Saul Perlmutter (June 11), which will take place in Bldg. 50. Each talk begins at noon and runs to 1:30. UC Berkeley staff

  17. 2012 - 12 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Dec 2012 Wed, 2012-12-19 00:00 JAG Thanks all Holiday Event Participants, volunteers Tue, 2012-12-18 14:00 ODH Signs Posted for Hall D, Bldg. 203, on Dec. 18 Fri, 2012-12-14 14:00 Effective Dec. 14: Bldg. 97 is Construction Zone (Counting House) Fri, 2012-12-14 14:00 Important Notices for All JLab Radiologically Trained Individuals: Wed, 2012-12-12 14:00 ODH Postings for Buildings 200 & 204 Changing as of Dec. 12 Wed, 2012-12-12 14:00 All Staff: Shutdown Time Accounting & Work Guidance

  18. 2012 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec 2012 Wed, 2012-12-19 00:00 JAG Thanks all Holiday Event Participants, volunteers Tue, 2012-12-18 14:00 ODH Signs Posted for Hall D, Bldg. 203, on Dec. 18 Fri, 2012-12-14 14:00 Effective Dec. 14: Bldg. 97 is Construction Zone (Counting House) Fri, 2012-12-14 14:00 Important Notices for All JLab Radiologically Trained Individuals: Wed, 2012-12-12 14:00 ODH Postings for Buildings 200 & 204 Changing as of Dec. 12 Wed, 2012-12-12 14:00 All Staff: Shutdown Time Accounting & Work Guidance

  19. 2014MSMap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OFFICE & LAB BLDG PHYSICS HALL WILHELM HALL FRILEY HALL HELSER HALL UNION DRIVE BISSELL ROAD U N I O N D R I V E BEYER COURT UNIO N DRIVE OSBORN DRIVE COMMUNICATIONS BUILDING MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BUILDING METALS DEVELOPMENT BUILDING GENETICS LAB INSECTARY SCIENCE HALL II SCIENCE HALL LAGOMARCINO HALL M E C H . M A IN T . B U IL D IN G P R IN T IN G A N D P U B L IC A T IO N S LIBRARY STORAGE FACILITY ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BLDG WANDA DALEY DRIVE STANGE ROAD HORSE BARN RUMINANT NUTRITION LAB

  20. 2016 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Colloquium Archive Date TItle March 30, 2016 No Colloquium March 16, 2016 No Colloquium March 2, 2016 4:00 pm Bldg. 440, A105-106 No Colloquium February 17, 2016 4:00 pm Bldg. 440, A105-106 "Memoir of the Manhattan Project and a Few of its People", Murray Peshkin, Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division I was a young undergraduate student who was drafted into the U.S. army and assigned to Los Alamos during World War II. I was lucky to become Richard Feynman's personal

  1. User_agenda_09_B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USERS WORKSHOP: AGENDA August 8-9, 2009 Bldg 203, Auditorium Saturday, August 8 (Bldg. 203 Auditorium) 8:45- 9:15 Registration & Coffee 9:15 - 9:30 Welcome & introduction to the meeting W. Loveland An updated Strategic Plan: Why? R. Janssens 9:30 - 10:00 Status of ATLAS (& Energy Upgrade) R. Pardo 10:00 - 10:30 Status of CARIBU R. Pardo/G. Savard 10:30 - 10:45 Coffee 10:45 - 12:45 Status report on existing equipment & planned upgrades* 10:45 - 11:00 HELIOS A. Wuosmaa 11:00 -

  2. AmesLab-ISUMap2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GILMAN HALL OFFICE & LAB BLDG PHYSICS HALL WILHELM HALL FRILEY HALL HELSER HALL UNION DRIVE BISSELL ROAD U N I O N D R I V E BEYER COURT UNIO N DRIVE OSBORN DRIVE COMMUNICATIONS BUILDING MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BUILDING METALS DEVELOPMENT BUILDING GENETICS LAB INSECTARY SCIENCE HALL II SCIENCE HALL LAGOMARCINO HALL M E C H . M A IN T . B U IL D IN G P R IN T IN G A N D P U B L IC A T IO N S LIBRARY STORAGE FACILITY ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BLDG WANDA DALEY DRIVE STANGE ROAD HORSE BARN RUMINANT

  3. Building America Technlogy Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Interior Foundation Insulation Upgrade – Madison Residence (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This basement insulation project included a dimple map conveying inbound moisture to a draintile, airtight spray polyurethane foam wall and floor insulation, and radiant floor heat installation.

  4. Safety Staff Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Staff Contact Information Print Contact Extension Location CONTROL ROOM (247) 4969 80-140 Floor Operations Floor Operators 7464 (RING) 80-159 Building Manager Jeff Troutman...

  5. Technology Solutions Case Study: Interior Foundation Insulation Upgrade-Madison Residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    This basement insulation project included a dimple mat conveying inbound moisture to a draintile, airtight spray polyurethane foam wall and floor insulation, and radiant floor heat installation

  6. Radiant Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the following sections discuss radiant floor heat and radiant panels separately. ... pumping air through the floors at night outweighs the benefits of using solar heat during the day. ...

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Below Grade Walls Basem ent Floors Passive Floors SYSTEMS | ... FINANCIAL | CONCLUSION Active sub-slab depressurization ... APPLIANCE CHOICE | Balancing Cost & Performance ...

  8. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Facilities involved in this work consisted of a warehouse and ore storage building, located at Chauncey Street and Vine Avenue, and floor space on the ground floor , southwest ...

  9. Building America Technlogy Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This basement insulation project included a dimple map conveying inbound moisture to a draintile, airtight spray polyurethane foam wall and floor insulation, and radiant floor heat ...

  10. Geologic investigation of roof and floor strata: longwall demonstration, Old Ben Mine No. 24. Prediction of coal balls in the Herrin Coal. Final technical report: Part 2. [Mineralized peat balls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMaris, P.J.; Bauer, R.A.; Cahill, R.A.; Damberger, H.H.

    1983-04-01

    Coal-ball areas, large deposits of mineralized peat in the coal seam, obstructed longwall mining in the Herrin Coal at Old Ben Mine No. 24. In-mine mapping located coal balls under transitional roof - areas where the roof lithology alternates between the Energy Shale and the Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone. Specifically, coal balls occur under eroded exposures or windows of the marine Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone in the Energy Shale. Two types of coal-ball areas have been identified, based on stratigraphic position in the coal seam: type I is restricted to the top of the seam, and type II occurs at midseam and below. To predict the distribution of coal balls, as well as explain their formation, a depositional model was developed: First, freshwater sediments buried the Herrin peat. Decomposition of the sealed peat continued, producing high CO/sub 2/ partial pressures; then selective erosion took place as a river removed the cover along sinuous paths, cutting through to the peat in some places. With the seal broken, CO/sub 2/ was released, and freshwaters that contained Ca and Mg ions flushed out organic acids. Later, marine mud buried both the freshwater sediments and the exposed peat, which accounts for the transitional roof over the Herrin Coal and the coal balls under the marine shale windows in the Energy Shale. The depositional model was supported by the first comprehensive set of geochemical data for coal balls. Coal balls generally contained less than 4 percent organic carbon and very low levels of detrital minerals. Although individual sites of concentrated coal balls cannot be predicted, the specific linear roof exposures associated with these coal-ball areas can be identified by mapping. Based on previously mapped areas, the trends of these linear exposures can be projected.

  11. ORNL/RASA-86/71

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... FELT 1 , 01 3 6 c ' , ..Tt:rS -- e .---.-.--.- BLDG I. I1 L - L AVE'ijUE F * SDIL SA.MPLES Fig. 4. Locations of soil samples on the property at 123 Avenue F, Lodi, New ...

  12. SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jason(N.(Hancock University(of(Conneccut Crical(So(Modes(Observed(by(Inelasc(XBRay(ScaDering Tuesday,(August(11,(2015 2:00(B(3:00pm MSL(Auditorium((TAB03,(Bldg.(1698,(Room(A103...

  13. 08-02-2010 NNSA-B-10-0328

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    02-2010 NNSA-B-10-0328 Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to characterize and abate existing asbestos in Building 840. ✖ Sandia Site Office Bldg. 840 Asbestos Characterization and Abatement Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico LACY,SUSAN DOYLENE 08/02

  14. FLD1222

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fax Name Number Number Location AMES SITE OFFICE Ames Site Office Cynthia K. Baebler, Manager ...........................................................................630-252-1563 630-252-2654 X/BLDG 201 ARGONNE SITE OFFICE Argonne Site Office Joanna M. Livengood, Manager .......................................................................630-252-2366 /201 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION Executive Office Elliot E. Mainzer, Administrator and Chief Executive Officer

  15. Laura E. Ratcliff | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Ratcliff Postdoctoral Appointee - Electronic Structure Code Laura Ratcliff Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Bldg. 240 - Wkstn. 1D15 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-1027 lratcliff@anl.gov Areas of Interest: Ab Initio Electronic Structure Methods

  16. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 19 IN F TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.; Shine, G.

    2009-12-14

    Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual material in Tank 19 prior to operational closure. Tank 19 is a Type IV underground waste storage tank located in the F-Tank Farm. It is a cylindrical-shaped, carbon steel tank with a diameter of 85 feet, a height of 34.25 feet, and a working capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Tank 19 was placed in service in 1961 and initially received a small amount of low heat waste from Tank 17. It then served as an evaporator concentrate (saltcake) receiver from February 1962 to September 1976. Tank 19 also received the spent zeolite ion exchange media from a cesium removal column that once operated in the Northeast riser of the tank to remove cesium from the evaporator overheads. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual waste, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the waste during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 19 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 19. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a practical impact on results. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the North and South hemispheres is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample in each hemisphere. A floor scrape sample was obtained from a compact region near the center riser slightly in the South hemisphere and has been analyzed for a shortened list of key analytes. There is not enough additional material from the floor scrape sample material for completing the full suite of constituents. No floor scrape samples have been previously taken from the North hemisphere. The criterion to determine the number of additional samples was based on the practical reduction in the uncertainty when a new sample is added. This was achieved when five additional samples are obtained. In addition, two archived samples will be used if a contingency such as failing to demonstrate the comparability of the Mantis samples to the floor scrape samples occurs. To complete sampling of the Tank 19 residual floor material, four additional samples should be taken from the North hemisphere and four additional samples should be taken from the South hemisphere. One of the samples from each hemisphere will be archived in case of need. Three of the four additional samples from each hemisphere will be analyzed. Once the results are available, differences between the Mantis and three floor scrape sample results will be evaluated. If there are no statistically significant analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples, those results will be combined and then UCL95%s will be calculated. If the analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples are statistically significant, the UCL95%s will be calculated without the Mantis sample results. If further reduction in the upper confidence limits is needed and can be achieved by the addition of the archived samples, they will be analyzed and included in t

  17. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 Final Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2011-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, Standard 90.1-2010, or 2010 edition) would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007(ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, Standard 90.1-2007, or 2007 edition). The final analysis considered each of the 109 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 that were included in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 16 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE's final determination. However, out of the 109 addenda, 34 were preliminarily determined to have a measureable and quantifiable impact. A suite of 240 computer energy simulations for building prototypes complying with ASHRAE 90.1-2007 was developed. These prototypes were then modified in accordance with these 34 addenda to create a second suite of corresponding building simulations reflecting the same buildings compliant with Standard 90.1-2010. The building simulations were conducted using the DOE EnergyPlus building simulation software. The resulting energy use from the complete suite of 480 simulation runs was then converted to energy use intensity (EUI, or energy use per unit floor area) metrics (Site EUI, Primary EUI, and energy cost intensity [ECI]) results for each simulation. For each edition of the standard, these EUIs were then aggregated to a national basis for each prototype using weighting factors based on construction floor area developed for each of the 15 U.S. climate zones using commercial construction data. When compared, the resulting weighted EUIs indicated that each of the 16 building prototypes used less energy under Standard 90.1-2010 than under Standard 90.1-2007 on a national basis when considering site energy, primary energy, or energy cost. The EUIs were also aggregated across building types to a national commercial building basis using the same weighting data. On a national basis, the final quantitative analysis estimated a floor-space-weighted national average reduction in new building energy consumption of 18.2 percent for source energy and 18.5 percent when considering site energy. An 18.2 percent savings in energy cost, based on national average commercial energy costs for electricity and natural gas, was also estimated.

  18. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs.

  19. California Energy Commission ¬ネメ Energy Efficiency and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 14728 Pipeline Avenue Suite E Chino Hills California 91709 Phone: ... CONTRACT NUMBER: WORK Suite E Chino Hills California 91709 ...

  20. Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Last-Out Energy Conservation Check List Office Symbol/ Name: Suite Room Number: Date/ Initials All Lights in Suite are Off? All Printers in Suite are Off? All Scanners in Suite are Off? Coffee Maker in Suite is Off? All Entrances to Suite are Locked?

  1. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related Links

  2. Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Info Visitor Information NERSC is located in Shyh Wang Hall-also known as the computational research and theory (CRT) building (Bldg. 59)-on the campus of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. You can find information about visiting the lab, including an interactive campus map, transportation and lodging suggestions at http://www.lbl.gov/visit/. Your host must arrange site access prior to your visit. Last edited: 2016-01-06 16:48:46

  3. Environmental Assessment for Final Rule 10 CFR 433 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rule 10 CFR 433 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule 10 CFR 433 Document details the U.S. Department of Energy's environmental assessment for Final Rule 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings. PDF icon fed_bldg_envassess2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1918: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1778: Draft Environmental Assessment

  4. CX-100588 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100588 Categorical Exclusion Determination Fleet Services EV Charging Station, Grant Sawyer State Office Bldg Award Number: DE-EE0006992 CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office Date: 04/04/2016 Location(s): NV Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide funding to the Nevada Department of Administration to construct an electric vehicle (EV) charging station. The proposed

  5. Effective Theory of Chiral Superfluids and Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Materials Science Seminar Effective Theory of Chiral Superfluids and Superconductors WHEN: Mar 24, 2016 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Hot Rocks Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg. 4200, Room 203-A SPEAKER: Sergej Moroz, Condensed Matter Theory Group, University of Colorado CONTACT: Caryll Blount (505) 665-3950 CATEGORY: Community Science TYPE: Seminar INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Two-dimensional fermionic chiral superfluidity and superconductivity is an active area of

  6. Jefferson Lab Human Resources - Initial Lab Orientation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    first day 8:00 Arrive in Support Service Center (bldg 28) Lobby; met by Training Consultant 9:00 Initial Paperwork 10:00 JLab's Mission, Culture, Policies 11:00 Training begins SAF100 ES&H Orientation (30 min) GEN101Standards of Conduct (30 min) GEN034 Security Awareness (30 min) 12:00 Release for lunch 1:00 Benefits Orientation 2:00 Badges 3:00 Begin Windshield tour of Campus/Site

  7. 03-01-2010 NNSA-B-10-0101.PDF

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    01 Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to remodel office space within Building 880 in Tech Area I (TA-I). The goal of the renovation would be to abate all existing asbestos-containing materials, make necessary seismic retrofits, upgrade all mechanical and electrical systems to current standards, and conform with architectural guidelines. The renovated space would be used for offices. There would be no laboratories in the future space. ✖ Sandia Site Office Bldg. 880 North

  8. Orientational Analysis of Molecules in Thin Films | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Orientational Analysis of Molecules in Thin Films Monday, September 17, 2012 - 10:00am SSRL Bldg. 137, room 226 Daniel Kaefer The synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a very powerful tool to unravel the orientation of organic molecules on surfaces or in thin films. This information on the alignment of - most often - highly anisotropic molecules can become crucial if an epitaxial or even crystalline organic growth is desired, if such thin film should serve

  9. Microsoft Word - Skurikhin-Alexei-RR-2016-Recipient-information.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Materials Science - Rapid Response Recipient Seminar Title: Optimizing Image Segmentation for Quantitative Studies of Materials (*) Dr. Alexei Skurikhin Los Alamos National Laboratory ISR-3: Space Data Science and Systems Group Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 Time: 11am - 12pm Location: IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Abstract: Recent advances in materials characterization techniques have opened the door for the collection of imagery during metal alloy processing at

  10. Microsoft Word - Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Argonne National Laboratory-CCP, Audit A-08-24.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KBS:08-1350:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 September 17, 2008 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 SUBJECT: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Argonne National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project, Audit A-08-24 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Argonne National

  11. Microsoft Word - Triola, Chris - IMS Seminar - 03-23-16 - Information sheet.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chris Triola Postdoctoral Fellow Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics Nordita Institute for Materials Science Seminar 10am - 11am - March 23, 2016 IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Novel Order in Driven Dirac Materials Abstract: Driving a material with a time-dependent field can have a profound affect on its electronic properties, like: raising the critical temperature of superconductivity, creating topologically nontrivial Floquet states, or generating unconventional

  12. Mr. James Bearzi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PO Box 3090 Ca rl sbad , New Mexico 88221 MAY 20 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe , New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for Evaluation of an AK Sufficiency Determination for Waste Stream SR-BCLDP.001 .002 Dear Mr. Bearzi: We are submitting for your evaluation , a provisional approval of an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) Sufficiency Determination Request for the Central Characterization Project (CCP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) waste stream

  13. Mr. James Bearzi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POBox 3090 Ca rl sbad , New Mexico 88221 JU 16 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for Evaluation of an AK Sufficiency Determination for Waste Stream SR-BCLDP.002 Dear Mr. Bearzi: We are submitting for your evaluation, a provisional approval of an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) Sufficiency Determination Request for the Central Characterization Project (CCP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) waste stream

  14. Mr. James Bearzi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 JUN 16 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for Evaluation of an AK Sufficiency Determination for Waste Stream SR-BCLDP.004.002 Dear Mr. Bearzi : We are submitting for your evaluation , a provisional approval of an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) Sufficiency Determination Request for the Central Characterization Project (CCP) at the Savannah River Site

  15. Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico ~8221 JUN"1 G 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for Evaluation of an AK Sufficiency Determination for Waste Stream SR-BCLDP.004.003 Dear Mr. Bearzi: We are submitting for your evaluation, a provisional approval of an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) Sufficiency Determination Request for the Central Characterization Project (CCP) at

  16. Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau Departmen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departmen t of Energy Carlsbad Field Office . P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 8822 1 AY 2 () 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for Evaluation of an AK Sufficiency Determination for Waste Stream SR-BCLDP.001.001 Dear Mr. Bearzi: We are submitting for your evaluation , a provisional approval of an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) Sufficiency Determination Request for the Central Characterization Project (CCP)

  17. Mr. John Kieling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carl sbad, New Mexico 8822 1 OCT 26 2011 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Final Audit Report A-11-20, Argonne National Laboratory Central Characterization Project for Remote-Handled Waste Characterization Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the subject audit report for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as required by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit.

  18. I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - Chemical characterization of fingerprints from adults and children Michelle V. Buchanan', Keiji Asano", and Arthur Bohanonb 'Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 5510, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6365 bKnoxville Police Department, 800 Church Ave., Knoxville, TN 379 ABSTRACX' Tbeobservaarm * that the of children disappear from surfaces more quickly t h a n those of adults initiateda study to characterize tbe chemical cumpmem in Gngerprints.

  19. CURRICULUM VITAE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ralph T. Muehleisen Ph.D, P.E., LEED AP BD+C, INCE Board Certified Principal Building Scientist, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave., Bldg. 202, Lemont IL 60439 Email: rmuehleisen@anl.gov, (630) 252-2547 Education Ph. D. in Acoustics, Department of Aerospace Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 1996 B.S., Majors in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1989 Work Experience 2011-Present: Principal Building Scientist, Argonne National

  20. Ca

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P O. Box 3090 Ca rlsbad, New Mexico 88221 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau MAY 1 6 2012 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Revised Calendar Year 2005-2008 Culebra Potentiometric Surface Map Package Dear Mr. Kieling: On August 5 , 2011 , the New Mexico Environmental Department (NMED) approved the Groundwater Work Plan submitted as a condition to

  1. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kisling. Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg. 1 Sanla Fe. New Mexico 87505-6303 SEP 2 0 2011 Subject Transmittal of the Waste Isolalion Pilot Plant Calendar Year 2009 Culebra Potentiometric Surface Map Package Dear Mr. Kieling : On August 5, 2011 the New Mexico Environmental Department (NMEO) approved the Groundwater Work Plan (Work Plan) submitted as a condition to the Final Stipulated Order (Order) dated December 1, 2009. A

  2. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    042007 Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for Evaluation of an AK Sufficiency Determination for SR-Rl- BClDP.001 Dear Mr. Bearzi: We are submitting for your evaluation, a provisional approval of an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) Sufficiency Determination Request for Battelle Columbus laboratory (BCl) waste stream SR-Rl-BClDP.001. In accordance with the Waste

  3. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOV 2 3 2009 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6110 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Program Dear Mr. Zappe: Enclosed is the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Program Audit Report for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as required by Section Il.e .2.e of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste

  4. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APR17D1 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Re: Transmittal of the Carlsbad Field Office Final Audit Report for Follow-Up on Audit A-08-11 of the Idaho National Laboratory Central Characterization Project Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Idaho National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project (INUCCP) Audit Report for the processes performed to characterize and

  5. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 19, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for INL/CCP Recertification Audit A-13-18 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-13-18 of the Idaho National Laboratory Central Characterization Program (INL/CCP) performing characterization and certification

  6. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 4, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for LANL/CCP Recertification Audit A-13-23 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-13-23 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Central Characterization Program (LANL/CCP) performing characterization and certification

  7. Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering, Spectroscopic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Techniques | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering, Spectroscopic Techniques Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Gang Chen Seminar: Structures at atomic scales are traditionally determined through X-ray crystallography that amplifies scattering intensities by introducing spatial periodicity. For amorphous materials and many macromolecules, such as viruses, proteins and biofilms, it is hard to

  8. Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics | Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASP Lectures This lecture series will include presentations by experts in variety of fields with focus on nanomaterials and their applications in solar energy conversion. The lectures will take place at Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-46, bldg. 535, Room 103. Please click the links for abstracts. Schedule Monday, February 8, 10am: V. I. Klimov,Center for Advanced Solar Phophysics: Overview of Research Thrusts Wednesday, February 17, 10am: V. I. Klimov, Nanocrystal Quantum Dots: Electronic

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 300 Area Perspective.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area Perspective 300 Area Perspective River and Plateau Committee February 15, 2012 February 15, 2012 John B. Price Business/Research Park in N Richland h d l h High Density Residential is the norm MSA Bldg and Townhouses "Smartpark" includes Townhouses High Density Residential Infiltration from Impervious Areas & Irrigation Townhouses Grass Townhouse Townhouses Grass Bare Ground from Construction Storm Sewer Asphalt Grass Grate p Remediated 1100 Area -Industrial Area f h l ff

  10. Improvement of X-ray Analysis of Nano-scaled Materials by Means of High

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolution X-ray Emission Spectrometry | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Improvement of X-ray Analysis of Nano-scaled Materials by Means of High Resolution X-ray Emission Spectrometry Monday, August 1, 2011 - 2:00pm SSRL Bldg. 137 Conference Room 137-322 Matthias Müller, Scientist at Physikalisch-Technischn, Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin, Germany Advanced research on novel semiconductor, energy-storage and energy-conversion devices relies on the reliability of the characterization

  11. In situ structural characterization of metal catalysts and materials using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XAFS spectroscopy in combination with complementary techniques. | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource In situ structural characterization of metal catalysts and materials using XAFS spectroscopy in combination with complementary techniques. Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 1:00pm SSRL Bldg. 137, Room 322 The availability of third generation light sources has greatly enhanced the opportunities for invesigating chemical change in real time.1 This presentation describes studies carried out

  12. Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Soft X-ray and Hard

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray, and its applications in electrochemistry | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Soft X-ray and Hard X-ray, and its applications in electrochemistry Friday, December 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL, Bldg. 137, room 322 Zhi Liu The synchrotron based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) endstation[1] pioneered at ALS based on differentially pumped electron energy analyzer has been recognized by scientific communities as

  13. Microsoft Word - 09-1581.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    581:UFC:2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 6, 2009 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Savannah River Site Central Characterization Project (A-09-16) Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Savannah River Site Certification Audit Report for the

  14. Microsoft Word - 10-1332 _2_

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 16, 2010 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6110 Subject: Transmittal of the CBFO Final Audit Report for Audit A-10-17 of the Idaho National Laboratory Central Characterization Project Analytical Laboratories Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Audit

  15. Microsoft Word - 12-1556.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    556:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 December 3, 2012 Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A-12-12 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for the Carlsbad

  16. Microsoft Word - 12-1568.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 December 12, 2012 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Recertification Audit A-12-14, INL Analytical Laboratories Utilizing the Central Characterization Project Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the final audit report for

  17. Microsoft Word - 13-2087 (WORD FORMAT).doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2087:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 November 4, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Closeout Audit A-13-19, INL Analytical Laboratories Utilizing the Central Characterization Program Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad

  18. Microsoft Word - Edited A-08-03 draft final report.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 16, 2008 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for Argonne National Laboratory Audit A-08-03 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Argonne National Laboratory Audit Report for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as required by Section II.C.2.c of the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Pennit. The

  19. Microsoft Word - Larsson, Mats - IMS Distinguished Lecture Series - Speaker Information.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mats Larsson Stockholm University Director of AlbaNova University Center Institute for Materials Science Distinguished Lecture Series Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking, Chirality, and Lev Landau and his Nobel Prize Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016 Time: 2pm - 3pm Location: MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Hosted By Alexander Balatsky Abstract The concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking has served physics well for almost a century, with ferromagnetism, superfluidity, and

  20. Microsoft Word - MARKIEWICZ, Bob - IMS Lecture Series-'D'++- Going Beyond DFT via GW and Vertex Corrections information.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Materieals Science Lecture Series 'D'++: Going Beyond DFT via GW and Vertex Corrections Professor R. S. Markiewicz Northeastern University, Boston Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2016 Time: 2:00 - 3:00pm Location: MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: A large variety of approaches have been implemented for extending DFT (density-functional theory) calculations of band structure to account for stronger calculations. In particular, GW calculations are used to

  1. Scattering Workshop May 16-17, 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application. group shot on the steps of bldg 41 (Click image for a hi-res version) Date: May 16 (Lectures) May 17 (Hands-on practical session) Location: SSRL Overview: Modern synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (SR-XRS) techniques offer the ability to probe nano- and atomic-scale structures and order/disorder relationships that critically govern the properties of advanced technological and

  2. Microsoft Word - 07-1047mpn ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-06 INL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Report of CBFO Recertification Audit A-07-06 of the INL Analytical Laboratories Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Transuranic Waste Certification Program (TWCP) activities and evaluation of the transition of INL TWCP to the Central

  3. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron lasers there has been interest in using coherent x-rays to probe condensed matter systems. Resonant scattering with x-rays allow elemental specificity with magnetic contrast, and coherent light leads to speckle in the scattered pattern due to interference from waves exiting the sample.

  4. CX-100273 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NWTC Bldg. 251 Roof & RTU-1 Replacement Project, NREL Tracking No. 15-007 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: B1.16, B2.5, B1.14, B5.1, DOE/EA 1914 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date: 06/05/15 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office

  5. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prof. James Avery Sauls Department of Physics & Astronomy Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois From Condensed Matter Physics to Next Generation Quantum Devices Wednesday, December 9, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Topic: In this Colloquium Professor Sauls will present his views on phases of matter under extreme conditions being explored by condensed matter physicists, materials scientists, engineers and chemists that hold promise for next generation

  6. UNCLASSIFIED Information Science and Technology Seminar Speaker Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science and Technology Seminar Speaker Series Joachim M. Buhmann Institute for Machine Learning ETH Zurich Information theory of algorithms: How precisely should we compute in Big Data settings? Wednesday, January 13, 2016 3:00 - 4:00 PM TA-3, Bldg. 1690, Room 102 (CNLS Conference Room) Abstract: Algorithms map input spaces to output spaces where inputs are possibly affected by fluctuations. Beside run time and memory consumption, an algorithm might be characterized by its

  7. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Distinguished Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Tony Rollett Department of Materials Science & Engineering Carnegie Mellon University Advanced Characterization of Additively Manufactured Materials, including Synchrotron-based 3D X-rays Wednesday, August 3, 2016 2:00 - 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) ABSTRACT: To come... Background: Professor Rollett's research program emphasizes quantification of microstructure, especially in three dimensions, and its impact on properties and processing using both

  8. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Distinguished Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    James Avery Sauls Department of Physics & Astronomy Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois From Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking to Topological Order Key paradigms in quantum matter Wednesday, November 25, 2015 2:00 - 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Topic: In this lecture Professor Sauls discusses the connection between two paradigms in theoretical physics: spontaneous symmetry breaking and topological order. These organizing principles are illustrated with discoveries

  9. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Distinguished Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gabriel Aeppli Head of the Synchrotron and Nanotechnology Department Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland Accelerator-based Light Sources for the Future Wednesday, August 12, 2015 2:00 to 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103) Abstract: We review current and future accelerator-based light sources and their applications to science, medicine and engineering. Particular attention is given to competing technologies such as electron microscopies. Bio: Gabriel Aeppli is professor of

  10. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Distinguished Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Joël Mesot Director, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland Probing Excitations in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems: Recent Highlights Obtained at the Large-Scale Facilities of the Paul Scherrer Institute Thursday, June 11, 2015 2 - 3 PM TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103 (MSL Auditorium) Abstract: The Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, is the largest research center for natural and engineering sciences within Switzerland. One of its main missions is to conceive, realize and run so-called

  11. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Distinguished Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doctor Peter Wölfle Professor Emeritus Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics (KIT) The Exotic World of Quantum Matter: Novel States Induced by Fluctuations Tuesday, June 30, 2015 2 - 3pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: The talk reviews established concepts of quantum matter and more recently discovered unexpected properties leading beyond. The low energy excitations of quantum matter generally have particle-like character. However, the character of these

  12. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Igor Altfeder Air Force Research Laboratory Dayton, Ohio Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Phonon Standing Waves Tuesday, March 8, 2016 2:30 - 3:30 pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: Previous STM studies of coherent wave processes at the nanoscale have resulted in a number of breakthroughs related to electron standing waves on surfaces. The experimental discovery of atomic scale phonon standing waves opens a new page in this rapidly developing research field. Using

  13. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edwin L. Thomas Dean of Engineering Professor of Materials Science and NanoEngineering Rice University - Houston, Texas Indistinguishable from Magic? (A Perspective on Some Aspects of Materials Research in the Next Decade) Tuesday, March 22, 2016 10am - 11am MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Addressing multifunctional materials: The mighty electron, the cool photon and the lowly phonon...how waves in periodic materials lead to interesting properties. Problem Driven Research:

  14. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr Roger D Doherty M.A. D. Phil., Fellow TMS Emeritus Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Solute Enhanced Strain Hardening of Aluminum Alloys for Higher Strength / Toughness Combinations Wednesday, May 6, 2015 1:15 - 2:15 PM TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103 (MSL Auditorium) Abstract: When the yield strength of metallic alloys is increased the fracture toughness almost always falls. By use of a plot of bond strength normalized fracture

  15. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Series Dr. Sergey Pershoguba Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (NORDITA) Postdoctoral Fellow Skyrmion-induced Bound States in a Superconductor Wednesday, January 20, 2016 11:00 - Noon IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Abstract: We consider a superconductor proximity coupled to a two-dimensional ferromagnetic film with a skyrmion texture. We predict the skyrmion bound states (SBS) that are induced in the superconductor, similar to the well-known Yu- Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) states.

  16. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Lecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antonia Antoniou Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia Mechanical Behavior of Hierarchical Nanoporous Metals Thursday, August 27, 2015 1:30 - 2:30pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103) Abstract: Nanoporous (NP) metal foams are a unique class of materials that are characterized by extremely high surface-to- volume ratios and possess such desirable properties of metals as high electrical conductivity, catalytic activity, and strength. This unusual combination of properties is

  17. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Lecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Garritt Tucker Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Atomistic Methods to Quantify Nanoscale Strain and Deformation Mechanisms in Nanostructured Materials Thursday, August 27, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103) Abstract: As the theoretical physicist, Sir Frederick Charles Franck, said, 'Crystals are like people: it is the defects in them that make them interesting.' Fundamental research in Materials Science and Engineering focuses on linking structure and

  18. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Sergii L. Dudarev Programme Grant Modelling Co-ordinator & Visiting Professor Oxford University Materials United Kingdom "Magnetic" Molecular Dynamics and Other Models for Fusion Reactor Materials Tuesday, September 15, 2015 2:00 - 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract - Multiscale models for fusion reactor materials address both the initial stages of production of radiation defects, where the recently discovered power law statistics of defect

  19. User Liaison Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Liaison Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? User Liaison Office User Liaison Home Users Group Program Advisory Committee User/Researcher Information print version ULO Services Driving in VA Housing Accomodations Office Space Student Affairs Office Telephone Services ULO Staff Lorelei Chopard User Liaison (ULO) (757) 269-6388 Bldg 12 L111 Hari Areti Head of

  20. User Shipments | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shipments Check-In | Computer Accounts | Data Collection & Analysis | Policies | Proposals | Schedules | User Portal Shipping Equipment and Materials Hazardous Materials Shipments Getting Items through U.S. Customs Shipping User Samples/Equipment Outside of the U.S. Establishing User Financial Account The following contact information should be included on all shipments to LCLS: Spokesperson's Name and c/o Instrument Scientist SLAC, LCLS Bldg. 950 (specify instrument) 2575 Sand Hill Rd.

  1. Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events Monday, October 29, 2012 - 3:30am SSRL Bldg. 137, Rm. 322 Krish Seetah, Stanford University, Department of Anthropology and Zooarcheology Laboratory The domestication of wild animal species has underpinned some of the most fundamental developments in human history. The inclusion of a range of fauna into the human menagerie has altered the way we feed and transport ourselves, not to mention how we

  2. Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated electron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated electron materials Friday, September 14, 2012 - 1:00pm SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Jun-Sik Lee Seminar One of the most challenging extant issues in condensed matter physics and applied materials science is the search for post-silicon based electronics, and multi-functional complex oxides offer hopes that new classes of devices can be developed out of these intriguing

  3. Contract Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract Management SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 Contract Management Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page SLAC Site Office (SSO) communicates and enforces contract requirements; reviews and approves contract performance and deliverables, and provides Contracting Officer direction and guidance to the

  4. As you prepare for your upcoming beam time, please be aware that construction is planned to update SLAC Gate 17 with RFID proximity card access hardware and to change the stairs next to the Security hut to an ADA compliant ramp. Please forward this to your proposal collaborators (and ensure that all users have registered and completed training before they arrive). This construction is scheduled to begin Tuesday 5/28 and be completed by 6/28. During this construction, access to the LCLS and SSRL buildings and experimental facilities will be provided as follows: VEHICLES ONLY THROUGH GATE 17 5/28-6/28 0600-1530 (6 am-3:30 pm) Construction Zone. Only VEHICLE traffic will be allowed access through Gate 17 and flagman will provide traffic control. 1530-1800 (3:30-6:00 pm) Assumes construction will have stopped for the day; both traffic lanes will be open for vehicles. 1800-0600 (6 pm-6 am) As now, Gate 17 will be closed or barricaded overnight. PEDESTRIANS ONLY THROUGH GATE 16 5/28-6/28 The pedestrian turnstile at Gate 16A will not change. The turnstile is available for pedestrian use 24/7 as long as the individual has a valid SLAC ID badge (and there is a guard at Gate 30 to 'buzz' them through). 0700-1600 (6 am-4 pm) Pedestrians who would normally walk through Gate 17 will instead follow the detour to Gate 16 swing gate which will be unlocked and staffed by Security. A valid SLAC ID badge is needed to enter; new users without IDs will be allowed to proceed for check-in and badging after confirmation with the User Research Administration Office (see detour map attached). FYI - After the construction is completed and proximity card readers are fully functional, users and staff will enter Gates 17 and 30 using an activated RFID proximity card. More details to follow.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building 137 Bldg. 270 CONSTRUCTION IMPACTS PEDESTRIAN AND VEHICLE ACCESS THROUGH SLAC SECURITY GATE 17 ~ May 28-June 28, 2013 The stairs next to the Gate 17 Guard House will be replaced with an ADA compliant ramp; the turnstile and fence at SLAC Gate 17 will be updated with RFID proximity card access hardware. During this construction, access beyond the fence, including the SSRL and LCLS buildings and user facilities will be provided as follows: VEHICLES ONLY THROUGH GATE 17 Security will

  5. Installation restoration program. Phase I. Records search. Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve facility, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) has developed a program to identify and evaluate past hazardous material disposal sites on DOD property, to control the migration of hazardous contaminants, and to control hazards to health or welfare that may result from these past disposal operations. This program is called the Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The IRP has four phases consisting of Phase I, Initial Assessment/Records Search; Phase II, Confirmation and Quantification; Phase III, Technology Base Development; and Phase IV, Operations/Remedial Measures. Niagara Falls AFRF is located in Niagara County, New York, approximately six miles northeast of the City of Niagara Falls and approximately fifteen miles north of Buffalo. The installation is currently comprised of 985 acres with a base population of approximately 2,560. The following areas were determined to have a sufficient potential to create environmental contamination and follow-on investigation is warranted: Bldg. 600 JP-4 Pipeline Leak; POL JP-4 Tank C; Landfill; BX MOGAS Tank Leak; NYANG Hazardous Waste Drum Storage; POL JP-4 Tank A; JP-4 Tank Truck Spill; Bldg. 202 Drum Storage Yard; Fire Training Facility No. 1, 2 and 3; Bldg. 850 Drum Storage Yard; and AFRES Hazardous Waste Drum Storage.

  6. CRT NUG 120203.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Theory Facility (CRT) Howard Walter NERSC Deputy Director CRT Facility 2 CRT * Four story, 140,000 GSF - Two 20,000 SF office floors 300 offices - 28,000 SF HPC floor...

  7. Radiant Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the cables or tubing in a solid floor and are the oldest form of modern radiant floor systems. The tubing or cable can be embedded in a thick concrete foundation slab (commonly...

  8. The Power of Choice ? Cold War Patriots Day of Remembrance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and went to the messy hole in the floor and with his bare hands and that small amount of water, he cleaned the feces from the floor and the hole. The rest of the prisoners grew...

  9. I_ - I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 2 - .- .- .- .L Building 3 contains approximately 2,400 m2 (25,500 ft' ) of floor space. ... Building 8 has a total floor space of approximately 500 m2 (5400 ft2). There are four ...

  10. Maximizing the ExoEarth candidate yield from a future direct imaging mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2014-11-10

    ExoEarth yield is a critical science metric for future exoplanet imaging missions. Here we estimate exoEarth candidate yield using single visit completeness for a variety of mission design and astrophysical parameters. We review the methods used in previous yield calculations and show that the method choice can significantly impact yield estimates as well as how the yield responds to mission parameters. We introduce a method, called Altruistic Yield Optimization, that optimizes the target list and exposure times to maximize mission yield, adapts maximally to changes in mission parameters, and increases exoEarth candidate yield by up to 100% compared to previous methods. We use Altruistic Yield Optimization to estimate exoEarth candidate yield for a large suite of mission and astrophysical parameters using single visit completeness. We find that exoEarth candidate yield is most sensitive to telescope diameter, followed by coronagraph inner working angle, followed by coronagraph contrast, and finally coronagraph contrast noise floor. We find a surprisingly weak dependence of exoEarth candidate yield on exozodi level. Additionally, we provide a quantitative approach to defining a yield goal for future exoEarth-imaging missions.

  11. Characteristics of KE Basin Sludge Samples Archived in the RPL - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2011-11-22

    Samples of sludge were collected from the K East fuel storage basin (KE Basin) floor, contiguous pits (Weasel Pit, North Load Out Pit, Dummy Elevator Pit, and Tech View Pit), and fuel storage canisters between 1995 and 2003 for chemical and radionuclide concentration analysis, physical property determination, and chemical process testing work. Because of the value of the sludge in this testing and because of the cost of obtaining additional fresh samples, an ongoing program of sludge preservation has taken place with the goals to track the sludge identities and preserve, as well as possible, the sludge composition by keeping the sludge in sealed jars and maintaining water coverage on the sludge consistent with the controlling Fluor Hanford (FH) Sampling and Analysis plans and FH contracts with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This work was originally initiated to provide material for planned hydrothermal treatment testing in accordance with the test plan for the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) corrosion process chemistry follow on testing (Delegard et al. 2007). Although most of the planned hydrothermal testing was canceled in July 2007 (as described in the forward of Delegard et al. 2007), sample consolidation and characterization was continued to identify a set of well-characterized sludge samples that are suited to support evolving STP initiatives. The work described in the letter was performed by the PNNL under the direction of the Sludge Treatment Project, managed by Fluor Hanford.

  12. Desert architecture for educational buildings, a case study: A center for training university graduates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebeid, M.

    1996-10-01

    A new program for training graduates in desert development is being implemented by the Desert Development Center (DDC) of the American University in Cairo. The facilities consist of fifty bed/sitting rooms for accommodating 100 students. Each unit consists of two rooms and a bathroom for the use of 4 students; a lecture theater which can house 120 students, with adjoining office for trainers as well as necessary facilities; a general cafeteria which can serve 120--150 persons and an adjoining dining room for teaching staff. The cafeteria building also houses the kitchen; a cold storage area; a laundry room, storerooms, sleeping quarters and services for the labor force of the building complex; a system of solar water heaters; and a special sanitary sewage system for treatment of waste water produced by the building`s activities. When designing and implementing this complex, architectural elements and building philosophy based on the concept of integrating with the environment were considered. Elements included orientation heights and building materials suited to the desert environment, thick walls, outer and inner finishing materials, roofs, malkafs, floors, colors, solar heaters, lighting, green areas, windbreaks, terraces, and furniture. The paper includes a general evaluation of this educational building based on the PRA approach (Participatory Rapid Appraisal) involving those living and working in it. As a result of her position with the project, the author was able to evaluate the original designs, recommend modifications, and evaluate their implementation and fulfillment of the original goals of the projects.

  13. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    Contents include articles entitled: House votes 309 to 107 to approve Texas compact; Nebraska governor hosts LLRW meeting; Southeast Compact considers funding proposal; Chem-Nuclear explores options re SC revenue requirements; Legislation sets revenue requirements for Barnwell; TCC meets: Supports CA request for technical assistance; DOE approves part of California`s technical assistance request; State legislators discuss LLRW management for OH, IL, NC; Washington governor re Potential New Hanford Role; Federal court enjoins DOE from excluding WCS on new disposal; Appellate court in favor of DOE in surcharge rebates dispute; Hearing set for October in Ward Valley case; court rejects federal motion to dismiss Ward Valley suit; NE sues commission re veto over export authorizations; US Supreme Court dismisses line-item veto challenge; Department of Interior Inspector General investigation requested; USEC privatization plan approved; DOD finalizes LLRW disposal charter; Clinton nominates six DOE appointees; Congress moves FUSRAP to Army Corps of Engineers; Schaefer named interim director of USGS: Nichols leaves EPA: NRC Commissioner Rogers` term expires; NRC: CA ``Well-Quantified`` to license Ward Valley facility; EPA objects to state permit for Louisiana facility; Petitions submitted to EPA oppose Shintech permits; ECOS draft recommendations re Enviro programs; Legislation introduced to prohibit spent fuel shipments to the Goshutes; and HLW legislation ready for floor action.

  14. Air-to-Water Heat Pumps With Radiant Delivery in Low-Load Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; German, A.; Dakin, B.; Springer, D.

    2013-12-01

    Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump (AWHP) systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

  15. Air-to-Water Heat Pumps With Radiant Delivery in Low-Load Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; German, A.; Dakin, B.; Springer, D.

    2013-12-01

    Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

  16. Air-To-Water Heat Pumps with Radiant Delivery in Low Load Homes: Tucson, Arizona and Chico, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump (AWHP) systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

  17. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogucz, E A

    2010-12-13

    This project pursued innovations to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in commercial and residential buildings. For commercial buildings, the project developed a testbed for intelligent nested environmental systems technologies (iNEST), which monitor and control energy flows and IEQ across a cascade of spaces from individuals desktops to office suites to floors to whole buildings. An iNEST testbed was constructed at Syracuse University and was used to assess the use of devices such as personal badges and CO2 sensors to study how reduced energy use and improved IEQ could be achieved. For residential buildings, resources were targeted in support of DoEs Builders Challenge Program and to recruit Syracuse, NY builders. Three homes in Syracuses Near Westside neighborhood were also registered under the program by Syracuse University team, with an additional home registered by one of the builders. Findings from the work at the iNEST testbed facility, and results from other related projects were disseminated through Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems (SyracuseCoE) 2008 Annual Symposium, the 9th International Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference & Exhibition, and through SyracuseCoEs website and eNewsletters to inform the broader community of researchers, designers and builders. These public communication activities helped enhance the understanding of high performance buildings and facilitate further market acceptance.

  18. Earthquake response of storey building in Jakarta using accelerographs data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julius, Admiral Musa; Sunardi, Bambang

    2015-04-24

    As seismotectonic, the Jakarta city will be greatly affected by the earthquake which originated from the subduction zone of the Sunda Strait and south of Java. Some occurrences of earthquakes in these location are often perceived by the occupants in the upper floors of multi-storey buildings in Jakarta but was not perceived by the occupants on the ground floor. The case shows the difference in ground-motion parameters on each floor height. The analysis of the earthquake data recorded by accelerographs on different floors need to be done to know the differences in ground-motion parameters. Data used in this research is accelerograph data installed on several floors in the main building of Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics Agency with a case study of Kebumen earthquake on January 25{sup th} 2014. Parameters analyzed include the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), Peak Ground Displacement (PGD), Peak Spectral Acceleration (PSA), Amplification (Ag), and the Effective Duration of earthquake (t{sub e}). Research stages include accelerographs data acquisition in three (3) different floors, conversion and data partition for each component, conversion to units of acceleration, determination of PGA, PGD, PSA, Ag and t{sub e} as well as data analysis. The study shows the value of PGA on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floors, respectively are 0.016 g, 0.053 g and 0.116 g. PGD on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 2.15 cm, 2.98 cm and 4.92 cm. PSA on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 0.067 g, 0.308 g and 0.836 g. Amplification of the peak acceleration value on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor to the surface rock are 4.37, 6.07 and 7.30. Effective duration of the earthquake on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 222.28 s, 202.28 s and 91.58 s. In general, with increasing floor of the building, the value of the peak ground acceleration, peak ground displacement, peak spectral acceleration and amplification growing, contrary to the value of the effective duration of earthquake decreases. The difference in this parameter is strongly influenced by local soil conditions and building construction.

  19. MEETING MATERIALS: JUNE 26, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Westin Crystal CityCrystal Ballroom VI (Located on the Second Floor)1800 Jefferson Davis HighwayArlington, VA 22202

  20. Physical Infrastructure Integration for Trinity, ASC L2 Milestone Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sena, Phillip A.

    2015-09-11

    Design, build, and integrate under-floor electrical and water-cooling distribution system for Trinity/ATS-1 platform.

  1. Calutron construction | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    construction Calutron construction Construction workers pour the concrete floor and footers for a Y-12 Calutron process building

  2. Open Source Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL Go Suite The LANL Go Suite is a collection of packages, libraries, utilities, and software patches related to Google's Go programming language. The LANL Go Suite largely takes ...

  3. Analysis Of The Tank 5F Final Characterization Samples-2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2012-09-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the following: Al-26, Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARATERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-01-20

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the following: Al-26, Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the following: Al-26, Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  6. Transport Modeling Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mathematical modeling is ideally suited for this analysis because fuel cells are difficult ... This balance and its optimization is ideally suited to mathematical modeling. In addition, ...

  7. County of Los Angeles Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 14728 Pipeline Avenue Suite E Chino Hills California 91709 Phone: ... CONTRACT NUMBER: DE WORK ORDER NUMBER: 2011 Suite E Chino Hills California ...

  8. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

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    660-2694 mbusch@fel.duke.edu Calisto, Tom R&D Engineer II Duke Office : PHY 012 Phone : (919) 660-2956 tc203@tunl.duke.edu Carlin, Bret Electronics Supervisor Duke Office : PHY 02 Phone : (919) 660-2544 carlin@tunl.duke.edu Dunham, John Accelerator Technician Duke Office : PHY 04 Phone : (919) 660-2542 dunham@tunl.duke.edu Emamian, Mark R&D Engineer III Duke Office : FEL 208 Phone : (919) 660-2649 me@fel.duke.edu Faircloth, Joe Coordinator, Project & Bldg. Duke Office : FEL 123 Phone

  9. WNR Offices

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    Offices, Experimental Areas, Buildings, and Contacts Description Contact Name Bldg/Room Phone Pager/Alt. Phone Group Office Julie Quintana 622/220 667-5377 665-5390 User Office Tanya Herrera 622/212 667-6797 MPF-31 Building Manager Kenny Madrid 31/125 665-0944 664-8327 MPF-17 Building Manager Gene Cartelli 6/133 667-2127 664-4234 MPF-7 Building Manager Bruce Wheeler 622/248 667-6715 664-8336 Property Julie Martinez 24/110 665-2058 664-6775 Waste Manager Lance Kloefkorn 6/236 665-3288 664-5972

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    Other Government Furnished Property (GFP) / Equipment 1 RO BARCODE DESCRIPTION MANUF. MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT_DATE 23 0000032497 THERMAL LABELING SYS BRADY WORLDWIDE TLS2200 BPTLS901644924 $0.00 28 119 24-Sep-13 23 F13412 PWR SUPPLY & READ BR BROOKS 5878 881OHC025872 $0.00 94 01 24-Sep-13 23 0000032498 THERMAL LABELING SYS BRADY WORLDWIDE TLS2200 BPTLS902745018 $0.00 17 106 24-Sep-13 23 0000106857 RECIRCULATOR POLYSCI POLY SCIENCE N0691883 G52197 $0.00 83 242 4-Oct-13 23 0000021812

  11. VPP Points of Contact web version 07092015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updated 7/9/2015 VPP POINTS OF CONTACT Organization DOE POC Contractor DOE Federal POC Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL)/222-S Laboratory Analytical Services and Testing (LAS&T)/Office of River Protection Bldg. 2704-S/Room 5 200 West Area William (Bill) J. Leonard ES&H Manager W_j_iv_bill_leonard@rl.gov Robert W. Schroeder, ALARA Robert_W_Schroeder@rl.gov Melissa Soto, VPP Chair Melissa_M_Soto@rl.gov Robert (Rob) D. Meyers, ZAC Chair Robert_D_Meyers@rl.gov

  12. Vol. 9: Building America Best Practices Series - Builders Challenge Guide

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Updated 7/9/2015 VPP POINTS OF CONTACT Organization DOE POC Contractor DOE Federal POC Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL)/222-S Laboratory Analytical Services and Testing (LAS&T)/Office of River Protection Bldg. 2704-S/Room 5 200 West Area William (Bill) J. Leonard ES&H Manager W_j_iv_bill_leonard@rl.gov Robert W. Schroeder, ALARA Robert_W_Schroeder@rl.gov Melissa Soto, VPP Chair Melissa_M_Soto@rl.gov Robert (Rob) D. Meyers, ZAC Chair Robert_D_Meyers@rl.gov

  13. Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement for the Mesaba Energy Project Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Plant Northern Minnesota Iron Range

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    Notice of Availability DOE/EA-1906: The Final EA for the Operations, Upgrades, and Consolidation at the Western Command site, KAFB, New Mexico (DOE/EA-1906) is available in hard copy at the Zimmerman Library UNM Campus, Albuquerque, NM and the KAFB Library, Bldg 20204, Kirtland AFB NM; electronically on this web page under NNSA Headquarters/ Office of Secure Transportation and on the DOE web site, www.energy.gov/NEPA. DOE/EA-1929: The Finding of No Significant Impact and the Final Environmental

  14. Jobs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

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    Jobs SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (155KB) Phone List Jobs Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 About Jobs Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Current Open Federal Positions The SLAC Site Office is located in Menlo Park, California. All open federal positions listed below are posted on USAJobs.gov

  15. LANSCE | Users | LUG | Topical User Meeting Agenda

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    Agenda (some presentations are included below) Sunday 4:00pm-6:00pm Registration: Best Western Monday 7:30am Registration: LANSCE, Bldg 1 Facility Presentations | LANSCE, Rosen Auditorium 8:15am-8:22am LANSCE User Group Executive Committee Welcome: Steve Conradson 2011 LUG-EC Chair 8:23am-8:30am Worshop Goals/Processes Kurt Schoenberg LANSCE Facility Director 8:30am-9:00am LANSCE Overview and Future Opportunities Kurt Schoenberg LANSCE Facility Director 9:00am-9:30am Nuclear Neutron Science at

  16. PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET ' ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1. H.#~~Sample Nos. 3 --Date Collected~~by-CESS-.Route to CBS LocationTITANIUM Type of Sample airnalyzed for F Alpham Remarks NIAGARA pALI+S* N.Y. U Beta Bldg. 103 - furnace room - -NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description I I I--- R ) T 1 Q I I I 7392 1100 GA Induction furnace area duri-nn ----l----- mDeriod;.02; 151 .3 while furnace was charged with UOT_-

  17. Project Manager, Nevada Test Site | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Project Manager, Nevada Test Site Susan Livenick, NTS Project Manager Susan Livenick August 2009 U.S. Department of Energy's Management Award On August 12, Susan Livenick, a Project Manager at the Nevada Test Site received the 2009 U.S. Department of Energy's Management Award at a special awards ceremony in Providence, R.I. The awards honor outstanding achievements in energy and water management. Susan oversaw Bldg. B3's abatement and renovation from 2005-2008, making B3 the

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 8 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Non-M&O Contracting Operations NA-APM-12 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000001 PAGE 3 OF 8 AMENDMENT 000001 The purpose of Amendment 000001 to solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Revise Standard Form (SF) 33 to change proposal due date and number of pages noted in Section

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 3 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Construction & Specialty Acquisition NA-APM-123 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000001 PAGE 3 OF 3 AMENDMENT 000002 The purpose of Amendment 000002 to Solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Provide clarification on Amendment 000001: (i) Item 14 of Amendment 00001 was

  20. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 3 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Construction & Specialty Acquisition NA-APM-123 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000003 PAGE 3 OF 3 AMENDMENT 000003 The purpose of Amendment 000003 to Solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Revise Attachment L-4 Past Performance Questionnaire (PPQ), for clarification.

  1. DRAFT CONTRACT BODY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONTRACT BODY PAGE of PAGES 2 50 2. CONTRACT NO. DE-SOL-0008449 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 20388 / NA-APM-123.1 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov Table of Contents SEC DESCRIPTION PAGE(S) SEC DESCRIPTION PAGE(S) PART I - THE SCHEDULE PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  A SOLICITATION/CONTRACT FORM 2  I CONTRACT CLAUSES 32  B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS 3 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS & ATTACHMENTS  C

  2. SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENTS

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    Professor(Udo(Schwingenschlögl King(Abdullah(University,(Materials(Science(&(Engineering Insights(Into(TwoCDimensional(Materials(from FirstCPrinciples(Calcula$ons Wednesday,(July(22,(2015 11(C(12 MSL(Auditorium((TAC03(C(Bldg(1698(C(Room(A103) Abstract: We discuss recent findings from first0principles calcula4ons on the structural and electronic proper4es of two0 dimensional materials. The focus of the talk is on silicene, the Si analogue of graphene, and on the class of monolayer transi4on

  3. Microsoft Word - Request to Invoke Dispute Resolution Related to Final Audit Report A-07-12.doc

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    DCM:AAC:08-0023:UFC:5486.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 June 11, 2008 Mr. James Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87502 Subject: Request to Invoke Dispute Resolution Related to Final Audit Report A-07-12 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project Dear Mr. Bearzi: This letter is to request that the provisions of the WIPP Permit Condition

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    17:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 6, 2009 Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Final Audit Report for the Idaho National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project A-09-08 Dear Mr. Bearzi: As requested in your letter dated August 4, 2009, the Carlsbad Field Office withdraws the final audit report A-09-08

  5. Microsoft Word - WORD FORMAT - 13-1427.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1427:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 31, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Recertification Audit Report for the AMWTP, Audit A-13-01 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recertification Audit A-13-01 of the Advanced

  6. Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

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    8, 2010 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Certification by a New Mexico Registered Professional Engineer in Support of TRUPACT-III References: United States Department Of Energy letter CBFO:OESH :GTB:MAG:11- 0702:UFC 5487.00 from Edward Ziemianski and M. F. Sharif to James Bearzi, dated January 10, 2011, subject: Notification of Planned Change to the Permitted Facility to Support TRUPACT-III United States Department Of

  7. Mr. John E. Kieling

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    O. Box 3090 CarlSbad C New M,Il.«il<o 88221 DE 1 9 LulZ New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Final Audit Report for the Argonne National Laboratory Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A-12-16 Dear Mr. Kieling : This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office Audit A-12-16 of the Argonne National Laboratory Central Characterization Project performing characterization and certification

  8. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau Departmen

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    Departmen t of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 O C T 3 1 2012 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Recertification Audit Report for the Hanford Site/Central Characterization Project Audit A-12-11 Dear Mr. Kieling : This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-12-11 of the Hanford Site/Central Characterization Project for

  9. Mr. John Kieling

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    Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 SEP 2 8 2011 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for the SNLlCCP Certification Audit A-11-23 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-11-23 of the Sandia National Laboratories Central Characterization Project (SNLlCCP) performing characterization and certification activities as required by Part

  10. Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

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    P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 JUN 2 6 2012 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Annual Proposed Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination List Reference: DOE Memorandum CBFO:OESH:GTB:ANC:11 :0781 :UFC 5822.00 from E.J. Ziemianski and M.F. Sharif to Mr. John Kieling, dated June 22,2011, Subject: Annual Proposed Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination List Dear Mr. Kieling: Pursuant to Permit Attachment C,

  11. By Institution | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    About SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (155KB) Phone List Jobs Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 About Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page The SLAC Site Office (SSO) is located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. The mission of the SSO is to manage the U.S. Department of

  12. Carlsbad Field Office P O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

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    UAR 7 2008 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Final Audit Report A-08-04 of the ORNLlCCP CH Waste Certification Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project (ORNLlCCP) Audit Report A-08-04 for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as required by Section II.C.2.c of the WIPP Hazardous

  13. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

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    1415:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 May 20, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Audit Report for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Central Characterization Program Audit A-13-12 Dear Mr. Kieling: In accordance with your letter addressed to me dated March 2, 2012, instructing that the

  14. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

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    - 6 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 Subject: Final Audit Report A-07-24 of the SRS/CCP Battelle Columbus RH Waste Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the final Audit Report for Audit A-07-27 of the Savannah River Site/Central Characterization Project (SRS/CCP) Battelle Columbus Remote Handled (RH) Waste, for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as

  15. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

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    26:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 May 28, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Interim and Final Audit Report for the Hanford Site/Central Characterization Program, Recertification Audit A-13-15 Dear Mr. Kieling: In accordance with your letter addressed to me dated March 2, 2012,

  16. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

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    338:UFC: 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 March 16, 2012 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Recertification Final Audit Report for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project, Audit A-12-03 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the final audit report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  17. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

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    26, 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, WIPP Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr., Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Hanford Site, Audit A-07 -10 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Hanford Audit Report for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as required by Section II.C.2.c of the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report contains the results of the

  18. Carlsbad Field Orfice P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

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    Orfice P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 APR 2 4 2 012 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Recertification Audit Report for Audit A-12-02 of the Savannah River Site Central Characterization Project Dear Mr. Kieling : This letter transmits the final audit report for Carlsbad Field Office Audit A-12-02 of the Savannah River Site

  19. Please join us for a triple-header seminar organized around Modeling RNA

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    and Protein/RNA Complexes | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Please join us for a triple-header seminar organized around Modeling RNA and Protein/RNA Complexes Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:15am SSRL, Bldg. 137-322 Speakers: Julie Bernauer, Debanu Das & Dimitar Pachov Program Description: 11:15-11:45 Julie Bernauer (INRIA AMIB Bioinfo) Multi-scale modeling for RNA structures: a challenge 11:45-12:00 Debanu Das (SSRL JSCG) Progress on HT-SB of Protein/Nucleic Acid complexes at

  20. Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in

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    Material Science | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in Material Science Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Yijin Liu Seminar There was a revolutionary development of X-ray imaging over the past few decades. The most substantial advancements in this field are closely related to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics

  1. ANL-14/01 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ANL-14/01 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report for 2013 Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Bldg. 201 Argonne, IL 60439-4832 www.anl.gov ANL-14/01 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report for 2013 by Lawrence P. Moos Environment, Safety, and Quality

  2. RS-PR-0005-001.PDF

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    5-001.doc Utility Bldg Roof Access Date: 2000/12/21 1. During normal operations, inform the operator on duty of the need to access the utility building roof. There can be no re- injection during this time. 2. During a shutdown as indicated by a green screen, inform the RSO or the RSO designate of the need to access the utility building roof. During shutdowns, the RSO or RSO designate maintains the keys for accelerator operation. Skip steps 3 and 7 below. 3. Pull Linac Chain A key from control

  3. Main Sidewalk from CEBAF Center Circle to TED is CLOSED to All Pedestrians

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  4. Microsoft Word - 07-0266mpn ltr to Zappe Final Report for A-07-21 CCP-CEMRC.doc

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    LC:07-0266:UFC:2300 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 March 27, 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Final Report for Audit A-07-21 for the CEMRC/CCP Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Audit Report for Audit A-07-21 of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center/ Central Characterization

  5. Microsoft Word - 07-1061.doc

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    DM/KJB:07-1061:UFC2300 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 June 20, 2007 Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the, INL/CCP Audit A-07-19 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Idaho National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project (INL/CCP) Audit Report for the processes

  6. Microsoft Word - 07-1090dsm ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-12 LANL-CCP.doc

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    7-1090:UFC:2300 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 25, 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the CH Waste Re-certification and RH Waste Certification Audit Report for the LANL/CCP Audit A-07-12 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Los Alamos National Laboratory/Central Characterization

  7. Microsoft Word - 07-1638dsm ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-03.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    638:UFC:2300 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 September 18, 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6313 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-03 of the ANL/CCP Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Argonne National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project (ANL/CCP) Audit Report A-07-03 for the processes

  8. Microsoft Word - 07-1647mpn ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-14.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CBFO:QA:MPN:LC:07-1647:UFC:2300 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 September 27, 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6313 Subject: Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-14 of the AMWTP Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Audit Report A-07-14 for the processes performed

  9. Microsoft Word - 10-1394

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10-1394:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 September 9, 2010 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6110 Subject: Transmittal of Recertification Audit Report A-10-16, INL/CCP Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the audit report for Idaho National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project (INL/CCP) Audit A-10-16 of the

  10. Microsoft Word - 12-1584.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 January 23, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, NM 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for the INL/CCP Recertification Audit A-12-13 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-12-13 of the Idaho National Laboratory

  11. Microsoft Word - 13-1301 (WORD FORMAT) Signature on File.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    301:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 12, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Closeout Audit Report for SNL/CCP Audit A-12-15 Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-12-15 of the Sandia National Laboratories/Central

  12. Microsoft Word - 13-2308 (WORD FORMAT) Signature on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    308:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 December 9, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Recertification Audit A-14-01 of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  13. Microsoft Word - Audit Report Repost.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 15, 2008 Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Carlsbad Field Office Final Audit Report A-08-09 of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Audit Report for the

  14. Microsoft Word - Map and Directions to UV.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schilletter-University Village (SUV) Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 Ames Laboratory - Public Affairs 111 TASF Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-3020 Page 1 515.294.9557 1 Enter Ames from Interstate 35 using the 13 th Street Exit (mile marker 113) 2 Continue west on 13 th Street to Stange Rd 3 Turn right (N) on Stange for approx. ½ mile. Look for the Main Office/Community Center (gray bldg-just before the stop lights). Take a right onto Edenburn Dr. and look for your building number.

  15. MESA Other GFP.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MESA Other GFP BARCODE DESCRIPTION MFG MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT DATE S10345 REFRIGERATOR ABSOCOLD 0000 430308515 $206.66 922 136 7/22/2013 0000031174 HEADSET PLNM22 UNIVE PLANTRONICSPLNM22 AV4357H7 $123.99 B01 282 7/2/2012 0000106508 HEADSET PLANTRONICS PLANTRONICSCS50EX N/A $267.95 B01 179 7/17/2013 0000106505 HEADSET PLANTRONICS PLANTRONICSCS50EX N/A $267.95 B01 272 7/17/2013 0000106506 HEADSET PLANTRONICS PLANTRONICSCS50EX N/A $267.95 922 104C 3/1/2013 0000106507 HEADSET PLANTRONICS

  16. 2008 CNM Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 CNM Users Meeting Tuesday, May 6, 2008 4:45-5:45 CNM Facility Tour 7:00-9:30 Users Week Banquet Wednesday, May 7, 2008 CNM Plenary and Science Session Bldg. 402 Lecture Hall 8:45-8:50 Welcome, Paul Evans, University of Wisconsin-Madison, CNM UEC Chair 8:50-9:00 Welcome from Laboratory Directorate,Al Sattelberger, Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences & Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory 9:00-9:30 Update from Washington: Eric Rohlfing, Associate Director of Science for

  17. 2013 - 07 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Jul 2013 Tue, 2013-07-30 15:17 Follow Construction Zone Restrictions During Demolition of Bldg. 59 Set to Begin the Week of Aug. 12 Tue, 2013-07-30 15:14 JLab to Test Tornado Warning Siren Friday, Aug. 2 at 10:30 a.m. Thu, 2013-07-25 16:29 SURA statement on completion of the acquisition of CSC's Applied Technology Division by PAE Wed, 2013-07-24 15:44 JLab Message from Hugh Montgomery: Voluntary Separation Program Fri, 2013-07-19 11:01 JLab Update Regarding Sequestration Impacts for FY13 Fri,

  18. 2014 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Secretarial Honor Awards 2014 Secretarial Honor Awards Secretary Moniz will present the 2014 Secretarial Honor Awards at a ceremony on May 7, 2015 from 9:45 am to 10:45 am. The Secretary's Honor Awards are designed to recognize excellence and achievements during the past year. Individuals and teams are selected by the Secretary to receive these awards.

    4 Seminars Archive Date Title December 10, 2014 4:00 p.m. Bldg. 440, A105-106 "Graphene: A new emerging lubricant," Diana Berman,

  19. 2015 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Colloquium Archive Date Title December 23, 2015 NO Colloquium December 16, 2015 4:00 pm Bldg. 440, A105-106 "The Status and Challenges of Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells", Yanfa Yan, University of Toledo, hosted by Jianguo J.G. Wen Organic-inorganic methylammounium lead halide perovskites, CH3NH3PbX3 (X= Cl, Br, I), have revolutionized the field of thin-film solar cells. Within five years, the efficiency of lead halide perovskite-based thin-film solar cells have increased rapidly

  20. 2015 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Seminars Archive Date Title December 16, 2015 11:00 am Bldg. 440, A105-106 "Quantum Optics of Carbon Nanotubes," Xuedan Ma,Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. Hosted by Gary Wiederrecht Because of their photoluminescence (PL) emission that spans over the 1.3 - 1.5 μm telecom spectral regime, individual semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been considered as ideal candidates for single photon

  1. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Stuart Brown Experimental Condensed Matter University of California, Los Angeles Charge Fluctuations and Superconductivity in Organic Conductors: the case of ''-(ET) 2 SF 5 CH 2 CF 2 SO 3 Wednesday, October 21, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Abstract: Superconductivity in most organic charge transfer salts is considered magnetically mediated, in part because of the proximity of the superconductivity to antiferromagnetic ground states as well as

  2. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ins$tute for Materials Science Dis$nguished Lecture Series Professor Frans Spaepen John C. & Helen F. Franklin Professor of Applied Physics Harvard University Cambridge, MA Structure of Liquids and the Crystal-Liquid Interface Wednesday, April 27, 2016 2:00 - 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: Iden%fying the principle that underlies the structure of even the simplest liquids is an enduring scien%fic challenge. Star%ng with the basic facts about liquids, this talk

  3. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Jian-Xin Zhu Los Alamos NaDonal Laboratory T-4: Physics of Condensed MaLer and Complex Systems Gutzwiller VariaDonal WavefuncDon Approach to Electronic CorrelaDon and LaUce Dynamics in MulD-Orbital Models Monday, May 16, 2016 2:00 - 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: Electronic correla+on effects in complex materials give rise to emergent phenomena including Mo7 insulators, magne+sm, heavy fermions, and unconven+onal superconduc+vity. These phenomena defy the

  4. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nan Li MPA-CINT: Materials Physics & ApplicaCons Division - Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Los Alamos NaConal Laboratory Achieving High Mechanical Deformability in Piezoelectric AlN Nanocomposites Monday, May 9, 2016 2:00 to 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: Piezoelectric ceramic films (such as AlN) have a wide range of applica;ons in microelectronics. Under electric fields or mechanical strains, these materials can achieve energy conversion between

  5. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Hilbert von Löhneysen Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Director of the Institute for Solid State Physics Karlsruhe, Germany Entropy Landscape of Materials with Strong Electronic Correla$ons Near Quantum Cri$cality Tuesday, January 26, 2016 3:00 - 4:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: In a number of materials, a second-order phase transi5on can be driven to zero temperature by a non-thermal control parameter such as pressure, magne5c or electric field, or

  6. Oak Ridge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~, . ., . .- -. -_ .._ ..-. - .- ..- Oak Ridge Associated post Of%ce Box 117 Uniwx.ities Oak Riie. Tennessee 37631-0117 Apill. 1991 Ms. cethy Hickey Bschtel Nstiod Inc. P. 0. Box 350 Oak Ridge, Tn 378314350 Subject: BLDG. 621-527 - BAKER AND WlLLfAMS WAREHOUSES Deer Ms. Hiikey: 8etween March 1 l-22, 1991, the Envfronmental Suvey and Sine Assessment Program fESSAP1 of Oak Ridge Associated Urtiversities fORALl conducted a radiological charscterization euwey of the East end West besernent bays in

  7. Microsoft Word - Congressional Ltr

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Northern New Mexico Citizens'Advisory Board A U.S. Department of Energy Site-Specific Advisory Board 94Cities of Gold Road Pojoaque, NM 87506 Phone: 505.989.1662 or 1.800.218.5942 Fax: 505.989.1752 www.nnmcab.energy.gov May 29, 2013 U. S. Senator Tom Udall 110 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC, 20510 U. S. Senator Martin Heinrich 702 Hart Senate Office Bldg Washington, D.C. 20510 Congressman Ben Ray Lujan 502 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 205102 Cannon HOB Washington,

  8. Accountable Property RO23_120213.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accountable Property 1 RO BARCODE DESCRIPTION MANUF. MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT_DATE 23 C3585 COMBUSTOR SECTIONS ( CUSTOM MADE N/A N/A $10,000.00 93 102 6-Sep-13 23 0000002197 ANALYZER AUTOMATIC P MICROMETRICS $10,000.00 OFF PITT 11-Oct-13 23 C2428 BIN, COAL STORAGE COPE MATERIAL H N/A N/A $10,250.00 93 103 29-Oct-10 23 0000036391 CHAMBER VACUUM CUSTO KURT J LESKER CUSTOM $10,337.90 OFF WVU 30-Aug-13 23 0000959 GRINDER, SURFACE, TH $10,406.25 05 101 24-Sep-13 23 0053850 SHEAR SQUARING NIAGARA

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL Gas Ordering SSRL supplies liquid nitrogen at no charge to users. The main filling station is located in the Bldg. 131 Annex. There is also a smaller tank for filling small dewars. When handling liquid nitrogen, please follow the posted instructions carefully and wear the safety gloves and glasses that have been provided for your use. SSRL provides liquid helium (LHe) for use with SSRL cryostats, and user accounts are assessed a per-shift charge for LHe use during scheduled beam time.

  10. Contact Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us Contact Us The Research Library staff is happy to answer questions that you may have regarding our collection, access services and more. We are also available to assist LANL researchers with The Research Library is open to the public Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm. email Email Us library@lanl.gov Call us Call Us 505-667-5809 Visit us Stop By We are located in the Oppenheimer Study Center TA 3, Bldg. 207 (across from Otowi) Address MS-P362 PO Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545-1362

  11. Notice of Availability | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Notice of Availability DOE/EA-1906: The Final EA for the Operations, Upgrades, and Consolidation at the Western Command site, KAFB, New Mexico (DOE/EA-1906) is available in hard copy at the Zimmerman Library UNM Campus, Albuquerque, NM and the KAFB Library, Bldg 20204, Kirtland AFB NM; electronically on this web page under NNSA Headquarters/ Office of Secure Transportation and on the DOE web site, www.energy.gov/NEPA. DOE/EA-1929: The Finding of No Significant Impact and the Final Environmental

  12. RFP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Section CONTRACT BODY PAGE of PAGES 2 43 2. CONTRACT NO. DE-SOL-0008449 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 20388 / NA-APM-123.1 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov Table of Contents SEC DESCRIPTION PAGE(S) SEC DESCRIPTION PAGE(S) PART I - THE SCHEDULE PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES √ A SOLICITATION/CONTRACT FORM 2 √ I CONTRACT CLAUSES 33 √ B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS 3 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS & ATTACHMENTS √ C

  13. The Influence of Angiography Table Shields and Height on Patient and Angiographer Irradiation During Interventional Radiology Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To quantify the influence of angiography table height on patient and angiographer irradiation, as compared with other routine protective measures such as the use of protective shields hanging at the tableside and from the ceiling of angiography suites. Methods. An experimental study was carried out in which a phantom (substitute for a human body) placed on the angiography table was irradiated by pulsed fluoroscopy. Entrance exposure rates were measured at the phantom surface (surrogate of patient skin exposure by incident X-ray beam) and at 60 cm from the phantom (analog to angiographer skin exposure by scatter). Exposure rates were measured at levels corresponding to the knees, testes, waist, xyphoid appendix, shoulders, and eyes of an angiographer 178 cm tall. Measurements were repeated at angiography table heights of 85, 95, 105, and 110 cm from the floor, with and without protective shields. Results. Moving the table from its highest to lowest position increased by 32% the phantom entrance exposure but decreased scatter to the angiographer. Scatter to the angiographer could be reduced most by using the protective shields (30-105 times less), but low table heights provided relatively more important protection (412-1121 {mu}Sv/hr reduction, or 15-72% scatter reduction) when shields were not used (e.g., for unprotected regions of the angiographer's body such as the hands). Conclusion. Working at lower table heights provides a little additional protection to exposed body parts of angiographers, at the cost of somewhat higher patient exposure. Although small, this incremental protection could be clinically relevant in the long term. The choice of table position should be a compromise based on multiple factors, including at least patient exposure, scatter to angiographers, and angiographer comfort.

  14. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Concrete Decontamination Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A. Ross, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Concrete surfaces contaminated with radionuclides present a significant challenge during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) process. As structures undergo D and D, coating layers and/or surface layers of the concrete containing the contaminants must be removed for disposal in such a way as to present little to no risk to human health or the environment. The selection of a concrete decontamination technology that is safe, efficient, and cost-effective is critical to the successful D and D of contaminated sites. To support U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management objectives and to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the best-suited concrete floor decontamination technology(s) for a given site, two innovative and three baseline technologies have been assessed under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU). The innovative technologies assessed include the Pegasus Coating Removal System and Textron's Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling System. The three baseline technologies assessed include: the Wheelabrator Blastrac model 1-15D, the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model GPx-1O-18 HO Rider, and the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model EC-7-2. These decontamination technology assessments provide directly comparable performance data that have previously been available for only a limited number of technologies under restrictive site-specific constraints. Some of the performance data collected during these technology assessments include: removal capability, production rate, removal gap, primary and secondary waste volumes, and operation and maintenance requirements. The performance data generated by this project is intended to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives.

  15. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Building Structures and Remaining Components Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005); and Waste Handling Plan for Building K-25 West Wing Process Equipment and Piping at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008b).

  16. Metrics for Evaluating the Accuracy of Solar Power Forecasting (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B.; Florita, A.; Lu, S.; Hamann, H.; Banunarayanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation proposes a suite of metrics for evaluating the performance of solar power forecasting.

  17. Radiant Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Systems » Radiant Cooling Radiant Cooling Radiant cooling cools a floor or ceiling by absorbing the heat radiated from the rest of the room. When the floor is cooled, it is often referred to as radiant floor cooling; cooling the ceiling is usually done in homes with radiant panels. Although potentially suitable for arid climates, radiant cooling is problematic for homes in more humid climates. Most radiant cooling home applications in North America have been based on aluminum panels

  18. Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ALBEDO; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; FLOORS; ...

  19. The MicroBooNE Experiment - About the Detector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembly of the TPC began at Fermilab during the summer of 2012. Everyone is pitching in from summer students to scientists. Check back regularly for updated photos. Moving a dewar One of two dewars being moved to LArTF. One will be used for liquid nitrogen and the other will be an argon buffer tank. LArTF First Floor This is the ground floor of the new Liquid Argon Test Facility (LArTF). (Photo from Fermilab VMS) LArFT First Floor First floor opposite of the loading dock. (Photo from Fermilab

  20. How Will We Explore Earth's Final Frontier? | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that can withstand the enormous pressure and harsh conditions of the ocean floor in order to facilitate subsea oil drilling. Watch all of the Invention Factory videos here. ...