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Sample records for blackout doe grid

  1. CORC Report TR-2005-07 Using mixed-integer programming to solve power grid blackout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienstock, Daniel

    CORC Report TR-2005-07 Using mixed-integer programming to solve power grid blackout problems Daniel the blackouts of the U.S. Northeast and Eastern Canada [17] of August 2003, and the September 2003 blackout that affected Italy [19]. In addition, Brazil experienced large blackouts in 1999 (see [15]). These blackouts

  2. Grid Watch: Mapping Blackouts with Smart Phones Noah Klugman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabal

    Grid Watch: Mapping Blackouts with Smart Phones Noah Klugman , Javier Rosa , Pat Pannuto , Matthew General Terms Economics, Measurement, Reliability, Security Keywords Smart Grid, Power Monitoring into the power grid is via a cen- tralized network of utility owned, deployed, and controlled smart meters. While

  3. A Probabilistic Model for the Dynamics of Cascading Failures and Blackouts in Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    cause failures of power system components such as transmission lines and generators, which, in turn, may1 A Probabilistic Model for the Dynamics of Cascading Failures and Blackouts in Power Grids Mahshid Abstract--Current power grids suffer periodic disturbances that may trigger cascades of component failures

  4. Does Liberalisation cause more Electricity Blackouts? Evidence from a Global Study of Newspaper Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, William; Pollitt, Michael G.

    K IN G P A P E R Abstract Does Liberalisation cause more electricity blackouts? Evidence from a global study of newspaper reports EPRG Working Paper 0827 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 0911 William Yu and Michael G... .Pollitt There is a public perception that electricity liberalisation is the major cause of recent electricity blackouts. This is reflected in the newspaper reporting of blackouts. By contrast, it was not listed as a cause in any official investigation reports...

  5. Postmortem analysis of power grid blackouts - The role of measurement systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-09-01

    Promptly following any blackout, an investigation is conducted to determine the who, what, where, when, why, and how. For system operators, it is important to quickly grasp the scale and magnitude of the event and rapidly restore service. Then a broader set of stakeholders get involved to assess system performance, determine root causes, compile lessons learned, and develop recommendations. At the heart of the post-mortem investigation is the detailed sequence of events. As accurately as possible, investigators need to know what happened and when. Especially during a cascading failure where events occur rapidly, accurate timing is crucial to understanding how the event unfolded so that the root causes can be determined. The sequence of events is based on vast amounts of data collected from multiple points in the system from a myriad of data collection instruments, some devoted to the purpose of supporting system disturbance post mortem analysis, others providing useful additional context or filling in missing gaps. The more that the investigators know about their available sources of data, and the inherent limitations of each, the better (and quicker) will be the analysis. This is especially important when a large blackout has occurred; there is pressure to find answers quickly, but due to the size and complexity of the event, a deliberate and methodical investigation is necessary. This article discusses the role that system monitoring plays in supporting the investigation of large-scale system disruptions and blackouts.

  6. Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations Blackout Final Implementation Report More Documents &...

  7. Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company:...

  8. Complex Dynamics of Blackouts in Power Transmission Systems B. A. Carreras and V. E. Lynch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical Reliability Council (NERC) data on blackouts of the North American power grid4 gave an average Individual blackouts are triggered by random events ranging from equipment failures and bad weather

  9. Abstract--Relay misoperations play an important role in cascading blackouts. Power swing and out-of-step conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Abstract--Relay misoperations play an important role in cascading blackouts. Power swing and out in the way that the power grid is operated. The major blackouts in the US, such as Midwest and Northeast blackout on August 14, 2003 and Western blackouts on July 2 and August 10, 1996, are the results of heavy

  10. Blackout 2003 University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Blackout 2003 MASSOUD AMIN University of Minnesota PUBLISHED BY THE IEEE COMPUTER SOCIETY I 1540 indicate that there was no apparent evidence of terrorism, the cascading blackouts were a sudden il According to data from the North American Electric Reliabil- ity Council (NERC) and analyses #12;Blackout

  11. A Survey of National Transmission Grid Modeling Capabilities at DOE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howle, Victoria E.

    711712003 A Survey of National Transmission Grid Modeling Capabilities at DOE Laboratories Steve Data Sheets.................................................................... 9 Electricity Market Complex Adaptive Systems (EMCAS)..................10 Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMAX

  12. Complex systems analysis of series of blackouts: cascading failure, critical points, and self-organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Newman, David E [University of Alaska

    2007-01-01

    We give an overview of a complex systems approach to large blackouts of electric power transmission systems caused by cascading failure. Instead of looking at the details of particular blackouts, we study the statistics and dynamics of series of blackouts with approximate global models. Blackout data from several countries suggest that the frequency of large blackouts is governed by a power law. The power law makes the risk of large blackouts consequential and is consistent with the power system being a complex system designed and operated near a critical point. Power system overall loading or stress relative to operating limits is a key factor affecting the risk of cascading failure. Power system blackout models and abstract models of cascading failure show critical points with power law behavior as load is increased. To explain why the power system is operated near these critical points and inspired by concepts from self-organized criticality, we suggest that power system operating margins evolve slowly to near a critical point and confirm this idea using a power system model. The slow evolution of the power system is driven by a steady increase in electric loading, economic pressures to maximize the use of the grid, and the engineering responses to blackouts that upgrade the system. Mitigation of blackout risk should account for dynamical effects in complex self-organized critical systems. For example, some methods of suppressing small blackouts could ultimately increase the risk of large blackouts.

  13. Hawaii International Conference on System Science, January 2004, Hawaii, copyright 2004 IEEE Dynamical and probabilistic approaches to the study of blackout vulnerability of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamical and probabilistic approaches to the study of blackout vulnerability of the power transmission grid to a similar characterization for power transmission system blackouts are identified in the OPA dynamical model of series of blackouts. The comparison between the CASCADE and OPA models yields parameters that can

  14. New DOE Reports on Smart Grid Technologies Seek to Promote Innovation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reports on Smart Grid Technologies Seek to Promote Innovation, Privacy and Access New DOE Reports on Smart Grid Technologies Seek to Promote Innovation, Privacy and Access October...

  15. Comments of the Demand Response and Smart Grid Coalition on DOE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Demand Response and Smart Grid Coalition on DOE's Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy...

  16. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding U.S. Electric Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Electric Grid Resiliency More Documents & Publications Recommendations on U. S. Grid Security - EAC 2011 DOE Responses to EAC Work Products - June 2014 Electricity...

  17. Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges In light of...

  18. DOE Grid Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us »Buildings DOEDOE F 1340.3 DOE

  19. Power Blackout Risks Risk Management Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Power Blackout Risks Risk Management Options Emerging Risk Initiative ­ Position Paper November 2011 #12;2 Content 1. Summary 3 2. Power blackouts challenge society and economy 4 3. Blackout risks on the increase 5 3.1. How power market trends influence blackout risks 5 3.1.1. Liberalisation and privatisation

  20. Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the...

  1. Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United...

  2. DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

  3. CRITICALITY IN A CASCADING FAILURE BLACKOUT MODEL Dusko P. Nedic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    n i f i - cant risk of large blackouts. Keywords: reliability, security, risk, power law 1, for all these types of interac- tion, the risk of cascading failure generally becomes more severe increases? Previous work suggests that a cascading failure does not gradually and uniformly be- come more

  4. Modeling radio communication blackout and blackout mitigation in hypersonic vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for the modeling and analysis of radio communication blackout of hypersonic vehicles is presented. A weakly ionized plasma generated around the surface of a hypersonic reentry vehicle traveling at Mach 23 was simulated using full Navier-Stokes equations in multi-species single fluid form. A seven species air chemistry model is used to compute the individual species densities in air including ionization - plasma densities are compared with experiment. The electromagnetic wave's interaction with the plasma layer is modeled using multi-fluid equations for fluid transport and full Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic fields. The multi-fluid solver is verified for a whistler wave propagating through a slab. First principles radio communication blackout over a hypersonic vehicle is demonstrated along with a simple blackout mitigation scheme using a magnetic window.

  5. Blackout 2003: The August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    States and Canada To Reduce Blackout Risk A report to the US-Canada Power System Outage Task Force on steps taken in the United States and Canada to reduce blackout risk one...

  6. Blackout 2003: The August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    System Outage Task Force on steps taken in the United States and Canada to reduce blackout risk one year after the August 14, 2003 blackout. Report to the U.S.-Canada Power...

  7. Microsoft Word - SmartGrid - NRC Input to DOE Requestrvjcomments...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Notices) Smart Grid Implementation Input - NRC Contact: Kenn A. Miller, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, 301-415-3152 Comments relevant to the following two sections...

  8. DOE Releases Maturity Model to Better Protect the Nation's Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model, which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity capabilities and prioritize their...

  9. Report from the Blackout of 2003 in New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comite, Stephen MD

    2003-01-01

    Report from the Blackout of 2003 in New York City Stephenabout experiences with the recent blackout in New York Citywhat happened in the 1977 blackout with looting and fires,

  10. The Northeast Blackout of 1965

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vassell, G.S.

    1990-10-11

    Twenty-five years ago, on November 9, 1965, the electric utility industry - and the nation - experienced the biggest power failure in history. While major power outages did happen before and after this unique event, none of them came even close to the Great Northeast Blackout of 1965 - not in terms of the size of the area or the number of people affected, not in terms of the trauma inflicted on the society at large, and not in terms of its impact on the electric utility industry. With our institution memory - as a society - being as short as it is, many of the lessons that were learned by the industry, by the regulators, and by the nation at large in the wake of the Northeast Blackout have been, by now, mostly forgotten. The 25th anniversary of this event offers a unique opportunity, therefore, to refresh our institutional memory in this regard and, by doing so, bring to bear our past experience to the problems of today. This article has been written with this objective in mind and from the perspective of an individual who experienced firsthand - as an active electric utility industry participant - the Northeast Blackout itself, its aftermath, and the subsequent evolution of the industry to the present day.

  11. Data Management Issues Associated with the August 14, 2003 Blackout Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2004-06-10

    The largest blackout in the history of the North American electric power grid occurred on August 14, 2003. An extensive investigation into what happened (and why) began immediately. The joint U.S.-Canada task force led the effort, including support from the electric utility industry and several federal agencies, e.g. the U.S. Department of Energy. The North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) supported the task force, including particularly the electricity working group. The overall blackout investigation team drew expertise from a large number of organizations, assembled into teams to address specific attributes of the blackout. This paper describes the data management issues associated with supporting the blackout investigation, beginning with the immediate response in the days and weeks following the blackout, supporting the interim report [1], to the long-term plans for deriving lessons learned for implementing improvements in the overall process of outage disturbance reporting. The sole focus of this paper is the electricity working group activities at NERC; the security and nuclear working groups are outside the scope of this paper.

  12. Blackouts, risk, and fat-tailed distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weron, R; Simonsen, Ingve; Weron, Rafal

    2005-01-01

    We analyze a 19-year time series of North American electric power transmission system blackouts. Contrary to previously reported results we find a fatter than exponential decay in the distribution of inter-occurrence times and evidence of seasonal dependence in the number of events. Our findings question the use of self-organized criticality, and in particular the sandpile model, as a paradigm of blackout dynamics in power transmission systems. Hopefully, though, they will provide guidelines to more accurate models for evaluation of blackout risk.

  13. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P

    1990-02-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC).

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID 1 Cognitive Radio Network for the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    and providers. Roughly speaking, the smart grid will: 1) reduce blackouts; 2) promote renewable energy usage; 3) give families more control over their energy diet. The motivation of this paper is to address items 2

  15. A Resilient Real-Time Agent-Based System for a Reconfigurable Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    blackout of August 14, 2003 was a wakeup call for both the industry and academia to re-think techniques]. The vulnerability of the power grid during the August 14 blackout calls for a re-design of the power grid at both

  16. ProfessorMassoudAmin,D.Sc. Professor Massoud Amin (http://umn.edu/~amin) witnessed the 1977 NYC blackout, the 9/11 tragedies near DC, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    blackout, the 9/11 tragedies near DC, and the collapse of the I-35W bridge. He works on enabling smart, secure and resilient infrastructures. He leads extensive projects in smart grids and is considered the father of smart grid. Since March 2003 Professor Amin has served as director of the Technological

  17. Station blackout transients in the semiscale facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    The test results of station blackout transients conducted in the Semiscale MOD-2B facility are discussed in this report. The Semiscale MOD-2B facility simulates a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant. The experiments were initiated from conditions typical of PWR plant operating conditions (primary pressure of 15.2 MPa (2205 psi) and cold leg fluid temperature of 550 K (530F)). Five station blackout experiments were conducted, Three tests in the Power Loss (PL) Test Series and the two Primary Boil-off (PBO) Tests. The responses of these tests were analyzed and compared. However, only one test response (S-PL-2) is presented and discussed in detail. The S-PL-2 experiment is characterized by examining the responses of the primary and secondary pressures and fluid temperatures, the pressurizer liquid level, the primary fluid distribution, and the core thermal behavior. The mechanisms driving the S-PL-2 responses, the main elements of the station blackout transient, the influences of initial and boundary conditions and other transient that may appear similar to a station blackout are also discussed. Information pertinent to station blackout nuclear safety issues is presented in the report. 13 refs., 44 figs.

  18. Grid Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

  19. REGIONAL BLACKOUTS: PROTECTION OF BROADCAST CONTENT ON 3G NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    REGIONAL BLACKOUTS: PROTECTION OF BROADCAST CONTENT ON 3G NETWORKS Alexander W. Dent, Allan- gional blackouts. Broadcasters are often required to res- trict broadcasts of certain content to specific of reception is outside the blackout region. What is now required is proof that the end user is outside

  20. Efficient algorithm for online N - 2 power grid contingency selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplunovich, Petr A. (Petr Alexandrovich)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple element outages (N - k contingencies) have caused some of the most massive blackouts and disturbances in the power grid. Such outages affect millions of people and cost the world economy billions of dollars annually. ...

  1. Exploring Complex Systems Aspects of Blackout Risk and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2011-01-01

    Electric power transmission systems are a key infrastructure, and blackouts of these systems have major consequences for the economy and national security. Analyses of blackout data suggest that blackout size distributions have a power law form over much of their range. This result is an indication that blackouts behave as a complex dynamical system. We use a simulation of an upgrading power transmission system to investigate how these complex system dynamics impact the assessment and mitigation of blackout risk. The mitigation of failures in complex systems needs to be approached with care. The mitigation efforts can move the system to a new dynamic equilibrium while remaining near criticality and preserving the power law region. Thus, while the absolute frequency of blackouts of all sizes may be reduced, the underlying forces can still cause the relative frequency of large blackouts to small blackouts to remain the same. Moreover, in some cases, efforts to mitigate small blackouts can even increase the frequency of large blackouts. This result occurs because the large and small blackouts are not mutually independent, but are strongly coupled by the complex dynamics.

  2. Blackout of 2003: Description and Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Institut de recherche d'Hydro-Québec (IREQ) ISO New England Korea Elec. Power Research InstitutePSERC Blackout of 2003: Description and Responses Dennis Ray Executive Director Power Systems interchange of ideas · Educate the next generation of power industry engineers #12;3 PSERC Collaborating

  3. Blackout 2003: U.S. - Canada Task Force Presents Final Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. - Canada Task Force Presents Final Report onBlackout of August 2003 Blackout 2003: U.S. - Canada Task Force Presents Final Report onBlackout of August 2003 August 14, 2003,...

  4. Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    consultation Transcript of the technical conference sponsored by the U.S. Canada task force investigating the August 14, 2003 blackout across Canada and the...

  5. Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System Investigation Team Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System Investigation Team...

  6. Blackout 2003: Conference for public review draft report on implementa...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for public review draft report on implementation of the task force recommendations Blackout 2003: Conference for public review draft report on implementation of the task force...

  7. Blackout 2003: Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Resources for Canada Lunn Release the 2003 Power Outage Final Report, October 3, 2006 Blackout 2003: Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Lunn...

  8. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE Smart Grid RFI_APGA Comments 110110.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    together with customer empowerment and advanced grid functionality can help reduce peak electricity demand and consumption, enhance grid reliability and resilience, leverage...

  10. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Southern California 96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION Earth System Grid, data replication, system monitoring Earth System Grid, data replication, system monitoring...

  11. The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

  12. Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Systems Integration team funds distribution grid integration research and development (R&D) activities to address the technical issues that surround distribution grid planning,...

  13. Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technology Development Roadmap in Support of Grid Appropriate Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kisner, Roger A [ORNL] [ORNL; O'Hara, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Quinn, Edward L. [Longenecker & Associates] [Longenecker & Associates; Miller, Don W. [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

    2009-01-01

    Grid Appropriate Reactors (GARs) are a component of the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. GARs have smaller output power (<~600 MWe), than those intended for deployment on large, tightly coupled grids. This smaller size is important in avoiding grid destabilization, which can result from having a large fraction of a grid s electrical generation supplied by a single source. GARs are envisioned to be deployed worldwide often in locations without extensive nuclear power experience. DOE recently sponsored the creation of an Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technology development roadmap emphasizing the specific characteristics of GARs [1]. This roadmapping effort builds upon and focuses the recently developed, more general nuclear energy ICHMI technology development roadmap [2]. The combination of the smaller plant size, smaller grids, and deployment in locations without extensive prior nuclear power experience presents particular infrastructure, regulation, design, operational, and safeguards challenges for effective GAR deployment. ICHMI technologies are central to efficient GAR operation and as such are a dimension of each of these challenges. Further, while the particular ICHMI technologies to be developed would be useful at larger power plants, they are not high-priority development items at the larger plants. For example, grid transient resilience would be a useful feature for any reactor/grid combination and indeed would have limited some recent blackout events. However, most large reactors have limited passive cooling features. Large plants with active safety response features will likely preserve trip preferential grid transient response. This contrasts sharply with GARs featuring passive shutdown cooling, which can safely support grid stability during large grid transients. ICHMI technologies ranging from alternative control algorithms to simplified human-interface system designs are key to enabling GARs to respond properly and thereby stabilize the grid during transients.

  14. The Modern Grid Initiative is a DOE-funded project managed by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rainsuit Theory of grid modernization. This is third in a series of discussions on how different mindsets look at grid modernization. One of my past bosses used to share humorous...

  15. Byzantine Fault Tolerance for Electric Power Grid Monitoring and Control Wenbing Zhao and F. Eugenio Villaseca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wenbing

    Byzantine Fault Tolerance for Electric Power Grid Monitoring and Control Wenbing Zhao and F of the electric power grid is crucial to ev- ery nation's security and well-being. As revealed by a num- ber of large-scale blackout incidents in North America, the data communication infrastructure for power grid

  16. The Impact of the Topology on Cascading Failures in a Power Grid Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Mieghem, Piet

    The Impact of the Topology on Cascading Failures in a Power Grid Model Yakup Koça,1 Martijn scale blackouts in power trans- mission grids. Secure electrical power supply requires, together with careful operation, a robust design of the electrical power grid topology. Currently, the impact

  17. OPTIMIZATION STRATEGIES FOR THE VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRIC POWER GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinar, Ali

    OPTIMIZATION STRATEGIES FOR THE VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRIC POWER GRID ALI PINAR, JUAN would cause a severe blackout, is critical for the secure operation of the electric power grid. We show how power grid vulnerability analysis can be studied as a bilevel mixed integer nonlinear programming

  18. Determination of station blackout frequency-duration relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.; Balakrishna, S.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. This generally involves the loss of redundant off-site power sources and the failure of two or more emergency diesel generators (EDGs). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed requiring all commercial reactors to have the capability of coping with a station blackout of a specified duration. The NRC has also proposed 4 or 8 h as acceptable durations, depending on plant susceptibility to the occurrence of station blackout events. Analyses were performed to determine expected station blackout frequencies representative of a majority of domestic nuclear power plants. A methodology based on that developed by the NRC was used. Representative industry data for loss of off-site power (LOOP) events and EDG reliability were used in the analyses.

  19. Abstract--Policy surrounding the North American transmission grid, particularly in the wake of electric-industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumsack, Seth

    1 Abstract--Policy surrounding the North American transmission grid, particularly in the wake of electric-industry restructuring and following the blackout of August, 2003, has treated network congestion, Wheatstone network, merchant transmission, available transfer capability, reliability, congestion

  20. PMEL contributions to the collaboration: SCALING THE EARTH SYSTEM GRID TO PETASCALE DATA for the DOE SciDACs Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hankin, Steve

    2012-06-01

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG softwareâ??now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF)â??has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  1. Loss of pressurizer water level during station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to both the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed a requirement that all plants be capable of maintaining adequate core cooling during station blackout events lasting a specified duration. The NRC has also suggested acceptable specified durations of four or eight hours, depending on individual plant susceptibility to blackout events. In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the occurrence of a station blackout event results in the functional loss of many plant components, including main feedwater, reactor coolant pumps, the emergency core cooling system, and pressurizer heaters and spray. Nevertheless, PWRs have the capability of removing decay heat for some period of time using steam-driven auxiliary feedwater pumps and the natural-circulation capability of the primary system. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the early response of a PWR to station blackout conditions. In particular, the effect of primary coolant shrinkage and inventory loss on pressurizer level is examined to gain insight into the operational and analytical issues associated with the proposed station blackout coping requirement.

  2. Microsoft Word - DM_VA-#126832-v3-Smart_Grid_Comments_--_DOE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Smart Grid technology not only can help "achieve environmental goals at lower cost," but also "has the potential to improve power quality, manage power scarcities, and...

  3. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools,...

  4. DOE Publishes Notice of Public Meeting for Smart Grid-connected...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the meeting will be: Discuss issues concerning the physical characterization of smart and grid-connected commercial and residential buildings end-use equipment and...

  5. D:\0myfiles\DOE Policy (LBL) Blackout Final\final-blackout-body-xx.vp

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEveryCustomer ServiceVisualization81AugustCanada

  6. Study of a Station Blackout Event in the PWR Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching-Hui Wu; Tsu-Jen Lin; Tsu-Mu Kao [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research P.O. Box 3-3, Longtan, 32500, Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    On March 18, 2001, a PWR nuclear power plant located in the Southern Taiwan occurred a Station Blackout (SBO) event. Monsoon seawater mist caused the instability of offsite power grids. High salt-contained mist caused offsite power supply to the nuclear power plant very unstable, and forced the plant to be shutdown. Around 24 hours later, when both units in the plant were shutdown, several inadequate high cycles of bus transfer between 345 kV and 161 kV startup transformers degraded the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears. Then, in the Train-A switchgear room of Unit 1 occurred a fire explosion, when the degraded switchgear was hot shorted at the in-coming 345 kV breaker. Inadequate configuration arrangement of the offsite power supply to the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears led to loss of offsite power (LOOP) events to both units in the plant. Both emergency diesel generators (EDG) of Unit 1 could not be in service in time, but those of Unit 2 were running well. The SBO event of Unit 1 lasted for about two hours till the fifth EDG (DG-5) was lined-up to the Train-B switchgear. This study investigated the scenario of the SBO event and evaluated a risk profile for the SBO period. Guidelines in the SBO event, suggested by probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) procedures were also reviewed. Many related topics such as the re-configuration of offsite power supply, the addition of isolation breakers of the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears, the betterment of DG-5 lineup design, and enhancement of the reliability of offsite power supply to the PWR plant, etc., will be in further studies. (authors)

  7. MATCASC: A tool to analyse cascading line outages in power grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koç, Yakup; Araujo, Nuno A M; Warnier, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Blackouts in power grids typically result from cascading failures. The key importance of the electric power grid to society encourages further research into sustaining power system reliability and developing new methods to manage the risks of cascading blackouts. Adequate software tools are required to better analyze, understand, and assess the consequences of the cascading failures. This paper presents MATCASC, an open source MATLAB based tool to analyse cascading failures in power grids. Cascading effects due to line overload outages are considered. The applicability of the MATCASC tool is demonstrated by assessing the robustness of IEEE test systems and real-world power grids with respect to cascading failures.

  8. Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers DOE: Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage...

  9. Abstract--Many large scale system blackouts involve relay misoperations. Traditional relay algorithms and settings need to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Abstract--Many large scale system blackouts involve relay misoperations. Traditional relay-wide blackouts involve relay misoperations [1]. Evaluation and improvement of existing relay algorithms

  10. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The ESGF software is distinguished from other collaborative knowledge systems in the climate community by its widespread adoption, federation capabilities, and broad developer base. It is the leading source for present climate data holdings, including the most important and largest data sets in the global-climate community, and - assuming its development continues - we expect it to be the leading source for future climate data holdings as well. Recently, ESG-CET extended its services beyond data-file access and delivery to include more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis. The latter capabilities allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. The ESG-CET team also faces substantial technical challenges due to the rapidly increasing scale of climate simulation and observational data, which will grow, for example, from less than 50 terabytes for the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment to multiple Petabytes for the next IPCC assessment. In a world of exponential technological change and rapidly growing sophistication in climate data analysis, an infrastructure such as ESGF must constantly evolve if it is to remain relevant and useful. Regretfully, we submit our final report at the end of project funding. To continue to serve the climate-science community, we are

  11. Graphical Contingency Analysis for the Nation's Electric Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zhenyu (Henry) Huang

    2012-12-31

    PNNL has developed a new tool to manage the electric grid more effectively, helping prevent blackouts and brownouts--and possibly avoiding millions of dollars in fines for system violations. The Graphical Contingency Analysis tool monitors grid performance, shows prioritized lists of problems, provides visualizations of potential consequences, and helps operators identify the most effective courses of action. This technology yields faster, better decisions and a more stable and reliable power grid.

  12. Graphical Contingency Analysis for the Nation's Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhenyu Huang

    2011-04-01

    PNNL has developed a new tool to manage the electric grid more effectively, helping prevent blackouts and brownouts--and possibly avoiding millions of dollars in fines for system violations. The Graphical Contingency Analysis tool monitors grid performance, shows prioritized lists of problems, provides visualizations of potential consequences, and helps operators identify the most effective courses of action. This technology yields faster, better decisions and a more stable and reliable power grid.

  13. Drosophila Rolling Blackout Displays Lipase Domain-Dependent and Independent Endocytic Functions Downstream of Dynamin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broadie, Kendal S.

    Drosophila Rolling Blackout Displays Lipase Domain-Dependent and Independent Endocytic Functions Drosophila temperature-sensitive rolling blackout (rbots) mutants display a total block of endocytosis in non rolling blackout (rbo), also known as conserved membrane protein at 44E (cmp44E) and stambhA (stmA) (8

  14. The 2003 North American electrical blackout: An accidental experiment in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stehr, Jeffrey

    The 2003 North American electrical blackout: An accidental experiment in atmospheric chemistry 2004; published 15 July 2004. [1] The August 2003 North American electrical blackout provided a unique observations over central Pennsylvania on August 15, 2003, $24 h into the blackout, revealed large reductions

  15. Blackouts: des vrits qui drangent Prof. Damien Ernst Universit de Lige

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    Blackouts: des vérités qui dérangent Prof. Damien Ernst ­ Université de Liège Novembre 2014 www un blackout. Cet hiver 2014-2015 en Belgique: Risque important que l'offre disponible soit inférieure à la demande. Mise en place de plans de délestage pour éviter le blackout total. #12;Mais comment

  16. Cellular/Molecular Rolling Blackout Is Required for Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broadie, Kendal S.

    Cellular/Molecular Rolling Blackout Is Required for Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Fu-De Huang, Elvin 37235-1634 Rolling blackout (RBO) is a putative transmembrane lipase required for phospholipase C; Kidokoro et al., 2004). We report here a new TS paralytic mutant, rolling blackout (rbo), which similarly

  17. STATISTICAL ESTIMATION OF CASCADING BLACKOUT SIZE AND PROPAGATION WITH BRANCHING PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATISTICAL ESTIMATION OF CASCADING BLACKOUT SIZE AND PROPAGATION WITH BRANCHING PROCESSES by Kevin Processes with Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.2 Additional Cascading Blackout Research and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.2.2 Estimating blackout size pdf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.2.3 Note

  18. Preventing Future Blackouts by Means of Enhanced Electric Power Systems Control: From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preventing Future Blackouts by Means of Enhanced Electric Power Systems Control: From Complexity that re- semble the blackout of August 2003. Also, the potential for efficient use of the resources during--Advanced control, complex large-scale dynamical systems, electric power blackouts, electricity restructuring

  19. Initial Evidence for Self-Organized Criticality in Electric Power System Blackouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreras, B.A.; Dobson, I.; Newman, D.E.; Poole, A.B.

    2000-01-04

    We examine correlations in a time series of electric power system blackout sizes using scaled window variance analysis and R/S statistics. The data shows some evidence of long time correlations and has Hurst exponent near 0.7. Large blackouts tend to correlate with further large blackouts after a long time interval. Similar effects are also observed in many other complex systems exhibiting self-organized criticality. We discuss this initial evidence and possible explanations for self-organized criticality in power systems blackouts. Self-organized criticality, if fully confirmed in power systems, would suggest new approaches to understanding and possibly controlling blackouts.

  20. Smart Grid Outreach and Communication Strategy: Next Steps - EAC Recommendations for DOE (October 17, 2012)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4 »DigitalanDepartmentSecondarySmart Grid Outreach and

  1. Kick-Off Meeting Smart Grid Ready Inverters DOE Project DE-EE0005337

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet) SoldDepartmentGOES-10PV Grid Integration

  2. Smart Grid e-Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Smart Grid Task Force Smart Grid e-Forum Smart Grid e-Forum DOE conducted a series of Smart Grid E-Forums to discuss various issues surrounding Smart Grid including...

  3. A network approach for power grid robustness against cascading failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiangrong; Kooij, Robert E; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Cascading failures are one of the main reasons for blackouts in electrical power grids. Stable power supply requires a robust design of the power grid topology. Currently, the impact of the grid structure on the grid robustness is mainly assessed by purely topological metrics, that fail to capture the fundamental properties of the electrical power grids such as power flow allocation according to Kirchhoff's laws. This paper deploys the effective graph resistance as a metric to relate the topology of a grid to its robustness against cascading failures. Specifically, the effective graph resistance is deployed as a metric for network expansions (by means of transmission line additions) of an existing power grid. Four strategies based on network properties are investigated to optimize the effective graph resistance, accordingly to improve the robustness, of a given power grid at a low computational complexity. Experimental results suggest the existence of Braess's paradox in power grids: bringing an additional li...

  4. Estimating Failure Propagation in Models of Cascading Blackouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Nkei, Bertrand [ORNL; Newman, David E [University of Alaska

    2005-09-01

    We compare and test statistical estimates of failure propagation in data from versions of a probabilistic model of loading-dependent cascading failure and a power systems blackout model of cascading transmission line overloads. The comparisons suggest mechanisms affecting failure propagation and are an initial step towards monitoring failure propagation from practical system data. Approximations to the probabilistic model describe the forms of probability distributions of cascade sizes.

  5. index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    includes numerical simulators, analytical models, databases, and documentation. Smart Grid The DOE Smart Grid Implementation Strategy team (previously the Modern Grid...

  6. DOE Hosts Public Roundtable Discussion of Smart-Grid Data Access and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOE Federal Aviation Professional AwardsProgramFrom left,

  7. DOE Publishes Notice of Public Meeting for Smart Grid-connected Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOE FederalThe Department ofFederalLEDWhile previousDepartment of

  8. DOE Provides $4.3 Million to Improve Reliability of the U.S. Electric Grid

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice of Headquarters AccountingDOE Organization Chart| Department of

  9. DOE Releases Maturity Model to Better Protect the Nation's Grid from

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice of Headquarters AccountingDOE Organization(RMP) Guideline

  10. DOE Announces Awards for up to $11 Million for New Solar Energy Grid

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10 DOE ASSESSMENTat Los Alamos | Department

  11. Parametric Grid Information in the DOE Knowledge Base: Data Preparation, Storage, and Access

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HIPP,JAMES R.; MOORE,SUSAN G.; MYERS,STEPHEN C.; SCHULTZ,CRAIG A.; SHEPHERD,ELLEN; YOUNG,CHRISTOPHER J.

    1999-10-01

    The parametric grid capability of the Knowledge Base provides an efficient, robust way to store and access interpolatable information which is needed to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. To meet both the accuracy and performance requirements of operational monitoring systems, we use a new approach which combines the error estimation of kriging with the speed and robustness of Natural Neighbor Interpolation (NNI). The method involves three basic steps: data preparation (DP), data storage (DS), and data access (DA). The goal of data preparation is to process a set of raw data points to produce a sufficient basis for accurate NNI of value and error estimates in the Data Access step. This basis includes a set of nodes and their connectedness, collectively known as a tessellation, and the corresponding values and errors that map to each node, which we call surfaces. In many cases, the raw data point distribution is not sufficiently dense to guarantee accurate error estimates from the NNI, so the original data set must be densified using a newly developed interpolation technique known as Modified Bayesian Kriging. Once appropriate kriging parameters have been determined by variogram analysis, the optimum basis for NNI is determined in a process they call mesh refinement, which involves iterative kriging, new node insertion, and Delauny triangle smoothing. The process terminates when an NNI basis has been calculated which will fir the kriged values within a specified tolerance. In the data storage step, the tessellations and surfaces are stored in the Knowledge Base, currently in a binary flatfile format but perhaps in the future in a spatially-indexed database. Finally, in the data access step, a client application makes a request for an interpolated value, which triggers a data fetch from the Knowledge Base through the libKBI interface, a walking triangle search for the containing triangle, and finally the NNI interpolation.

  12. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    does not address the 21 st century power supply challenges The benefits of a modernized grid are substantial Running today's digital society through yesterday's grid is like...

  13. Electricity storage for grid-connected household dwellings with PV panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulder, Grietus; Six, Daan; Ridder, Fjo De

    2010-07-15

    Classically electricity storage for PV panels is mostly designed for stand-alone applications. In contrast, we focus in this article on houses connected to the grid with a small-scale storage to store a part of the solar power for postponed consumption within the day or the next days. In this way the house owner becomes less dependent on the grid and does only pay for the net shortage of his energy production. Local storage solutions pave the way for many new applications like omitting over-voltage of the line and bridging periods of power-line black-out. Since 2009 using self-consumption of PV energy is publicly encouraged in Germany, which can be realised by electric storage. This paper develops methods to determine the optimal storage size for grid-connected dwellings with PV panels. From measurements in houses we were able to establish calculation rules for sizing the storage. Two situations for electricity storage are covered: - the storage system is an optimum to cover most of the electricity needs; - it is an optimum for covering the peak power need of a dwelling. After these calculation rules a second step is needed to determine the size of the real battery. The article treats the aspects that should be taken into consideration before buying a specific battery like lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries. (author)

  14. Reproducing continuous radio blackout using glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Kai; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Shao, Mingxu [School of Aerospace Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071 (China)] [School of Aerospace Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071 (China); Zhang, Hanlu [School of Communication and Information Engineering, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an 710121 (China)] [School of Communication and Information Engineering, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an 710121 (China)

    2013-10-15

    A novel plasma generator is described that offers large-scale, continuous, non-magnetized plasma with a 30-cm-diameter hollow structure, which provides a path for an electromagnetic wave. The plasma is excited by a low-pressure glow discharge, with varying electron densities ranging from 10{sup 9} to 2.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?3}. An electromagnetic wave propagation experiment reproduced a continuous radio blackout in UHF-, L-, and S-bands. The results are consistent with theoretical expectations. The proposed method is suitable in simulating a plasma sheath, and in researching communications, navigation, electromagnetic mitigations, and antenna compensation in plasma sheaths.

  15. High-Performance Computing for Real-Time Grid Analysis and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2013-10-31

    Power grids worldwide are undergoing an unprecedented transition as a result of grid evolution meeting information revolution. The grid evolution is largely driven by the desire for green energy. Emerging grid technologies such as renewable generation, smart loads, plug-in hybrid vehicles, and distributed generation provide opportunities to generate energy from green sources and to manage energy use for better system efficiency. With utility companies actively deploying these technologies, a high level of penetration of these new technologies is expected in the next 5-10 years, bringing in a level of intermittency, uncertainties, and complexity that the grid did not see nor design for. On the other hand, the information infrastructure in the power grid is being revolutionized with large-scale deployment of sensors and meters in both the transmission and distribution networks. The future grid will have two-way flows of both electrons and information. The challenge is how to take advantage of the information revolution: pull the large amount of data in, process it in real time, and put information out to manage grid evolution. Without addressing this challenge, the opportunities in grid evolution will remain unfulfilled. This transition poses grand challenges in grid modeling, simulation, and information presentation. The computational complexity of underlying power grid modeling and simulation will significantly increase in the next decade due to an increased model size and a decreased time window allowed to compute model solutions. High-performance computing is essential to enable this transition. The essential technical barrier is to vastly increase the computational speed so operation response time can be reduced from minutes to seconds and sub-seconds. The speed at which key functions such as state estimation and contingency analysis are conducted (typically every 3-5 minutes) needs to be dramatically increased so that the analysis of contingencies is both comprehensive and real time. An even bigger challenge is how to incorporate dynamic information into real-time grid operation. Today’s online grid operation is based on a static grid model and can only provide a static snapshot of current system operation status, while dynamic analysis is conducted offline because of low computational efficiency. The offline analysis uses a worst-case scenario to determine transmission limits, resulting in under-utilization of grid assets. This conservative approach does not necessarily lead to reliability. Many times, actual power grid scenarios are not studied, and they will push the grid over the edge and resulting in outages and blackouts. This chapter addresses the HPC needs in power grid analysis and operations. Example applications such as state estimation and contingency analysis are given to demonstrate the value of HPC in power grid applications. Future research directions are suggested for high performance computing applications in power grids to improve the transparency, efficiency, and reliability of power grids.

  16. Thermohydraulic and Safety Analysis for CARR Under Station Blackout Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenxi Tian; Suizheng Qiu; Guanghui Su; Dounan Jia [Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road, Xi'an 710049 (China); Xingmin Liu - China Institute of Atomic Energy

    2006-07-01

    A thermohydraulic and safety analysis code (TSACC) has been developed using Fortran 90 language to evaluate the transient thermohydraulic behaviors and safety characteristics of the China Advanced Research Reactor(CARR) under Station Blackout Accident(SBA). For the development of TSACC, a series of corresponding mathematical and physical models were considered. Point reactor neutron kinetics model was adopted for solving reactor power. All possible flow and heat transfer conditions under station blackout accident were considered and the optional models were supplied. The usual Finite Difference Method (FDM) was abandoned and a new model was adopted to evaluate the temperature field of core plate type fuel element. A new simple and convenient equation was proposed for the resolution of the transient behaviors of the main pump instead of the complicated four-quadrant model. Gear method and Adams method were adopted alternately for a better solution to the stiff differential equations describing the dynamic behaviors of the CARR. The computational result of TSACC showed the enough safety margin of CARR under SBA. For the purpose of Verification and Validation (V and V), the simulated results of TSACC were compared with those of Relap5/Mdo3. The V and V result indicated a good agreement between the results by the two codes. Because of the adoption of modular programming techniques, this analysis code is expected to be applied to other reactors by easily modifying the corresponding function modules. (authors)

  17. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joe

    2008-01-01

    on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and400 kV substation. The blackout affected 4.5 million peopleReasons of the East Coast US Blackout on August 14, 2003”,

  18. Potential failure of steam generator tubes following a station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, L.W.; Palmrose, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is considering changes to pressurized water reactor (PWR) requirements relating to steam generator tube plugging and repair criteria, including leakage monitoring. The proposed changes are known as the alternate tube plugging criteria (APC) and are intended to permit PWRs to operate with through-wall cracks in steam generator tubes subject to meeting a specified limit on predicted primary to secondary leakage under accident conditions. To assess the consequences of the alternate plugging criteria, analyses were performed for a station blackout sequence in which the reactor core melts while the reactor coolant system (RCS) remains at high pressure. Evaluations were conducted to investigate the potential for tube failure with and without secondary system depressurization. The excessive heat coupled with the high-pressure differentials across the steam generator tubes could result in creep rupture failure of the tubes during a severe accident, which could lead to a radiological release directly to the environment. In order to assess the safety significance of the APC, it is important to identify the level of steam generator tube leakage that can occur without challenging the previous study conclusions that steam generator creep failure will not occur prior to a surge line or hot-leg failure. To assess the effect of leakage on steam generator tube integrity during a core melt sequence with the RCS at high pressure and the secondary side of the steam generators pressurized and depressurized, an analysis was performed for a core melt event resulting from an unmitigated station blackout to identify the total steamenerator and tube leakage flow rates that could induce tube ruptures prior to other RCS boudary faliures that could depressurize the RCS.

  19. Blackout 2003: U.S. - Canada Task Force Presents Final Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Resources Canada, released the Final Report of the U.S. -Canada Power System Outage Task Force. U.S. - Canada Task Force Presents Final Report on Blackout of August 2003...

  20. Advanced fault diagnosis techniques and their role in preventing cascading blackouts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Nan

    2007-04-25

    /or transmission facilities may also happen before the blackouts. ? Contingency conditions: Before the blackouts, the system may be additionally weakened by unscheduled outages, such as several transmission line, transformer and generator outages due to the faults... outages is proposed. The scheme tries to precisely locate the faulted area and avoid unnecessary trip due to the hidden failure or overload. Adaptive protection schemes are introduced to coordinate the relay operations and settings with the prevailing...

  1. AUSTRIAN GRID AUSTRIAN GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author 1.0 2005-07-28 Initial Version See cover on page 3 #12;AUSTRIAN GRID 3/18 A PROTOTYPE OF THE SEE

  2. file://P:\\Smart Grid\\Smart Grid RFI Policy and Logistical Comme

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Docket: DOE-HQ-2010-0024 Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Comment On: DOE-HQ-2010-0024-0001 Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid...

  3. Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  4. Reports on Initial Results of Smart Grid Investment Grant Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reports on Initial Results of Smart Grid Investment Grant Projects (December 2012) Reports on Initial Results of Smart Grid Investment Grant Projects (December 2012) DOE is...

  5. Testing and Validation of Vehicle to Grid Communication Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Validation of Vehicle to Grid Communication Standards Testing and Validation of Vehicle to Grid Communication Standards 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

  6. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and...

  7. DOE Announces Public Meetings on the Communications Needs of Utilities and Smart-Grid Data Access and Privacy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has long recognized the importance of incorporating broadband and other interactive communications technologies into ongoing efforts to modernize America’s electrical...

  8. Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -VII, August 19-24 2007, Charleston, South Carolina, USA Towards Quantifying Cascading Blackout Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. Therefore, we aim for efficient methods of estimating blackout risk that could work in a time Towards Quantifying Cascading Blackout Risk Ian Dobson Kevin R. Wierzbicki Janghoon Kim Hui Ren ECE. The ability to efficiently quantify cascading blackout risk from observed data and simulations could offer new

  9. Reply to comment by D. A. Hansen et al. on ``The 2003 North American electrical blackout: An accidental experiment in atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stehr, Jeffrey

    Reply to comment by D. A. Hansen et al. on ``The 2003 North American electrical blackout), Reply to comment by D. A. Hansen et al. on ``The 2003 North American electrical blackout: An accidental blackout: An accidental experiment in atmospheric chemistry'' and ap- preciate the opportunity to expand

  10. Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Complex Systems Analysis of Series of Blackouts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Analysis of Series of Blackouts: Cascading Failure, Criticality, and Self-organization Ian Dobson a comprehensive account of a complex systems ap- proach to large blackouts caused by cascading failure. In- stead of looking at the details of particular blackouts, we study the statistics, dynamics and risk of series

  11. Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, January 2002, Hawaii. c 2002 IEEE. Examining criticality of blackouts in power system models with cascading events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    criticality of blackouts in power system models with cascading events I. Dobson ECE Department Univ As power system loading increases, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. We investigate a critical loading at which the average size of blackouts in- creases sharply to examine whether

  12. Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, January 2001, Maui, Hawaii. c 2001 IEEE An initial model for complex dynamics in electric power system blackouts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, David

    An initial model for complex dynamics in electric power system blackouts I. Dobson ECE Department University of electric power transmission system blackouts. The model describes opposing forces which have been conjectured to cause self-organized criticality in power system blackouts. There is a slow time scale

  13. Utility perspective on station blackout rule implementation with NUMARC 87-00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maracek, J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of the station blackout rule involved an unusually high level of cooperation between the industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The industry developed an approach to implementation of the rule in the form of the Nuclear Management and Resources Council's (NUMARC's) Guidelines and Technical Bases for NUMARC Initiatives Addressing Station Blackout at Light Water Reactors (NUMARC 87-00). This document was reviewed and accepted by the NRC staff as a means for meeting the requirements of the station blackout rule. Yet difficulties still arose when individual utilities used the NUMARC 87-00 approach to respond to the rule. This presentation examines the development process and subsequent difficulties and identifies potential improvements for development and implementation of new rules in the future.

  14. Applications of the RELAP5 code to the station blackout transients at the Browns Ferry Unit One Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.R.; Wagoner, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    As a part of the charter of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program, station blackout transients have been analyzed using a RELAP5 model of the Browns Ferry Unit 1 Plant. The task was conducted as a partial fulfillment of the needs of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in examining the Unresolved Safety Issue A-44: Station Blackout (1) the station blackout transients were examined (a) to define the equipment needed to maintain a well cooled core, (b) to determine when core uncovery would occur given equipment failure, and (c) to characterize the behavior of the vessel thermal-hydraulics during the station blackout transients (in part as the plant operator would see it). These items are discussed in the paper. Conclusions and observations specific to the station blackout are presented.

  15. Integrated TRAC/MELPROG analyses of a PWR station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henninger, R.; Dearing, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The first complete, coupled, and largely mechanistic analysis of the entire reactor-coolant system during a station blackout (TMLB') core-meltdown accident has been made with MELPROG/TRAC. The calculation was initiated at the start of the transient and ended with a late recovery of cooling. Additional cooling provided by water from the primary system delayed events relative to a standalone MELPROG calculation. Natural circulation within the vessel was established and primary-relief-valve action did little to disturb this flow. In addition, it was calculated directly that the hot leg reached a failure temperature long before vessel failure. Beyond relocation of the core, we have calculated the boiloff of the water in the lower head and have estimated the time of vessel failure to be at about 14,700 s into the transient. For ''nominal'' corium-water heat transfer, the boiloff process (steam-production rate) is slow enough that the relief valves prevent pressurization beyond 17.5 MPa. Parametric cases with increased corium-water heat transfer resulted in steaming rates beyond the capability of the relief valves, leading to pressures in excess of 19.2 MPa. Natural convection flow around the loop, if started by removing the water in the loop seal, was blocked by a relatively less-dense hydrogen/steam mixture that flowed to the top of the steam generator. Emergency core-cooling system activation late in the transient (after core slump) resulted in rapid cooling of the periphery of the debris region but slower cooling in the interior regions because of poor water penetration.

  16. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

  17. Combating False Reports for Secure Networked Control in Smart Grid via Trustiness Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Husheng; Djouadi, Seddik M

    2010-01-01

    Smart grid, equipped with modern communication infrastructures, is subject to possible cyber attacks. Particularly, false report attacks which replace the sensor reports with fraud ones may cause the instability of the whole power grid or even result in a large area blackout. In this paper, a trustiness system is introduced to the controller, who computes the trustiness of different sensors by comparing its prediction, obtained from Kalman filtering, on the system state with the reports from sensor. The trustiness mechanism is discussed and analyzed for the Linear Quadratic Regulation (LQR) controller. Numerical simulations show that the trustiness system can effectively combat the cyber attacks to smart grid.

  18. The response of BWR Mark II containments to station blackout severe accident sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, S.R.; Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Tobias, M.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the results of a series of calculations conducted to investigate the response of BWR Mark 2 containments to short-term and long-term station blackout severe accident sequences. The BWR-LTAS, BWRSAR, and MELCOR codes were employed to conduct quantitative accident sequence progression and containment response analyses for several station blackout scenarios. The accident mitigation effectiveness of automatic depressurization system actuation, drywell flooding via containment spray operation, and debris quenching in Mark 2 suppression pools is assessed. 27 refs., 16 figs., 21 tabs.

  19. Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI 2010-23251: Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI 2010-23251: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI...

  20. SCDAP severe core-damage studies: BWR ATWS and PWR station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laats, E.T.; Chambers, R.; Driskell, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is addressing a number of accident scenarios that potentially pose a health hazard to the public. Two of the scenarios being analyzed in detail at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are the station blackout at the Bellefonte nuclear plant and the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) at the Browns Ferry-1 plant. The INEL analyses of the station blackout and ATWS have been divided into four parts, which represent the sequence being followed in this study. First, the evaluation of long term irradiation effects prior to the station blackout or ATWS was conducted using the FRAPCON-2 fuel rod behavior code; second, the reactor primary and secondary coolant system behavior is being analyzed with the RELAP5 code; third, the degradation of the core is being analyzed with the SCDAP code; and finally, the containment building response is being analyzed with the CONTEMPT code. This paper addresses only the SCDAP/MODO degraded core analyses for both the station blackout and ATWS scenarios.

  1. Recovery sequences for a station blackout accident at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recovery sequences for a low-pressure, short term, station blackout severe accident at the Grand Gulf power plant have been investigated using the computer code MELCOR, version 1.8.3 PN. This paper investigates the effect of reflood timing and mass flow rate on accident recovery.

  2. RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the station blackout experiment conducted at the IIST facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferng, Y.M.; Liu, T.J.; Lee, C.H. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-10-01

    Thermal-hydraulic responses in the station blackout experiment conducted at the IIST facility are simulated through the use of the advanced system code RELAP5/MOD3. Typical behaviors occurring in the IIST station blackout transient are characterized by secondary boiloff, primary saturation and pressurization, and subsequent core uncovery and heatup. As the coolant inventory within the steam generator secondary system boils dry, the primary system pressure increases as a result of degradation of the heat removal ability of the steam generator secondary side. This pressurization phenomenon causes the pressurizer safety valve to open and the primary coolant to deplete through the valve, causing the core to eventually become uncovered. The same response can be exactly simulated by the current model. The current calculated results show fairly good agreement with the experimental data, but the timing of the events occurring in the station blackout transient is calculated earlier than the measured value. The overall comparison of key parameters between the calculated results and IIST test data, however, reveals that the current RELAP5/MOD3 model can provide reasonable station blackout modeling for simulating long-term system behavior.

  3. Blackouts Are Inevitable Coping, Not Prevention, Should Be the Primary Goal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In a large, complicated arrangement such as our system for generating, transmitting and distributing and could even be counterproductive, causing future failures because of some unanticipated interaction blackouts. When hurricanes, tornadoes, ice storms or other problems black out the system, backup generators

  4. SGIG and SGDP Highlights: Jumpstarting a Modern Grid (October...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided DOE with 4.5 billion to modernize the electric power grid. Under the largest program, the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG), DOE and the...

  5. Wide-Area Situational Awareness of Power Grids with Limited Phasor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Nieplocha, Jarek; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2006-09-30

    Lack of situational awareness has been identified as one of root causes for the August 14, 2003 Northeast Blackout in North America. To improve situational awareness, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched several projects to deploy Wide Area Measurement Systems (WAMS) in different interconnections. Compared to the tens of thousands of buses, the number of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) is quite limited and not enough to achieve the observability for the whole interconnections. To utilize the limited number of PMU measurements to improve situational awareness, this paper proposes to combine PMU measurement data and power flow equations to form a hybrid power flow model. Technically, a model which combines the concept of observable islands and modeling of power flow conditions, is proposed. The model is called a Hybrid Power Flow Model as it has both PMU measurements and simulation assumptions, which describes prior knowledge available about whole power systems. By solving the hybrid power flow equations, the proposed method can be used to derive power system states to improve the situational awareness of a power grid.

  6. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabari, Anil; Fadipe, Oloruntomi

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  7. Methodology to determine the technical performance and value proposition for grid-scale energy storage systems : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Loose, Verne William; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Trudnowski, Daniel J.

    2012-12-01

    As the amount of renewable generation increases, the inherent variability of wind and photovoltaic systems must be addressed in order to ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of the nation's electricity grid. Grid-scale energy storage systems are uniquely suited to address the variability of renewable generation and to provide other valuable grid services. The goal of this report is to quantify the technical performance required to provide di erent grid bene ts and to specify the proper techniques for estimating the value of grid-scale energy storage systems.

  8. Smart Grid Outreach and Communication Strategy: Next Steps -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - EAC Recommendations for DOE Action, approved at the October 15-16, 2012 EAC Meeting. Smart Grid Outreach and Communication Strategy: Next Steps - EAC Recommendations for DOE...

  9. Transforming Power Grid Operations via High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2008-07-31

    Past power grid blackout events revealed the adequacy of grid operations in responding to adverse situations partially due to low computational efficiency in grid operation functions. High performance computing (HPC) provides a promising solution to this problem. HPC applications in power grid computation also become necessary to take advantage of parallel computing platforms as the computer industry is undergoing a significant change from the traditional single-processor environment to an era for multi-processor computing platforms. HPC applications to power grid operations are multi-fold. HPC can improve today’s grid operation functions like state estimation and contingency analysis and reduce the solution time from minutes to seconds, comparable to SCADA measurement cycles. HPC also enables the integration of dynamic analysis into real-time grid operations. Dynamic state estimation, look-ahead dynamic simulation and real-time dynamic contingency analysis can be implemented and would be three key dynamic functions in future control centers. HPC applications call for better decision support tools, which also need HPC support to handle large volume of data and large number of cases. Given the complexity of the grid and the sheer number of possible configurations, HPC is considered to be an indispensible element in the next generation control centers.

  10. Recent blackouts in US and continental Europe: is liberalisation to blame?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bialek, Janusz

    2004-06-16

    to be self-sufficient, i.e. generation matched demand. This resulted in well developed internal transmission networks but relatively weak tie-lines linking neighbouring networks. Over time the networks started to be increasingly interconnected but those... and some early lessons to be learnt. There are several common features regarding all the recent blackouts. They were all transmission-based, i.e. there were no problems at the time with the level of generation. The systems were not stressed before...

  11. MELCOR calculations for a low-pressure short-term station blackout in a BWR-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A postulated, low-pressure, short term station blackout severe accident has been analyzed using the MELCOR code for the Grand Gulf nuclear power plant. Different versions have been used with three different models of the plant. This paper presents results of the effects of different plant models and versions of MELCOR on the calculated results and to present the best-estimating timing of events for this transient.

  12. Regulatory/backfit analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1988-06-01

    Station blackout is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory/backfit analysis for USI A-44. It includes (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the recommended technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements, and (7) a backfit analysis demonstrating that the resolution of USI A-44 complies with the backfit rule (10 CFR 50.109).

  13. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    ''Station Blackout'' is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory analysis for USI A-44. It includes: (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the proposed technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, and (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements.

  14. Modeling Advanced Neutron Source reactor station blackout accident using RELAP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N.C.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fletcher, C.D. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) system model using RELAP5 has been developed to perform loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and non-LOCA transients as safety-related input for early design considerations. The transients studies include LOCA, station blackout, and reactivity insertion accidents. The small-, medium-, and large-break LOCA results were presented and documented. This paper will focus on the station blackout scenario. The station blackout analyses have concentrated on thermal-hydraulic system response with and without accumulators. Five transient calculations were performed to characterize system performance using various numbers and sizes of accumulators at several key sites. The main findings will be discussed with recommendations for conceptual design considerations. ANS is a state-of-the-art research reactor to be built and operated at high heat flux, high mass flux, and high coolant subcooling. To accommodate these features, three ANS-specific changes were made in the RELAP5 code by adding: the Petukhov heat transfer correlation for single-phase forced convection in the thin coolant channel; the Gambill additive method with the Weatherhead wall superheat for the critical heat flux; and the Griffith drift flux model for the interfacial drag in the slug flow regime. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Grid Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnott, R.O.

    Sinnott,R.O. National Centre for e-Social Science book, Grid Computing: Technology, Service and Application, CRC Press, November 2008.

  16. Lassoing Line Outages in the Smart Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Fast and accurate unveiling of power line outages is of paramount importance not only for preventing faults that may lead to blackouts, but also for routine monitoring and control tasks of the smart grid, including state estimation and optimal power flow. Existing approaches are either challenged by the \\emph{combinatorial complexity} issues involved, and are thus limited to identifying single- and double-line outages; or, they invoke less pragmatic assumptions such as \\emph{conditionally independent} phasor angle measurements available across the grid. Using only a subset of voltage phasor angle data, the present paper develops a near real-time algorithm for identifying multiple line outages at the affordable complexity of solving a quadratic program via block coordinate descent iterations. The novel approach relies on reformulating the DC linear power flow model as a \\emph{sparse} overcomplete expansion, and leveraging contemporary advances in compressive sampling and variable selection using the least-abso...

  17. Alvarado and Rajaraman. The 2003 Blackout: Did the System Operator Have Enough Power? page 1 Christensen Associates 4610 University Avenue, Ste. 700 Madison, WI 53705-2164 Voice 608.231.2266 Fax 608.231.2108

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarado and Rajaraman. The 2003 Blackout: Did the System Operator Have Enough Power? page 1.231.2108 THE 2003 BLACKOUT: DID THE SYSTEM OPERATOR HAVE ENOUGH POWER? Fernando L. Alvarado (alvarado blackout are still being investigated and it is too soon to know what went wrong. From press accounts

  18. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  19. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  20. National transmission grid study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, Spencer

    2003-05-31

    The National Energy Policy Plan directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study to examine the benefits of establishing a national electricity transmission grid and to identify transmission bottlenecks and measures to address them. DOE began by conducting an independent analysis of U.S. electricity markets and identifying transmission system bottlenecks using DOE’s Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS). DOE’s analysis, presented in Section 2, confirms the central role of the nation’s transmission system in lowering costs to consumers through increased trade. More importantly, DOE’s analysis also confirms the results of previous studies, which show that transmission bottlenecks and related transmission system market practices are adding hundreds of millions of dollars to consumers’ electricity bills each year. A more detailed technical overview of the use of POEMS is provided in Appendix A. DOE led an extensive, open, public input process and heard a wide range of comments and recommendations that have all been considered.1 More than 150 participants registered for three public workshops held in Detroit, MI (September 24, 2001); Atlanta, GA (September 26, 2001); and Phoenix, AZ (September 28, 2001).

  1. Containment pressurization and burning of combustible gases in a large, dry PWR containment during a station blackout sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Fan, C.T. (National Tsing-Hua Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hsinchu (TW))

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, responses of a large, dry pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment in a station blackout sequence are analyzed with the CONTAIN, MARCH3, and MAAP codes. Results show that the predicted containment responses in a station blackout sequence of these three codes are substantially different. Among these predictions, the MAAP code predicts the highest containment pressure because of the large amount of water made available to quench the debris upon vessel failure. The gradual water boiloff by debris pressurizes the containment. The combustible gas burning models in these codes are briefly described and compared.

  2. Comments of Tendril Networks, Inc. on DOE Request for Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use and Privacy Comments of the Demand Response and Smart Grid Coalition on DOE's Implementing the National Broadband Plan...

  3. New Article on Cybersecurity Discusses DOE's Partnership with...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are partnering to keep the smart grid...

  4. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU SERVE | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a DOE-sponsored publication...

  5. Distributed Monitoring for Prevention of Cascading Failures in Operational Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnier, Martijn; Koç, Yakup; Pauwels, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Electrical power grids are vulnerable to cascading failures that can lead to large blackouts. Detection and prevention of cascading failures in power grids is impor- tant. Currently, grid operators mainly monitor the state (loading level) of individual components in power grids. The complex architecture of power grids, with many interdependencies, makes it difficult to aggregate data provided by local compo- nents in a timely manner and meaningful way: monitoring the resilience with re- spect to cascading failures of an operational power grid is a challenge. This paper addresses this challenge. The main ideas behind the paper are that (i) a robustness metric based on both the topology and the operative state of the power grid can be used to quantify power grid robustness and (ii) a new proposed a distributed computation method with self-stabilizing properties can be used to achieving near real-time monitoring of the robustness of the power grid. Our con- tributions thus provide insight into the resilience wit...

  6. Station Blackout: A case study in the interaction of mechanistic and probabilistic safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli; Cristian Rabiti

    2013-11-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margins is important to improved decision making about nuclear power plant design, operation, and plant life extension. As research and development (R&D) in the light-water reactor (LWR) Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario.

  7. Final Report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64432 "New Grid and Discretization Technologies for Ocean and Ice Simulations"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunzburger, Max

    2013-03-12

    The work reported is in pursuit of these goals: high-quality unstructured, non-uniform Voronoi and Delaunay grids; improved finite element and finite volume discretization schemes; and improved finite element and finite volume discretization schemes. These are sought for application to spherical and three-dimensional applications suitable for ocean, atmosphere, ice-sheet, and other climate modeling applications.

  8. Security for grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.; Jackson, Keith R.

    2005-01-01

    differences between Grid security and host or site securityof requirements for Grid security in order to achieve thecompletely. Index Terms — Grid security, authentication,

  9. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM : A Software Framework for Power System Operations technologies needed to support the operations and planning of the future power grid » provide a framework to the GridPACK numerical library that is being developed in the Future Power Grid Initiative APPROACH

  10. PREPRINT; TO APPEAR IN IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY IN 2011 1 Exploring complex systems aspects of blackout risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    , IEEE Abstract--Electric power transmission systems are a key in- frastructure and blackouts-organized criticality, electric power transmission system, infrastructure, power law ACRONYM IEAR Interrupted Energy Power flow through transmission line joining node i to node j Fijmax Maximum power flow through

  11. Hawaii International Conference on System Science, January 2003, Hawaii, 2003 IEEE Blackout Mitigation Assessment in Power Transmission Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, David

    @engr.wisc.edu Abstract Electric power transmission systems are a key infrastructure and blackouts of these systems have by the dynamics. 1. Introduction Electric power transmission systems are an important element of the national Mitigation Assessment in Power Transmission Systems B. A. Carreras Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge

  12. Forum: Let there be light Jay Apt and Lester Lave say power blackouts are too frequent, dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forum: Let there be light Jay Apt and Lester Lave say power blackouts are too frequent, dangerous blamed the pilot -- for inadequate training, not inspecting the aircraft thoroughly, flying in dangerous conditions or not reacting properly to the danger. Rather than have many erring pilots and dead passengers

  13. Solar Electric Grid Integration - Advanced Concepts (SEGIS-AC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Electric Grid Integration - Advanced Concepts (SEGIS-AC) program, DOE is funding solar projects that are targeting ways to develop power electronics and build smarter, more...

  14. Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient FAQs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    These Questions and Answers have been provided by DOE to Smart Grid Investment Grant selectees. The information discussed within these documents applies specifically and only to...

  15. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    via smartgridpolicy@hq.doe.gov Smart Grid Request for Information: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy The Alliance to Save...

  16. National Transmission Grid Study: 2002 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study to examine the benefits of establishing a national electricity transmission grid and to identify transmission bottlenecks and measures to...

  17. ESBWR response to an extended station blackout/loss of all AC power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, A. J.; Marquino, W. [New Plants Engineering, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, M/CA 75, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28402 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackouts for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event. Beyond 7 days, only a few simple actions are needed to cope with the SBO for an indefinite amount of time. The operation of the ICS as the primary success path for mitigation of an SBO, allows for near immediate plant restart once power is restored. (authors)

  18. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced Computational Kernels OBJECTIVE The U Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (509) 375-3899 bruce.palmer@pnnl.gov ABOUT FPGI The Future Power and ensure a more secure, efficient and reliable future grid. Building on the Electricity Infrastructure

  19. Transportation Center Seminar........ "Overview of Power Grid Research at Argonne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Transportation Center Seminar........ "Overview of Power Grid Research at Argonne National is the first U.S. DOE national laboratory. Argonne has been engaged in power grid related research for over thirty years. In this talk, I will give an overview of the research activities on power grid at Argonne

  20. Federated Grids and their Security Geoffrey Fox and Marlon Pierce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federated Grids and their Security Geoffrey Fox and Marlon Pierce Draft 0.4 Introduction We examine the consequences, requirements, and possible implementation issues needed to support security in federated grids that user identity in current Grid security implementations has two major shortcomings: it does not scale

  1. Early Power Grid Verification Under Circuit Current Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Early Power Grid Verification Under Circuit Current Uncertainties Imad A. Ferzli Department of ECE Eindhoven, The Netherlands lars@magma-da.com ABSTRACT As power grid safety becomes increasingly important in modern integrated circuits, so does the need to start power grid verifica- tion early in the design cycle

  2. Source term experiment STEP-3 simulating a PWR severe station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-05-21

    For a severe PWR accident that leads to a loss of feedwater to the steam generators, such as might occur in a station blackout, fission product decay heating will cause a water boiloff. Without effective cooling of the core, steam will begin to oxidize the Zircaloy cladding. The noble gases and volatile fission products, such as Cs and I, that are major contributors to the radiological source term, will be released from the damaged fuel shortly after cladding failure. The accident environment when these volatile fission products escape was simulated in STEP-3 using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The primary objective was to examine the releases in samples collected as close to the test zone as possible. In this paper, an analysis of the temperatures and hydrogen generation is compared with the measurements. The analysis is needed to estimate releases and characterize conditions at the source for studies of fission product transport.

  3. Comparative Study of Station Blackout Counterpart Tests in APEX and ROSA/AP600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafi, Abd Y.; Reyes, Jose N. Jr. [Oregon State University (United States)

    2000-05-15

    A comparison is presented between station blackout tests conducted in both the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) facility and in the modified Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA/AP600) Large-Scale Test Facility. The comparison includes the depressurization and liquid-level behavior during secondary-side blowdown, natural circulation, automatic depressurization system operation, and in-containment refueling water storage tank injection. Reasonable agreement between the test results from APEX NRC-2 and ROSA/AP600 AP-BO-01 has been observed with respect to the timing of depressurization and liquid draining rates. This indicates that the reduced height and pressure scaling of APEX preserves the sequence of events relative to the full-height and pressure ROSA/AP600.

  4. Proposed SPAR Modeling Method for Quantifying Time Dependent Station Blackout Cut Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Schroeder

    2010-06-01

    Abstract: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (USNRC’s) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models and industry risk models take similar approaches to analyzing the risk associated with loss of offsite power and station blackout (LOOP/SBO) events at nuclear reactor plants. In both SPAR models and industry models, core damage risk resulting from a LOOP/SBO event is analyzed using a combination of event trees and fault trees that produce cut sets that are, in turn, quantified to obtain a numerical estimate of the resulting core damage risk. A proposed SPAR method for quantifying the time-dependent cut sets is sometimes referred to as a convolution method. The SPAR method reflects assumptions about the timing of emergency diesel failures, the timing of subsequent attempts at emergency diesel repair, and the timing of core damage that may be different than those often used in industry models. This paper describes the proposed SPAR method.

  5. Demonstration of fully coupled simplified extended station black-out accident simulation with RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin; Zou, Ling; Anders, David; Martineau, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The RELAP-7 code develop-ment effort started in October of 2011 and by the end of the second development year, a number of physical components with simplified two phase flow capability have been de-veloped to support the simplified boiling water reactor (BWR) extended station blackout (SBO) analyses. The demonstration case includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety system components for the safety relief valve (SRV), the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system, and the wet well. Three scenar-ios for the SBO simulations have been considered. Since RELAP-7 is not a severe acci-dent analysis code, the simulation stops when fuel clad temperature reaches damage point. Scenario I represents an extreme station blackout accident without any external cooling and cooling water injection. The system pressure is controlled by automatically releasing steam through SRVs. Scenario II includes the RCIC system but without SRV. The RCIC system is fully coupled with the reactor primary system and all the major components are dynamically simulated. The third scenario includes both the RCIC system and the SRV to provide a more realistic simulation. This paper will describe the major models and dis-cuss the results for the three scenarios. The RELAP-7 simulations for the three simplified SBO scenarios show the importance of dynamically simulating the SRVs, the RCIC sys-tem, and the wet well system to the reactor safety during extended SBO accidents.

  6. Human Factors for Situation Assessment in Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttromson, Ross T.; Schur, Anne; Greitzer, Frank L.; Paget, Mia L.

    2007-08-08

    Executive Summary Despite advances in technology, power system operators must assimilate overwhelming amounts of data to keep the grid operating. Analyses of recent blackouts have clearly demonstrated the need to enhance the operator’s situation awareness (SA). The long-term objective of this research is to integrate valuable technologies into the grid operator environment that support decision making under normal and abnormal operating conditions and remove non-technical barriers to enable the optimum use of these technologies by individuals working alone and as a team. More specifically, the research aims to identify methods and principles to increase SA of grid operators in the context of system conditions that are representative or common across many operating entities and develop operationally relevant experimental methods for studying technologies and operational practices which contribute to SA. With increasing complexity and interconnectivity of the grid, the scope and complexity of situation awareness have grown. New paradigms are needed to guide research and tool development aimed to enhance and improve operations. In reviewing related research, operating practices, systems, and tools, the present study established a taxonomy that provides a perspective on research and development surrounding power grid situation awareness and clarifies the field of human factors/SA for grid operations. Information sources that we used to identify critical factors underlying SA included interviews with experienced operational personnel, available historical summaries and transcripts of abnormal conditions and outages (e.g., the August 14, 2003 blackout), scientific literature, and operational policies/procedures and other documentation. Our analysis of August 2003 blackout transcripts and interviews adopted a different perspective than previous analyses of this material, and we complemented this analysis with additional interviews. Based on our analysis and a broad literature review, we advocate a new perspective on SA in terms of sensemaking, also called situated or ecological decision making, where the focus of the investigation is to understand why the decision maker(s) experienced the situation the way they did, or why what they saw made sense to them at the time. This perspective is distinct from the traditional branch of human factors research in the field which focuses more on ergonomics and the transactional relationship between the human operator and the systems. Consistent with our findings from the literature review, we recognized an over-arching need to focus SA research on issues surrounding the concept of shared knowledge; e.g., awareness of what is happening in adjacent areas as well as one’s own area of responsibility. Major findings were: a) Inadequate communication/information sharing is pervasive, b) Information is available, but not used. Many tools and mechanisms exist for operators to build awareness of the physical grid system, yet the transcripts reveal that they still need to call and exchange information with operators of neighboring areas to improve or validate their SA. The specific types of information that they request are quite predictable and, in most cases, cover information that could be available to both operators and reliability coordinators through readily available displays or other data sources, c) Shared Knowledge is Required on Operations/Actions as Well as Physical Status. In an ideal, technologically and organizationally perfect world, every control room and every reliability coordinator may have access to complete data across all regional control areas and yet, there would still be reason for the operators to call each other to gain and improve their SA of power grid operations, and d) Situation Awareness as sensemaking and shared knowledge.

  7. Technology Challenges in Designing the Future Grid to Enable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " Funded by the U.S. DOE Vijay Vittal Director, Power Systems Engineering Research Center Professor in six technical thrust areas in the PSERC Future Grid Initiative, a DOE-funded research effort entitled

  8. Received 7 Oct 2012 | Accepted 29 Apr 2013 | Published 27 Jun 2013 Realistic control of network dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    -grid undergoing a large blackout may still have other stable states in which no blackout would occur

  9. Using Multiple-Valued Logic Decision Diagrams to Model System Threat Probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Mitchell

    . As an example, in the 2003 blackout of the US power grid, many complex interactions caused a blackout to occur

  10. Mitigating Cascading Failures in Interdependent Power Grids and Communication Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hay, David

    -time monitoring and rapid control decisions for mitigating failures led to a catastrophic blackout which affected 50 million people in Northeast Amer- ica. According to the final report of the 2003 blackout [6 than 5 minutes and led to a full blackout in the Northeast United States and parts of Canada

  11. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and posted for universal access at www.nreca.coop/smartgrid. This research is available for widespread distribution to both cooperative members and non-members. These reports are listed in Table 1.2. Interoperability: The deliverable in this area was the advancement of the MultiSpeak™ interoperability standard from version 4.0 to version 5.0, and improvement in the MultiSpeak™ documentation to include more than 100 use cases. This deliverable substantially expanded the scope and usability of MultiSpeak, ™ the most widely deployed utility interoperability standard, now in use by more than 900 utilities. MultiSpeak™ documentation can be accessed only at www.multispeak.org. Cyber Security: NRECA’s starting point was to develop cyber security tools that incorporated succinct guidance on best practices. The deliverables were: cyber security extensions to MultiSpeak,™ which allow more security message exchanges; a Guide to Developing a Cyber Security and Risk Mitigation Plan; a Cyber Security Risk Mitigation Checklist; a Cyber Security Plan Template that co-ops can use to create their own cyber security plans; and Security Questions for Smart Grid Vendors.

  12. Uncertainties in source term estimates for a station blackout accident in a BWR with Mark I containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Cazzoli, E.; Liu, Y.; Davis, R.; Nourbakhsh, H.; Schmidt, E.; Unwin, S.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, attention is limited to a single accident progression sequence, namly a station blackout accident in a BWR with a Mark I containment building. Identified as an important accident in the draft version of NUREG-1150 a station blackout involves loss of both off-site power and dc power resulting in failure of the diesels to start and in the unavailability of the high pressure injection and core isolation cooling systems. This paper illustrates the calculated uncertainties (Probability Density Functions) associated with the radiological releases into the environment for the nine fission product groups at 10 hours following the initiation of core-concrete interactions. Also shown are the results ofthe STCP base case simulation. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Grid Certificates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene'sGreg-Delwiche SignGrid

  14. PSERC Future Grid Initiative: A Research Program Sponsored by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. DOE Probabilistic Simulation Methodology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    and Energy Reliability, U.S. DOE Probabilistic Simulation Methodology for Evaluation of Renewable Resource on the development of a comprehensive, stochastic simulation approach for power systems with renewable and storage of the transmission constraints on the hourly day- ahead markets. We adopt Monte Carlo simulation techniques

  15. A Static PatternIndependent Technique for Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    A Static Pattern­Independent Technique for Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification # Dionysios Design verification must include the power grid. Checking that the voltage on the power grid does) the obviously large size of the power grids for modern high­performance chips, and ii) the di#culty of setting

  16. A Static Pattern-Independent Technique for Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    by the circuit off the grid. The current waveforms of these current sources may be determined by a priorA Static Pattern-Independent Technique for Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification Dionysios Design verification must include the power grid. Checking that the voltage on the power grid does

  17. Grid Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taft, Jeffrey D.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.

    2015-03-02

    This work was done at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically with respect to issues relevant to U.S. electric transmission, storage and distribution infrastructure.

  18. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart...

  19. DOE Announces Nearly $3.2 Million to Help Consumers Better Manage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Seven Projects That Will Advance Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Research Selected by DOE for Further Development Phase II Smart Grid Data...

  20. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Knowledge Advancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Kalinich, Donald A.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the knowledge advancements from the uncertainty analysis for the State-of- the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout accident scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This work assessed key MELCOR and MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) modeling uncertainties in an integrated fashion to quantify the relative importance of each uncertain input on potential accident progression, radiological releases, and off-site consequences. This quantitative uncertainty analysis provides measures of the effects on consequences, of each of the selected uncertain parameters both individually and in interaction with other parameters. The results measure the model response (e.g., variance in the output) to uncertainty in the selected input. Investigation into the important uncertain parameters in turn yields insights into important phenomena for accident progression and off-site consequences. This uncertainty analysis confirmed the known importance of some parameters, such as failure rate of the Safety Relief Valve in accident progression modeling and the dry deposition velocity in off-site consequence modeling. The analysis also revealed some new insights, such as dependent effect of cesium chemical form for different accident progressions. (auth)

  1. Source-term experiment STEP-3 simulating a PWR severe station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    For a severe pressurized water reactor accident that leads to a loss of feedwater to the stream generators, such as might occur in a station blackout, fission product decay heating causes a water boil-off. Without effective decay heat removal, the fuel elements will be uncovered. Eventually, steam will oxidize the overheated cladding. The noble gases and volatile fission products, such as cesium and iodine, that are major contributors to the radiological source term will be released from the damaged fuel shortly after cladding failure. The accident environment when these volatile fission products escape was simulated in STEP-3 using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The primary objective was to examine the releases in samples collected as close to the test zone as possible. In this paper, an analysis of the temperatures and hydrogen generation is compared with the measurements. The analysis is needed to estimate releases and characterize conditions at the source for studies of fission product transport.

  2. Analysis of fission product revaporization in a BWR reactor cooling system during a station blackout accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.W.; Schmidt, E.; Cazzoli, E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary analysis of fission product revaporization in the Reactor Cooling System (RCS) after the vessel failure. The station blackout transient for BWR Mark I Power Plant is considered. The TRAPMELT3 models of evaporization, chemisorption, and the decay heating of RCS structures and gases are adopted in the analysis. The RCS flow models based on the density-difference between the RCS and containment pedestal region are developed to estimate the RCS outflow which carries the revaporized fission product to the containment. A computer code called REVAP is developed for the analysis. The REVAP is incorporated with the MARCH, TRAPMELT3 and NAUA codes of the Source Term Code Pack Package (STCP). The NAUA code is used to estimate the impact of revaporization on environmental release. The results show that the thermal-hydraulic conditions between the RCS and the pedestal region are important factors determining the magnitude of revaporization and subsequent release of the volatile fission product. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Evaluation of EBR-II driver-fuel elements following an unprotected station blackout accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.K.; Bottcher, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    One of the current design objectives for a liquid metal reactor (LMR) is the inherent shutdown-cooling capability of the reactor, such that the reactor itself can safely reduce power following a total loss of pump power without activating the reactor shutdown system (RSS). Following a loss-of-flow (LOF) accident and a failure of RSS, in EBR-II, reactor core damage and plant restartability is of considerable interest. In the LOF event, high temperature in the reactor causes negative reactivity feedback that reduces reactor power. After an accident, reactor fuel performance is one of the factors used to assess the restartability of the plant. A thermal-hydraulic-neutronic analysis was performed to determine the response of the plant and the temperature of individual subassemblies. These temperatures were then used to assess the damage to driver fuel elements caused by the station blackout accident. The maximum depth of cladding wastage from molten eutectic at temperatures >715/sup 0/C was found to be 0.0053 mm for the hottest subassembly; this value is considerably less than the 0.28 mm cladding thickness. 12 refs.

  4. MELCOR Analysis of Steam Generator Tube Creep Rupture in Station Blackout Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Y.; Vierow, K. [Purdue University (United States)

    2005-12-15

    A pressurized water reactor steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) is of concern because it represents a bypass of the containment for radioactive materials to the environment. In a station blackout accident, tube integrity could be threatened by creep rupture, particularly if cracks are present in the tube walls. Methods are developed herein to improve assessment capabilities for SGTR by using the severe-accident code MELCOR. Best-estimate assumptions based on recent research and computational fluid dynamics calculations are applied in the MELCOR analysis to simulate two-dimensional natural circulation and to determine the relative creep-rupture timing in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components. A new method is developed to estimate the steam generator (SG) hottest tube wall temperature and the tube critical crack size for the SG tubes to fail first. The critical crack size for SG tubes to fail first is estimated to be 20% of the wall thickness larger than by a previous analysis. Sensitivity studies show that the failure sequence would change if some assumptions are modified. In particular, the uncertainty in the countercurrent flow limit model could reverse the failure sequence of the SG tubes and surge line.

  5. Planning for the Next Blackout: Optimizing the Use of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glickman, Joan A.; Herrera, Shawn; Kline, Keith F.; Warwick, William M.

    2004-12-01

    Given recent blackouts and concerns of terrorist attacks, some public and private organizations are taking steps to produce their own heating, cooling, and power in the event of future, potentially prolonged, outages. For example, military installations, such as Fort Bragg in North Carolina, and the Marine Task Force Training Command in Twentynine Palms, California, turned to combined heat and power and other distributed energy technologies to reduce costs and simultaneously manage their energy and reliability needs. While these individual efforts can help ensure reliability for these facilities, public policies continue to discourage most individual public and private entities from making such investments. As a result, communities across the country are not adequately prepared to protect human health and ensure safety in the event of a prolonged emergency. Significant cost savings and social benefits can accrue if parties interested in emergency preparedness, energy efficiency, and environmentally preferred technologies, come together to identify and implement win-win solutions. This paper offers recommendations to help federal, state, and local governments, along with utilities, jointly plan and invest in cleaner distributed energy technologies to address growing reliability needs as well as environmental and emergency preparedness concerns.

  6. Analysis of Kuosheng Station Blackout Accident Using MELCOR 1.8.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.-J.; Chien, C.-S.; Wang, T.-C.; Chiang, K.-S

    2000-11-15

    The MELCOR code, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a fully integrated, relatively fast-running code that models the progression of severe accidents in commercial light water nuclear power plants (NPPs).A specific station blackout (SBO) accident for Kuosheng (BWR-6) NPP is simulated using the MELCOR 1.8.4 code. The MELCOR input deck for Kuosheng NPP is established based on Kuosheng NPP design data and the MELCOR users' guides. The initial steady-state conditions are generated with a developed self-initialization algorithm. The main severe accident phenomena and the fission product release fractions associated with the SBO accident were simulated. The predicted results are plausible and as expected in light of current understanding of severe accident phenomena. The uncertainty of this analysis is briefly discussed. The important features of the MELCOR 1.8.4 are described. The estimated results provide useful information for the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of Kuosheng NPP. This tool will be applied to the PRA, the severe accident analysis, and the severe accident management study of Kuosheng NPP in the near future.

  7. Analysis of core uncovery time in Kuosheng station blackout transient with MELCOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.J.; Chien, C.S. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Lungtan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-02-01

    The MELCOR code, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories, is capable of simulating severe accident phenomena of nuclear power plants. Core uncovery time is an important parameter in the probabilistic risk assessment. However, many MELCOR users do not generate the initial conditions in a station blackout (SBO) transient analysis. Thus, achieving reliable core uncovery time is difficult. The core uncovery time for the Kuosheng nuclear power plant during an SBO transient is analyzed. First, full-power steady-state conditions are generated with the application of a developed self-initialization algorithm. Then the response of the SBO transient up to core uncovery is simulated. The effects of key parameters including the initialization process and the reactor feed pump (RFP) coastdown time on the core uncovery time are analyzed. The initialization process is the most important parameter that affects the core uncovery time. Because SBO transient analysis, the correct initial conditions must be generated to achieve a reliable core uncovery time. The core uncovery time is also sensitive to the RFP coastdown time. A correct time constant is required.

  8. The equal load-sharing model of cascade failures in power grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scala, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Electric power-systems are one of the most important critical infrastructures. In recent years, they have been exposed to extreme stress due to the increasing demand, the introduction of distributed renewable energy sources, and the development of extensive interconnections. We investigate the phenomenon of abrupt breakdown of an electric power-system under two scenarios: load growth (mimicking the ever-increasing customer demand) and power fluctuations (mimicking the effects of renewable sources). Our results indicate that increasing the system size causes breakdowns to become more abrupt; in fact, mapping the system to a solvable statistical-physics model indicates the occurrence of a first order transition in the large size limit. Such an enhancement for the systemic risk failures (black-outs) with increasing network size is an effect that should be considered in the current projects aiming to integrate national power-grids into "super-grids".

  9. Energy storage for the electricity grid : benefits and market potential assessment guide : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M.; Corey, Garth P.

    2010-02-01

    This guide describes a high-level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric-utility-related applications. The overarching theme addressed is the concept of combining applications/benefits into attractive value propositions that include use of energy storage, possibly including distributed and/or modular systems. Other topics addressed include: high-level estimates of application-specific lifecycle benefit (10 years) in $/kW and maximum market potential (10 years) in MW. Combined, these criteria indicate the economic potential (in $Millions) for a given energy storage application/benefit. The benefits and value propositions characterized provide an important indication of storage system cost targets for system and subsystem developers, vendors, and prospective users. Maximum market potential estimates provide developers, vendors, and energy policymakers with an indication of the upper bound of the potential demand for storage. The combination of the value of an individual benefit (in $/kW) and the corresponding maximum market potential estimate (in MW) indicates the possible impact that storage could have on the U.S. economy. The intended audience for this document includes persons or organizations needing a framework for making first-cut or high-level estimates of benefits for a specific storage project and/or those seeking a high-level estimate of viable price points and/or maximum market potential for their products. Thus, the intended audience includes: electric utility planners, electricity end users, non-utility electric energy and electric services providers, electric utility regulators and policymakers, intermittent renewables advocates and developers, Smart Grid advocates and developers, storage technology and project developers, and energy storage advocates.

  10. Quantifiably secure power grid operation, management, and evolution : a study of uncertainties affecting the grid integration of renewables.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Genetha Anne; Watson, Jean-Paul; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Gramacy, Robert B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes findings and results of the Quantifiably Secure Power Grid Operation, Management, and Evolution LDRD. The focus of the LDRD was to develop decisionsupport technologies to enable rational and quantifiable risk management for two key grid operational timescales: scheduling (day-ahead) and planning (month-to-year-ahead). Risk or resiliency metrics are foundational in this effort. The 2003 Northeast Blackout investigative report stressed the criticality of enforceable metrics for system resiliency - the grid's ability to satisfy demands subject to perturbation. However, we neither have well-defined risk metrics for addressing the pervasive uncertainties in a renewable energy era, nor decision-support tools for their enforcement, which severely impacts efforts to rationally improve grid security. For day-ahead unit commitment, decision-support tools must account for topological security constraints, loss-of-load (economic) costs, and supply and demand variability - especially given high renewables penetration. For long-term planning, transmission and generation expansion must ensure realized demand is satisfied for various projected technological, climate, and growth scenarios. The decision-support tools investigated in this project paid particular attention to tailoriented risk metrics for explicitly addressing high-consequence events. Historically, decisionsupport tools for the grid consider expected cost minimization, largely ignoring risk and instead penalizing loss-of-load through artificial parameters. The technical focus of this work was the development of scalable solvers for enforcing risk metrics. Advanced stochastic programming solvers were developed to address generation and transmission expansion and unit commitment, minimizing cost subject to pre-specified risk thresholds. Particular attention was paid to renewables where security critically depends on production and demand prediction accuracy. To address this concern, powerful filtering techniques for spatio-temporal measurement assimilation were used to develop short-term predictive stochastic models. To achieve uncertaintytolerant solutions, very large numbers of scenarios must be simultaneously considered. One focus of this work was investigating ways of reasonably reducing this number.

  11. SmartGrid: Quarterly Data Summaries from the Data Hub and SmartGrid Project Information (from OpenEI and SmartGrid.gov)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Both OpenEI and SmartGrid.gov are DOE portals to a wealth of information about the federal initiatives that support the development of the technologies, policies and projects transforming the electric power industry. Projects funded through the U.S. Recovery Act are organized by type and pinned to an interactive map at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Smart_Grid. Each project title links to more detailed information. The Quarterly Data Summaries from the Data Hub at SmartGrid.gov are also available on OpenEI at http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/928. In addition, the SmartGrid Information Center contains documents and reports that can be searched or browsed. Smart Grid Resources introduces international SmartGrid programs and sites, while OpenEI encourages users to add SmartGrid information to the repository.

  12. DOE/BTO Summary Wrap Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * EERE And Grid Integration: Role Of Transaction-based Controls - Purpose, Context & Motivation for Transaction-Based Reference Platform (DOE, PNNL) * Transaction-based Controls:...

  13. Investigations on optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident in a VVER-1000 pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Kliem, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The reactor safety issues are of primary importance for preserving the health of the population and ensuring no release of radioactivity and fission products into the environment. A part of the nuclear research focuses on improvement of the safety of existing nuclear power plants. Studies, research and efforts are a continuing process at improving the safety and reliability of existing and newly developed nuclear power plants at prevention of a core melt accident. Station blackout (loss of AC power supply) is one of the dominant accidents taken into consideration at performing accident analysis. In case of multiple failures of safety systems it leads to a severe accident. To prevent an accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences, accident management measures must be performed. The present paper outlines possibilities for application and optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident. Assessed is the behaviour of the nuclear power plant during a station blackout accident without accident management measures and with application of primary/secondary side oriented accident management measures. Discussed are the possibilities for operators ' intervention and the influence of the performed accident management measures on the course of the accident. Special attention has been paid to the effectiveness of the passive feeding and physical phenomena having an influence on the system behaviour. The performed simulations show that the effectiveness of the secondary side feeding procedure can be limited due to an early evaporation or flashing effects in the feed water system. The analyzed cases show that the effectiveness of the accident management measures strongly depends on the initiation criteria applied for depressurization of the reactor coolant system. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen Mitigation Strategy of the APR1400 Nuclear Power Plant for a Hypothetical Station Blackout Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Sang-Baik; Kim, Hee-Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    In order to analyze the hydrogen distribution during a hypothetical station blackout accident in the Korean next-generation Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400) containment, the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW was used. The source of the hydrogen and steam for the GASFLOW analysis was obtained from a MAAP calculation. The discharged water, steam, and hydrogen from the pressurizer are released into the water of the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST). Most of the discharged steam is condensed in the IRWST water because of its subcooling, and dry hydrogen is released into the free volume of the IRWST; finally, it goes out to the annular compartment above the IRWST through the vent holes. From the GASFLOW analysis, it was found that the gas mixture in the IRWST becomes quickly nonflammable by oxygen starvation but the hydrogen is accumulated in the annular compartment because of the narrow ventilation gap between the operating deck and containment wall when the igniters installed in the IRWST are not operated. When the igniters installed in the APR1400 were turned on, a short period of burning occurred in the IRWST, and then the flame was extinguished by the oxygen starvation in the IRWST. The unburned hydrogen was released into the annular compartment and went up to the dome because no igniters are installed around the annular compartment in the base design of the APR1400. From this result, it could be concluded that the control of the hydrogen concentration is difficult for the base design. In this study design modifications are proposed and evaluated with GASFLOW in view of the hydrogen mitigation strategy.

  15. 2340 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION FORENSICS AND SECURITY, VOL. 9, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2014 Resilience Analysis of Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Haibo

    also brings risks of catastrophic consequences, e.g., large-scale blackouts. In the current literature can cause large blackout size. Previously, these combinations are ignored by the synchronous attack. NOMENCLATURE M seq Blackout Size of M-node Sequential Attack. M syn Blackout Size of M-node Synchronous Attack

  16. Source terms released into the environment for a station blackout severe accident at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This study calculates source terms released into the environment at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station after containment failure during a postulated low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR, version 1.8.1, was used in these calculations. Source terms were calculated for three different containment failure modes. The largest environmental releases occur for early containment failure at the drywell liner in contact with the cavity by liner melt-through. This containment failure mode is very likely to occur when the cavity is dry during this postulated severe accident sequence.

  17. Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges More Documents & Publications SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York New York Independent System...

  18. Final Report for DOE Project: Portal Web Services: Support of DOE SciDAC Collaboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Thomas, PI; Geoffrey Fox, Co-PI; D. Gannon; M. Pierce; R. Moore; D Schissel; J. Boisseau

    2007-10-01

    Grid portals provide the scientific community with familiar and simplified interfaces to the Grid and Grid services, and it is important to deploy grid portals onto the SciDAC grids and collaboratories. The goal of this project is the research, development and deployment of interoperable portal and web services that can be used on SciDAC National Collaboratory grids. This project has four primary task areas: development of portal systems; management of data collections; DOE science application integration; and development of web and grid services in support of the above activities.

  19. Parallel grid population

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago

    2015-07-28

    Parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. One example embodiment is a method for parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. The method includes a first act of dividing a grid into n distinct grid portions, where n is the number of processors available for populating the grid. The method also includes acts of dividing a plurality of objects into n distinct sets of objects, assigning a distinct set of objects to each processor such that each processor determines by which distinct grid portion(s) each object in its distinct set of objects is at least partially bounded, and assigning a distinct grid portion to each processor such that each processor populates its distinct grid portion with any objects that were previously determined to be at least partially bounded by its distinct grid portion.

  20. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    Reliability for Improved Grid Security,” IEEE TransmissionNext Generation Power Grid Security, Syngress, 2010. [12] A.Grids,” 16th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security,

  1. Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    customers, and improve overall service reliability to reduce customer losses from power disruptions. This report presents findings on smart grid improvements in outage...

  2. Statistical Analysis of Abnormal Electric Power Grid Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferryman, Thomas A.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2010-10-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a technique to analyze Phasor Measurement Unit data to identify typical patterns, atypical events and precursors to a blackout or other undesirable event. The approach combines a data-driven multivariate analysis with an engineering-model approach. The method identifies atypical events, provides a plane English description of the event, and the capability to use drill-down graphics for detailed investigations. The tool can be applied to the entire grid, individual organizations (e.g. TVA, BPA), or specific substations (e.g., TVA_CUMB). The tool is envisioned for (1) event investigations, (2) overnight processing to generate a Morning Report that characterizes the previous days activity with respect to previous activity over the previous 10-30 days, and (3) potentially near-real-time operation to support the grid operators. This paper presents the current status of the tool and illustrations of its application to real world PMU data collected in three 10-day periods in 2007.

  3. Update to the 2008 EAC Report: "Smart Grid: Enabler of the New...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 Report to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap DOE Responses to EAC Work Products - September 2015...

  4. Exploiting the Computational Grid Lecture 1 Globus and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    software used. · · The Globus toolkit consists of four key components: · Security ­ handled by Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI) · Resource Management ­ Grid Resource Allocation Manager (GRAM) · Information Services ­ Grid Resource Information Protocol (GRIP) · Data Management ­ Grid FTP · Security is essential

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout caused by external flooding using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impacts of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper focuses on the impacts of power uprate on the safety margin of a boiling water reactor for a flooding induced station black-out event. Analysis is performed by using a combination of thermal-hydraulic codes and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. RAVEN. We employed both classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Results obtained give a detailed investigation of the issues associated with a plant power uprate including the effects of station black-out accident scenarios. We were able to quantify how the timing of specific events was impacted by a higher nominal reactor core power. Such safety insights can provide useful information to the decision makers to perform risk informed margins management.

  6. Performance of "WAMS East 1" in Providing Dynamic Information for the North East Blackout of August 14, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, John F.; Bhatt, Navin B.; Shah, Kirit; Kolluri, Sharma

    2004-12-31

    The blackout that impacted the U.S. and Canada on August 14, 2003, was notable for its extent, complexity, and impact. It triggered a massive review of operating records to determine what happened, why it happened, and how to avoid it in future operations. Much of this work was done at NERC level, through the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force. Additional background information concerning the event was gathered together by a group of utilities that, collectively, have been developing a wide area measurement system (WAMS) for the eastern interconnection. Like its counterpart in the western interconnection, "WAMS East" has a primary backbone of synchronized phasor measurements that are continuously recorded at central locations. Operational data have been critical for understanding and responding to the August 14 Blackout. Records collected on WAMS East demonstrate the contributions that well synchronized data offer in such efforts, and the value of strategically located continuous recording systems to facilitate their integration. This paper examines overall performance of the WAMS East backbone, with a brief assessment of the technology involved.

  7. STEAM LINE BREAK AND STATION BLACKOUT TRANSIENTS FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANT HEXAGONAL TIGHT LATTICE BWR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHATGI,U.S.; JO,J.; CHUNG,B.D.; TAKAHASHI,H.

    2002-06-09

    Safety analyses of a proliferation resistant, economically competitive, high conversion, boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core which therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum, and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of Light Water Reactors. The tight lattice core has a very narrow flow channels with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular BWR core and, thus, presents a special challenge to core cooling, because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator to fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios. In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core has been placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected with Isolation Condenser System (ICs). The vessel is placed in containment with Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to SBWR; ICs and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump was placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney, since the buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel as the tight lattice configuration resulted in much larger friction in the core than the SBWR. The constitutive relationships for RELAP5 were assessed for narrow channels, and as a result the heat transfer package was modified. The modified RELAP5 was used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events for a tight pitch lattice core: the Station Blackout and the Main Steam Line Break events. The results of the analyses indicate that the HCBWR system will be safely brought to the shutdown condition for these transients.

  8. Comparing Simulation Results with Traditional PRA Model on a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhegang Ma; Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    A previous study used RELAP and RAVEN to conduct a boiling water reactor station black-out (SBO) case study in a simulation based environment to show the capabilities of the risk-informed safety margin characterization methodology. This report compares the RELAP/RAVEN simulation results with traditional PRA model results. The RELAP/RAVEN simulation run results were reviewed for their input parameters and output results. The input parameters for each simulation run include various timing information such as diesel generator or offsite power recovery time, Safety Relief Valve stuck open time, High Pressure Core Injection or Reactor Core Isolation Cooling fail to run time, extended core cooling operation time, depressurization delay time, and firewater injection time. The output results include the maximum fuel clad temperature, the outcome, and the simulation end time. A traditional SBO PRA model in this report contains four event trees that are linked together with the transferring feature in SAPHIRE software. Unlike the usual Level 1 PRA quantification process in which only core damage sequences are quantified, this report quantifies all SBO sequences, whether they are core damage sequences or success (i.e., non core damage) sequences, in order to provide a full comparison with the simulation results. Three different approaches were used to solve event tree top events and quantify the SBO sequences: “W” process flag, default process flag without proper adjustment, and default process flag with adjustment to account for the success branch probabilities. Without post-processing, the first two approaches yield incorrect results with a total conditional probability greater than 1.0. The last approach accounts for the success branch probabilities and provides correct conditional sequence probabilities that are to be used for comparison. To better compare the results from the PRA model and the simulation runs, a simplified SBO event tree was developed with only four top events and eighteen SBO sequences (versus fifty-four SBO sequences in the original SBO model). The estimated SBO sequence conditional probabilities from the original SBO model were integrated to the corresponding sequences in the simplified SBO event tree. These results were then compared with the simulation run results.

  9. Steam Line Break and Station Blackout Transients for Proliferation Resistant Hexagonal Tight Lattice BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upendra Rohatgi; Jae Jo; Bub Dong Chung; Hiroshi Takahashi [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Energy Sciences and Technology Department, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Downar, T.J. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN 47906-1290 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Safety analyses of a proliferation resistant, economically competitive, high conversion, boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core which therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum, and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of Light Water Reactors. A tight lattice BWR core has very narrow flow channels with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular BWR core. The tight lattice core presented a special challenge to core cooling, because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator to fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios. In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core has been placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected with an Isolation Cooling System (ICS). The vessel is placed in a containment with a Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and a Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to the SBWR; the ICS and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump was placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney. The buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel since the tight lattice configuration resulted in much larger friction in the core than the SBWR. A modified RELAP5 Code was used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events for a tight pitch lattice core: the Station Blackout and the Main Steam Line Break events. The constitutive relationships for RELAP5 were compared with the correlations and the data available for narrow channels, and the heat transfer package was modified for narrow channel application. The results of the analyses indicate that the HCBWR system will be safely shutdown for these transients. (authors)

  10. ABUSE: PKI for Real-World Email Trust Chris Masone, Sean Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Sean W.

    calls made between grid management personnel during the August 2003 North American blackout Domain The electrical power grid (particularly the North American blackout of August 2003) provides

  11. Method of grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  12. The soft grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kardasis, Ari (Ari David)

    2011-01-01

    The grid in architecture is a systematic organization of space. The means that architects use to organize space are, almost by definition, rigid and totalizing. The Cartesian grid, which will serve as the antagonist of the ...

  13. Vehicle to Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willett Kempton; Meryl Gardner; Michael Hidrue; Fouad Kamilev; Sachin Kamboj; Jon Lilley; Rodney McGee; George Parsons; Nat Pearre; Keith Trnka

    2010-12-31

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of a two-year DOE-funded project on Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIV) with vehicle to grid power (V2G). The project included several research and development components: an analysis of US driving patterns; an analysis of the market for EVs and V2G-capable EVs; development and testing of GIV components (in-car and in-EVSE); interconnect law and policy; and development and filing of patents. In addition, development activities included GIV manufacturing and licensing of technologies developed under this grant. Also, five vehicles were built and deployed, four for the fleet of the State of Delaware, plus one for the University of Delaware fleet.

  14. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    Grids”, IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, vol. 2, no. 2,Malicious Data Attacks on Smart Grid State Estimation:Attack and Detection in Smart Grid,” to appear in IEEE

  15. Chaninik Wind Group Wind Heat Smart Grids Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiners, Dennis

    2013-06-29

    Final report summarizes technology used, system design and outcomes for US DoE Tribal Energy Program award to deploy Wind Heat Smart Grids in the Chaninik Wind Group communities in southwest Alaska.

  16. Cyber Security & Smart Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, J.

    2011-01-01

    and interoperability ESL-KT-11-11-23 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Cyber Vulnerabilities In The Legacy Power Grid ? SCADA Security ? Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are used extensively to control and monitor the national... & Smart Grid Jonathan Shapiro Texas Institute The Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference Cyber Security & Smart Grid ESL-KT-11-11-23 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Cyber Security and The Smart Grid Networks...

  17. Establishing Public Policy as a Primary Cause of Engineering Failure: Did Market Deregulation Lead to the North American `Blackout', August 14th 2003?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    some 3,700 utility organizations providing more than 320,000 kilometers of transmission lines and Ontario, Canada, experienced an electric power blackout on 14th August 2003. The outage affected an area to their power supplies. Losses have been estimated between $5-10 billion. It is, therefore, one of the most wide

  18. Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, January 3-6, 2001, Maui, Hawaii. 2001 IEEE Modeling Blackout Dynamics in Power Transmission Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, David

    in electric power transmission systems is implemented and studied in simple networks with a regular structure Electric power transmission systems are complex engineering systems with many interacting components failure, weather conditions, vandalism, and human error [1]. The dominant causes triggering blackouts

  19. Metagenomics Smart power grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metagenomics Smart power grid The new weapons workhorse Laser on Mars LOS ALAMOS SCIENCE'll read about a unique collaboration to create a "smart" power grid to accommodate an increasing, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING 2 8 14 Dynamic Vision DARHT FULFILLS ITS DESTINY Solar Smart Grid in the Atomic

  20. A Guidebook on Grid Interconnection and Islanded Operation of Mini-Grid Power Systems Up to 200 kW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greacen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    electrification, part 9-2: Microgrids,” IEC/TS 62257-9-2the role of mini-grids/microgrids is fundamentally differentspecifications addresses microgrids, though it does not

  1. Progress in Grid Scale Flow Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress in Grid Scale Flow Batteries IMRE GYUK, PROGRAM MANAGER ENERGY STORAGE RESEARCH, DOE Flow 2011Year #12;Flow Battery Research at PNNL and Sandia #12; Iron-containing "MetIL" Redox Couples for Flow Batteries, Sandia Sandia has developed

  2. Smart Grid Cybersecurity: Job Performance Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, David

    2012-08-01

    This is the project report to DOE OE-30 for the completion of Phase 1 of a 3 phase report. This report outlines the work done to develop a smart grid cybersecurity certification. This work is being done with the subcontractor NBISE.

  3. HEADLINE: DOE Pursues Automation in West Virginia Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a Smart Grid. So, what exactly does this Smart Grid distribution automation system look like? As always, interoperability is a factor. First, it's vital for a utility to...

  4. A Scaled Random Walk Solver for Fast Power Grid Analysis Baktash Boghrati, Sachin Sapatnekar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    A Scaled Random Walk Solver for Fast Power Grid Analysis Baktash Boghrati, Sachin Sapatnekar-chip power grids requires the solution of large systems of linear algebraic equations with specific prop. These methods build a probabilistic network that corresponds to the power grid. However, this construction does

  5. Optimization Strategies for the Vulnerability Analysis of the Electric Power Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinar, A.; Meza, J.; Donde, V.; Lesieutre, B.

    2007-11-13

    Identifying small groups of lines, whose removal would cause a severe blackout, is critical for the secure operation of the electric power grid. We show how power grid vulnerability analysis can be studied as a mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) problem. Our analysis reveals a special structure in the formulation that can be exploited to avoid nonlinearity and approximate the original problem as a pure combinatorial problem. The key new observation behind our analysis is the correspondence between the Jacobian matrix (a representation of the feasibility boundary of the equations that describe the flow of power in the network) and the Laplacian matrix in spectral graph theory (a representation of the graph of the power grid). The reduced combinatorial problem is known as the network inhibition problem, for which we present a mixed integer linear programming formulation. Our experiments on benchmark power grids show that the reduced combinatorial model provides an accurate approximation, to enable vulnerability analyses of real-sized problems with more than 10,000 power lines.

  6. Optimization strategies for the vulnerability analysis of the electric power grid.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meza, Juan C.; Pinar, Ali; Lesieutre, Bernard; Donde, Vaibhav

    2009-03-01

    Identifying small groups of lines, whose removal would cause a severe blackout, is critical for the secure operation of the electric power grid. We show how power grid vulnerability analysis can be studied as a mixed integer nonlinear programming (minlp) problem. Our analysis reveals a special structure in the formulation that can be exploited to avoid nonlinearity and approximate the original problem as a pure combinatorial problem. The key new observation behind our analysis is the correspondence between the Jacobian matrix (a representation of the feasibility boundary of the equations that describe the flow of power in the network) and the Laplacian matrix in spectral graph theory (a representation of the graph of the power grid). The reduced combinatorial problem is known as the network inhibition problem, for which we present a mixed integer linear programming formulation. Our experiments on benchmark power grids show that the reduced combinatorial model provides an accurate approximation, to enable vulnerability analyses of real-sized problems with more than 10,000 power lines.

  7. smart grid publications | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named|Got Solitons?scriptEnv - loadingITM Benchmark

  8. smart grid | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named|Got Solitons?scriptEnv - loadingITM Benchmarksmart

  9. smart grid | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m mDiurnal Variations of9

  10. Understanding The Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of what the Smart Grid is and what is being done to define and implement it. The electric industry is preparing to undergo a transition from a centralized, producer-controlled network to a decentralized, user-interactive one. Not only will the technology involved in the electric grid change, but the entire business model of the industry will change too. A major objective of the report is to identify the changes that the Smart Grid will bring about so that industry participants can be prepared to face them. A concise overview of the development of the Smart Grid is provided. It presents an understanding of what the Smart Grid is, what new business opportunities or risks might come about due to its introduction, and what activities are already taking place regarding defining or implementing the Smart Grid. This report will be of interest to the utility industry, energy service providers, aggregators, and regulators. It will also be of interest to home/building automation vendors, information technology vendors, academics, consultants, and analysts. The scope of the report includes an overview of the Smart Grid which identifies the main components of the Smart Grid, describes its characteristics, and describes how the Smart Grid differs from the current electric grid. The overview also identifies the key concepts involved in the transition to the Smart Grid and explains why a Smart Grid is needed by identifying the deficiencies of the current grid and the need for new investment. The report also looks at the impact of the Smart Grid, identifying other industries which have gone through a similar transition, identifying the overall benefits of the Smart Grid, and discussing the impact of the Smart Grid on industry participants. Furthermore, the report looks at current activities to implement the Smart Grid including utility projects, industry collaborations, and government initiatives. Finally, the report takes a look at key technology providers involved in the Smart Grid and provides profiles on them including contact information, company overviews, technology reviews, and key Smart Grid activities.

  11. Real Time Simulation of Power Grid Disruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinthavali, Supriya; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Fernandez, Steven J; Groer, Christopher S; Nutaro, James J; Olama, Mohammed M; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Spafford, Kyle L; Vacaliuc, Bogdan

    2012-11-01

    DOE-OE and DOE-SC workshops (Reference 1-3) identified the key power grid problem that requires insight addressable by the next generation of exascale computing is coupling of real-time data streams (1-2 TB per hour) as the streams are ingested to dynamic models. These models would then identify predicted disruptions in time (2-4 seconds) to trigger the smart grid s self healing functions. This project attempted to establish the feasibility of this approach and defined the scientific issues, and demonstrated example solutions to important smart grid simulation problems. These objectives were accomplished by 1) using the existing frequency recorders on the national grid to establish a representative and scalable real-time data stream; 2) invoking ORNL signature identification algorithms; 3) modeling dynamically a representative region of the Eastern interconnect using an institutional cluster, measuring the scalability and computational benchmarks for a national capability; and 4) constructing a prototype simulation for the system s concept of smart grid deployment. The delivered ORNL enduring capability included: 1) data processing and simulation metrics to design a national capability justifying exascale applications; 2) Software and intellectual property built around the example solutions; 3) demonstrated dynamic models to design few second self-healing.

  12. Smart Grid: Transforming the Electric System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.

    2010-04-13

    This paper introduces smart grid concepts, summarizes the status of current smart grid related efforts, and explains smart grid priorities.

  13. Grid Simulator for Power Quality Assessment of Micro-Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    1 Grid Simulator for Power Quality Assessment of Micro-Grids Joaqu´in Eloy-Garc´iaa , Juan C of the simulator. Finally, a case study is presented by testing a micro-grid. Index Terms Grid Simulator, Power for power quality assessment of micro-grids". Published in IET Power Electronics. doi: 10.1049/iet-pel.2012

  14. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Advisory Committee (thru 2020) Smart Grid Task Force (thru 2020) Smart Grid Interoperability Framework (NIST) Smart Grid System Report Status and prospects of development...

  15. Data security on the national fusion grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    of any computational grid is security. Effective sharing oflike ITER. Keywords: security, FusionGrid, grid computing 1.A Security Architecture for Computational Grids,” Proc. 5th

  16. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    of any computational grid is security. Effective sharing oflike ITER. Keywords: security, FusionGrid, grid computing 1.A Security Architecture for Computational Grids,” Proc. 5th

  17. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  18. Grid Conected Functionality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PM: Dane Christensen, dane.christensen@nrel.gov National Renewable Energy Laboratory Grid Connected Functionality 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary...

  19. Panel 1, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen for Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    22011 eere.energy.gov DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen for Energy Storage Workshop on Hydrogen Energy Storage Grid and Transportation Services Sacramento, California Dr....

  20. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  1. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Development of the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of the Next Generation Grid Operating System (Energy Management System) - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Development of the Next...

  2. Re: DOE Request for Information - Implementing the National Broadband...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    or "DOE") regarding the current and future communications requirements of utilities, including, but not limited to, the requirements of the Smart Grid, in an effort to...

  3. DOE RFI 2010-11129 NBP RFI: Communications Requirements Titled...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy" DOE RFI 2010-11129 NBP RFI: Communications...

  4. DOE Building Technologies Office seeks science and engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Building Technologies Office seeks science and engineering graduate students for 2016-2017 pilot program to research building to grid integration Deadline for applying is Nov....

  5. DOE Request for Information - Implementing the National Broadband...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information - Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy DOE Request for Information -...

  6. Reply comments to DOE Request for Information-Implementing the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Information-Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Customers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy Reply comments to DOE Request for...

  7. Containment failure time and mode for a low-pressure short-term station blackout in a BWR-4 with Mark-I containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.; Greene, S.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates containment failure time and mode for a low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident sequence in a boiling water reactor (BWR-4) with a Mark-I containment. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR, version 1.8.1, was used in these calculations. Other results using the MELCOR/CORBH package and the BWRSAR and CONTAIN codes are also presented and compared to the MELCOR results. The plant analyzed is the Peach Bottom atomic station, a BWR-4 with a Mark-I containment. The automatic depressurization system was used to depressurize the vessel in accordance with the Emergency Procedure Guidelines. Two different variations of the station blackout were studied: one with a dry cavity and the other with a flooded cavity. For the flooded cavity, it is assumed that a control rod drive (CRD) pump becomes operational after vessel failure, and it is used to pump water into the cavity.

  8. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, vol. 2, no. 2, June [21] O.Malicious Data Attacks on Smart Grid State Estimation:Attack and Detection in Smart Grid,” to appear in IEEE

  9. Grid Logging: Best Practices Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tierney, Brian L

    2008-01-01

    file” file=/etc/grid-security/certificates/4a6cd8b1.0 guid=reading” file=/etc/grid-security/grid-mapfile guid=F7D64975-

  10. Metagenomics Smart power grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metagenomics Smart power grid The new weapons workhorse Laser on Mars LOS ALAMOS SCIENCE'll read about a unique collaboration to create a "smart" power grid to accommodate an increasing, and plans to modify an enzyme to grow renewable biofuels and mitigate carbon emissions from power plants

  11. SGIP Smart Grid Interoperabilty Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SGIP Smart Grid Interoperability Panel Building2Grid Integration Dave Hardin David Holmberg The SGIP was explicitly established to support NIST in fulfilling its...

  12. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of all 16 machines damped quickly ­ improved frequency performance » AGC ensures tie line power flows on the Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) national electric grid research facility, the FPGI will advance the science and develop the technologies

  13. The spectral element method (SEM) on variable-resolution grids: evaluating grid sensitivity and resolution-aware numerical viscosity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guba, O.; Taylor, M. A.; Ullrich, P. A.; Overfelt, J. R.; Levy, M. N.

    2014-11-27

    We evaluate the performance of the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) spectral element method on variable-resolution grids using the shallow-water equations in spherical geometry. We configure the method as it is used in CAM, with dissipation of grid scale variance, implemented using hyperviscosity. Hyperviscosity is highly scale selective and grid independent, but does require a resolution-dependent coefficient. For the spectral element method with variable-resolution grids and highly distorted elements, we obtain the best results if we introduce a tensor-based hyperviscosity with tensor coefficients tied to the eigenvalues of the local element metric tensor. The tensor hyperviscosity is constructed so that, formore »regions of uniform resolution, it matches the traditional constant-coefficient hyperviscosity. With the tensor hyperviscosity, the large-scale solution is almost completely unaffected by the presence of grid refinement. This later point is important for climate applications in which long term climatological averages can be imprinted by stationary inhomogeneities in the truncation error. We also evaluate the robustness of the approach with respect to grid quality by considering unstructured conforming quadrilateral grids generated with a well-known grid-generating toolkit and grids generated by SQuadGen, a new open source alternative which produces lower valence nodes.« less

  14. The spectral element method on variable resolution grids: evaluating grid sensitivity and resolution-aware numerical viscosity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guba, O.; Taylor, M. A.; Ullrich, P. A.; Overfelt, J. R.; Levy, M. N.

    2014-06-25

    We evaluate the performance of the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) spectral element method on variable resolution grids using the shallow water equations in spherical geometry. We configure the method as it is used in CAM, with dissipation of grid scale variance implemented using hyperviscosity. Hyperviscosity is highly scale selective and grid independent, but does require a resolution dependent coefficient. For the spectral element method with variable resolution grids and highly distorted elements, we obtain the best results if we introduce a tensor-based hyperviscosity with tensor coefficients tied to the eigenvalues of the local element metric tensor. The tensor hyperviscosity ismore »constructed so that for regions of uniform resolution it matches the traditional constant coefficient hyperviscsosity. With the tensor hyperviscosity the large scale solution is almost completely unaffected by the presence of grid refinement. This later point is important for climate applications where long term climatological averages can be imprinted by stationary inhomogeneities in the truncation error. We also evaluate the robustness of the approach with respect to grid quality by considering unstructured conforming quadrilateral grids generated with a well-known grid-generating toolkit and grids generated by SQuadGen, a new open source alternative which produces lower valence nodes.« less

  15. Pilot evaluation of electricity-reliability and power-quality monitoring in California's Silicon Valley with the I-Grid(R) system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph; Divan, Deepak; Brumsickle, William

    2004-01-01

    Silicon Valley with the I-Grid ® System Prepared for Imre Gyuk Energy StorageSilicon Valley with the I-Grid System Acknowledgments The authors thank Imre Gyuk, DOE Energy Storage

  16. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM Power Networking,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM Power Networking, Equipment, and Technology (powerNET) Testbed OBJECTIVE A lot of interest in research, improvements, and testing surrounds the power grid to bear on the challenges of the power grid Therefore, a community resource is needed to enable needed

  17. Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Future Grid: The Environment Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems" Funded by the U

  18. MANGO – Modal Analysis for Grid Operation: A Method for Damping Improvement through Operating Point Adjustment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ning; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chen, Yousu; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Diao, Ruisheng; Fuller, Jason C.; Mittelstadt, William A.; Hauer, John F.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2010-10-18

    Small signal stability problems are one of the major threats to grid stability and reliability in the U.S. power grid. An undamped mode can cause large-amplitude oscillations and may result in system breakups and large-scale blackouts. There have been several incidents of system-wide oscillations. Of those incidents, the most notable is the August 10, 1996 western system breakup, a result of undamped system-wide oscillations. Significant efforts have been devoted to monitoring system oscillatory behaviors from measurements in the past 20 years. The deployment of phasor measurement units (PMU) provides high-precision, time-synchronized data needed for detecting oscillation modes. Measurement-based modal analysis, also known as ModeMeter, uses real-time phasor measurements to identify system oscillation modes and their damping. Low damping indicates potential system stability issues. Modal analysis has been demonstrated with phasor measurements to have the capability of estimating system modes from both oscillation signals and ambient data. With more and more phasor measurements available and ModeMeter techniques maturing, there is yet a need for methods to bring modal analysis from monitoring to actions. The methods should be able to associate low damping with grid operating conditions, so operators or automated operation schemes can respond when low damping is observed. The work presented in this report aims to develop such a method and establish a Modal Analysis for Grid Operation (MANGO) procedure to aid grid operation decision making to increase inter-area modal damping. The procedure can provide operation suggestions (such as increasing generation or decreasing load) for mitigating inter-area oscillations.

  19. GRIDS: Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    GRIDS Project: The 12 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s GRIDS Project, short for “Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage,” are developing storage technologies that can store renewable energy for use at any location on the grid at an investment cost less than $100 per kilowatt hour. Flexible, large-scale storage would create a stronger and more robust electric grid by enabling renewables to contribute to reliable power generation.

  20. DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by...

  1. Modern Grid Initiative Distribution Taxonomy Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Chen, Yousu; Chassin, David P.; Pratt, Robert G.; Engel, David W.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2008-11-01

    This is the final report for the development of a toxonomy of prototypical electrical distribution feeders. Two of the primary goals of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Modern Grid Initiative (MGI) are 'to accelerate the modernization of our nation's electricity grid' and to 'support demonstrations of systems of key technologies that can serve as the foundation for an integrated, modern power grid'. A key component to the realization of these goals is the effective implementation of new, as well as existing, 'smart grid technologies'. Possibly the largest barrier that has been identified in the deployment of smart grid technologies is the inability to evaluate how their deployment will affect the electricity infrastructure, both locally and on a regional scale. The inability to evaluate the impacts of these technologies is primarily due to the lack of detailed electrical distribution feeder information. While detailed distribution feeder information does reside with the various distribution utilities, there is no central repository of information that can be openly accessed. The role of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the MGI for FY08 was to collect distribution feeder models, in the SynerGEE{reg_sign} format, from electric utilities around the nation so that they could be analyzed to identify regional differences in feeder design and operation. Based on this analysis PNNL developed a taxonomy of 24 prototypical feeder models in the GridLAB-D simulations environment that contain the fundamental characteristics of non-urban core, radial distribution feeders from the various regions of the U.S. Weighting factors for these feeders are also presented so that they can be used to generate a representative sample for various regions within the United States. The final product presented in this report is a toolset that enables the evaluation of new smart grid technologies, with the ability to aggregate their effects to regional and national levels. The distribution feeder models presented in this report are based on actual utility models but do not contain any proprietary or system specific information. As a result, the models discussed in this report can be openly distributed to industry, academia, or any interested entity, in order to facilitate the ability to evaluate smart grid technologies.

  2. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  3. Developing Fully Coupled Dynamical Reactor Core Isolation System Models in RELAP-7 for Extended Station Black-Out Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-04-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup water to the reactor vessel for core cooling when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. It was one of the very few safety systems still available during the Fukushima Daiichi accidents after the tsunamis hit the plants and the system successfully delayed the core meltdown for a few days for unit 2 & 3. Therefore, detailed models for RCIC system components are indispensable to understand extended station black-out accidents (SBO) for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the new generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, major components to simulate the RCIC system have been developed. This paper describes the models for those components such as turbine, pump, and wet well. Selected individual component test simulations and a simplified SBO simulation up to but before core damage is presented. The successful implementation of the simplified RCIC and wet well models paves the way to further improve the models for safety analysis by including more detailed physical processes in the near future.

  4. Experimental and code simulation of a station blackout scenario for APR1400 with test facility ATLAS and MARS code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, X. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Choi, K. Y.; Park, H. S.; Cho, S.; Kang, K. H.; Choi, N. H. [Thermal-hydraulic Safety Research Div., KAERI Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Dae-deok Dae-ro 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    A SBO (station blackout) experiment named SBO-01 was performed at full-pressure IET (Integral Effect Test) facility ATLAS (Advanced Test Loop for Accident Simulation) which is scaled down from the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe). In this study, the transient of SBO-01 is discussed and is subdivided into three phases: the SG fluid loss phase, the RCS fluid loss phase, and the core coolant depletion and core heatup phase. In addition, the typical phenomena in SBO-01 test - SG dryout, natural circulation, core coolant boiling, the PRZ full, core heat-up - are identified. Furthermore, the SBO-01 test is reproduced by the MARS code calculation with the ATLAS model which represents the ATLAS test facility. The experimental and calculated transients are then compared and discussed. The comparison reveals there was malfunction of equipments: the SG leakage through SG MSSV and the measurement error of loop flow meter. As the ATLAS model is validated against the experimental results, it can be further employed to investigate the other possible SBO scenarios and to study the scaling distortions in the ATLAS. (authors)

  5. DOE Final Report for DE-FG02-01ER63198 Title: IMPROVING THE PROCESSES OF LAND-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION IN CCSM 2.0 AT HIGHER RESOLUTION AND BETTER SUB-GRID SCALING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Robert Dickinson

    2008-08-16

    Our CCPP project consists of the development and testing of a systematic sub-grid scaling framework for the CLM. It consists of four elements: i) a complex vegetation tiling representation; ii) an orographic tiling system; iii) a tiling system to describe a distribution of water table parameters intended to provide a realistic statistical model of wetlands; and iv) improvements of past developed treatments of precipitation intensity.

  6. Random array grid collimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  7. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01

    New England Outlook: Smart Grid is About Consumers,” Apr. [Transmission in the Smart Grid By Kory Walter Hedman ATransmission in the Smart Grid by Kory Walter Hedman Doctor

  8. Interoperable PKI Data Distribution in Computational Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Massimiliano

    2010-01-01

    2008), “Overview of the Grid Security Infrastructure. ” [Protocol (PRQP) into the Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI).its integration into the Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI).

  9. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joe

    2008-01-01

    case, confidence in grid security will increase. Confidencecase, confidence in grid security will increase. Confidencecase, confidence in grid security will increase. Confidence

  10. GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems (Smart Grid Project) (Spain) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected...

  11. NREL Smart Grid Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hambrick, J.

    2012-01-01

    Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

  12. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Convergence of the Uncertainty Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, Nathan E.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Mattie, Patrick D.; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the convergence of MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) probabilistic results of offsite consequences for the uncertainty analysis of the State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The consequence metrics evaluated are individual latent-cancer fatality (LCF) risk and individual early fatality risk. Consequence results are presented as conditional risk (i.e., assuming the accident occurs, risk per event) to individuals of the public as a result of the accident. In order to verify convergence for this uncertainty analysis, as recommended by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, a ‘high’ source term from the original population of Monte Carlo runs has been selected to be used for: (1) a study of the distribution of consequence results stemming solely from epistemic uncertainty in the MACCS2 parameters (i.e., separating the effect from the source term uncertainty), and (2) a comparison between Simple Random Sampling (SRS) and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) in order to validate the original results obtained with LHS. Three replicates (each using a different random seed) of size 1,000 each using LHS and another set of three replicates of size 1,000 using SRS are analyzed. The results show that the LCF risk results are well converged with either LHS or SRS sampling. The early fatality risk results are less well converged at radial distances beyond 2 miles, and this is expected due to the sparse data (predominance of “zero” results).

  13. The Global Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

  14. O`ahu Grid Study: Validation of Grid Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O`ahu Grid Study: Validation of Grid Models Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask 7.2 Deliverable By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York

  15. Now Available: Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages...

  16. Effect of the timing of vessel depressurization on a short-term station blackout in a BWR-4 performed with the MELCOR code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect that the timing of vessel depressurization has in the progression of a short-term station blackout accident in a boiling water reactor (BWR)-4. This study was performed with the MELCOR (version 1.8.1) severe-accident code. A similar study was previously completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using different computer codes. The purpose of this study is to confirm and expand on the previous study and investigate the applicability of MELCOR for severe-accident management analysis.

  17. Comparison of MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5 results for a low-pressure, short-term station blackout at Browns Ferry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This study compares results obtained with two U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored codes, MELCOR version 1.8.3 (1.8PQ) and SCDAP/RELAP5 Mod3.1 release C, for the same transient - a low-pressure, short-term station blackout accident at the Browns Ferry nuclear plant. This work is part of MELCOR assessment activities to compare core damage progression calculations of MELCOR against SCDAP/RELAP5 since the two codes model core damage progression very differently.

  18. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology HomeGrid CyberGrid Integration

  19. Smart Grid Research At TTU Robert C. Qiu and David Gao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    and definitions for use in Smart Grid #12;Wind Energy Solar Energy (Donated by TVA) A Real-Time Smart Grid Testbed million external funding from DoE, NSF and industry NSF Career Award Part of Center for Energy Systems;Generating Plant Transmission Line Substation Broadband over Powerlines -- Provide for two-way communications

  20. A Privacy-Preserving Scheme for Incentive-Based Demand Response in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    1 A Privacy-Preserving Scheme for Incentive-Based Demand Response in the Smart Grid Yanmin Gong to both grid operators and customers, exploiting the full potential of demand response. However to be attributable to individuals. However, this assumption does not hold in incentive-based demand response (IDR

  1. Core Grid Functions: A Minimal Architecture for Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , etc.) Identity Credential Management Grid Security Infrastructure Globus 2-style interface · Service Security Gateways information servers · J2EE hosting environment servers · Factory services Grid Security · Architectural Constraints (e.g. security) · Bindings #12;8 Resource Discovery & State / Grid Persistent State

  2. Stability of elastic grid shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesnil, Romain, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The elastic grid shell is a solution that combines double curvature and ease of mounting. This structural system, based on the deformation of an initially at grid without shear stiffness was invented more than fifty years ...

  3. Grid Applications Dr Gabrielle Allen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gabrielle

    CCT Grid Application Areas ! Computational Chemistry " GridChem: Building community deployment simulations, drilling technologies, integration with sensors and wireless networks, dynamic data driven & DynaCode: Data workflows with coupled models, dynamic data driven scenarios, metadata. (scoop

  4. Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electric Power Smart Grid Smart Grid Rows of battery racks at the Salem Smart Power Center in Salem, Oregon. The Battelle-led Pacific Northwest Smart...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EV-Smart Grid Research & Interoperability Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about EV-smart grid...

  6. APEC Smart Grid Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2012-03-01

    This brief paper describes the activities of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Smart Grid Initiative (ASGI) which is being led by the U.S. and developed by the APEC Energy Working Group. In the paper, I describe the origin of the initiative and briefly mention the four major elements of the initiative along with existing APEC projects which support it.

  7. Unlocking the smart grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-10-15

    The country has progressed in a relatively short time from rotary dial phones to computers, cell phones, and iPads. With proper planning and orderly policy implementation, the same will happen with the Smart Grid. Here are some suggestions on how to proceed. (author)

  8. Power Grid Vulnerability to Geographically Correlated Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Kenneth

    potential locations for grid monitoring, and hence, will have impact on the deployment of the smart-grid

  9. print_grid() add_vessel()

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharlin, Ehud

    grid.py print_grid() add_vessel() has_overlap() GRID_WIDTH GRID_HEIGHT NUM_VESSELS B VESSEL_NAMES[] VESSEL_SIZES[] human.py get_location() get_choice() grid_defend[] grid_attack[] import grid ai.py get, return false · add_vessel(grid, row, column, size, direction) ­ Check direction ­ Single for loop (size

  10. Networked Loads in the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhifang; Li, Xiao; Muthukumar, Vishak; Scaglione, Anna; Peisert, Sean; McParland, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    A. Frincke. Smart-Grid Security Issues. IEEE Security &review on smart grid cyber security. Technical Report

  11. Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Grid Interaction Technical Team (GITT) is to support a transition scenario to large scale grid-connected vehicle charging with transformational technology, proof of concept and information dissemination. The GITT facilitates technical coordination and collaboration between vehicle-grid connectivity and communication activities among U.S. DRIVE government and industry partners.

  12. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-08

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  13. Convergence for the Smart Grid -On the technology opportunities for Future Cyber-Physical Energy Systems, invited paper at New Research Directions for Future Cyber-Physical Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Convergence for the Smart Grid - On the technology opportunities for Future Cyber-Physical Energy Angeles, CA. 90095 http://winmec.ucla.edu Email:smartgrid@winmec.ucla.edu Convergence for the Smart Grid into what the Future / Smart Electric Grid should look like. For example the DOE has a vision for the Modern

  14. DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    high-temperature superconductors, which have the potential to alleviate congestion on an electricity grid that is experiencing increased demand from consumers. PDF icon DOE...

  15. Steam Line Break and Station Blackout Transients for Proliferation-Resistant Hexagonal Tight Lattice Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, Upendra S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Jo, Jae H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Chung, Bub Dong [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Takahashi, Hiroshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2004-01-15

    Safety analyses of a proliferation-resistant, economically competitive, high-conversion boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems, are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core that therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of light water reactors. The tight lattice core has a very narrow flow channel with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular boiling water reactor (BWR) core and, thus, presents a special challenge to core cooling because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator-to-fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios.In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core is placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected to the isolation condenser system (ICS). The vessel is placed in containment with the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) and passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's simplified BWR (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to those of the SBWR; the ICS and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump is placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney since the buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel as the tight lattice configuration results in much larger friction in the core than with the SBWR.The constitutive relationships for RELAP5 are assessed for narrow channels, and as a result the heat transfer package is modified. The modified RELAP5 is used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events for a tight pitch lattice core: the station blackout and the main-steam-line-break events. The results of the analyses indicate that the HCBWR system will be safely brought to the shutdown condition for these transients.

  16. Thick Pixelated CZT Detectors With Isolated Steering Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Jung; A. B. Garson; J. S. Perkins; H. Krawczynski; J. Matteson; R. T. Skelton; A. Burger; M. Groza

    2005-11-18

    We explore the possibility to improve the performance of 0.5 cm thick Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with the help of steering grids on the anode side of the detectors. Steering grids can improve the energy resolution of CZT detectors by enhancing the small pixel effect; furthermore, they can increase their detection efficiency by steering electrons to the anode pixels which otherwise would drift to the area between pixels. Previously, the benefit of steering grids had been compromised by additional noise associated with currents between the steering grids and the anode pixels. We use thin film deposition techniques to isolate the steering grid from the CZT substrate by a 150 nm thick layer of the isolator Aluminiumoxide. While the thin layer does not affect the beneficial effect of the steering grid on the weighting potentials and the electric field inside the detector, it suppresses the currents between the steering grid and the anode pixels. In this contribution, we present first results from a 2 x 2 x 0.5 cm CZT detector with 8 x 8 pixels that we tested before and after deposition of an isolated steering grid. The steering grid improves the 662 keV energy resolution of the detector by a factor of 1.3 (from about 2% to about 1.5%), while not reducing the detection efficiency. To gain further insights into the detector response in the region between pixels, we measured energy spectra with a collimated Cs137 source. The collimator measurements can be used to enhance our understanding of energy spectra measured under flood illumination of the detectors.

  17. Data Management in the GridRPC GridRPC Data Management API

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caniou, Yves

    Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion GridRPC Data Management API Implementations, Le Mahec, Nakada GridRPC DM API: Implem. and Interop. Issues (1/13) #12;Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion Goal GridRPC DM types: Reminder 1 Data Management in the GridRPC Goal GridRPC DM types

  18. Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Electrification Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technical and Economic...

  19. Rethinking the Future Grid: Integrated Nuclear Renewable Energy Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Boardman, R.; Ruth, M.; Zinaman, O.; Forsberg, C.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. One concept under consideration by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a 'hybrid system' that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product.

  20. Grid Integration Studies: Data Requirements, Greening the Grid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rates) for grid integration model development and calibration. * Collect and archive sub-hourly data where possible. * Monitor and incorporate best practices in fore- casting...

  1. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Grid Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    measurements, control strategy, and theories so that the essential transactive market between buildings and the grid will fully function and deliver benefits to all...

  2. The Application Hosting Environment: Lightweight Middleware for Grid-Based Computational Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Coveney; R. S. Saksena; S. J. Zasada; M. McKeown; S. Pickles

    2006-11-27

    Grid computing is distributed computing performed transparently across multiple administrative domains. Grid middleware, which is meant to enable access to grid resources, is currently widely seen as being too heavyweight and, in consequence, unwieldy for general scientific use. Its heavyweight nature, especially on the client-side, has severely restricted the uptake of grid technology by computational scientists. In this paper, we describe the Application Hosting Environment (AHE) which we have developed to address some of these problems. The AHE is a lightweight, easily deployable environment designed to allow the scientist to quickly and easily run legacy applications on distributed grid resources. It provides a higher level abstraction of a grid than is offered by existing grid middleware schemes such as the Globus Toolkit. As a result the computational scientist does not need to know the details of any particular underlying grid middleware and is isolated from any changes to it on the distributed resources. The functionality provided by the AHE is `application-centric': applications are exposed as web services with a well-defined standards-compliant interface. This allows the computational scientist to start and manage application instances on a grid in a transparent manner, thus greatly simplifying the user experience. We describe how a range of computational science codes have been hosted within the AHE and how the design of the AHE allows us to implement complex workflows for deployment on grid infrastructure.

  3. Blackout Final Implementation Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and are paying particular attention to transmis- sion planning, cost allocation for multi-state trans- mission projects, and ensuring the timely recovery of prudent...

  4. Blackout Final Implementation Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergy Industrial Local GovernmentDepartment ofFinal

  5. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

    2001-01-01

    issues and challenges The Grid security requirements that wea seri- ous challenge to Grid security measures. Grids thatbased on using available Grid security services. Both Globus

  6. Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III...

  7. Grid Integration of Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Breitling; T. Granzer; H. Enke

    2009-03-23

    Robotic telescopes and grid technology have made significant progress in recent years. Both innovations offer important advantages over conventional technologies, particularly in combination with one another. Here, we introduce robotic telescopes used by the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam as ideal instruments for building a robotic telescope network. We also discuss the grid architecture and protocols facilitating the network integration that is being developed by the German AstroGrid-D project. Finally, we present three user interfaces employed for this purpose.

  8. GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More Documents & Publications QER - Comment of GridWise Alliance 1 SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York Smart Grid: Enabler of the New Energy Economy...

  9. Feedback" An Article for Smart Grid News The Smart Grid Transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback" An Article for Smart Grid News The Smart Grid Transition-Getting Started We are on the ground floor of a Smart Grid...

  10. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  11. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resulting data Modeling and analyzing short-term PV variability Developing PV system models for grid planning and interconnection studies Evaluating related PV system...

  12. Smart-Grid Security Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khurana, Himanshu; Hadley, Mark D.; Lu, Ning; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-01-29

    TITLE: Smart-Grid Security Issues (Editorial Material, English) IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY 8 (1). JAN-FEB 2010. p.81-85 IEEE COMPUTER SOC, LOS ALAMITOS

  13. Sandia Energy - Smart Grid Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reliability, efficiency, flexibility, and cost effectiveness. Smart-grid features include demand-response capabilities, advanced controls, DER integration, increased situational...

  14. Sandia Energy - Transmission Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are not adequate for PV systems. In particular, utilities are concerned about the cost of managing PV variability and uncertainty, and possible impact on bulk grid...

  15. Getting Our Grid Report Card

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overwhelming turnout at peer reviews shows the growing recognition that a modern grid is integral to developing a clean energy economy.

  16. Buildings to Grid Technical Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    A meeting book created for the Buildings to Grid Technical Meeting that includes speaker and attendee bios, as well as white papers and discussion questions.

  17. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-02

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  18. Environmental Impact of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to reduce pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: - Demand Response - Electric Vehicles - Demand Side Management - Renewables and Distributed...

  19. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-22

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  20. Large power grid analysis using domain decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanram, Kartik

    Large power grid analysis using domain decomposition Quming Zhou, Kai Sun, Kartik Mohanram, Danny C referred to as the power grid. The power grid for a modern integrated circuit may consist of several grid is traditionally described as a large-scale linear system. Simulation of power grids usually

  1. Sandia Energy - Grid Modernization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologiesEnergyGeoscience HomeGrid Modernization

  2. Smart Grid System Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES PursuantEnergy Small| August 2014 2014 Smart Grid

  3. National Transmission Grid Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department ofDepartment ofEnergyIncreasedNational104-113] |Grid

  4. Grid Client Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene'sGreg-Delwiche SignGridClient

  5. Grid Software and Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene'sGreg-DelwicheGrid

  6. Grid-based Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based Production Grid-based Production

  7. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology HomeGrid Cyber

  8. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    With the convergence of technologies such as MEMS sensor devices, wireless networking, and low-power em- beddedSensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged

  9. International Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloul, Fadi

    International Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities is currently evolving into the smart grid. Smart grid integrates the traditional electrical power grid, controlling and managing the demands of customers. A smart grid is a huge complex network composed of millions

  10. Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid NICTA is developing technology to automate costs. The Future · Cover more of Smart Grid control (diagnosis, reconfiguration, protection, voltage) products for the Smart Grid. Contact Details: Technical Jussi Rintanen Canberra Research Laboratory Tel

  11. Parallel Simulation for VLSI Power Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Le

    2015-07-23

    Due to the increasing complexity of VLSI circuits, power grid simulation has become more and more time-consuming. Hence, there is a need for fast and accurate power grid simulator. In order to perform power grid simulation ...

  12. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01

    inclusion of energy storage devices in the smart grid couldGrid and its Affect on Renewable Resources and Energy Storage ..Grid and its Affect on Renewable Resources and Energy Storage

  13. Considering Prefabulous and Almost Off the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grenier, Lotus; Beba, Zoe; Gray, Art

    2013-01-01

    upon it.The prototype, Off—grid IT HOUSE is our own house,were very accurate. The ?rst off—grid IT HOUSE is relativelyPrefabulous and Almost Off the Grid Introduction Two recent

  14. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment of Off-Grid Lighting Applications:Testing for Emerging Off-grid White-LED Illumination SystemsBudget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for Small

  15. What will the Smart Grid Look Like?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to natural disasters. Smart GrId mIleStoneS Smart Grid milestones represent the building blocks of the Smart Grid. Completion of each requires the deployment and...

  16. Solar energy grid integration systems - Energy storage (SEGIS-ES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, Dan; Peek, Georgianne H.; Hanley, Charles; Boyes, John

    2008-05-01

    In late 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a series of studies to address issues related to potential high penetration of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation systems on our nation’s electric grid. This Renewable Systems Interconnection (RSI) initiative resulted in the publication of 14 reports and an Executive Summary that defined needs in areas related to utility planning tools and business models, new grid architectures and PV systems configurations, and models to assess market penetration and the effects of high-penetration PV systems. As a result of this effort, the Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) program was initiated in early 2008. SEGIS is an industry-led effort to develop new PV inverters, controllers, and energy management systems that will greatly enhance the utility of distributed PV systems.

  17. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kirkham, Harold

    2014-07-01

    To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. It measures 21 metrics to provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This report looks across a spectrum of smart grid concerns to measure the status of smart grid deployment and impacts.

  18. DOE Report Describes Progress in the Deployment of Synchrophasor...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 15 August, 2013 - 10:09 OpenEI PMU recovery act SGIG Smart Grid The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of...

  19. New Article on Cybersecurity Discusses DOE's Partnership with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis A new article by OE's Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are...

  20. Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act SGIG Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity...

  1. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01

    models of the electric transmission network flow problem.requirements in the electric transmission grid is provided.operations of the electric transmission grid. It also

  2. Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Grid Basics Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid Basics Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar...

  3. National Grid Generation, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Grid Generation, LLC (Redirected from KeySpan Generation LLC) Jump to: navigation, search Name: National Grid Generation, LLC Place: New York Service Territory:...

  4. Secure Interoperable Open Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, Thoman

    2014-12-31

    The Consolidated Edison, Inc., of New York (Con Edison) Secure Interoperable Open Smart Grid Demonstration Project (SGDP), sponsored by the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE), demonstrated that the reliability, efficiency, and flexibility of the grid can be improved through a combination of enhanced monitoring and control capabilities using systems and resources that interoperate within a secure services framework. The project demonstrated the capability to shift, balance, and reduce load where and when needed in response to system contingencies or emergencies by leveraging controllable field assets. The range of field assets includes curtailable customer loads, distributed generation (DG), battery storage, electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, building management systems (BMS), home area networks (HANs), high-voltage monitoring, and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). The SGDP enables the seamless integration and control of these field assets through a common, cyber-secure, interoperable control platform, which integrates a number of existing legacy control and data systems, as well as new smart grid (SG) systems and applications. By integrating advanced technologies for monitoring and control, the SGDP helps target and reduce peak load growth, improves the reliability and efficiency of Con Edison’s grid, and increases the ability to accommodate the growing use of distributed resources. Con Edison is dedicated to lowering costs, improving reliability and customer service, and reducing its impact on the environment for its customers. These objectives also align with the policy objectives of New York State as a whole. To help meet these objectives, Con Edison’s long-term vision for the distribution grid relies on the successful integration and control of a growing penetration of distributed resources, including demand response (DR) resources, battery storage units, and DG. For example, Con Edison is expecting significant long-term growth of DG. The SGDP enables the efficient, flexible integration of these disparate resources and lays the architectural foundations for future scalability. Con Edison assembled an SGDP team of more than 16 different project partners, including technology vendors, and participating organizations, and the Con Edison team provided overall guidance and project management. Project team members are listed in Table 1-1.

  5. From the Grid to the Smart Grid, Topologically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The Smart Grid is not just about the digitalization of the Power Grid. In its more visionary acceptation, it is a model of energy management in which the users are engaged in producing energy as well as consuming it, while having information systems fully aware of the energy demand-response of the network and of dynamically varying prices. A natural question is then: to make the Smart Grid a reality will the Distribution Grid have to be updated? We assume a positive answer to the question and we consider the lower layers of Medium and Low Voltage to be the most affected by the change. In our previous work, we have analyzed samples of the Dutch Distribution Grid in our previous work and we have considered possible evolutions of these using synthetic topologies modeled after studies of complex systems in other technological domains in another previous work. In this paper, we take an extra important further step by defining a methodology for evolving any existing physical Power Grid to a good Smart Grid model th...

  6. The Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, Ruth; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Avery, Paul; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre; Wurthwein, Frank; Gardner, Rob; Wilde, Mike; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-06-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support its use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  7. DOE Orders Mirant Power Plant to Operate Under Limited Circumstances...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electricity from other generating sources. If the Mirant plant is not operational, an outage of the high voltage transmission lines could cause a blackout in the central District...

  8. Statistical Computations with AstroGrid and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert C Nichol; Garry Smith; Christopher J Miller; Chris Genovese; Larry Wasserman; Brent Bryan; Alexander Gray; Jeff Schneider; Andrew W Moore

    2005-11-15

    We outline our first steps towards marrying two new and emerging technologies; the Virtual Observatory (e.g, AstroGrid) and the computational grid. We discuss the construction of VOTechBroker, which is a modular software tool designed to abstract the tasks of submission and management of a large number of computational jobs to a distributed computer system. The broker will also interact with the AstroGrid workflow and MySpace environments. We present our planned usage of the VOTechBroker in computing a huge number of n-point correlation functions from the SDSS, as well as fitting over a million CMBfast models to the WMAP data.

  9. Open grid vs mesh grid as the extraction field structure in a streak camera image-converter tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.W.; Peterson, R.L.

    1982-05-13

    It is concluded that the dynamic range of a streak tube does not depend on whether it uses a fine-mesh or an open structure to provide the extraction field. An RCA C-73435 streak tube body was fitted with two extraction grid structures by replacing the conventional open grid with a steel plate containing two apertures. One aperture simulated the open grid structure; the other was a 2 x 20 mm slit covered with a fine mesh (40 wires per mm, 38% transmissive). The apertures were equal distances above and below the tube axis. Using 35-ps pulses, dynamic range curves were taken at 1.06 ..mu..m on one aperture at a time, while blocking the other aperture. As we anticipated, the tube saturated at nearly the same point for the open and mesh apertures. The noise levels for both apertures were almost equal and very close to the film fog level. Noise level was lower than for earlier measurements on other makes of tubes with a fine-mesh grid. The dynamic range for both apertures was in the order of 6000, which indicates that the lower dynamic range of other tubes must be due to something other than the use of a fine-mesh grid.

  10. Smart Grid Week: Working to Modernize the Nation's Electric Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Learn More about the Smart Grid Visit smartgrid.gov for access to videos, maps and data on the effort to transform the nation's...

  11. 2012 Smart Grid Peer Review Presentations - Day 2 Smart Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Day 2 Smart Grid panel discussion are below. Moderator: Lee Kreval, SDG&E 2012 SG Peer Review - Day 2 Panel Discussion: Puesh Kumar, American Public Power Association 2012 SG Peer...

  12. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Grid Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropski, Ben; Pratt, Rob

    2014-03-28

    This paper outlines the nature of the power grid, lists challenges and barriers to the implementation of a transactive energy ecosystem, and provides concept solutions to current technological impediments.

  13. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids. Accelerating Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Brian; Burman, Kari; Davidson, Carolyn; Elchinger, Michael; Hardison, R.; Karsiwulan, D.; Castermans, B.

    2015-06-30

    Sustainable Energy for Remote Indonesian Grids (SERIG) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to support Indonesia’s efforts to develop clean energy and increase access to electricity in remote locations throughout the country. With DOE support, the SERIG implementation team consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Winrock International’s Jakarta, Indonesia office. Through technical assistance that includes techno-economic feasibility evaluation for selected projects, government-to-government coordination, infrastructure assessment, stakeholder outreach, and policy analysis, SERIG seeks to provide opportunities for individual project development and a collective framework for national replication office.

  14. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  15. Grid Architecture Release 2.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November 2014 Draft #12;Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November..................................................................................................... 2.1 3.0 Brief Introduction to Grid Architecture........................................................................................ 3.2 3.1 How Grid Architecture Can Be Used

  16. Algorithmic Decision Theory and the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of uncontrollable influences such as weather #12;11 Today's Electric Power Grid ·Today's electric power systems Grid, October 2010. #12;10 Today's Electric Power Grid ·Today's electric power systems have grown up's Electric Power Grid ·Challenges include: -Huge number of customers, uncontrolled demand -Changing supply

  17. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Intelligent Networked Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Intelligent Networked Sensors Capable of Autonomous, Adaptive from the rest of the power grid and reconnect and synchronize without loss of functionality FOCUS AREA Power Grid Initiative (FPGI) will deliver next-generation concepts and tools for grid operation

  18. Course Description Grid Computing, NGSSC, 2p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmroth, Erik

    #12;­ Grid security: Grid security demands and solutions for, e.g., authen- tication, authorityCourse Description Grid Computing, NGSSC, 2p Erik Elmroth, Olle Mulmo, and Leif Nixon February 14, 2003 General information This course is designed to give a broad overview of the concept of grid comput

  19. Introduction to FireGrid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Stephen; Usmani, Asif; Upadhyay, Rochan; Berry, Dave; Potter, Stephen; Torero, Jose L

    2007-11-14

    FireGrid is an ambitious and innovative project, seeking to develop the technology to support a new way of managing emergency response in the modern built environment. Specific novel aspects include the integration of ...

  20. Grid Pricing of Fed Cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Ted C.; Hogan, Robert J.; Anderson, David P.

    2009-03-02

    There are several value-based fed cattle pricing systems, including formula pricing, price grids and alliances. This publication describes the different cattle pricing methods and helps you decide which is best for you....

  1. Smart Grid: Opportunities and Challenges Toward a Stronger and Smarter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Smart Grid: Opportunities and Challenges Toward a Stronger and Smarter Grid S. Massoud Amin, D electrical energy infrastructure ­ Transforming the Network into a Smart Grid ­ Developing an Expanded be reproduced in any form without prior authorization. Enabling a Stronger and Smarter Grid ·Smart Grid

  2. How Dynamic is the Grid? Towards a Quality Metric for Grid Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakellariou, Rizos

    How Dynamic is the Grid? Towards a Quality Metric for Grid Information Systems Laurence Field CERN rizos@cs.man.ac.uk Abstract--Grid information systems play a core role in today's production Grid. Quality metrics for Grid information systems are required in order to compare different implementations

  3. EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy EconoGrid is a detailed simulation model, implemented in SLX1 , of a grid compute economy that implements selected of users. In a grid compute economy, computing resources are sold to users in a market where price

  4. Smart Grid Information Security (IS) Functional Requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai

    2011-01-01

    It is important to implement safe smart grid environment to enhance people's lives and livelihoods. This paper provides information on smart grid IS functional requirement by illustrating some discussion points to the sixteen identified requirements. This paper introduces the smart grid potential hazards that can be referred as a triggering factor to improve the system and security of the entire grid. The background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid IS is described with the adoption of hermeneutic circle as methodology. Grid information technology and security-s session discusses that grid provides the chance of a simple and transparent access to different information sources. In addition, the transformation between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the IS importance on the communication field reflects the criticality of grid IS functional requirement identification is introduces. The smart grid IS functional requirements described in this paper are general and ...

  5. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2012-01-01

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  6. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-04-09

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  7. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-05-29

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  8. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-03-03

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  9. The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond BURLINGTON SHERATON HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER MAY Laboratories 9:10-10:15 a.m. Opening Plenary: The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid

  10. Grid Transformation Workshop Results Grid Transformation Workshop Results 2 April 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grid Transformation Workshop Results April 2012 #12;Grid Transformation Workshop Results 2 April 2012 Grid Transformation Workshop Results plications. We will explore the basics of data modeling. Each approach will be evaluated with the following criteria: feasibility, dependability, security

  11. Competition and Reliability in North American Electricity Markets...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Publications The Relationship between Competitive Power Markets and Grid Reliability. Blackout 2003: Electric System Working Group Technical Conference - Comments and...

  12. Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse (SGIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Saifur

    2014-08-31

    Since the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was enacted, there has been a large number of websites that discusses smart grid and relevant information, including those from government, academia, industry, private sector and regulatory. These websites collect information independently. Therefore, smart grid information was quite scattered and dispersed. The objective of this work was to develop, populate, manage and maintain the public Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse (SGIC) web portal. The information in the SGIC website is comprehensive that includes smart grid information, research & development, demonstration projects, technical standards, costs & benefit analyses, business cases, legislation, policy & regulation, and other information on lesson learned and best practices. The content in the SGIC website is logically grouped to allow easily browse, search and sort. In addition to providing the browse and search feature, the SGIC web portal also allow users to share their smart grid information with others though our online content submission platform. The Clearinghouse web portal, therefore, serves as the first stop shop for smart grid information that collects smart grid information in a non-bias, non-promotional manner and can provide a missing link from information sources to end users and better serve users’ needs. The web portal is available at www.sgiclearinghouse.org. This report summarizes the work performed during the course of the project (September 2009 – August 2014). Section 2.0 lists SGIC Advisory Committee and User Group members. Section 3.0 discusses SGIC information architecture and web-based database application functionalities. Section 4.0 summarizes SGIC features and functionalities, including its search, browse and sort capabilities, web portal social networking, online content submission platform and security measures implemented. Section 5.0 discusses SGIC web portal contents, including smart grid 101, smart grid projects, deployment experience (i.e., use cases, lessons learned, cost-benefit analyses and business cases), in-depth information (i.e., standards, technology, cyber security, legislation, education and training and demand response), as well as international information. Section 6.0 summarizes SGIC statistics from the launch of the portal on July 07, 2010 to August 31, 2014. Section 7.0 summarizes publicly available information as a result of this work.

  13. Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  14. Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) The Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG)...

  15. Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  16. A monitoring sensor management system for grid environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tierney, Brian; Crowley, Brian; Gunter, Dan; Lee, Jason; Thompson, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A Monitoring Sensor Management System for Grid Environmentsof a Grid environment. 1.1 Monitoring Agents For thismonitoring data management system within a Grid environment.

  17. Grid Energy Storage - December 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Energy Storage - December 2013 Grid Energy Storage - December 2013 Modernizing the electric grid will help the nation meet the challenge of handling projected energy...

  18. PSERC Webinar Series: Issues in Designing the Future Grid - Cyber...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grid," focusing on the information hierarchy for the future grid and grid enablers of sustainable energy systems. The second webinar, Cyber-Physical Systems Security for the...

  19. Sandia Energy - Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Grid Integration Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems...

  20. Integrating Grid Services into the Cray XT4 Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cholia, Shreyas

    2010-01-01

    to point to appropriate locations eg. /etc/grid-security?/globus/grid-security-nid1234, /etc/grid-security/certificates?/globus/certificates • The

  1. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    that are vital for grid security.     The cost of  these problems involving grid security  at  bulk  transmission/problems  involving  grid  security  at  distribution  or 

  2. POWER GRID RELIABILITY AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Anjan; Venkatasubramanian, Vaithianathan; Hauser, Carl; Bakken, David; Anderson, David; Zhao, Chuanlin; Liu, Dong; Yang, Tao; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Lin; Ning, Jiawei; Tashman, Zaid

    2014-09-30

    This project has led to the development of a real-time simulation platform for electric power grids called Grid Simulator or GridSim for simulating the dynamic and information network interactions of large- scale power systems. The platform consists of physical models of power system components including synchronous generators, loads and control, which are simulated using a modified commercial power simulator namely Transient Stability Analysis Tool (TSAT) [1] together with data cleanup components, as well as an emulated substation level and wide-area power analysis components. The platform also includes realistic representations of communication network middleware that can emulate the real-time information flow back and forth between substations and control centers in wide-area power systems. The platform has been validated on a realistic 6000-bus model of the western American power system. The simulator GridSim developed in this project is the first of its kind in its ability to simulate real-time response of large-scale power grids, and serves as a cost effective real-time stability and control simulation platform for power industry.

  3. DOE Launches New Smart Grid Web Portal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department ofRefrigerators |Department offorEnergyJointFraudSmart

  4. Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartment ofSoutheast Climate C hange a nd t10Challenges

  5. Smart Grid Savings and Grid Integration of Renewables in Idaho

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4 »DigitalanDepartmentSecondarySmart GridSmart Grid 1 Smart

  6. A Guidebook on Grid Interconnection and Islanded Operation of Mini-Grid Power Systems Up to 200 kW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greacen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    is connected to a power grid, the frequency is regulated bywith regional or national power grids calls for standardizedisland to the mainland power grid. The solar systems, which

  7. Grids: The Top Ten Questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schopf, Jennifer M.; Nitzberg, Bill

    2002-01-01

    The design and implementation of a national computing system and data grid has become a reachable goal from both the computer science and computational science point of view. A distributed infrastructure capable of sophisticated computational functions can bring many benefits to scientific work, but poses many challenges, both technical and socio-political. Technical challenges include having basic software tools, higher-level services, functioning and pervasive security, and standards, while socio-political issues include building a user community, adding incentives for sites to be part of a user-centric environment, and educating funding sources about the needs of this community. This paper details the areasmore »relating to Grid research that we feel still need to be addressed to fully leverage the advantages of the Grid.« less

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS Stochastic Analysis of Cascading-Failure Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    the prediction of the evolution of blackout probability in time. Moreover, the asymptotic analysis of the blackout probability enables the calculation of the probability mass function of the blackout size. A key, stochastic anal- ysis, Markov chain, blackout probability. I. INTRODUCTION WHILE power grids are reliable

  9. Convectively cooled electrical grid structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.W.

    1980-11-10

    Undesirable distortions of electrical grid conductors from thermal cycling are minimized and related problems such as unwanted thermionic emission and structural failure from overheating are avoided by providing for a flow of fluid coolant within each conductor. The conductors are secured at each end to separate flexible support elements which accommodate to individual longitudinal expansion and contraction of each conductor while resisting lateral displacements, the coolant flow preferably being directed into and out of each conductor through passages in the flexible support elements. The grid may have a modular or divided construction which facilitates manufacture and repairs.

  10. GENI: Grid Hardware and Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-09

    GENI Project: The 15 projects in ARPA-E’s GENI program, short for “Green Electricity Network Integration,” aim to modernize the way electricity is transmitted in the U.S. through advances in hardware and software for the electric grid. These advances will improve the efficiency and reliability of electricity transmission, increase the amount of renewable energy the grid can utilize, and provide energy suppliers and consumers with greater control over their power flows in order to better manage peak power demand and cost.

  11. Sandia Energy - Grid Modernization Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology HomeGrid CyberGrid

  12. GridMat: Matlab Toolbox for GridLAB-D to Analyse Grid Impact and Validate Residential Microgrid Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    GridMat: Matlab Toolbox for GridLAB-D to Analyse Grid Impact and Validate Residential Microgrid.alfaruque, fahourai} @ uci.edu Abstract-- Residential microgrid has the capability to participate in the distribution level) advanced control algorithms need to be developed and validated for such residential microgrids

  13. Interstate Grid Electrification Improvement Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01

    E. B. Fisher, S. S. Oren, “Smart flexible just-in-timeISO New England Outlook: Smart Grid is About Consumers,”Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid By Kory Walter

  15. Market Update: New England Islanded Grids

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Join the Islanded Grid Resource Center (IGRC) for our upcoming webinar highlighting the islanded grid communities along the New England coast that are exploring their options for reducing high...

  16. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Danish Power System Transformation 58 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R...

  17. Vids4Grids- Controls, Connectors & Surge Protectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modernizing our grid means exciting new devices in the power sector. Find out how new lighting controls, connectors and surge protection will bring out electric grid to the next level.

  18. Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with the New York Times and E&E TV Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with the New York Times and E&E...

  19. New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York 2009 Smart Grid System...

  20. Smart Grid Technology Gives Small Business New Light | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    enabling here and learn more about modernizing our grid for the 21st century, visit SmartGrid.gov. Addthis Related Articles Now Available: Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid...

  1. Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy

  2. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-15

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  3. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-27

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  4. Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave INFORME para la Sostenibilidad Energética y Ambiental, FUNSEAM. #12;Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave eléctrica y los diferentes sectores que forman la smart grid. 6 Figura 2. Evolución y previsión de

  5. Modeling and Grid impedance Variation Analysis of Parallel Connected Grid Connected Inverter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    of power converter are important issues todays as the grid is becoming much more power electronics filtering and resonance damping methods are studied in islanded micro- grid application to reduceModeling and Grid impedance Variation Analysis of Parallel Connected Grid Connected Inverter based

  6. Dumb Crypto in Smart Grids: Practical Cryptanalysis of the Open Smart Grid Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Dumb Crypto in Smart Grids: Practical Cryptanalysis of the Open Smart Grid Protocol Philipp in EAXprime [5], an AE block cipher mode derived from EAX [8], standardized as ANSI C12.22-2008 for Smart Grid scheme, which is deployed in the Open Smart Grid Protocol (OSGP) [15]. The latter is an application layer

  7. EL Program: Smart Grid Program Manager: David Wollman, Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EL Program: Smart Grid Program Manager: David Wollman, Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program Office, Associate Program Manager: Dean Prochaska, Smart Grid and Cyber- Physical Systems Program [updated August 23, 2013] Summary: This program develops and demonstrates smart grid measurement science

  8. Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    home energy manage- ment systems (HEMS) and the distribution feeder. One such simulation tool is Grid1 Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations Timothy M to completion without allowing the real-time interaction of Smart Grid controls, such as home energy management

  9. What is a Grid? Grid Today, AUGUST 12, 2002: VOL. 1 NO. 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) · authentication, delegation, and secure communication (the basic Grid security services) · identity certificateWhat is a Grid? Grid Today, AUGUST 12, 2002: VOL. 1 NO. 9 (http://www.gridtoday.com/02/0812/020812.html) I would like to provide perspective on the question of what is a Grid - a perspective derived

  10. Role of Power Grid in Side Channel Attack and Power-Grid-Aware Secure Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhunia, Swarup

    Role of Power Grid in Side Channel Attack and Power-Grid-Aware Secure Design Xinmu Wang1 , Wen Yueh on the operating frequency due to RLC structure of a power grid. In this paper, we analyze the ef- fect of power grid on SCA and provide quantitative results to demonstrate the frequency-dependent SCA resistance due

  11. Teaching the Grid: Learning Distributed Computing with the M-grid Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Robert

    . This situation arises in a number of different scenarios, including Grid computing which is a secure, service how to use as real Grid software requires extensive setting up and complex security processes. M-grid it is executed. Established Grid systems have extensive security infrastructures associated with them

  12. Grid Limitations Presentation to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldick, Ross

    generation: ­ Concentrate on "on-grid" applications, · National energy policy. #12;3 Overview of Generation% of total cost of electric power system, · Inter-connects almost all electric generation and demand in North of the electricity system. · Historically, utilities planned generation and transmission jointly to meet growing

  13. ELECTRIC GRID PROTECTION THE INTERNATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    interference, Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), or Intentional Electromagnetic Interference (IEMI). See below the status of national electric grid evaluation and protection against electromagnetic threats in 11 counties sensitivity to the full range of electromagnetic threats1 . This historic and ongoing situation has resulted

  14. Software & GRID Computing for LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Hal

    Software & GRID Computing for LHC (Computing Work in a Big Group) Frederick Luehring luehring computing ­ Writing software in large collaboration ­ Processing a large datastream February 10, 2011 P410/P Software in a Collaboration February 10, 2011 P410/P609 Presentation F. Luehring Pg. 10 #12;Collaborative

  15. Comparison of MELCOR modeling techniques and effects of vessel water injection on a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    A fully qualified, best-estimate MELCOR deck has been prepared for the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station and has been run using MELCOR 1.8.3 (1.8 PN) for a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout severe accident. The same severe accident sequence has been run with the same MELCOR version for the same plant using the deck prepared during the NUREG-1150 study. A third run was also completed with the best-estimate deck but without the Lower Plenum Debris Bed (BH) Package to model the lower plenum. The results from the three runs have been compared, and substantial differences have been found. The timing of important events is shorter, and the calculated source terms are in most cases larger for the NUREG-1150 deck results. However, some of the source terms calculated by the NUREG-1150 deck are not conservative when compared to the best-estimate deck results. These results identified some deficiencies in the NUREG-1150 model of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. Injection recovery sequences have also been simulated by injecting water into the vessel after core relocation started. This marks the first use of the new BH Package of MELCOR to investigate the effects of water addition to a lower plenum debris bed. The calculated results indicate that vessel failure can be prevented by injecting water at a sufficiently early stage. No pressure spikes in the vessel were predicted during the water injection. The MELCOR code has proven to be a useful tool for severe accident management strategies.

  16. An uncertainty analysis of the hydrogen source term for a station blackout accident in Sequoyah using MELCOR 1.8.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Wagner, Kenneth Charles

    2014-03-01

    A methodology for using the MELCOR code with the Latin Hypercube Sampling method was developed to estimate uncertainty in various predicted quantities such as hydrogen generation or release of fission products under severe accident conditions. In this case, the emphasis was on estimating the range of hydrogen sources in station blackout conditions in the Sequoyah Ice Condenser plant, taking into account uncertainties in the modeled physics known to affect hydrogen generation. The method uses user-specified likelihood distributions for uncertain model parameters, which may include uncertainties of a stochastic nature, to produce a collection of code calculations, or realizations, characterizing the range of possible outcomes. Forty MELCOR code realizations of Sequoyah were conducted that included 10 uncertain parameters, producing a range of in-vessel hydrogen quantities. The range of total hydrogen produced was approximately 583kg 131kg. Sensitivity analyses revealed expected trends with respected to the parameters of greatest importance, however, considerable scatter in results when plotted against any of the uncertain parameters was observed, with no parameter manifesting dominant effects on hydrogen generation. It is concluded that, with respect to the physics parameters investigated, in order to further reduce predicted hydrogen uncertainty, it would be necessary to reduce all physics parameter uncertainties similarly, bearing in mind that some parameters are inherently uncertain within a range. It is suspected that some residual uncertainty associated with modeling complex, coupled and synergistic phenomena, is an inherent aspect of complex systems and cannot be reduced to point value estimates. The probabilistic analyses such as the one demonstrated in this work are important to properly characterize response of complex systems such as severe accident progression in nuclear power plants.

  17. Smart Energy Management and Control for Fuel Cell Based Micro-Grid Connected Neighborhoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2006-03-15

    Fuel cell power generation promises to be an efficient, pollution-free, reliable power source in both large scale and small scale, remote applications. DOE formed the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance with the intention of breaking one of the last barriers remaining for cost effective fuel cell power generation. The Alliance’s goal is to produce a core solid-state fuel cell module at a cost of no more than $400 per kilowatt and ready for commercial application by 2010. With their inherently high, 60-70% conversion efficiencies, significantly reduced carbon dioxide emissions, and negligible emissions of other pollutants, fuel cells will be the obvious choice for a broad variety of commercial and residential applications when their cost effectiveness is improved. In a research program funded by the Department of Energy, the research team has been investigating smart fuel cell-operated residential micro-grid communities. This research has focused on using smart control systems in conjunction with fuel cell power plants, with the goal to reduce energy consumption, reduce demand peaks and still meet the energy requirements of any household in a micro-grid community environment. In Phases I and II, a SEMaC was developed and extended to a micro-grid community. In addition, an optimal configuration was determined for a single fuel cell power plant supplying power to a ten-home micro-grid community. In Phase III, the plan is to expand this work to fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods (mini-grid). The economic implications of hydrogen cogeneration will be investigated. These efforts are consistent with DOE’s mission to decentralize domestic electric power generation and to accelerate the onset of the hydrogen economy. A major challenge facing the routine implementation and use of a fuel cell based mini-grid is the varying electrical demand of the individual micro-grids, and, therefore, analyzing these issues is vital. Efforts are needed to determine the most appropriate means of implementing micro-grids and the costs and processes involved with their extended operation. With the development and availability of fuel cell based stand-alone power plants, an electrical mini-grid, encompassing several connected residential neighborhoods, has become a viable concept. A primary objective of this project is to define the parameters of an economically efficient fuel cell based mini-grid. Since pure hydrogen is not economically available in sufficient quantities at the present time, the use of reforming technology to produce and store excess hydrogen will also be investigated. From a broader perspective, the factors that bear upon the feasibility of fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods are similar to those pertaining to the electrification of a small town with a localized power generating station containing several conventional generating units. In the conventional case, the town or locality would also be connected to the larger grid system of the utility company. Therefore, in the case of the fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods, this option should also be available. The objectives of this research project are: To demonstrate that smart energy management of a fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhood can be efficient and cost-effective;To define the most economical micro-grid configuration; and, To determine how residential micro-grid connected fuel cell(s) can contribute to America's hydrogen energy future.

  18. Deploying Systems Interoperability and Customer Choice within Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    twiki- sggrid/bin/view/SmartGrid/PriorityActionPlanssggrid/bin/view/SmartGrid/TTMeetingOnPriceCommunications The

  19. Integration of Computing and Information on Grids Geoffrey Fox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Fran Berman, Tony Hey and myself. (http://www.grid2002.org/ ) · Grids support e-Science representing

  20. Cyber Security in Smart Grid Substations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Cyber Security in Smart Grid Substations Thijs Baars Lucas van den Bemd Michail Theuns Robin van.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;CYBER SECURITY IN SMART GRID SUBSTATIONS Thijs Baars T.Brinkkemper@uu.nl Abstract. This report describes the state of smart grid security in Europe, specifically the Netherlands

  1. Enhancing Power Grid Stability through Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoba, Taras I.

    Enhancing Power Grid Stability through Analytics: Information is Power, and Power is Information no dummies). · But... many challenges in the North American power grid revolve around coordinating? Power is Information · Refrain in many quarters of the power grid today says that we must "extract

  2. Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

  3. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Next Generation Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Next Generation Network Simulations for Power System Applications resources. To operate the future power grids, these will need to take into account: » the integration (509) 372-6575 jason.fuller@pnnl.gov ABOUT FPGI The Future Power Grid Initiative (FPGI) will deliver

  4. Multiprocessor computer overset grid method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM); Ober, Curtis C. (Los Lunas, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A multiprocessor computer overset grid method and apparatus comprises associating points in each overset grid with processors and using mapped interpolation transformations to communicate intermediate values between processors assigned base and target points of the interpolation transformations. The method allows a multiprocessor computer to operate with effective load balance on overset grid applications.

  5. Vids 4 Grids: Surge Arresters and Switchgears

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new video series is increasing general public knowledge of the cutting edge jobs in the power sector that are essential to implementing a national clean-energy Smart Grid. Find out how switches and surge arresters are making the grid more reliable -- helping to bring the grid into the 21st century.

  6. Incremental Power Grid Verification ECE Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Incremental Power Grid Verification Abhishek ECE Department University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada f.najm@utoronto.ca ABSTRACT Verification of the on-die power grid is a key step in the design General Terms Performance, Algorithms, Verification Keywords Power Grid, voltage drop 1. INTRODUCTION

  7. Grid Orientations, (d, d + 2)-Polytopes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsner, Stefan

    the grid orientation can be read off a planar arrangement of red and blue lines. If f is an abstractGrid Orientations, (d, d + 2)-Polytopes and Arrangements of Pseudolines Stefan Felsner Institut f of linear programs on simple d-polytopes with d + 2 facets. These can be encoded by admissible grid

  8. Compressed Sensing Off the Grid Gongguo Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recht, Ben

    Compressed Sensing Off the Grid Gongguo Tang , Badri Narayan Bhaskar , Parikshit Shah are not assumed to lie on a grid, but can assume any values in the normalized frequency domain [0, 1]. An atomic a discretization procedure to reduce the continuous parameter space to a finite set of grid points [1, 3, 22, 25

  9. Development of renewable energy Challenges for the electrical grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    (U 20 kV) · Grids initially constructed and operated to distribute electricity · New Role technology cost reduction #12;Challenges for the grids 4. Grid Codes · Grid Codes: Regulation for production challenges ­ New capacities & grid connection : RES grid connection schemes (S3RENR) ­ RES and distribution

  10. Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, T.

    2013-02-01

    The report summarizes a 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. The study looked at existing large hydropower operations in the U.S., models for different electricity futures, markets, costs of existing and new technologies as well as trends related to hydropower investments in other parts of the world.

  11. A Benchmark Suite for SOAP-based Communication in Grid Web Services Michael R. Head1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the complex dependencies between the SOAP implementation and the application. We propose a standard benchmark of choice for grid standards such as the Web Services Resource Frame- work (WSRF) [14]. The WSRF initiative, Career Award ACI-0133838, and DOE grants DEFC02-01ER25451, DEFG02-02ER25526, Early Career Principle Inves

  12. THE NATIONAL FUSION COLLABORATORY PROJECT: APPLYING GRID TECHNOLOGY FOR MAGNETIC FUSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mary R.

    THE NATIONAL FUSION COLLABORATORY PROJECT: APPLYING GRID TECHNOLOGY FOR MAGNETIC FUSION RESEARCH D Diego, California 92186-5608 email: schissel@fusion.gat.com, Phone: (858) 455-3387, Fax: (858) 455- 4156, Berkeley, California 04720 The overall goal of the DOE SciDAC funded U.S. National Fusion Collaboratory

  13. Building-Grid Integration Research and Development Innovators Program (BIRD IP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) within the Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking graduate students interested in exploring building-grid integration and development (R&D) technology concepts that can improve the operating efficiency of buildings and increase penetration of distributed renewable energy generation, leading to more efficient buildings and cleaner generation of electricity.

  14. Building the International Lattice Data Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Beckett; B. Joo; C. M. Maynard; D. Pleiter; O. Tatebe; T. Yoshie

    2009-10-09

    We present the International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG), a loosely federated grid of grids for sharing data from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations. The ILDG comprises of metadata, file format and web-service standards, which can be used to wrap regional data-grid interfaces, allowing seamless access to catalogues and data in a diverse set of collaborating regional grids. We discuss the technological underpinnings of the ILDG, primarily the metadata and the middleware, and offer a critique of its various aspects with the hindsight of the design work and the first full year of production.

  15. Building the International Lattice Data Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark G. Beckett, Paul Coddington, Bálint Joó, Chris M. Maynard, Dirk Pleiter, Osamu Tatebe, Tomoteru Yoshie

    2011-06-01

    We present the International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG), a loosely federated grid-of-grids for sharing data from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations. The ILDG comprises of metadata, file-format and web-service standards, which can be used to wrap regional data-grid interfaces, allowing seamless access to catalogues and data in a diverse set of collaborating regional grids. We discuss the technological underpinnings of the ILDG, primarily the metadata and the middleware, and offer a critique of its various aspects with the hindsight of the design work and the two years of production.

  16. Energy System Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power inKenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Energy System Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power inKenya By Katherine Deaton Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power inKenya Energy System Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power in Kenya by Katherine Steel Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division

  17. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGetDepartment of|GreenerGridTeam

  18. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Clements, Samuel L.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kirkham, Harold; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Smith, David L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gardner, Chris; Varney, Jeff

    2014-07-01

    A smart grid uses digital power control and communication technology to improve the reliability, security, flexibility, and efficiency of the electric system, from large generation through the delivery systems to electricity consumers and a growing number of distributed generation and storage resources. To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. The Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report defines and examines 21 metrics that collectively provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This appendix presents papers covering each of the 21 metrics identified in Section 2.1 of the Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report. These metric papers were prepared in advance of the main body of the report and collectively form its informational backbone.

  19. RETHINKING THE FUTURE GRID: INTEGRATED NUCLEAR-RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Bragg-Sitton; R. Boardman

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 electricity generation mix in the United States consisted of ~13% renewables (hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal), 19% nuclear, 27% natural gas, and 39% coal. In the 2011 State of the Union Address, President Obama set a clean energy goal for the nation: “By 2035, 80 percent of America’s electricity will come from clean energy sources. Some folks want wind and solar. Others want nuclear, clean coal and natural gas. To meet this goal we will need them all.” The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recognize that “all of the above” means that we are called to best utilize all available clean energy sources. To meet the stated environmental goals for electricity generation and for the broader energy sector, there is a need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere. New energy systems must be capable of significantly reducing environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. A concept being advanced by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product. For the purposes of the present work, the hybrid system would integrate two or more energy resources to generate two or more products, one of which must be an energy commodity, such as electricity or transportation fuel. Subsystems would be integrated ‘‘behind’’ the electrical transmission bus and would be comprised of two or more energy conversion subsystems that have traditionally been separate or isolated. Energy flows would be dynamically apportioned as necessary to meet grid demand via a single, highly responsive connection to the grid that provides dispatchable electricity while capital-intensive generation assets operate at full capacity. Candidate region-specific hybrid energy systems selected for further study and figures of merit that will be used to assess system performance will be presented.

  20. DOE News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE, (509) 372-0810 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Project's Analytical Laboratory mechanical systems design completed Richland, Wash. -- Engineers working on the Hanford Waste...

  1. DOE News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTACT: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Carrie Meyer, DOE, (509) 372-0810 February 15, 2012 Fourth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy...

  2. DOE Office of Basic Sciences: An Overview of Basic Research Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Basic Energy Sciences Overview Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC ) Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research...

  3. DOE/OE Load as a Resource R&D Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, Dan T.

    2011-10-25

    DOE R&D and OE’s PSA and ISER programs support OE’s mission to modernize electric grid, enhance energy infrastructure security and reliability, and facilitate recovery from energy supply disruptions.

  4. Transdisciplinary electric power grid science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brummitt, Charles D; Dobson, Ian; Moore, Cristopher; D'Souza, Raissa M

    2013-01-01

    The 20th-century engineering feat that most improved the quality of human life, the electric power system, now faces discipline-spanning challenges that threaten that distinction. So multilayered and complex that they resemble ecosystems, power grids face risks from their interdependent cyber, physical, social and economic layers. Only with a holistic understanding of the dynamics of electricity infrastructure and human operators, automatic controls, electricity markets, weather, climate and policy can we fortify worldwide access to electricity.

  5. Grid Architecture | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGetDepartment of|GreenerGrid Applications

  6. Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvestingRenewable Energy (EERE) |Share YourSmart Grid Smart

  7. Green Energy Workshop Student Posters Semantic Complex Event Processing for Smart Grid Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    for Smart Grid Information Integration and Demand Management Qunzhi Zhou, Yogesh of the power grid to a Smart Grid. The benefits of Smart Grid include demand Grid Demonstration Project. We define an ontology model for Smart Grid

  8. Reducing the Vulnerability of Electric Power Grids to Terrorist Attacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross Baldick; Thekla Boutsika; Jin Hur; Manho Joung; Yin Wu; Minqi Zhong

    2009-01-31

    This report describes the development of a cascading outage analyzer that, given an initial disturbance on an electric power system, checks for thermal overloads, under-frequency and over-frequency conditions, and under-voltage conditions that would result in removal of elements from the system. The analyzer simulates the successive tripping of elements due to protective actions until a post-event steady state or a system blackout is reached.

  9. Flexographically Printed Rechargeable Zinc-based Battery for Grid Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zuoqian

    2013-01-01

    network applications. For grid energy storage applicationelectronics for grid energy storage applications. DedicationGrid Energy Storage..

  10. Statistical Analysis for On-Chip Power Grid Networks and Interconnects Considering Process Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Ning

    2009-01-01

    2 Background and Related Models Variational Power GridOn-chip Power Grid Network Models . . . . . . . . . .Power Grid Models Considered Process

  11. EcoGrid EU (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence, RhodeEchols County,EU (Smart Grid Project) Jump

  12. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-03-13

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  13. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-02-24

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  14. Recovery Act-SmartGrid regional demonstration transmission and distribution (T&D) Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, Edward T.

    2015-01-31

    This document represents the Final Technical Report for the Kansas City Power & Light Company (KCP&L) Green Impact Zone SmartGrid Demonstration Project (SGDP). The KCP&L project is partially funded by Department of Energy (DOE) Regional Smart Grid Demonstration Project cooperative agreement DE-OE0000221 in the Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure application area. This Final Technical Report summarizes the KCP&L SGDP as of April 30, 2015 and includes summaries of the project design, implementation, operations, and analysis performed as of that date.

  15. DOE-0346

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSite toDOE, State of IdahoDOE-0346

  16. DOE-0400

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSite toDOE, State of IdahoDOE-03461 of

  17. Columbia University, Electrical Engineering Technical Report #2011-05-06, Nov. 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zussman, Gil

    to the results of a real cascade that occurred during a major blackout in the San Diego area on Sept. 2011. INTRODUCTION Recent colossal failures of the power grid (such as the Aug. 2003 blackout in the Northeastern of the existing power transmission system and to identify ways to mitigate large-scale blackouts. The power grid

  18. Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-30

    To address future grid requirements, a U.S. Department of Energy ARRA Storage Demonstration program was launched in 2009 to commercialize promising technologies needed for stronger and more renewables-intensive grids. Raytheon Ktech and EnerVault received a cost-share grant award from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a grid-scale storage system based on EnerVault’s iron-chromium redox flow battery technology.

  19. FINAL REPORT - CENTER FOR GRID MODERNIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Daniel R

    2008-06-30

    The objective of the CGM was to develop high-priority grid modernization technologies in advanced sensors, communications, controls and smart systems to enable use of real-time or near real-time information for monitoring, analyzing and managing distribution and transmission grid conditions. The key strategic approach to carry out individual CGM research and development (R&D) projects was through partnerships, primarily with the GridApp™ Consortium utility members.

  20. SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electric grid. New York is the proud home of key industrial smart grid players including GE and IBM,and it represents an epicenter of major energy research within academia,...

  1. Quantifying the Impact of Adverse Events on the Electricity Grid as a Function of Grid Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Du, Pengwei

    2011-11-30

    Abstract--Traditional approaches to the study of grid vulnerability have taken an asset based approach, which seeks to identify those assets most likely to result in grid-wide failures or disruptions in the event that they are compromised. We propose an alternative approach to the study of grid vulnerability, one based on the topological structure of the entire grid. We propose a method that will identify topological parameters most closely related to the ability of the grid to withstand an adverse event. We compare these topological parameters in terms of their impact on the vulnerability metric we have defined, referred to as the grid’s “survivability”. Our approach is motivated by Paul Baran’s work on communications networks, which also studied vulnerability in terms of network-wide parameters. Our approach is useful both as a planning model for evaluating proposed changes to a grid and as a risk assessment tool.

  2. Grid-independent Issue in Numerical Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Wei; Wang Jian; Liao Guangxuan

    2006-09-26

    Grid independent is associated with the accuracy or even rationality of numerical results. This paper takes two-dimensional steady heat transfer for example to reveal the effect of grid resolution on numerical results. The law of grid dependence is obtained and a simple mathematical formula is presented. The production acquired here can be used as the guidance in choosing grid density in numerical simulation and get exact grid independent value without using infinite fine grid. Through analyzing grid independent, we can find the minimum number of grid cells that is needed to get grid-independent results. Such strategy can save computational resource while ensure a rational computational result.

  3. Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metrics and Benefits 07 Dec 09 For additional guidance documents, please visit the SmartGrid.gov Reporting Resources page REPORTING DATA COLLECTION October 12, 2011 Federal...

  4. Smart Grid Demonstration Funding Opportunity Announcement DE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000036: Frequently Asked Questions Smart Grid Demonstration Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000036: Frequently Asked...

  5. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y AMI Demand Response Distribution Management Systems Advanced OMS Distribution Automation...

  6. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Time of Use Rates Customer Information System IT upgrades Customer Education Demand Response CE empowers the customer and supports grid operations Office of...

  7. PNNL GridWise | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overview This is a case study of two year-long demonstration projects that tested demand-response concepts. The Grid Friendly Appliance Project demonstrated how household...

  8. The Quest for Sustainable Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardelli, Pedro H J; Cardieri, Paulo; Latva-aho, Matti

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a reply to the opinion paper: Transdisciplinary electric power grid science (PNAS), 2013 [arXiv:1307.7305].

  9. Case Study - EPB Smart Grid Investment Grant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Investment Grant 1 Smart switches installed in EPB service territory A Smarter Electric Circuit: Electric Power Board of Chattanooga Makes the Switch EPB of Chattanooga,...

  10. Grid Modernization: Challenges, Opportunities, and Solutions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    various topics which span a multitude of areas related to grid modernization including demand response, stochastic optimization for renewable integration, microgrids and...

  11. BPA Study of Smart Grid Economics ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of Smart Grid Economics Identifies Attractive Opportunities and Key Uncertainties Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Navigant Consulting recently released a white...

  12. "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science discoveries unveiled "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos science discoveries unveiled September 15 The event is an opportunity for...

  13. Energy Storage for the Power Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Imhoff, Carl; Vaishnav, Dave

    2014-06-12

    The iron vanadium redox flow battery was developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a solution to large-scale energy storage for the power grid.

  14. Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Applying Results, Reaching Beyond Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience: Applying Results, Reaching Beyond March 23, 2015 - 10:55am Addthis In...

  15. Energy Storage for the Power Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Imhoff, Carl; Vaishnav, Dave

    2014-04-23

    The iron vanadium redox flow battery was developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a solution to large-scale energy storage for the power grid.

  16. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01

    energy consumption over two years for (i) a grid charged LED lamp like the one we deployed, (ii) a corresponding solar

  17. Opening Remarks, Grid Integration Initiative Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loads Power Systems Integration Lab PV and Grid Simulators Energy Systems Integration Lab Fuel Cells, Electrolyzers Outdoor Test Area EVs, MV equipment Rooftop PV & Wind Energy...

  18. Optimization Online - Compressed Sensing Off the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sep 13, 2012 ... Compressed Sensing Off the Grid. Gongguo Tang(gtang5 ***at*** wisc.edu) Badri Narayan Bhaskar(bnbhaskar ***at*** wisc.edu) Parikshit ...

  19. Transmission Grid Integration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    utility operations, engage in transmission planning forums, and model generator output. More information on transmission grid integration is available in the Transmission...

  20. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some Technical Challenges Symposium on Modeling & Control of Alternative Energy Systems Joe Miller - Modern Grid Team Lead April 2, 2009 1 Conducted by the National Energy...

  1. Answering Your Questions about Grid Modernization | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the two-way flow of electricity and information between utility and users, and enable demand response, outage management and other important capabilities. A smarter grid...

  2. Grid Portal System Based on GPIR , Geoffrey Fox2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grid Portal System Based on GPIR Fang Juan1 , Geoffrey Fox2 , Marlon Pierce2 1 College of Computer Bloomington, IN 47404, USA fangjuan@bjut.edu.cn ; {gcf, mpierce}@indiana.edu Abstract Grid portal is the bridge between Grid and user. In this paper a Grid portal system is set up based on GPIR of Grid

  3. Supporting service management data composition in grid environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    monitoring architecture to the grid environment. For this purpose, the Relational Grid Monitoring, Monitoring, Service Management 1. Motivation The emerging grid environments make use of a multitude in [3] to grid environments. The aim is to facilitate deployment of well established grid monitoring

  4. Supporting service management data composition in grid environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ vice monitoring architecture to the grid environment. For this purpose, the Relational Grid Monitoring, Monitoring, Service Management 1. Motivation The emerging grid environments make use of a multitude in [3] to grid environments. The aim is to facilitate deployment of well established grid monitoring

  5. Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Acknowledgements This white paper was developed as one of nine white papers in the project "The Future Grid

  6. Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification Department of ECE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification Maha Nizam Department of ECE University of Toronto devgan@magma-da.com ABSTRACT Full-chip verification requires one to check if the power grid is safe, i of the circuit attached to the grid, thereby precluding early verification of the grid. We propose a power grid

  7. Grid Innovation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene'sGreg-DelwicheGrid Innovation

  8. Grid Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— We wantInvestigations Committee onVehiclesGrid

  9. NREL: Wind Research - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12WorkingSolarTechnologiesSilverGrid Integration

  10. Grid Integration | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice ofofWindUpcomingcanGrid Integration The Wind Program works with

  11. D:\0myfiles\Blackout Progress\Blackout-Progress.vp

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEveryCustomer ServiceVisualization81August 14,

  12. Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, IncBio Centers Announcementand TheBiota Biota

  13. SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1 and Rajkumar Buyya2 Keywords: Sensors, Sensor Networks, Grid computing, SensorML, SensorWeb. 1. Introduction Recent advances in electronic circuit miniaturization and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the creation

  14. GridUnit: Software Testing on the Grid Alexandre Duarte, Walfredo Cirne, Francisco Brasileiro, Patrcia Machado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    GridUnit: Software Testing on the Grid Alexandre Duarte, Walfredo Cirne, Francisco Brasileiro testing is a fundamental part of system development. As software grows, its test suite becomes larger, there is the need to test software in a variety of environments. In this paper, we introduce GridUnit, an extension

  15. An Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    of interoperability, shared ontologies between different systems, and mappings of a domain ontology onto a service.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The Earth System GridAn Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid. Line Pouchard

  16. DOE Science Showcase - DOE's Smart Grid Research | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01TechnicalScientific and TechnicalOffice ofOffice of Scientific

  17. Balancing markets Bertrand Cornlusse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    of imbalance: · frequency deviates from 50Hz · loss of synchronism · blackout In case of imbalance start capability, to restart a grid following a blackout · Provision of reactive power, for voltage

  18. Universality Class of the Fiber Bundle Model on Complex Networks Dong-Hee Kim,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hawoong

    ,12]. For instance, the recent blackout in the United States and Canada was caused by the cascading breakdown of elements through a power grid. The scenario of a major blackout is very similar to the idea of the FBM

  19. A COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE OPTIMAL POWER FLOW PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under these contingencies was exemplified by the blackout in the North American power grid during 2003. The reason for the blackout was a failure of only a handful of contingencies in the network [8

  20. A COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE OPTIMAL POWER FLOW PROBLEM Baha Alzalg, Catalina Anghel, Wenying Gan, Qing Huang, Mustazee Rahman, Alex Shum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under these contingencies was exemplified by the blackout in the North American power grid during 2003. The reason for the blackout was a failure of only a handful of contingencies in the network [8