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1

City of Black River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Black River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Black River Falls Place Wisconsin Utility Id 1776 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - Gs-1 Single Phase Commercial General Service - Gs-1 Single Phase with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial General Service - Gs-1 Three Phase Commercial

2

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River R D 4 0 0 RD 415 HWY41 RD 207 REVISRD YO SEM ITE SP RINGS P KY LILLEY County Rosedale Ranch Revis Mountain Daulton Spring Red Top Lookout Buford Mountain Black Hawk Lake

Wang, Zhi

3

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will match Focus on Energy incentive to 5,000 Commercial Central AC Tune-Up: 50 LED Exit Signs: Free Installation River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) offers a variety of...

4

7Falling Into a Black Hole An object that falls into a black hole will cross the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7Falling Into a Black Hole An object that falls into a black hole will cross the Event Horizon. Astronomers have determined the mass of this companion to be 8.7 times the sun. As a black hole, its Event determined the mass of this companion to be 8.7 times the sun. As a black hole, its Event Horizon radius

5

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Other Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type PACE Financing Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The program will also support the installation of energy efficiency measures in connection with a qualifying renewable energy project, provided that the renewable energy

6

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $0.30/kWh Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special rate, $0.30/kilowatt-hour (kWh), is available to all the RFMU customers on a first-come, first-served basis for systems up to 4 kilowatts (kW). The RFMU

7

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and...

8

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Shared Savings Program: $2,500 - $50,000 Energy Improvement Incentive: Varies, Contact WPPI RFP for Energy Efficiency: Varies, Contact WPPI Efficient Lighting Program: Will match Focus on Energy incentive to $5,000

9

Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana) Jump to: navigation, search Name Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc Place Montana Utility Id 6169 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

10

Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming) Jump to: navigation, search Name Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 6169 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

11

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Nonprofit Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate 60% of project cost, up to $5,000 Program Info Funding Source POWERful Choices Initiative Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentive equal to Focus on Energy Incentive River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) provides matching rebates to

12

Accident Investigation of the Fall Injury at the Savannah River...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Accident Investigation Report Fall Injury Accident at the Savannah River Site on July 1, 2011 August 8, 2011 Disclaimer...

13

City of Thief River Falls, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thief River Falls, Minnesota (Utility Company) Thief River Falls, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Thief River Falls Place Minnesota Utility Id 18820 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100% controlled electric heat separate meter Residential Commercial - 100% controlled electric heat Commercial Commercial general service rate Commercial Commercial service rate with Standby Generation Commercial Geothermal Heating Residential

14

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Other Program Info Start Date 05/01/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/12 State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Tree Planting: 50% of cost up to $50 (limit 3 trees) Freezer Recycling: $30 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Energy Star Home Performance: 33.3% up to $1,500 15% Energy Savings from Installed Measures: $200

15

Comment on Origin of Groundwater Discharge at Fall River Springs  

SciTech Connect

I'm writing at the request of the Pit River Tribe to offer my professional opinion as a geochemist regarding the origin of groundwater discharge at the Fall River Springs, Shasta Co., California. In 1997, I conducted a study of the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes in northern California, in collaboration with one of my colleagues. This work was published as a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report (Davisson and Rose, 1997). The Fall River Springs emerge from the distal end of the Giant Crater Lava Field, a laterally extensive basalt flow that stretches from the southern flank of Medicine Lake Volcano southward for a distance of 40 km. Both Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava Field have virtually no surface water drainages. Precipitation that falls in these areas is inferred to seep into fractures in the rock, where it is carried down gradient under the force of gravity. Mean annual precipitation rates on Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava field are adequate to account for the {approx}1200 ft{sup 3}/sec discharge of the Fall River Springs. To evaluate the origin of the springs using geochemical methods, water samples were collected from the Fall River Springs and the Medicine Lake highlands and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. The isotope ratios measured for a groundwater sample are diagnostic of the average composition of the precipitation from which the water was derived. The isotope ratios of rain and snow also vary systematically with elevation, such that groundwater derived from recharge at higher elevations can be distinguished from that which originated at lower elevations. The stable isotope data for the Fall River Springs are consistent with groundwater recharge on the Medicine Lake Volcano and adjacent lava field. Mass balance calculations suggest that approximately half of the Fall River Springs flow is derived from the volcanic edifice. Rose and Davisson (1996) showed that the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes commonly contain dissolved CO{sub 2} that originated from the volcanoes. This volcanic CO{sub 2} component is readily identified from carbon-14 measurements of the water. Carbon-14 analyses of the Fall River samples indicate that at least 27% of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the springs was derived from a volcanic CO{sub 2} source. Such a large volcanic CO{sub 2} flux requires that the groundwater supplying flow to the Fall River Springs must originate from a volcano where magma degassing is actively occurring. Given the hydrogeologic configuration of the Fall River aquifer system, it appears that the Medicine Lake Volcano is the only likely source of the volcanic CO{sub 2}. These data independently confirm the Medicine Lake highlands as a significant recharge source for the Fall River Springs. Moreover, these data indicate that groundwater recharge occurring on Medicine Lake Volcano must interact with a CO{sub 2} volatile phase derived from the geothermal system beneath the volcano. The lack of hot springs on Medicine Lake Volcano suggests that the geothermal system underlying the volcano is relatively tightly sealed. Nevertheless, it is probable that the geothermal fluid originates from precipitation falling on the volcanic edifice. This is the same water that supplies an important fraction of the Fall River Spring discharge. The source of the geothermal fluid can be evaluated using stable isotopes. The oxygen isotope signature of the geothermal fluid may have been modified by high temperature oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding rock, but the hydrogen isotope signature should still be diagnostic of the origin of the fluid. Although the geothermal system appears to be largely decoupled from the shallow groundwater system that supplies the Fall River Springs, it is uncertain what impact the development of the geothermal system as an energy resource would have on groundwater circulation patterns on the volcano. Given the importance of the Fall River Springs as a water resource for the

Rose, T

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Comment on Origin of Groundwater Discharge at Fall River Springs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I'm writing at the request of the Pit River Tribe to offer my professional opinion as a geochemist regarding the origin of groundwater discharge at the Fall River Springs, Shasta Co., California. In 1997, I conducted a study of the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes in northern California, in collaboration with one of my colleagues. This work was published as a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report (Davisson and Rose, 1997). The Fall River Springs emerge from the distal end of the Giant Crater Lava Field, a laterally extensive basalt flow that stretches from the southern flank of Medicine Lake Volcano southward for a distance of 40 km. Both Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava Field have virtually no surface water drainages. Precipitation that falls in these areas is inferred to seep into fractures in the rock, where it is carried down gradient under the force of gravity. Mean annual precipitation rates on Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava field are adequate to account for the {approx}1200 ft{sup 3}/sec discharge of the Fall River Springs. To evaluate the origin of the springs using geochemical methods, water samples were collected from the Fall River Springs and the Medicine Lake highlands and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. The isotope ratios measured for a groundwater sample are diagnostic of the average composition of the precipitation from which the water was derived. The isotope ratios of rain and snow also vary systematically with elevation, such that groundwater derived from recharge at higher elevations can be distinguished from that which originated at lower elevations. The stable isotope data for the Fall River Springs are consistent with groundwater recharge on the Medicine Lake Volcano and adjacent lava field. Mass balance calculations suggest that approximately half of the Fall River Springs flow is derived from the volcanic edifice. Rose and Davisson (1996) showed that the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes commonly contain dissolved CO{sub 2} that originated from the volcanoes. This volcanic CO{sub 2} component is readily identified from carbon-14 measurements of the water. Carbon-14 analyses of the Fall River samples indicate that at least 27% of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the springs was derived from a volcanic CO{sub 2} source. Such a large volcanic CO{sub 2} flux requires that the groundwater supplying flow to the Fall River Springs must originate from a volcano where magma degassing is actively occurring. Given the hydrogeologic configuration of the Fall River aquifer system, it appears that the Medicine Lake Volcano is the only likely source of the volcanic CO{sub 2}. These data independently confirm the Medicine Lake highlands as a significant recharge source for the Fall River Springs. Moreover, these data indicate that groundwater recharge occurring on Medicine Lake Volcano must interact with a CO{sub 2} volatile phase derived from the geothermal system beneath the volcano. The lack of hot springs on Medicine Lake Volcano suggests that the geothermal system underlying the volcano is relatively tightly sealed. Nevertheless, it is probable that the geothermal fluid originates from precipitation falling on the volcanic edifice. This is the same water that supplies an important fraction of the Fall River Spring discharge. The source of the geothermal fluid can be evaluated using stable isotopes. The oxygen isotope signature of the geothermal fluid may have been modified by high temperature oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding rock, but the hydrogen isotope signature should still be diagnostic of the origin of the fluid. Although the geothermal system appears to be largely decoupled from the shallow groundwater system that supplies the Fall River Springs, it is uncertain what impact the development of the geothermal system as an energy resource would have on groundwater circulation patterns on the volcano. Given the importance of the Fall River Springs as a water resource for the

Rose, T

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

City of River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of River Falls Place Wisconsin Utility Id 16082 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

18

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities February 1, 2013 - 9:00am Addthis South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the laboratory and seven historically black colleges and universities. South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the laboratory and seven historically black colleges and universities.

19

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities February 1, 2013 - 9:00am Addthis South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the laboratory and seven historically black colleges and universities. South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the laboratory and seven historically black colleges and universities.

20

Spawning Distribution of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is separated into 2 chapters. The chapters are (1) Progress toward determining the spawning distribution of supplemented fall chinook salmon in the Snake River in 1999; and (2) Fall chinook salmon spawning ground surveys in the Snake River, 1999.

Garcia, Aaron P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Black River Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coop Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Black River Electric Coop Place Missouri Utility Id 1775 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting MV 175 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting MV 250 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting MV 400 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting SLV 400 W Direct Lighting Outdoor Lighting SLV 400 W Flood Lighting Outdoor Lighting SVL 100 W Lighting Residential Residential Single Phase General Service Commercial Standard Single-Phase Commercial/Industrial Service Industrial

22

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated to provide empirical data and analyses on the dam passage timing, travel rate, survival, and life history variation of fall Chinook salmon that are produced in the Clearwater River. The area of interest for this study focuses on the lower four miles of the Clearwater River and its confluence with the Snake River because this is an area where many fish delay their seaward migration. The goal of the project is to increase our understanding of the environmental and biological factors that affect juvenile life history of fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. The following summaries are provided for each of the individual chapters in this report.

Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluate the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Habitat, Status Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-038-00, Evaluate the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, began in FY04 (15 December 2003) and continues into FY06. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during FY04 and FY05. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). This project evaluates the restoration potential of mainstem habitats for fall Chinook salmon. The studies address two research questions: 'Are there sections not currently used by spawning fall Chinook salmon within the impounded lower Snake River that possess the physical characteristics for potentially suitable fall Chinook spawning habitat?' and 'Can hydrosystem operations affecting these sections be adjusted such that the sections closely resemble the physical characteristics of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in similar physical settings?' Efforts are focused at two study sites: (1) the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Columbia River confluence, and (2) the Lower Granite Dam tailrace. Our previous studies indicated that these two areas have the highest potential for restoring Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The study sites will be evaluated under existing structural configurations at the dams (i.e., without partial removal of a dam structure), and alternative operational scenarios (e.g., varying forebay/tailwater elevations). The areas studied represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We are using a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats is the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Escapement estimates for fall of 2000 indicate more than 9000 adult fall Chinook salmon returned to this area, accounting for more than 2100 redds within a 5 km section of river.

Hanrahan, T.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

Black River Farm Solar Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farm Solar Project Farm Solar Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Black River Farm Solar Project Facility Black River Farm Solar Project Sector Solar Facility Type Fixed Tilt Ground-Mount & Roof-Mount Owner EnXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Black River Farm Location Hunterdon County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.5669515°, -74.9208772° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5669515,"lon":-74.9208772,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume I..  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developed to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost ratio of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. 28 figs., 23 tabs.

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Quasinormal ringing of Kerr black holes. II. Excitation by particles falling radially with arbitrary energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytical understanding of quasinormal mode ringing requires an accurate knowledge of the Green's function describing the response of the black hole to external perturbations. We carry out a comprehensive study of quasinormal mode excitation for Kerr black holes. Relying on the formalism developed by Mano, Suzuki and Takasugi, we improve and extend previous calculations of the quasinormal mode residues in the complex frequency plane ("excitation factors" B_q). Using these results we compute the "excitation coefficients" C_q (essentially the mode amplitudes) in the special case where the source of the perturbations is a particle falling into the black hole along the symmetry axis. We compare this calculation with numerical integrations of the perturbation equations, and we show quantitatively how the addition of higher overtones improves the agreement with the numerical waveforms. Our results should find applications in models of the ringdown stage and in the construction of semianalytical template banks for gravitational-wave detectors, especially for binaries with large mass ratios and/or fast-spinning black holes.

Zhongyang Zhang; Emanuele Berti; Vitor Cardoso

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

27

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoirs epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the waters surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River, Annual Report 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted primarily in 1997 and 1998. This report communicates significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Connor, William P.; Burge, Howard L.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program during the fall of 2001. The objective was to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with either surgically implanted electromyogram (EMG) transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters and were monitored with mobile and stationary receivers. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted passage of three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat River and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between, below, and above the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat River, 40% passed the first falls, 24% passed the second falls, and 20% made it to Lyle Falls. None of the EMG-tagged fish were able to pass Lyle Falls, either over the falls or via a fishway at Lyle Falls. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 centimeters per second (cm s{sup -1}) between falls to as high as 189 (cm s{sup -1}) at falls passage. Fish swam above critical swimming speeds while passing the falls more often than while swimming between the falls (58.9% versus 1.7% of the transmitter signals). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (100.7 to 128.2 kilocalories [kcals] to traverse areas between or below falls versus 0.3 to 1.0 kcals to pass falls). Relationships between sex, length, and time of day on the success of falls passage were also examined. Average swimming speeds were highest during the day in all areas except at some waterfalls. There was no apparent relationship between either fish condition or length and successful passage of waterfalls in the lower Klickitat River. Female fall chinook salmon, however, had a much lower likelihood of passing waterfalls than males. The study also examined energy costs and swimming speeds for fish released above Lyle Falls as they migrated to upstream spawning areas. This journey averaged 15.93 days to travel a mean maximum of 37.6 km upstream at a total energy cost of approx 3,971 kcals (34% anaerobic and 66% aerobic) for a sample of five fish. A bioenergetics example was run, which estimated that fall chinook salmon would expend an estimated 1,208 kcal to pass from the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam and 874 kcals to pass Bonneville Dam and pool and the three falls on the Lower Klickitat River, plus an additional 2,770 kcals above the falls to reach the spawning grounds, leaving them with approximately 18% (1,089 kcals) of their original energy reserves for spawning. Results of the bioenergetics example suggest that a delay of 9 to 11 days along the lower Klickitat River may deplete their remaining energy reserves (at a rate of about 105 kcal d{sup -1}) resulting in death before spawning would occur.

Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Black River Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop, Inc Electric Coop, Inc Place South Carolina Utility Id 1763 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Power Industrial Residential Residential Small Commercial Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1040/kWh Commercial: $0.1090/kWh Industrial: $0.0750/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Black_River_Electric_Coop,_Inc&oldid=409055" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

32

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Habitat quality of historic Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning locations and implications for incubation survival: part 1, substrate quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluated substrate quality at two historic fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning sites in the Snake River, Idaho, USA. The primary objective of this evaluation was to measure sediment permeability within these areas to determine the potential quality of the habitat in the event that anadromous salmonids are reintroduced to the upper Snake River. Riverbed sediments within the two sites in the upper Snake River were sampled using freeze cores and hydraulic slug tests. Sediment grain size distributions at both sites were typical of gravel-bed rivers with the surface layer coarser than the underlying substrate, suggesting the riverbed surface was armored. Despite the armored nature of the bed, the size of the largest material present on the riverbed surface was well within the size limit of material capable of being excavated by spawning fall Chinook salmon. The percentage of fines was low, suggesting good quality substrate for incubating salmon embryos. Geometric mean particle sizes found in this study compared to a 55% to 80% survival to emergence based on literature values. Hydraulic slug tests showed moderate to high hydraulic conductivity and were comparable to values from current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hells Canyon Reach of the Snake River and the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. Predicted estimates of mean egg survival at both sites (48% and 74%) equaled or exceeded estimates from fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hells Canyon Reach and the Hanford Reach.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Redd Site Selection and Spawning Habitat Use by Fall Chinook Salmon, Hanford Reach, Columbia River : Final Report 1995 - 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1995 through 1998 on identifying the spawning habitat requirements of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The project investigated whether traditional spawning habitat models could be improved in order to make better predictions of available habitat for fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. Results suggest models could be improved if they used spawning area-specific, rather than river-specific, spawning characteristics; incorporated hyporheic discharge measurements; and gave further consideration to the geomorphic features that are present in the unconstrained segments of large alluvial rivers. Ultimately the recovery of endangered fall chinook salmon will depend on how well we are able to recreate the characteristics once common in alluvial floodplains of large rivers. The results from this research can be used to better define the relationship between these physical habitat characteristics and fall chinook salmon spawning site selection, and provide more efficient use of limited recovery resources. This report is divided into four chapters which were presented in the author's doctoral dissertation which he completed through the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Each of the chapters has been published in peer reviewed journals or is currently under review. Chapter one is a conceptual spawning habitat model that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Chapter two describes the comparison of the physical factors associated with fall chinook salmon redd clusters located at two sites within the Reach. Spatial point pattern analysis of redds showed that redd clusters averaged approximately 10 hectares in area and their locations were consistent from year to year. The tendency to spawn in clusters suggests fall chinook salmon's use of spawning habitat is highly selective. Hydraulic characteristics of the redd clusters were significantly different than the habitat surrounding them. Velocity and lateral slope of the river bottom were the most important habitat variables in predicting redd site selection. While these variables explained a large proportion of the variance in redd site selection (86 to 96%), some unmeasured factors still accounted for a small percentage of actual spawning site selection. Chapter three describes the results from an investigation into the hyporheic characteristics of the two spawning areas studied in chapter two. This investigation showed that the magnitude and chemical characteristics of hyporheic discharge were different between and within two spawning areas. Apparently, fall chinook salmon used chemical and physical cues from the discharge to locate spawning areas. Finally, chapter four describes a unique method that was developed to install piezometers into the cobble bed of the Columbia River.

Geist, David R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999 and years previous. In an effort to provide this information to a wider audience, the individual chapters in this report have been submitted as manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. These chapters communicate significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Abundance and timing of seaward migration of Snake River fall chinook salmon was indexed using passage data collected at Lower Granite Dam for five years. We used genetic analyses to determine the lineage of fish recaptured at Lower Granite Dam that had been previously PIT tagged. We then used discriminant analysis to determine run membership of PIT-tagged smolts that were not recaptured to enable us to calculate annual run composition and to compared early life history attributes of wild subyearling fall and spring chinook salmon. Because spring chinook salmon made up from 15.1 to 44.4% of the tagged subyearling smolts that were detected passing Lower Granite Dam, subyearling passage data at Lower Granite Dam can only be used to index fall chinook salmon smolt abundance and passage timing if genetic samples are taken to identify run membership of smolts. Otherwise, fall chinook salmon smolt abundance would be overestimated and timing of fall chinook salmon smolt passage would appear to be earlier and more protracted than is the case.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Spawning and abundance of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1948--1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River provides the only major spawning habitat for the upriver bright (URB) race of fall chinook salmon in the mainstem Columbia River. Hanford Site biologists have conducted aerial surveys of spawning salmon in the Hanford Reach since 1948. This report summarizes data on fall chinook salmon spawning in the Hanford Reach and presents a discussion of factors that may affect population trends. Most data are limited to fisheries agency reports and other working documents. Fisheries management practices in the Columbia River system have changed rapidly over the last decade, particularly under requirements of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980. New information has been generated and included in this report. 75 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

Dauble, D.D.; Watson, D.G.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Physicochemical Characteristics of the Hyporheic Zone Affect Redd Site Selection of Chum and Fall Chinook Salmon, Columbia River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) may historically have been the most abundant species of Columbia River salmon, contributing as much as 50% of the total biomass of all salmon in the Pacific Ocean prior to the 1940's (Neave 1961). By the 1950's, however, run sizes to the Columbia River dropped dramatically and in 1999 the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Columbia River chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA; NMFS 1999). Habitat degradation, water diversions, harvest, and artificial propagation are the major human-induced factors that have contributed to the species decline (NMFS 1998). Columbia River chum salmon spawn exclusively in the lower river below Bonneville Dam, including an area near Ives Island. The Ives Island chum salmon are part of the Columbia River evolutionary significant unit (ESU) for this species, and are included in the ESA listing. In addition to chum salmon, fall chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) also spawn at Ives Island. Spawning surveys conducted at Ives Island over the last several years show that chum and fall chinook salmon spawned in clusters in different locations (US Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, unpublished data). The presence of redd clusters suggested that fish were selecting specific habitat features within the study area (Geist and Dauble 1998). Understanding the specific features of these spawning areas is needed to quantify the amount of habitat available to each species so that minimum flows can be set to protect fish and maintain high quality habitat.

Geist, David R.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Influence of river level on temperature and hydraulic gradients in chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning areas downstream of Bonneville Dam, Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon segregate spatially during spawning in the Ives Island side channel of the lower Columbia River downstream from Bonneville Dam. Previous research during one spawning season (2000) suggested that these species selected spawning habitats based on differences in hyporheic temperature and vertical hydraulic gradient (VHG) with the river. In this study, we confirmed the spatial segregation of spawning based on hyporheic characteristics over four years (20012004) and examined the effects of load-following operations (power generation to meet short-term electrical demand) at Bonneville Dam on hyporheic function and characteristics. We found that during the study period, hyporheic temperature and VHG in chum salmon spawning areas were highly variable during periods of load-following operation when river levels fluctuated. In contrast, hyporheic water temperature and VHG within chum spawning areas fluctuated less when river levels were not changing due to load-following operation. Variable temperature and VHG could affect chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning segregation and incubation success by altering the cues each species uses to select redd sites. Alterations in site selection would result in a breakdown in the spatial segregation of spawning between chum and fall Chinook salmon, which would expose earlier spawning fall Chinook eggs to a greater risk of dislodgement from later spawning chum salmon. Additional research will be required to fully assess the effects of load-following operations on the hyporheic environment and spawning and incubation success of chum and fall Chinook salmon downstream from Bonneville Dam.

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Murray, Christopher J.; McGrath, Kathy; Bott, Yi-Ju; Hanrahan, Timothy P.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by PNNL that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall chinook salmon spawning areas. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The hydrologic regime during the 2002?2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, the results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only two sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude changes in discharge, these flux reversals had minimal effect on emergence timing estimates. Indeed, the emergence timing estimates at all sites was largely unaffected by the changes in river stage resulting from hydropower operations at Hells Canyon Dam. Our results indicate that the range of emergence timing estimates due to differences among the eggs from different females can be as large as or larger than the emergence timing estimates due to site differences (i.e., bed temperatures within and among sites). We conclude that during the 2002-2003 fall chinook salmon incubation period, hydropower operations of Hells Canyon Dam had an insignificant effect on fry emergence timing at the study sites. It appears that short-term (i.e., hourly to daily) manipulations of discharge from the Hells Canyon Complex during the incubation period would not substantially alter egg pocket incubation temperatures, and thus would not affect fry emergence timing at the study sites. However, the use of hydropower operational manipulations at the Hells Canyon Complex to accelerate egg incubation and fry emergence should not be ruled out on the basis of only one water year's worth of study. Further investigation of the incubation environment of Snake River fall chinook salmon is warranted based on the complexity of hyporheic zone characteristics and the variability of surface/subsurface interactions among dry, normal, and wet water years.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Abernethy, Cary S.

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2007, we used radio and acoustic telemetry to evaluate the migratory behavior, survival, mortality, and delay of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River and Lower Granite Reservoir. Monthly releases of radio-tagged fish ({approx}95/month) were made from May through October and releases of 122-149/month acoustic-tagged fish per month were made from August through October. We compared the size at release of our tagged fish to that which could have been obtained at the same time from in-river, beach seine collections made by the Nez Perce Tribe. Had we relied on in-river collections to obtain our fish, we would have obtained very few in June from the free-flowing river but by late July and August over 90% of collected fish in the transition zone were large enough for tagging. Detection probabilities of radio-tagged subyearlings were generally high ranging from 0.60 (SE=0.22) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the different study reaches and months. Lower detection probabilities were observed in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches where fewer fish were detected. Detection probabilities of acoustic-tagged subyearlings were also high and ranged from 0.86 (SE=0.09) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches during August through October. Estimates of the joint probability of migration and survival generally declined in a downstream direction for fish released from June through August. Estimates were lowest in the transition zone (the lower 7 km of the Clearwater River) for the June release and lowest in the confluence area for July and August releases. The joint probability of migration and survival in these reaches was higher for the September and October releases, and were similar to those of fish released in May. Both fish weight and length at tagging were significantly correlated with the joint probability of migrating and surviving for both radio-tagged and acoustic-tagged fish. For both tag types, fish that were heavier at tagging had a higher probability of successfully passing through the confluence (P=0.0050 for radio-tagged fish; P=0.0038 for acoustic-tagged fish). Radio-tagged fish with greater weight at tagging also had a higher probability of migrating and surviving through both the lower free-flowing reach (P=0.0497) and the transition zone (P=0.0007). Downstream movement rates of radio-tagged subyearlings were highest in free-flowing reaches in every month and decreased considerably with impoundment. Movement rates were slowest in the transition zone for the June and August release groups, and in the confluence reach for the July release group. For acoustic-tagged subyearlings, the slowest movement rates through the confluence and upper reservoir reaches were observed for the September release group. Radio-tagged fish released in August showed the greatest delay in the transition zone, while acoustic-tagged fish released in September showed the greatest delay in the transition zone and confluence reaches. Across the monthly release groups from July through September, the probability of delaying in the transition zone and surviving there declined throughout the study. All monthly release groups of radio-tagged subyearlings showed evidence of mortality within the transition zone, with final estimates (across the full 45-d detection period) ranging from 0.12 (SE not available) for the May release group to 0.58 (SE = 0.06) for the June release group. The May and September release groups tended to have lower mortality in the transition zone than the June, July, and August release groups. Live fish were primarily detected away from shore in the channel, whereas all dead fish were located along shorelines with most being located in the vicinity of the Memorial Bridge and immediately upstream. During the May detection period, before the implementation of summer flow augmentation, temperatures in the Clearwater River and Snake River arms of Lower Granite Reservoir and the downstream boundary of the confluence ranged from 8 to 17 C. During the June-August detection periods, however, temperatures in

Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; McMichael, Geoffrey A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by Washington Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (WDFW) biologists in 1993 (Hymer 1997). Known spawning areas included gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and Ives Island. The size of this population from 1994 to 1996 was estimated at 1,800 to 5,200 fish (Hymer 1997), and 554 fish in 1998 (Van der Naald et al. 1999). These estimates were based on carcass surveys and visual observation of redds by boat near the shoreline. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted underwater video surveys in the fall of 1999 and 2000 to determine the extent of the fall chinook salmon spawning and to estimate the number of redds occurring in deeper water. Estimates of redds occurring in water depths exceeding 2.2 m at 143,000 cubic feet per second (kcfs) were 499 in 1999 (Mueller and Dauble 1999) and 567 redds >2.2 m at 127 kcfs in 2000 (this study). The majority of the redds found were confined near the main river channel adjacent to Pierce Island. Chum salmon (O. keta) also have been documented using the mouth of Hamilton Creek and portions of Hamilton Slough for spawning. The majority of chum salmon were found to spawn in shallow water at the mouth of Hamilton Creek adjacent to Ives Island. Estimates of the natural chum salmon spawning population for 1998 were 226 (Van der Naald et al. 1999). Chum salmon spawning near Ives Island are part of the Columbia River evolutionary significant unit (ESU), and are included in the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) listing in March 1999. Our main objective of this study was to locate deep water spawning locations of fall chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel and to collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites. The secondary objective was to map any chum salmon redds located in the deep sections of Hamilton Slough. There are several ongoing investigations to define the physical habitat characteristics associated with fall chinook and chum salmon spawning areas downstream of Bonneville Dam. A major concern is to determine what flows (i.e., surface elevations) are necessary to ensure their long-term survival. This objective is consistent with the high priority placed by the Northwest Power Planning Council's Independent Advisory Board and the salmon managers on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

Mueller, Robert P.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2004; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2004 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

The transient response of bedrock river networks to sudden base level fall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following a change in the factors that determine landscape form, a transient signal of adjustment propagates through the river network, progressively adjusting channels and hillslopes to the new conditions. When conditions ...

Crosby, Benjamin T. (Benjamin Thomas)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall Chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period (mid- to late-summer) when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River Chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations (e.g., summer flow augmentation) to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile Chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall Chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. This was a pilot-scale study to evaluate these relationships under existing operations of Hells Canyon Dam (i.e., without any prescribed manipulations of river discharge) during the 2002-2003 water year. The project was initiated in the context of examining the potential for improving juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon survival by modifying the discharge operations of Hells Canyon Dam. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project at index sites throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The HCR extends from Hells Canyon Dam (river kilometer [rkm] 399) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude

Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR are: (1) ODFW (Report A): Operate and evaluate the juvenile fish bypass system in the West Extension Irrigation District canal at Three Mile Falls Dam; and (2) CTUIR (Report 8): Examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin that includes restorations of coho salmon Oncorhynchus Wsutch and chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha and enhancement of summer steelhead 0. mytiss.

Nigro, Anthony A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

Geist, David (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawtscha) Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted video-based boat surveys to identify fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas located in deep water (>1 m) downstream of Bonneville Dam in the fall of 2002. This report documents the number and extent of chinook salmon spawning near Ives and Pierce Islands of the Columbia River, and is the fourth in a series of reports prepared since 1999. The main objective of this study was to find deepwater spawning locations of fall chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel, collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites, and provide estimates of adult spawners in the surveyed area. The secondary objective was to document the occurrence of any chum salmon (O. keta) redds located in the deeper sections near below Hamilton Creek. There was a significant increase in the number of fall chinook salmon redds found in the locations surveyed during the 2002 surveys when compared to previous surveys by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A total of 192 redds were found in two general locations adjacent to Pierce Island (river km 228.5) encompassing an area of approximately 9.31 ha. Peak spawning activity, based on redd counts and live fish seen near redds, was on or near November 15, 2002. An estimated 1,768 fall chinook salmon redds at water depths exceeding {approx}1.m ({approx} 125 kcfs) were documented in 2002. This estimate is the expanded number based on the number of redds found within the pre-defined survey area. Fall chinook salmon redds were found at water depths from 0.9 to 8.5 m and were constructed in gravel to large cobble ranging in size from 4.83 to 13.4 cm in diameter. No chum salmon redds were found in areas surveyed during 2002, although several carcasses were found at the mouth of Woodward Creek and in the deeper sections below Hamilton Creek.

Mueller, Robert (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, 1989 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979 this study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall chinook salmon from the Columbia River. Coded wire tagging (CWT) of hatchery fall chinook salmon began in 1979 with the 1978 brood and was completed in 1982 with the 1981 brood of fish at rearing facilities on the Columbia River system. From 18 to 20 rearing facilities were involved in the study each brood year. Nearly 14 million tagged fish, about 4% of the production, were released as part of this study over the four years, 1979 through 1982. Sampling for recoveries of these tagged fish occurred from 1980 through 1986 in the sport and commercial marine fisheries from Alaska through California, Columbia River fisheries, and returns to hatcheries and adjacent streams. The National Marine Fisheries Service coordinated this study among three fishery agencies: US Fish and Wildfire Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution, fishery contribution, survival, and value of the production of fall chinook salmon from each rearing facility on the Columbia River system to Pacific coast salmon fisheries. To achieve these objectives fish from each hatchery were given a distinctive CWT. 81 refs., 20 figs., 68 tabs.

Vreeland, Robert R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effects of Summer Flow Augmentation on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2002 and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2002. Peer-review publication remains a high priority of this research project, and it insures that our work meets high scientific standards. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers coauthored by personnel of project 199102900 that were written or published from 1998 to 2003.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA); Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effects of Summer Flow Augmentation on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2004 and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Columbia River basin. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall Chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2004. Publication is a high priority of our staff. Publication provides our results to a wide audience, and it insures that our work meets high scientific standards. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 1991-02900 that were written or published from 1998 to 2005.

Tiffan, Kenneth F. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA); Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning Habitat near Ives and Pierce Islands in the Columbia River, Progress Report 1999-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The area around Ives Island below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River supports spawning populations of chum and fall chinook salmon. Because this area is sensitive to water level fluctuations caused by changes in discharge from Bonneville Dam and from tidal cycles, we initiated a study to quantify flow-dependent changes in available spawning habitat for chum and fall chinook salmon. We conducted surveys to characterize the substrates available in the Ives Island study area. Detailed bathymetry was also obtained to serve as a foundation for two-dimension hydrodynamic modeling, which was used to estimate water velocities, depths, and wetted area over a range of simulated flows. Habitat surveys were conducted and logistic regression was used to identify physical habitat variables that were important in determining the presence of chum and fall chinook salmon redds. The physical habitat data were analyzed using the logistic regression models to create probability coverages for the presence of redds in a Geographic Information System. There was generally good agreement between chum and fall chinook salmon redd locations and areas where we predicted suitable spawning habitat. We found that at Columbia River discharges less than 120 kcfs, an important chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek could only be supported by discharge from Hamilton Creek. Chum salmon did not appear to spawn in proportion to habitat availability, however our predictive model did not include all variables known to be important to chum salmon redd-site selection. Fall chinook salmon spawning habitat was less sensitive to flow and the main channel of the Columbia River along Pierce Island was predicted to contain sufficient habitat at all modeled flows.

Garland, Rodney; Tiffan, Kenneth; Rondorf, Dennis

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Summary of Temperature Data Collected to Improve Emergence Timing Estimates for Chum and Fall Chinook Salmon in the Lower Columbia River, 1998-2004 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1999 through 2004, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected temperature data from within chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning gravels and the overlying river at 21 locations in the Ives Island area approximately 5 km downstream from Bonneville Dam. Sample locations included areas where riverbed temperatures were elevated, potentially influencing alevin development and emergence timing. The study objectives were to (1) collect riverbed and river temperature data each year from the onset of spawning (October) to the end of emergence (June) and (2) provide those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with fall Chinook and chum salmon emergence timing estimates. Three systems were used over the life of the study. The first consisted of temperature sensors deployed inside piezometers that were screened to the riverbed or the river within chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. These sensors required direct access by staff to download data and were difficult to recover during high river discharge. The second system consisted of a similar arrangement but with a wire connecting the thermistor to a data logger attached to a buoy at the water surface. This system allowed for data retrieval at high river discharge but proved relatively unreliable. The third system consisted of temperature sensors installed in piezometers such that real-time data could be downloaded remotely via radio telemetry. After being downloaded, data were posted hourly on the Internet. Several times during the emergence season of each year, temperature data were downloaded manually and provided to management agencies. During 2003 and 2004, the real-time data were made available on the Internet to assist with emergence timing estimates. Examination of temperature data reveals several important patterns. Piezometer sites differ in the direction of vertical flow between surface and subsurface water. Bed temperatures in upwelling areas are more stable during salmon spawning and incubation than they are in downwelling areas. Bed temperatures in downwelling areas generally reflect river temperatures. Chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning is spatially segregated, with chum salmon in upwelling areas and fall Chinook salmon in downwelling areas. Although these general patterns remain similar among the years during which data were collected, differences also exist that are dependent on interannual flow characteristics.

Arntzen, E.; Geist, D.; Hanrahan, T.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted video-based boat surveys to identify fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas located in deep water (greater than 1 m) downstream of Bonneville Dam in fall 2004. This report documents the number and extent of Chinook salmon spawning near Ives and Pierce Islands of the Columbia River and is the sixth in a series of reports prepared since 1999. The main objectives of this study were to find deepwater spawning locations of fall Chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel, collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites, and provide estimates of adult spawners in the surveyed area. The primary search area was adjacent to the upper portion of Pierce Island, and the secondary search zone was downstream of this area near the lower portion of Pierce Island. A secondary objective was to document the occurrence of any chum salmon (O. keta) redds in the deeper sections downstream of Hamilton Creek (slough zone search area). Fall Chinook salmon redd numbers were down slightly from the record number found during 2003. The number of fall Chinook redds found in the Ives-Pierce Island complex (river km 228.5) during 2004 was 293, which does not include the number of shallow water redds found by visual observation by boat by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The redds encompassed an area of 14.6 ha occurring adjacent to the lower part of Ives Island and Pierce Island. Peak spawning activity, based on redd counts and live fish seen near redds, was on or near November 16, 2004. An expanded redd count based on percentage video coverage in the primary and secondary search zones was 3,198 fall Chinook salmon redds at water depths exceeding approximately 1.0 m (approximately 125 kcfs) with an estimated spawning population of 10,800. Fall Chinook salmon redds were found at water depths from 1.07 to 7.6 m and were constructed predominantly of medium cobbles ranging in size from 7.6 to 15.2 cm in diameter. Near-bed water velocity readings taken in the secondary search ranged from 0.04 to 0.98 m/s (median 0.45 m/s). No chum salmon redds were found in a limited area within the relatively deeper sections of Hamilton Slough below Hamilton Creek. No additional salmon or chum redds were found in other areas searched, including near Woodward, Tanner, and McCord Creeks.

Mueller, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawtscha) Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted video-based boat surveys in fall 2003 to identify spawning areas for fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in deep water (>1 m) downstream of Bonneville Dam. This report documents the number and extent of Chinook salmon spawning near Ives and Pierce islands of the Columbia River, and is the fifth in a series of reports prepared since 1999. The primary objective of this study was to find deepwater spawning locations of fall Chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel, collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites, and provide estimates of adult spawners in the surveyed area. The secondary objective was to document the occurrence of any chum salmon (O. keta) redds in the deeper sections near below Hamilton Creek. Results from the 2003 study show a continuing trend upward in the number of fall Chinook salmon redds found within the survey zones. The number of fall Chinook redds found in the Ives Pierce Island complex (river km 228.5) has increased by a factor of five since the surveys began in 1999. The total number of redds found during 2003 was 336, which compares to 192 in 2002, 43 in 2001, 76 in 2000, and 64 in 1999. The redds encompassed an area of 13.7 ha occurring adjacent to the lower part of Ives Island and Pierce Island. Peak spawning activity, based on redd counts and live fish seen near redds, was on or near November 24, 2003. An expanded redd count based on percentage of video coverage in the primary and secondary search zones was 3,218 fall Chinook salmon redds in water exceeding 1 m deep and flowing at about 125 kcfs. Fall Chinook salmon redds were found at water depths from 1.07 to 7.6 m and were constructed predominantly of medium cobbles ranging from 7.6 to 15.2 cm in diameter. Two chum salmon redds were found in a small location downstream from Hamilton Creek in water depths of approximately 1 m. No salmon redds were found in other areas searched, including near Woodward, Tanner, and McCord creeks.

Mueller, Robert

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A STAR DISRUPTED BY A STELLAR BLACK HOLE AS THE ORIGIN OF THE CLOUD FALLING TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER  

SciTech Connect

We propose that the cloud moving on a highly eccentric orbit near the central black hole in our Galaxy, reported by Gillessen et al., is formed by a photoevaporation wind originating in a disk around a star that is tidally perturbed and shocked at every peribothron passage. The disk is proposed to have formed when a stellar black hole flew by the star, tidally disrupted its envelope, and placed the star on its present orbit with some of the tidal debris forming a disk. A disrupting encounter at the location of the observed cloud is most likely to be caused by a stellar black hole because of the expected dynamical mass segregation; the rate of these disk-forming encounters may be as high as {approx}10{sup -6} per year. The star should also be spun up by the encounter, so the disk may subsequently expand by absorbing angular momentum from the star. Once the disk expands up to the tidal truncation radius, the tidal perturbation of the outer disk edge at every peribothron may place gas streams on larger orbits, which can give rise to a photoevaporation wind that forms the cloud at every orbit. This model predicts that, after the cloud is disrupted at the next peribothron passage in 2013, a smaller unresolved cloud will gradually grow around the star on the same present orbit. An increased infrared luminosity from the disk may also be detectable when the peribothron is reached. We also note that this model revives the encounter theory for planet formation.

Miralda-Escude, Jordi [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Relationship Between Survival of Columbia River Fall Chinook Salmon and In-River Environmental Factors : Analysis of Historic Data for Juvenile and Adult Salmonid Production: Phase 2. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzes in greater detail the coded-wire-tag (CWT) returns of Priest Rapids Hatchery fall chinook for the years 1976--1989 initially begun by Hilborn et al. (1993a). These additional analyses were prompted by suggestions made by peer reviews of the initial draft report. The initial draft and the peer review comments are included in this final report (Appendices A and B). The statistical analyses paired Priest Rapids stock with potential downriver reference stocks to isolate in-river survival rates. Thirty-three potential reference stocks were initially examined for similar ocean recovery rates; the five stocks with the most similar recovery patterns (i.e., Bonneville Brights, Cowlitz, Gray's River, Tanner Creek, and Washougal) to the Priest Rapids stock were used in the subsequent analysis of in-river survival. Three alternate forms of multiple regression models were used to investigate the relationship between predicted in-river survival and ambient conditions. Analyses were conducted with and without attempts to adjust for smolt transportation at McNary Dam. Independent variables examined in the analysis included river flows, temperature, turbidity, and spill along with the total biomass of hatchery releases in the Columbia-Snake River Basin.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Donnelly, Robert F.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2000, 2001, and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into sections and self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2001. The Journal Manuscripts section includes complete copies of papers submitted or published during 2000 and 2001 that were not included in previous annual reports. Publication is a high priority for this project because it provides our results to a wide audience, it ensures that our work meets high scientific standards, and we believe that it is a necessary obligation of a research project. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 199102900 that were published from 1998 to 2001.

Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Black holes 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black holes 1. Introduction What is a black hole? Roughly it can be described as a region that nothing can escape from it. Light falling into a black hole cannot escape from it. It is called `black' because it does not reflect anything. Since nothing can escape from it, it means that a black hole

Glass, Ian S.

70

Statistical evaluation of the effects of fall and winter flows on the spring condition of rainbow and brown trout in the green river downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flaming Gorge Dam, a hydroelectric facility operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is located on the Green River in Daggett County, northeastern Utah. In recent years, single peak releases each day or steady flows have been the operational pattern during the winter period. A double-peak pattern (two flow peaks each day) was implemented during the winter of 2006-2007 by Reclamation. Because there is no recent history of double-peaking at Flaming Gorge Dam, the potential effects of double-peaking operations on the body condition of trout in the dam's tailwater are not known. A study plan was developed that identified research activities to evaluate potential effects from double-peaking operations during winter months. Along with other tasks, the study plan identified the need to conduct a statistical analysis of existing data on trout condition and macroinvertebrate abundance to evaluate potential effects of hydropower operations. This report presents the results of this analysis. We analyzed historical data to (1) describe temporal patterns and relationships among flows, benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, and condition of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the tailwaters of Flaming Gorge Dam and (2) to evaluate the degree to which flow characteristics (i.e., flow volumes and flow variability) and benthic macroinvertebrate abundance affect the condition of trout in this area. This information, together with further analyses of size-stratified trout data, may also serve as baseline data to which the effects of potential future double-peaking flows can be compared. The condition (length, weight and/or relative weight) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at two sites in the Green River downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (Tailrace and Little Hole) and weight of brown trout (Salmo trutta) at the Little Hole site has been decreasing since 1990 while the abundance of brown trout has been increasing at the two sites. At the same time, flow variability in the river has decreased and the abundance of total benthic macroinvertebrates at the Tailrace site has increased. The condition of trout in spring (averaged across all sampled trout) was positively correlated with fall and winter flow variability (including within-day skewness, within-season skewness and/or change in flow between days) at both locations. No negative correlations between trout condition and any measure of flow variability were detected. The length and weight of rainbow trout at the Little Hole site were negatively correlated with increasing fall and winter flow volume. The condition of brown trout at Little Hole and the condition of brown and rainbow trout at Tailrace were not correlated with flow volume. Macroinvertebrate variables during October were either positively correlated or not correlated with measures of trout condition at the Tailrace and Little Hole sites. With the exception of a positive correlation between taxa richness of macroinvertebrates in January and the relative weight of brown trout at Tailrace, the macroinvertebrate variables during January and April were either not correlated or negatively correlated with measures of trout condition. We hypothesize that high flow variability increased drift by dislodging benthic macroinvertebrates, and that the drift, in turn, resulted in mostly lower densities of benthic macroinvertebrates, which benefited the trout by giving them more feeding opportunities. This was supported by negative correlations between benthic macroinvertebrates and flow variability. Macroinvertebrate abundance (with the exception of ephemeropterans) was also negatively correlated with flow volume. The change in trout condition from fall to spring, as measured by the ratio of spring to fall relative weight, was evaluated to determine their usefulness as a standardized index to control for the initial condition of the fish as they enter the winter period. The ratio values were less correlated with the fall condition values than the spring condition values and did not show the same re

Magnusson, A. K.; LaGory, K. E.; Hayse, J. W.; Environmental Science Division

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

71

An investigation of two homologous series of carboxylic acids in Black Trona Water from the Green River Basin  

SciTech Connect

Two series of carboxylic acids were identified in the dialysate from a sample of Black Trona Water from the Green River Basin of Wyoming. One of the series consists of straight-chain dicarboxylic acids ranging in carbon number from four to fourteen. This series had been observed by previous workers. The other series, much less abundant than the dicarboxylic acids, appears to be a series of homologous tricarboxylic acids that are derivatives of succinic acid. The structures of these compounds were determined by analysis of the mass spectra of their methyl esters and trideuteromethyl esters. Definitive biological precursors of this unusual class of compounds could not be assigned.

Branthaver, J.F.; Thomas, K.P.; Logan, E.R.; Barden, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume VIII; New Model for Estimating Survival Probabilities and Residualization from a Release-Recapture Study of Fall Chinook Salmon Smolts in the Snake River, 1995 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

Standard release-recapture analysis using Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models to estimate survival probabilities between hydroelectric facilities for Snake River fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) ignore the possibility of individual fish residualizing and completing their migration in the year following tagging.

Lowther, Alan B.; Skalski, John R. (University of Washington, School of Fisheries, Fisheries Research Institute, Seattle, WA)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report results from an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River during 2003 and in the Columbia River during 1999-2002. Earlier years of the study included serial releases of PIT-tagged hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon upstream from Lower Granite Dam, but these were discontinued in 2003. Instead, we estimated survival from a large number of PIT-tagged fish released upstream from Lower Granite Dam to evaluate transportation from Snake River Dams. During late May and early June 2003, 68,572 hatchery-reared subyearling fall Chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released at Couse Creek and Pittsburg Landing in the free-flowing Snake River. We estimated survival for these fish from release to Lower Granite Dam tailrace. In comparison to wild subyearling fall Chinook salmon PIT tagged and released in the free-flowing Snake River, the hatchery fish we released traveled faster and had higher survival to Lower Granite Dam, likely because of their larger size at release. For fish left in the river to migrate we estimated survival from Lower Granite Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace. Each year, a small proportion of fish released are not detected until the following spring. However, the number of fish released in 2003 that overwintered in the river and were detected as they migrated seaward as yearlings in 2004 was small (<1.0%) and had minimal effect on survival estimates. We evaluated a prototype floating PIT-tag detector deployed upstream from Lower Granite reservoir to collect data for use in partitioning travel time and survival between free-flowing and reservoir habitats. The floating detector performed poorly, detecting only 27 PIT tags in 340 h of operation from a targeted release of 68,572; far too few to partition travel time and survival between habitats. We collected river-run subyearling Chinook salmon (mostly wild fish from the Hanford Reach) at McNary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

76

black ears to blonde cats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

black ears to blonde cats: paths for designing change Ben Bederson & Allison Druin Computer Science of cats lived in a remote village. A river divided the village in two. Black cats lived on one bank and blonde cats lived on the other... In summer and autumn, a black cat ruled the village and in spring

Golbeck, Jennifer

77

37Black Hole Power...X Black holes are sometimes surrounded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

37Black Hole Power...X Black holes are sometimes surrounded by a disk of orbiting matter. This disk is very hot. As matter finally falls into the black hole from the inner edge of that disk, it releases the infalling matter is about 7% of its rest-mass in all forms (heat+ light). The power produced by a black hole

78

Evaluation of Delisting Criteria and Rebuilding Schedules for Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook, Fall Chinook and Sockeye Salmon : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 10 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We develop a framework for distinguishing healthy and threatened populations, and we analyze specific criteria by which these terms can be measured for threatened populations of salmon in the Snake River. We review reports and analyze existing data on listed populations of salmon in the Snake River to establish a framework for two stages of the recovery process: (1) defining de-listing criteria, and (2) estimating the percentage increase in survival that will be necessary for recovery of the population within specified time frames, given the de-listing criteria that must be achieved. We develop and apply a simplified population model to estimate the percentage improvement in survival that will be necessary to achieve different rates of recovery. We considered five main concepts identifying de-listing criteria: (1) minimum population size, (2) rates of population change, (3) number of population subunits, (4) survival rates, and (5) driving variables. In considering minimum population size, we conclude that high variation in survival rates poses a substantially greater probability of causing extinction than does loss of genetic variation. Distinct population subunits exist and affect both the genetic variability of the population and the dynamics of population decline and growth. We distinguish between two types of population subunits, (1) genetic and (2) geographic, and we give examples of their effects on population recovery.

Cramer, Steven P.; Neeley, Doug

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Factors hindering the development of small-scale municipal hydropower: a case study of the Black River project in Springfield, Vermont  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are many good reasons to use New England's small-scale hydropower resources to generate electricity. But current production capacity in the three northern states is only 1300 MW, just 35% of the 3710 MW estimated to be available to the states. Though the benefits of properly designed projects seem substantial, many factors combine to hinder their development. The Black River project in Springfield, Vermont, exemplifies the problem. Even after the two has invested over five years and $1 million in its effort to develop 30 MW of capacity, it still has not received either federal or state approval to proceed with construction. The first 4 years of the Springfield experience are described and factors that have greatly increased the cost and planning time for the project are identified. The purpose is to identify changes that could facilitate efforts to develop small-scale hydropower at other acceptable sites. On the basis of this experience it is recommended that: after issuance of a FERC permit, a preliminary determination of the project's impacts should be made by FERC officials; if environmental impacts are solely local or limited, environmental analysis/determination should be placed in the hands of the state; short-form licensing should be used for all run-of-river hydro projects that utilize and do not significantly modify existing water impoundment areas and do not significantly alter downstream flow patterns; and a hydro ombudsman with power at the state level should be established to facilitate governmental inter-agency coordination and project-related information transfer: one-stop licensing. (LCL)

Peters, E.; Berger, G.; Amlin, J.; Meadows, D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project Black-Cell and Hard-to-Reach Pipe Spools Procurement Process and the Office of River Protection Audit of That Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Black-Cell and Hard-To-Reach Pipe Spools Procurement Process and the Office of River Protection Audit of That Process January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project Black-Cell and Hard-to-Reach Pipe Spools Procurement Process and the Office of River Protection Audit of That Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Black-Cell and Hard-To-Reach Pipe Spools Procurement Process and the Office of River Protection Audit of That Process January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

82

Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Black holes and beyond  

SciTech Connect

The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

Mathur, Samir D., E-mail: mathur.16@osu.edu

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

FDST 8010 (Fall 2003)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FDST 8010 (Fall Semester 2007) FOOD LIPIDS Instructor: C. C. Akoh Objective: After completion of this course, students will know: 1. How the chemical composition and structure can influence the analysis, processing, deterioration, nutrit

85

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration S-1 Executive Summary S.1 Chapter 1: Purpose of and Need for Action The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (YN) have requested funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to modify the existing Lyle Falls Fishway located on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. This fishway is owned by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and operated by the YN. The US Forest Service (USFS) administers portions of the Klickitat River and its corridor under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act). Lyle Falls, at river mile (RM) 2.2 of the Klickitat River, prevents some upstream migrating fish from reaching the upper watershed, especially when flows are low. The

86

BLACK ISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK ISSUES :: Your Portal To Diversity :: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::: http transactions in recent years include Viacom's acquisition of Black Entertainment Television, NBC's purchase Bookshelf Events Tech Briefs - more - #12;BLACK ISSUES :: Your Portal To Diversity

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

87

Del Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Del Black Del Black dblack.jpg Del C. Black HPC Technician, Operations Technology Group, DCBlack@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-6821 , Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop...

88

Black Funnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hartle-Hawking state of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM at strong coupling and large $N$ on a fixed black hole background has two proposed gravitational duals: a black funnel or a black droplet. We construct the black funnel solutions that are dual to the Hartle-Hawking state on a Schwarzschild black hole and on a class of three-dimensional asymptotically flat black hole backgrounds. We compute their holographic stress tensor and argue for the stability of these solutions.

Santos, Jorge E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Black Funnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hartle-Hawking state of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM at strong coupling and large $N$ on a fixed black hole background has two proposed gravitational duals: a black funnel or a black droplet. We construct the black funnel solutions that are dual to the Hartle-Hawking state on a Schwarzschild black hole and on a class of three-dimensional asymptotically flat black hole backgrounds. We compute their holographic stress tensor and argue for the stability of these solutions.

Jorge E. Santos; Benson Way

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Douglas Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Black Doug Black Indoor Environment Group Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-3058 Berkeley CA 94720 Office...

91

Color of fall leaves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Color of fall leaves Color of fall leaves Name: macmillan Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do leaves change color in the fall? Is the cold a contributing factor? What determines the ultimate color of a leaf? Is the change due to an absence of chlorophyll or the presence of something else? Replies: This will be a partial answer. The colors are due to chemicals called carotenes, the same chemicals that give rise to color of carrots. There are several and they have different colors. They are present in the leaves all of the time. We see them in the fall because the chlorophyll production in the leaves stops. I think it is due to the cooling, not directly the presence of freezing temperatures, it seems to depend on the plant. It would be a good experiment to see what events contribute to the changes. Clearly the amount of water in the plant contributes to the quality of the color.

92

Flambeau River Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flambeau River Biofuels Flambeau River Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Flambeau River Biofuels Place Park Falls, Wisconsin Sector Biomass Product A subsidiary of Flambeau River Papers LLC that plans to develop a Fischer Tropsch diesel project in Park Falls, Wisconsin that will process residual wood biomass from forest and agricultural sources. References Flambeau River Biofuels[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Flambeau River Biofuels is a company located in Park Falls, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Flambeau River Biofuels" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flambeau_River_Biofuels&oldid=345407" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

93

Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0397 March 2008 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0397) Responsible Agencies: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation); Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW); U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS), Title of Proposed Project: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project State Involved: Washington (WA) Abstract: BPA proposes to fund modification of the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in

95

Falling film evaporator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A falling film evaporator including a vertically oriented pipe heated exteriorly by a steam jacket and interiorly by a finned steam tube, all heating surfaces of the pipe and steam tube being formed of a material wet by water such as stainless steel, and packing within the pipe consisting of Raschig rings formed of a material that is not wet by water such as polyvinylidene fluoride.

Bruns, Lester E. (Kennewick, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Edible Fall Fruits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall Fruits Fall Fruits Nature Bulletin No 161-A September 19, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor EDIBLE FALL FRUITS Autumn is the favorite season for many people, and especially those who have the hobby of harvesting wild fruits for home use. In the forest preserves they, and you too, can have the fun of hunting, finding and gathering them. You can have the added satisfaction of making -- for enjoyment by your family and friends -- jellies, jam, preserves, pickles, and beverages that are "different". One of the most abundant, but least used of all wild fruits in the Chicago region are those of the hawthorns, We have perhaps 200 species, hybrids and varieties, most of them along woodland borders and in thickets that have taken over many old fields and clearings. Their fruits, called haws, vary widely in size and color when ripe. Most of them are small and many are dull red; some are yellow and some are spotted. Only a few bear the mealy, bright scarlet fruits, from 3/4 inch to more than an inch in diameter, which are most desirable and known as "red haws". Some folks, mostly boys, eat them raw. Others use them to make a unique jelly.

97

Granite Falls Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Granite Falls Energy Place Granite Falls, Minnesota Zip 56241 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References Granite Falls Energy1 LinkedIn...

98

EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho Summary DOE's Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as co-lead Federal agencies, prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to operate Albeni Falls dam during the winter months (approximately December 15th to March 31st) and determine whether the existing Columbia River System Operation Review EIS (DOE/EIS-0170) is adequate or a supplemental or new EIS is required. For more information about this project, see: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/AFD-FWPO/ http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/System_Operation/ (Link

99

W:WPGRAPHSCCTCCTODAY_fall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PSDF and Vision 21 PSDF and Vision 21 ..................... 1 Project News Bytes ..................... 1 Barge-Mounted PFBC ................. 4 PM 2.5 Monitoring Efforts ............. 6 NETL's PM 2.5 Research .............. 8 Upcoming Events ......................... 8 Advanced Turbine Program ......... 9 International Initiatives .............. 10 R&D Milestones ........................ 12 Specialty NO x Conferences ....... 13 Status of CCT Projects .............. 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION PROJECT NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0215P-41 ISSUE NO. 41, FALL 2000 See "News Bytes" on page 7... See "PSDF" on page 2... SGI International, owner of the Liquids-From-Coal ® technology used in the ENCOAL Mild Coal

100

2009, Webbers Falls Open  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern and its Southwestern and its customers, the May 27, 2009, Webbers Falls Open House hosted by the Tulsa District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) was just one more example of what can be accomplished when partners in Federal hydropower work together. The event, which was designed to publicize the upcoming rehabilitation of the project, drew staff members from several congressional offices as well as a healthy contingent of Corps, Southwestern, and customer representatives. Colonel Anthony Funkhouser, Commander of the Tulsa District, welcomed the attendees and emphasized the importance of working together to accomplish common goals. Southwestern's Administrator, Jon Worthington, spoke of the importance of hydropower, both regionally and nationally, and quantified its benefits by citing the average 5,570

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

2003 Fall TOPICS 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SUMMARY of the SUMMARY of the Fall Meeting of the American Statistical Association (ASA) Committee on Energy Statistics with the Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, D.C. 20585 October 16 and 17, 2003 Thursday, October 09, 2003 Background: EIA's Strategic Plan and Performance Goals for 2003-2008 (Plenary Session): Session emphasis was on the action plan for Goal 1, the first of the three EIA Goals: Goal 1: EIA's information program is relevant, reliable and consistent with changing industry structures, and EIA's information products are high quality and timely. Goal 2: EIA's resource base is sufficient to accomplish its mission Goal 3: EIA employees rate EIA high in the areas of leadership management, and meaningful work; and they rate themselves high in motivation and

102

NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

:i" :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d ,,,, ;<:x,, Prepared for the 3 I. Office of Environmental Restoration I, U.S. Department of Energy i gy i. ~: ,,, "! ? ' :' : "' ,//, FINAL REPORT ".$ :,a ,,, MARCH 1995 ; m L ,, ,, ,,,. ., ,,. ' 1 jq ,Ij:,., .,~ _,I_ 1 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the

103

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Oaks South Croydon East Croydon Streatham Common West Norwood Gipsy Hill Crystal Palace Birkbeck Penge

Delmotte, Nausicaa

104

Correlation loss and multipartite entanglement across a black hole horizon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the Hawking effect on entangled fields. By considering a scalar field which is in a two-mode squeezed state from the point of view of freely falling (Kruskal) observers crossing the horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole, we study the degradation ... Keywords: Hawking-Unruh effect, Schwarzschild black holes, continuous variable correlations, multipartite entanglement

Gerardo Adesso; Ivette Fuentes-Schuller

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Spectrum of the radiation from electric charges and from dipoles which free infall into a black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The free fall of electric charges and dipoles, radial and freely falling into the Schwarzschild black hole event horizon, was considered. Inverse effect of electromagnetic fields on the black hole is neglected. Dipole was considered as a point particle, so the deformation associated with exposure by tidal forces are neglected. According to the theorem, "the lack of hair" of black holes, multipole magnetic fields must be fully emitted by multipole fall into a black hole. The spectrum of electromagnetic radiation power for these multipoles (monopole and dipole) was found. Differences were found in the spectra for different orientations of the falling dipole. A general method has been developed to find radiated electromagnetic multipole fields for the free falling multipoles into a black hole (including higher order multipoles - quadrupoles, etc.). The electromagnetic spectrum can be compared with observational data from stellar mass and smaller black holes.

A. A. Shatskiy; I. D. Novikov; L. N. Lipatova

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

Black Genetics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Genetics Name: Andrea Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why does the child of a blonde haired woman and a dark haired man usually have dark hair. Also, why does...

107

Steve Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise...

108

Black mothers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study is about how a group of professional, middle-aged Black1 women, between the ages of 50 and 55, define motherhood. It explores their self-definitions (more)

Jenkins, Nina Lyon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor fall velocity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fall velocity fall velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor fall velocity Fall velocity of hydrometeors (e.g. rain, snow, graupel, hail). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer WSACR : Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, tuned to W-Band (95GHz) Field Campaign Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

110

LBNL/ Adopt Fall Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the Company Letter Certification Template to address if your company has decided to work under LBNL fall protection program. See attached Chapter 30 of our program of PUB...

111

Twin Falls District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls District Jump to: navigation, search Name BML Twin Falls District Office Address 2536 Kimberly Road Place Twin Falls, ID Zip 83301 Phone number 208-736-2350 Website http:...

112

ARM - Black Forest News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GermanyBlack Forest News Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update,...

113

Fall 2005 Meeting of the ASA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of EIA's fall 2005 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these...

114

Kettle Falls Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Facility...

115

Tell President Obama About Coal River Mountain Coal River Mountain and the Heathrow Airport runway remind me how important it is to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tell President Obama About Coal River Mountain Coal River Mountain and the Heathrow Airport runway remind me how important it is to keep our eye on the ball. Coal River Mountain is the site of an absurdity. I learned about Coal River Mountain from students at Virginia Tech last fall. They were concerned

Hansen, James E.

116

Black ring deconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rotating black holes from 5d black rings, hep-th/0504125. [fuzzball proposal for black holes: An elementary review,The quantum structure of black holes, hep-th/0510180. [5

Gimon, Eric G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid...

118

falls-city2.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Falls City Disposal Site Falls City Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed near Falls City, Texas, between 1961 and 1982. The milling operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike waste containing radioactive material and other contaminants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings in an engineered disposal cell in 1994. DOE established the LTSM Program in 1988 to provide stewardship of disposal cells that contain low-level radioactive material after completion of environmental restoration activities. The mission of the LTSM Program is to ensure that the disposal cells continue to prevent release of contaminated materials to the environment. These materials will remain potentially hazardous for thousands of years. As long as the cells function as

119

Fall 2007 ASA Meeting Disclaimer  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Meeting of the 7 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files you will find unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2007 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings can be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts. The public meeting took place October 18 and 19, 2007 in the Forrestal Building at 1000 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585. All of the plenary and three of the break-out sessions were in 8E-089. The three remaining break-out sessions were in 5E-069. The fall meeting agenda, papers, presentation slides and other materials

120

Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Idaho Utility Id 6169 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Industrial General Service > 10 kW Industrial General Service* Commercial Irrigation Service Rate Commercial Irrigation Service Rate* Commercial Residential Rate Residential Small General Service Commercial Small General Service > 10 kW Commercial Small General Service* Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1040/kWh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff (Wisconsin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government, Industrial, Institutional, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing...

122

Fall River County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3.2240279°, -103.4511768° 3.2240279°, -103.4511768° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2240279,"lon":-103.4511768,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The combined value of RFMU and Focus on Energy incentives will cover 60% of the project costs, up to 5,000. Eligible measures include but are not limited to lighting,...

124

OkanoganRiver Summer/FallChinookSalmon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbines that generate up to 270 MW of power. This is a gravity dam constructed in 1958. It is 489 m longCase Study Continuous Monitoring of an Ice Sheet in a Reservoir Upstream of Beaumont Dam, Canada: The geomatics engineering contributions to continuous three-dimensional monitoring of ice sheet in a dam

125

Diesel prices continue to fall  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to fall The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.09 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly...

126

Fall Orientation Schedule Kresge College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2011 Fall Orientation Schedule Kresge College University of California Santa Cruz September 16 - 26 60 05 1 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 Kresge College our time is now #12;#12;3 1 Orientation Week Planner your first several days on campus. This Orientation Schedule is designed to help guide you. Use

California at Santa Cruz, University of

127

Research Report Black 1 White 5 Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Black 1 White 5 Black Hypodescent in Reflexive Categorization of Racially Ambiguous--Historically, the principle of hypodescent specified that individuals with one Black and one White parent should be considered Black. Two experiments ex- amined whether categorizations of racially ambiguous targets reflect

Reber, Paul J.

128

BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo YOUR PAYCHECKPAYROLL TAXES AND EMPLOYMENT LAW BY SPONSORED BY #12;BlackLining Demo e BlackLining Demo e BlackLining Demo e AMERICAN PAYROLL ASSOCIATION i Design by PRIWORKS.com. Images from Thinkstock.com. #12;BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo Black

Harms, Kyle E.

129

Black Holes in Higher Dimensions (Black Strings and Black Rings)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main focus of this session was the presentation of new higher-dimensional black hole solutions, including black rings, black strings, and multi black holes, and the study of their properties. Besides new asymptotically flat and locally asymptotically flat black objects also new black holes with anti-de Sitter asymptotics were reported. The studies of their properties included the investigation of their stability, their thermodynamics, their analyticity and their existence. Furthermore, the geodesics in such higher-dimensional space-times were investigated.

Kunz, Jutta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Quantum information cannot be completely hidden in correlations: implications for the black-hole information paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The black-hole information paradox has fueled a fascinating effort to reconcile the predictions of general relativity and those of quantum mechanics. Gravitational considerations teach us that black holes must trap everything that falls into them. Quantum mechanically the mass of a black hole leaks away as featureless (Hawking) radiation, but if the black hole vanishes, where is the information about the matter that made it? We treat the states of the in-fallen matter quantum mechanically and show that the black-hole information paradox becomes more severe. Our formulation of the paradox rules out one of the most conservative resolutions: that the state of the in-falling matter might be hidden in correlations between semi-classical Hawking radiation and the internal states of the black hole. As a consequence, either unitarity or Hawking's semi-classical predictions must break down. Any resolution of the black-hole information crisis must elucidate one of these possibilities.

Samuel L. Braunstein; Arun K. Pati

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

Safe Fall: Humanoid robot fall direction change through intelligent stepping and inertia shaping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although fall is a rare event in the life of a humanoid robot, we must be prepared for it because its consequences are serious. In this paper we present a fall strategy which rapidly modifies the robot's fall direction in ...

Yun, Seung-kook

132

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Black hole masking and black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masking of black holes means that, for given total mass and Hawking temperatures, these data may correspond to either "pure" black hole or a black hole of a lesser mass surrounded by a massive shell. It is shown that there is one-to one correspondence between this phenomenon and thermodynamics of a black hole in a finite size cavity: masking of black holes is possible if and only if there exists at least one locally unstable black hole solution in the corresponding canonical ensemble.

Zaslavskii, Oleg B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Predicted Fall Chinook Survival and Passage Timing Under BiOp and Alternative Summer Spill Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corps of Engineers, Waterways Experiment Station (WES) as well as additional work done by Columbia Basin are provided in table 1. Hanford Reach fall Chinook 1 #12;were released at river kilometer 593 with a single release profile modeled after the cumulative "1 3 W" pittag releases in the Hanford reach. All stocks were

Washington at Seattle, University of

135

100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

J.M. Queen

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial...

137

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009 Using graph theory to compare least cost path and circuit theory;Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009 Fahrig 2000; With et al. 1997). Many of the metrics developed with the FunConn v1 (Theobald et al. 2006) network #12;Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009 analysis package

Hansen, Andrew J.

139

(Black)Largemouth Bass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

negra, black bass, huro y otros Netherlands: Florellenbaars Poland: weilkogebowy, bas weilkohebowy Portugal: Black bass, perca americana, perca trucha, boca grande, robal...

140

Free-fall core sampler  

SciTech Connect

The described free-fall corer apparatus consists of an expendable, elongated casing having an annular-shaped ballast member secured to it. A cylindrical housing surmounts this ballast member and accommodates a float which is tied to the core liner. During descent of the apparatus, the float is latched to the ballast element, but when the apparatus strikes bottom, a pilot weight suspended from the float latching means moves upward and allows the float to freely ascend within the ocean. This ascent unlatches the core liner from the expendable casing and the liner is thereafter raised to the surface. (13 claims)

Raymond, S.O.; Sachs, P.L.

1968-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Semi-supervised fall detection algorithm using fall indicators in smartphone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fall injury is a health-threatening incident that may cause instant death. There are many research interests aimed to detect fall incidents as early as possible. Fall detection is envisioned critical on ICT-assisted healthcare future. In this paper, ... Keywords: accelerometer, algorithm, decision tree, fall detection, indicators, orientation sensor, smartphone, thresholds

P. N. Ali Fahmi; Vo Viet; Choi Deok-Jai

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

color: DIVPOP; black: low;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

color: DIVPOP; black: low; red: middle; green: high. Vesicle dynamcis · Maturation rate comparison black: low DIVPOP red: middle DIVPOP green: high DIVPOP · Quality of vesicles black: low death rate red: master; red: mutants; black: vesicle boundary. Neutral model Step division model Conclusions (1

Utrecht, Universiteit

143

Concentric Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional minimal supergravity that describe concentric black rings with an optional black hole at the common centre. Configurations of two black rings are found which have the same conserved charges as a single rotating black hole; these black rings can have a total horizon area less than, equal to, or greater than the black hole with the same charges. A numerical investigation of these particular black ring solutions suggests that they do not have closed timelike curves.

Jerome P. Gauntlett; Jan B. Gutowski

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilit P Utilit P Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Federal Energy Management Program FUPWG Fall 2009 David McAndrew November 18 & 19, 2009 Utility Program Sailing into Energy Efficiency President Obama Signing E.O. 13514 Signing of Executive Order 13514 - Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy & Economic Performance Federal Energy Management Program femp.energy.gov 4 E.O. 13514 SUMMARY  Transf formative shif ft in the way the government operates  Establishes GHGs as the integrating metric for tracking progress in federal sustainability  Requires a deliberative planning process  Links goal achievement to budget allocations Links goal achievement to budget allocations and OMB scorecards.  Establishes numerous additional goals for  Establishes numerous additional goals for

145

Mixing on a Shallow Shelf of the Black Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructure measurements were carried out on the shallow shelf of the Black Sea, from the sea surface to the bottom, using a free-falling BAKLAN-S profiler released from an anchored ship. A northeast to southwest transect consisting of eight ...

I. D. Lozovatsky; H. J. S. Fernando

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

TheTheTheThe MysteryMysteryMysteryMystery ofofofof the Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TheTheTheThe MysteryMysteryMysteryMystery ofofofof the Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lake Manuel AlfonsecaManuel AlfonsecaManuel AlfonsecaManuel Alfonseca #12;Manuel Alfonseca 2 #12;The Mystery of the Black Lake 3 The Mystery of the Black LakeThe Mystery of the Black LakeThe Mystery

Alfonseca, Manuel

147

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: Registration Information. 2000 TMS FALL EXTRACTION AND PROCESS METALLURGY...

148

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

Center for Emergent Superconductivity 2013 Fall Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES) 2013 Fall Workshop Homepage Registration pulldown Talks pulldown CES Workshop Talks CES Jr. Research Talks Programs pulldown Contact Us...

150

Center for Emergent Superconductivity 2013 Fall Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

main gate, please inform the guard you are attending the Center for Emergent Superconductivity 2013 Fall Workshop workshop. You may be requested to check in at the security...

151

About the TMS Fall Meeting '98  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

David Bourell, MPMD, University of Texas, Austin, Texas ; Dr. Richard Wright, MPMD, INEEL, Idaho Falls, Idaho; Dr. Walter Milligan, ASM/MSCTS, Michigan...

152

2001 TMS Fall Meeting: Student Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2001 TMS Fall Meeting: Student Information ... graduate students. For more information, contact Tara Oprosky, Membership Coordinator at toprosky@tms.org

153

2006 TMS Fall Extraction and Processing Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2006 TMS Fall Extraction & Processing Meeting: Sohn Int'l Symposium ... Sold out. Hyatt Regency Islandia Hotel In the heart of Mission Bay Park, the Hyatt has ...

154

Idaho Falls Power- Residential Weatherization Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Residential customers with permanently installed electric heat who receive service from the City of Idaho Falls, are eligible for 0% weatherization loans. City Energy Service will conduct an...

155

Energy Specialist Info Sheet- Fall Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPECIALIST TRAINING PROGRAM ORENTATION FOR THE FALL SESSION BEGINS OCTOBER 27th This program is sponsored by the Central Florida Energy Efficiency Alliance (CFEEA) to provide...

156

Ice Fall Doctors 5, Changing Route  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Base Camp. The recordings span a wide variety of topics from making and drinking chang to the work of Mount Everest's 'ice fall doctors'....

Loomis, Molly

157

Summary of the Fall Meeting of the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data, extraction loss, liquefied natural gas operations, and consumption volumes and prices. Some of these efforts were part of the Fall 2002 forms clearance project, while...

158

Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Share  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Share Research with EM Laboratory in Successful Exchange Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Share Research with EM Laboratory in Successful Exchange February 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the laboratory and seven historically black colleges and universities. South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the

159

Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Share  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Share Research with EM Laboratory in Successful Exchange Students, Faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities Share Research with EM Laboratory in Successful Exchange February 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the laboratory and seven historically black colleges and universities. South Carolina State University students William Dumpson, left, and Alejandra Chirino, center, talk with Savannah River National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Michalske at a recent research exchange involving the

160

Venditti, J.G., J.T. Minear, P.A. Nelson, J. Wooster, W.E. Dietrich (2006), Response of alternate bar topography to variation in sediment supply in gravel-bedded rivers, Eos Trans. AGU, 87(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract H51G-0583.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reactivation of geomorphic process in these channels, which are commonly incised with heavily armored river downstream migration, became stationary. Bar top surfaces were heavily armored, while adjacent pools and bar

Venditti, Jeremy G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Brane World Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five dimensional neutral rotating black rings are described from a Randall-Sundrum brane world perspective in the bulk black string framework. To this end we consider a rotating black string extension of a five dimensional black ring into the bulk of a six dimensional Randall-Sundrum brane world with a single four brane. The bulk solution intercepts the four brane in a five dimensional black ring with the usual curvature singularity on the brane. The bulk geodesics restricted to the plane of rotation of the black ring are constructed and their projections on the four brane match with the usual black ring geodesics restricted to the same plane. The asymptotic nature of the bulk geodesics are elucidated with reference to a bulk singularity at the AdS horizon. We further discuss the description of a brane world black ring as a limit of a boosted bulk black 2 brane with periodic identification.

Anurag Sahay; Gautam Sengupta

2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fall Chinook Aclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, and will ultimately work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Complete returns for all three acclimation facilities will not occur until the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish protected under the Endangered Species Act) from those returns will be returning for the next five years. In 2001, a total of 2,051,099 fish weighing 59,647 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 318,932 yearling fish weighing 31,128 pounds and 1,732,167 sub-yearling fish weighing 28,519 pounds. Yearling fish numbers were reduced by Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) and sub-yearling acclimation time was limited by record low river water flows.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Black Hole Horizons and Black Hole Thermodynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work investigates how black holes can be described in terms of different definitions of horizons. Global definitions in terms of event horizons and Killing (more)

Nielsen, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Black String Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an exact description of the steady flow of a black string into a planar horizon. The event horizon is out of equilibrium and provides a simple, exact instance of a `flowing black funnel' in any dimension D>=5. It is also an approximation to a smooth intersection between a black string and a black hole, in the limit in which the black hole is much larger than the black string thickness. The construction extends easily to more general flows, in particular charged flows.

Emparan, Roberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

DOE/EIS-0397: Record of Decision for the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (2/20/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT RECORD OF DECISION Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project SUMMARY The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund modifications to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. In addition to improving fish passage to the upper part of the Klickitat River watershed, the modifications will facilitate collection and monitoring of biological information for future fishery management and enhance opportunities for adult salmonids to access and utilize habitat in the upper Klickitat River. This decision implements the Proposed Action and Preferred Alternative identified in the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (Lyle Falls) EIS (DOE/EIS-0397, November 2008). BPA was

166

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FALL 2010 Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 MATH 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B 4 MATH 243 Analytic Geometry & Calculus C 4 Critical Reading and Writing 3 Breadth Requirement Elective 1 3 15 17 CHEG 231 Chemical Engineering

Lee, Kelvin H.

167

Learning to fall: Designing low damage fall sequences for humanoid soccer robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology for the analysis and design of fall sequences of robots that minimize joint/articulation injuries, and the damage of valuable body parts is proposed. These fall sequences can be activated/triggered by the robot in case of a detected unintentional ... Keywords: Complex humanoid robots simulation, Fall management, Full-body motion control, Humanoid soccer robots, Nao humanoid robots

J. Ruiz-del-Solar; R. Palma-Amestoy; R. Marchant; I. Parra-Tsunekawa; P. Zegers

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Black and White Sight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black and White Sight Name: Andy Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do some animals see in black and White? Replies: In the animal kingdom, sight is accomplished by...

169

Uranium: Prices, rise, then fall  

SciTech Connect

Uranium prices hit eight-year highs in both market tiers, $16.60/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for non-former Soviet Union (FSU) origin and $15.50 for FSU origin during mid 1996. However, they declined to $14.70 and $13.90, respectively, by the end of the year. Increased uranium prices continue to encourage new production and restarts of production facilities presently on standby. Australia scrapped its {open_quotes}three-mine{close_quotes} policy following the ouster of the Labor party in a March election. The move opens the way for increasing competition with Canada`s low-cost producers. Other events in the industry during 1996 that have current or potential impacts on the market include: approval of legislation outlining the ground rules for privatization of the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) and the subsequent sales of converted Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) from its nuclear weapons program, announcement of sales plans for converted US HEU and other surplus material through either the Department of Energy or USEC, and continuation of quotas for uranium from the FSU in the United States and Europe. In Canada, permitting activities continued on the Cigar Lake and McArthur River projects; and construction commenced on the McClean Lake mill.

Pool, T.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

ACCRETORBLACK DONOR BLACK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIELD NO FIELD FIELD NO FIELD FIELD NO FIELD FIELD NO FIELD FIELD DONOR BLACK STREAM HOLE WIND NEUTRON

171

Quantum Harmonic Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by the recent conjecture that black holes are condensates (of gravitons), we investigate a simple model for the black hole degrees of freedom that is consistent both from the point of view of Quantum mechanics and of General Relativity. Since the two perspectives should converge for small, Planck size, black holes, we expect our construction is useful for understanding the physics of microscopic, quantum black holes.

Casadio, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Black holes without firewalls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The postulates of black hole complementarity do not imply a firewall for infalling observers at a black hole horizon. The dynamics of the stretched horizon, that scrambles and re-emits information, determines whether infalling observers experience anything out of the ordinary when entering a large black hole. In particular, there is no firewall if the stretched horizon degrees of freedom retain information for a time of order the black hole scrambling time.

Larjo, Klaus; Thorlacius, Larus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Publications Salmonid Broodstock, Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publications Salmonid Broodstock, Black Cod, and Successful Fishing Piers "Salmon Broodstock Avenue. N.E.. Seattle, WA 98105. "Black Cod, Boom or Bust?", also published by Washington Sea Grant- page paper- bound booklet addresses the location and status of black cod stocks. harvest methods

174

Furnace Black Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher #12 of Crystallographic Studies #12;005F7 Methodologies #12;005F8 Summary · For all furnace carbon black 12? Surface Unorganized Carbon Identified #12;005F11 SRCC's Model #12;005F12 Carbon Black Surface Activity

175

Nonstationary artificial black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the existence of artificial non-stationary spherically symmetric black holes. We give examples of the appearance of black holes and of disappearance of white holes. We also discuss the relation between the apparent and the event horizons for the case of artificial black holes.

Eskin, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-04 2-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC - WEA-2012-04 November 9, 2012 Issued to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), LLC, related to a Worker Fall from a Scaffold in the K-Area Complex at the Savannah River Site This letter refers to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with a worker fall from a Tele-Tower® Adjustable Work Platform in the K-Area Complex at the Savannah River Site on July 1, 2011. The results of DOE's investigation were provided to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) in an investigation report dated May 8, 2012. An enforcement conference was held on June 27, 2012, with you and members of your staff to discuss the

177

Phantom Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exact solutions of electrically charged phantom black holes with the cosmological constant are constructed. They are labelled by the mass, the electrical charge, the cosmological constant and the coupling constant between the phantom and the Maxwell field. It is found that the phantom has important consequences on the properties of black holes. In particular, the extremal charged phantom black holes can never be achieved and so the third law of thermodynamics for black holes still holds. The cosmological aspects of the phantom black hole and phantom field are also briefly discussed.

C. J. Gao; S. N. Zhang

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. populations have declined over the last century due to a variety of human impacts. Chum salmon O. keta populations in the Columbia River have remained severely depressed for the past several decades, while upriver bright (URB) fall Chinook salmon O. tschawytscha populations have maintained relatively healthy levels. For the past seven years we have collected data on adult spawning and juvenile emergence and outmigration of URB fall Chinook and chum salmon populations in the Ives and Pierce islands complex below Bonneville Dam. In 2004, we estimated 1,733 fall Chinook salmon and 336 chum salmon spawned in our study area. Fall Chinook salmon spawning peaked 19 November with 337 redds and chum salmon spawning peaked 3 December with 148 redds. Biological characteristics continue to suggest chum salmon in our study area are similar to nearby stocks in Hardy and Hamilton creeks, and Chinook salmon we observe are similar to upriver bright stocks. Temperature data indicated that 2004 brood URB fall Chinook salmon emergence began on 6 January and ended 27 May 2005, with peak emergence occurring 12 March. Chum salmon emergence began 4 February and continued through 2 May 2005, with peak emergence occurring on 21 March. Between 13 January and 28 June, we sampled 28,984 juvenile Chinook salmon and 1,909 juvenile chum salmon. We also released 32,642 fin-marked and coded-wire tagged juvenile fall Chinook salmon to assess survival. The peak catch of juvenile fall Chinook salmon occurred on 18 April. Our results suggested that the majority of fall Chinook salmon outmigrate during late May and early June, at 70-80 mm fork length (FL). The peak catch of juvenile chum salmon occurred 25 March. Juvenile chum salmon appeared to outmigrate at 40-55 mm FL. Outmigration of chum salmon peaked in March but extended into April and May.

van der Naald, Wayne; Duff, Cameron; Friesen, Thomas A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

RHIC | Black Holes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in the universe. The gravitational field of a black hole is so strong that Einstein's general relativity tells us that nothing, not even light, can escape from the black hole's interior. However, in 1974 physicist Stephen Hawking demonstrated that black holes must emit radiation once the quantum effects are included. According to quantum mechanics, the physical vacuum is bubbling with short-lived virtual particle-antiparticle pairs. Creation of a particle-antiparticle pair from the vacuum conflicts with energy conservation, but energy need not be conserved at short times in quantum mechanics, according to Heisenberg's

180

Fall 2012 Composite Data Products - Backup Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes 15 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2012 for fuel cell backup power systems.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential New Construction Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heater: Natural Gas 0.67 EF or greater; Electric 0.93 EF or greater Windows: 0.35 U-value or less Program Administrator Cedar Falls Utilities Website http:www.cfu.net...

182

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Texas Texas Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site Data Validation Package-April 2013 Groundwater Sampling Ground Water Compliance Action Plan Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Falls City Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Falls City, Texas Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon

183

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline decreased for the second week in a row to 3.71 a gallon on Monday. That's down...

184

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.61 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.7 cents from a week ago, based on...

185

Precipitation Rate and Extinction in Falling Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible and infrared atmospheric transmittances measured through falling snow have shown a wavelength dependence in which extinction is greater for longer wavelengths. The diffraction component of the energy scattered by the snow crystals causes ...

Mary Ann Seagraves

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014 Certificate Program CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONCONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION #12;About the Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program The new Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program offers professionals in chemi- cal engineering

California at Davis, University of

187

TMS Fall Meeting '99 Registration Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 4, 1999 ... Focusing on physical metallurgy and materials, the 1999 TMS Fall Meeting will ... Print out this form, complete it, and fax or mail it to the TMS...

188

TMS Fall Meeting '99: General Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 4, 1999 ... Focusing on physical metallurgy and materials, the TMS Fall ... Don't miss out on this opportunity for a one-year trial membership in TMS and...

189

Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

BLM Twin Falls District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twin Falls District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM Twin Falls District Office Address 2536 Kimberly Road Place Twin Falls, ID Zip 83301 Phone number 208-735-2060...

192

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002 a total of 364 adult fall chinook and 472 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 290 fall chinook and 403 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 214. The peak redd count for chum was 776. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 15 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 6 December. There were estimated to be a total of 1,881 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2002. The study area's 2002 chum population was estimated to be 4,232 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2002 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on February 3 2003 and ended 7 May 2003, with peak emergence occurring 20 April. 2002 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 27 January and continued through 6 April 2003. Peak chum emergence took place 1 March. A total of 10,925 juvenile chinook and 1,577 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 24 January and 21 July 2003 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2003 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2002 and 2003 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Progress Continues Toward Closure of Two Underground Waste Tanks at Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. The EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is filling two radioactive liquid waste tanks with a cement-like grout in an effort to operationally close them this fall.

194

Organization of the River and Flood Program in the National Weather Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Weather Service is charged by law with the responsibility of issuing forecasts and warnings of floods to the nation to help save lives and mitigate property damage. This mission falls under the authority of the River and Flood ...

E. A. Stallings; L. A. Wenzel

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

"Black Star" or Astrophysical Black Hole? K. Petrovay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Black Star" or Astrophysical Black Hole? K. Petrovay Eötvös University, Department of Astronomy. Recently wide publicity has been given to a claim by T. Vachaspati that "black holes do not exist", that the objects known as black holes in astrophysics should rather be called "black stars" and they not only do

Petrovay, Kristóf

196

Pages that link to "American Falls, Idaho" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "American Falls, Idaho" American Falls, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page: American...

197

Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports...

198

Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline...

199

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: New Technologies for the Next Millennium. 2000 TMS FALL EXTRACTION AND...

200

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: US Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: U.S. Airways. 2000 TMS FALL EXTRACTION AND PROCESS METALLURGY MEETING:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Mill Site - TX...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site Documents Related to Falls City Mill Site Data Validation Package for...

202

2000 TMS Fall Meeting: Technical Events and Sessions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Meeting: Technical Events & Sessions. October 812, 2000 TMS FALL MEETING 2000 St. Louis, Missouri. Focusing on physical...

203

Our River  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

204

Thousand Cankers of Black Walnut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thousand Cankers Disease of Black Walnut How to Identify and Prevent the Spread of Thousand Cankers counties. Remember: Only YOU can help prevent the spread of thousand cankers disease! Black Walnuts Facts Native range of black walnut in the United States. Uses of Black Walnut Mature black walnuts grown

205

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

McLeod, Bruce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

207

A Black Hole Levitron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of spatially stabilising four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes kept in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al's multi-center solutions provides a supergravity description of such backgrounds within which a black hole can be trapped in a given volume. This is realised by levitating a black hole over a magnetic dipole base. We comment on how such a construction resembles a mechanical Levitron.

Xerxes D. Arsiwalla; Erik P. Verlinde

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

208

EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood 50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide federal funding to Flambeau River Biofuels (FRB) to construct and operate a biomass-to-liquid biorefinery in Park Falls, Wisconsin, on property currently used by Flambeau Rivers Paper, LLC (FRP) for a pulp and paper mill and Johnson Timber Corporation's (JTC) Summit Lake Yard for timber storage. This project would design a biorefinery which would produce up to 1,150 barrels per day (bpd) of clean syncrude. The biorefinery would also supply

209

Using remotely sensed imagery and GIS to monitor and research salmon spawning: A case study of the Hanford Reach fall chinook (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The alteration of ecological systems has greatly reduced salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest. The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, for example, is a component of the last ecosystem in eastern Washington State that supports a relatively healthy population of fall chinook salmon ([Oncorhynchus tshawytscha], Huntington et al. 1996). This population of fall chinook may function as a metapopulation for the Mid-Columbia region (ISG 1996). Metapopulations can seed or re-colonize unused habitat through the mechanism of straying (spawning in non-natal areas) and may be critical to the salmon recovery process if lost or degraded habitat is restored (i.e., the Snake, Upper Columbia, and Yakima rivers). For these reasons, the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is extremely important for preservation of the species in the Columbia River Basin. Because this population is important to the region, non-intrusive techniques of analysis are essential for researching and monitoring population trends and spawning activities.

RH Visser

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

210

Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Dark core of a low mass star left when  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Dark core of a low mass star left when a white dwarf cools. Black dwarfs disappear from view. Mass: 0.5 - 1.4 SM StarPower Points: 1 Dark core of a low mass star left when a white dwarf cools. Black dwarfs, like the charcoal briquette pictured in the sky, are made

Bechtold, Jill

211

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

212

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003 a total of 253 adult fall chinook and 113 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 221 fall chinook and 109 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 190. The peak redd count for chum was 262. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 24 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 24 November. There were estimated to be a total of 1,533 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2003. The study area's 2003 chum population was estimated to be 688 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2003 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on January 6, 2004 and ended 28 April 2004, with peak emergence occurring 13 April. 2003 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 22 February and continued through 15 April 2004. Peak chum emergence took place 25 March. A total of 25,433 juvenile chinook and 4,864 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 20 January and 28 June 2004 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2004 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2003 all of the fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Duff, Cameron; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Black Hole - String Transition and Rolling D-brane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the black hole - string transition in the two-dimensional Lorentzian black hole system from the exact boundary states that describe the rolling D-brane falling down into the two-dimensional black hole. The black hole - string phase transition is one of the fundamental properties of the non-supersymmetric black holes in string theory, and we will reveal the nature of the phase transition from the exactly solvable world-sheet conformal field theory viewpoint. Since the two-dimensional Lorentzian black hole system (SL(2;R)_k/U(1) coset model at level k) typically appears as near-horizon geometries of various singularities such as NS5-branes in string theory, our results can be regarded as the probe of such singularities from the non-supersymmetric probe rolling D-brane. The exact construction of boundary states for the rolling D0-brane falling down into the two-dimensional D-brane enables us to probe the phase transition at k=1 directly in the physical amplitudes. During the study, we uncover three fundamental questions in string theory as a consistent theory of quantum gravity: small charge limit v.s. large charge limit of non-supersymmetric quantum black holes, analyticity v.s. non-analyticity in physical amplitudes and physical observables, and unitarity v.s. open closed duality in time-dependent string backgrounds. This work is based on the PhD thesis submitted to Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo, which was defended on January 2007.

Yu Nakayama

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fall 2005 Meeting of the ASA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Meeting of the 6 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files you may find unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2006 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings may be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts. The public meeting took place October 6 and 7, 2006 in the Forrestal Building at 1000 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585. All of the plenary and two of the break-out sessions were in 8E-089. The two remaining break-out sessions were in 5E-069. The fall meeting agenda, papers, presentation slides and other materials

215

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.23333333,"lon":-121.7666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

REDUCTION OF THE MOMENTUM OF FALLING BODIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means for catching free falling bodies that may be damaged upon impact is given. Several layers of floating gas-filled rubber balls are contained within a partially compartmented tank of liquid. The compartment extends from beneath the surface of the liquid to that height necessary to contain the desired number of layers of the balls. The balls and the liquid itself break the force of the fall by absorbing the kinetic energy of falling body. The body may then be retrieved from the floor of the tank by a rake that extends from outside of the tank through the free surface area and underneath the compartment wall. This arrangement is particularly useful in collecting irradiated atomic fuel rods that are discharged from a reactor at considerable height without damaging the thin aluminum jacket of the rods.

Kendall, J.W.; Morrison, I.H.

1954-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

217

River Steamboats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Steamboats River Steamboats Nature Bulletin No. 628-A February 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RIVER STEAMBOATS The westward migration of the pioneer settlers and the rapid growth of agriculture, commerce and industry in the Middle West is in large part the story of water transportation on our inland waterways. The two main water routes were the chain of Great Lakes on the north and the Ohio River on the south. Sailing vessels carrying hundreds of tons were able to navigate on the Great Lakes almost as freely as on the ocean. Also, on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers heavy loads could be floated downstream from Pittsburgh to New Orleans -- almost 2000 miles. But boats had to be hauled back upstream by manpower -- grueling labor, stretching over weeks or months to move a few tons a few hundred miles. The coming of the steamboat a century and a half ago changed all this.

218

Black Hole Mergers Manuela Campanelli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Hole Mergers Manuela Campanelli Center for Computa6 Department of Physics Duke University Feb 15-17, 2012 #12;Black Holes Antennae galaxies, op6cal, HST · In General Rela6vity (GR), Black Holes (BHs

Wolpert, Robert L

219

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig Abstract We review the theory of stationary black hole solutions of vacuum Einstein equations. Keywords: black holes, event horizons, Schwarzschild metric, Kerr metric, no-hair theorems 1

Chru?ciel, Piotr T.

220

Repackaging SRS Black Box TRU Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, large items of TRU Waste, which were too large to be packaged in drums for disposal have been packaged in various sizes of custom made plywood boxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS), for many years. These boxes were subsequently packaged into large steel ''Black Boxes'' for storage at SRS, pending availability of Characterization and Certification capability, to facilitate disposal of larger items of TRU Waste. There are approximately 107 Black Boxes in inventory at SRS, each measuring some 18' x 12' x 7', and weighing up to 45,000 lbs. These Black Boxes have been stored since the early 1980s. The project to repackage this waste into Standard Large Boxes (SLBs), Standard Waste Boxes (SWB) and Ten Drum Overpacks (TDOP), for subsequent characterization and WIPP disposal, commenced in FY04. To date, 10 Black Boxes have been repackaged, resulting in 40 SLB-2's, and 37 B25 overpack boxes, these B25's will be overpacked in SLB-2's prior to shipping to WIPP. This paper will describe experience to date from this project.

Swale, D. J.; Stone, K.A.; Milner, T. N.

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Study of falling-jet flash evaporators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results of flash evaporation from sheets of water, 3.2 mm and 6.3 mm thick and 27.9 cm wide, falling freely in the presence of their own vapor, are reported. With no flashing the jets fall in coherent sheets, but with flashing the jets were observed to spread and break up into droplets. Flashing was characterized by an effectiveness parameter, which was found to increase with increasing water temperature and jet length. Variations in water flow rate and heat flux did not influence the effectiveness appreciably.

Kreith, F.; Olson, D.A.; Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Rotating Hairy Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

20 Summer/Fall 2012 Children and Libraries Author is ......  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- garten. Sobering evidence from multiple sources indicates that children who fall behind in reading

224

Fall 2011 Composite Data Products: National FCEV Learning Demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical presentation describes Fall 2011 composite data products: national FCEV learning demonstration.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Black Hole Shadows of Charged Spinning Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method for measuring the black hole charge by imaging a black hole shadow in a galactic center by future interferometers. Even when the black hole is uncharged, it is possible to confirm the charge neutrality by this method. We first derive the analytic formulae of the black hole shadow in an optically thin medium around a charged spinning black hole, and then investigate how contours of the black hole shadow depend on the spin and the charge of the black hole for several inclination angles between the rotation axis of the black hole and the observer. This method only assumes stationary black hole and general relativity. By fitting the formula of the contours of the shadow to the observed image of the shadow, in addition to the black hole charge, one can also determine the black hole spin and the inclination angle without any degeneracy among the charge, the spin, and the inclination angle unless the inclination angle is null.

Rohta Takahashi

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE RELATIONSHIP OF BLACK POWER AND BLACK ARTS/CONSCIUSNESS MOVEMENTS TO THE BLACK STUDIES MOVEMENT .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is an examination of three social movements that occurred during the 1960s and 1970s: the Black Power Movement, Black Arts/Consciousness Movement, and Black (more)

Woods, Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Lumens Placard (Black) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lumensplacard-black.eps More Documents & Publications Lumens Placard (Black) Lumens Placard (Green) Energy Savers Guide...

228

California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Law 273.71 California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008) Units: 2 CCN (2Ls/3Ls): 49696:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Instructor's Profile: Mr. Frank is the Executive Director of the California Center from the University of California at Davis in 1974. Following positions as a staff attorney

Kammen, Daniel M.

229

The rise and fall of surfactants lore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant changes have occurred in the surfacThe rise and fall of surfactants lore tants industry in the past 30 years, both in terms of what we consider to be important and in the paradigms that we operate under. The following discussion highlights my v

230

Better Plants Fall 2013 Progress Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fall 2013 Progress Update chronicles the Better Buildings Programs efforts to capture these cost-effective, energy-saving opportunities and demonstrate that strong energy management practices are good for business, good for the economy, and good for the environment.

231

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Engineering (FYE) 2 CHEG 112 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 CHEM 111 General Chemistry 3 CHEM 112 General Chemistry and Writing 3 Breadth Requirement Elective 1 3 15 17 CHEG 231 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 CHEG 325

Lee, Kelvin H.

232

Ice Fall Doctors 6, Long Conversation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ang Nima and Ang Kami discuss different elements of their lives as Ice Fall Doctors: what they like about the job; safety; what their wives think of the work; religion and how it keeps them safe in the ice; spirits in the Icefall and the surrounding...

Loomis, Molly

233

Book reviews, Fall 2011 Christian P. Robert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book reviews, Fall 2011 Christian P. Robert Universit´e Paris-Dauphine, CEREMADE, IUF, and CREST of three book reviews of Lange (2010), Vasishth and Broe (2011), and Stephenson (2008), respectively is irrelevant." (page iii) I had missed the first edition of this book and thus I started reading

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

234

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Black holes at accelerators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collision of high-energy particles, Phys. Rev. D 67, 024009 (2003) [arXiv:gr-qc/0209003]. [6] D. M. Eardley and S. B. Giddings, Classical black hole production in high-energy collisions, Phys. Rev. D 66, 044011 (2002) [arXiv:gr-qc/0201034]. [7] H. Yoshino... about black hole formation in high-energy collisions, Class. Quant. Grav. 22, L61 (2005) [arXiv:hep-ph/0505125]. [16] G. T. Horowitz, Higher dimensional generalizations of the Kerr black hole, arXiv:gr-qc/0507080. [17] C. M. Harris and P. Kanti...

Webber, Bryan R

236

American Black Bear: Ursus americanus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3/21/2011 1 USFWS American Black Bear: Ursus americanus www.bear.org LDWF Historic Distribution, forested regions (Pelton et al. 1994) Glacier Kenai Queen Charlotte Island. Kermode Dall American Black regions (Pelton et al. 1994) #12;3/21/2011 2 Historic Range Louisiana black bear Louisiana Black Bear

Gray, Matthew

237

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig # Piotr T. Chru?sciel + February 8, 2005 Abstract We review the theory of stationary black hole solutions of vacuum Einstein equations. Keywords: black holes, event. this space­time a natural model for a non­rotating black hole. We can now come back to the problem

Chru?ciel, Piotr T.

238

Physics of AGN Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of AGN Black Holes Heino Falcke MPIfR Bonn Contents: ffl Why Black Holes? ffl What are black holes? ffl Luminosity ffl Observational Evidence Literature: ``An Introduction to Active Galactic. #12; Black Hole Paradigm Not really hollow For typical quasar luminosity of L = 10 46 L 46 erg sec

Falcke, Heino

239

Black Box Checking Doron Peled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Box Checking Doron Peled The University of Texas at Austin Department of Electrical and formalize this problem of black box checking and suggest several algorithms. Since the input to black box the given property. We call this problem black box checking. To simplify the discussion, we will not deal

Peled, Doron A.

240

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig Piotr T. Chru´sciel February 8, 2005 Abstract We review the theory of stationary black hole solutions of vacuum Einstein equations. Keywords: black holes, event-Szekeres extension of the Schwarzschild solution. this space-time a natural model for a non-rotating black hole. We

Chru?ciel, Piotr T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BLACK HISTORY @ Your Education Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK HISTORY @ Your Education Library Focus on Canadian Resources: Songs Granfield, Linda. Illus, Rella. Solme Black Women: Profiles of Black Women in Canada. Sister Vision, 1993. FC106.B6B73 1993 Bramble, Linda. Black Fugitive Slaves in Early Canada. Vanwell, 1987. Juv E450.B73 1987 Carter, Velma

Ellis, Randy

242

Delineating River Bottom Substrate using Very High-Resolution Digital Imagery derived from Large Scale Aerial Photography.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Progress Energy is currently relicensing the Tillery and Blewett Falls developments (i.e., Yadkin-Pee Dee River Hydroelectric Project No. 2206) with the Federal Regulatory Commission (FERC). (more)

Lemonds, Rodney Wade

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

RHIC | Black Holes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Before RHIC began operations in 2000, some were concerned that it would produce black holes that would threaten the earth. Here's why those concerns were unfounded. Committee Review of Speculative "Disaster Scenarios" at RHIC In July 1999, Brookhaven Lab Director John Marburger convened a committee of distinguished physicists to write a comprehensive report on the arguments that address the safety of speculative disaster scenarios at RHIC. The scenarios are: Creation of a black hole that would "eat" ordinary matter. Initiation of a transition to a new, more stable universe. Formation of a "strangelet" that would convert ordinary matter to a new form. jaffee "We conclude that there are no credible mechanisms for catastrophic

245

Northern Black Widows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Black Widows Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I live in Fairbanks, Alaska and came across a spider that I've never seen before. It is about 1.5 cm...

246

The Black Bear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Bear Black Bear Nature Bulletin No. 286-A December 9, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BLACK BEAR The most amusing and human-like of all our American wild animals is the Black Bear. Slow, clumsy and loose-jointed in appearance, with a shambling gait, he can be very swift and nimble. Like any good clown he is also a good acrobat with a fine sense of balance and timing. He is a great climber in spite of his bulk. Shrewd and droll, he is very popular in menageries and as a performer in circuses and side shows because he learns tricks easily. He can stand on his hind legs to wrestle, box, dance, or beg for food and, occasionally, one becomes a graceful artist on roller skates. They love applause.

247

More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: Increased distillate fuel production sure seems to explain some of the January 2001 stock increase. This graph shows the distillate yield pattern over the 1990's. Generally yields rise in the fall to build stocks for winter distillate use. On average, the yield during the fourth quarter is about 2% higher than the average of the lowest yield months of June, July and August. (Recognize that a 1% change in yield is about a 150 MB/D change in distillate production, which is about 4% of winter demand.) During the fall of 1996, the winter season began with very low stocks, but refiners pushed yields to very high levels and regained some of the lost ground. As we saw earlier, we entered last winter in a similar situation as 1996 with low stock levels. At last year's SHOPP conference, Joanne Shore

248

Why are gasoline prices falling so rapidly?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Why are gasoline prices falling so rapidly? Why are gasoline prices falling so rapidly? As of October 29, 2001, the national average retail price of regular gasoline was $1.235 per gallon, its lowest level since November 8, 1999 (Figure 1). The average price has fallen 29 cents in 6 weeks since September 17, with further declines perhaps to come. The sharpest decline has been in the Midwest (Petroleum Administration for Defense District 2), where the average has dropped 57 cents in 8 weeks since Labor Day (September 3). Additionally, this decline comes on the heels of a 33-cent drop in the national average in 10 weeks from Memorial Day through August 6, interrupted only by a brief 17-cent rise in August. In total, the national average retail gasoline price has fallen nearly 48 cents from its peak on May 14. This is already the widest one-year range in retail prices

249

cctoday_fall_2005_Final.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

491 * ISSUE NO. 64, FALL 2005 491 * ISSUE NO. 64, FALL 2005 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEW DOE PROGRAM TO ADVANCE FUEL CELL CENTRAL POWER STATIONS Recent advances in technology have precipitated movement of fuel cells into the central power arena in support of FutureGen - coal-based central power plants capable of co-producing electricity and clean fuels (including hydrogen), enabling carbon sequestration, and producing near-zero emis- sions. While the initial focus of the Offi ce of Fossil Energy (FE) stationary fuel cell research and development program has been on distributed genera- tion applications, the strategy has always included eventual integration with central power plants. The central power element of the strategy is now being implemented under the Fuel Cell Coal-Based Systems program.

250

Black suit with a white, button down, collared dress shirt and conservative tie Black socks and black shoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dress Code Men · Black suit with a white, button down, collared dress shirt and conservative tie · Black socks and black shoes Women · Black dress, black suit pant or skirt (dress or skirt must be at or below the knee) · Black hose (without pattern) and black dress shoes MSC OPAS provides: · A volunteer

Boas, Harold P.

251

Black Saturn with dipole ring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new stationary, asymptotically flat solution of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity describing a Saturn-like black object: a rotating black hole surrounded by a rotating dipole black ring. The solution is generated by combining the vacuum black Saturn solution and the vacuum black ring solution with appropriately chosen parameters. Some basic properties of the solution are analyzed and the basic quantities are calculated.

Stoytcho Yazadjiev

2007-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Great Falls lineament, Idaho and Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The name Great Falls lineament is given to a northeast-trending zone of diverse geologic features that can be traced northeastward from the Idaho batholith in the cordilleran miogeocline of the United States, across thrust belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through the cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwesternmost Saskatchewan, Canada. The zone is well represented in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana where geologic mapping has outlined northeast-trending, high-angle faults and shear zones that: (1) extend more than 150 km (93 mi) from near Salmon, Idaho, northeastward toward Anaconda, Montana; (2) define a nearly continuous zone of faulting that shows recurrent movement from middle Proterozoic to Holocene time; (3) controlled the intrusion and orientation of some Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary batholithic rocks and early Tertiary dike swarms; and (4) controlled the uplift and orientation of the Anaconda-Pintlar Range. The boundary is also characterized by: high-angle faults, shear zones, and topographic lineaments; pronounced linear gravity and magnetic anomalies; igneous intrusions; and fault controlled depositional patterns and mineralization. That the Great Falls lineament is controlled by a similar Precambrian boundary between the Archean Wyoming province of southwestern Montana and early Proterozoic terrane to the north is speculative; however, the geologic features found along the Great Falls lineament share many common characteristics with features present along the Archean-Proterozoic boundary in Canada.

O'Neil, J.M.; Lopez, D.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern Great Basin Appalachian Denver Florida Peninsula Black Warrior W Y T h ru st B e lt Powder River Paradox- Uinta- Grtr Green River MT Thrust Belt Powder River North (1) Powder River South (2) Denver North (1) Denver South (3) Denver Middle (2) TX CA MT AZ ID NV NM CO IL OR UT KS WY IA NE SD MN ND OK FL WI MO AL WA GA AR LA MI IN PA NY NC MS TN KY VA OH SC

254

Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: applications; Basin and Range Province; Black Rock Desert; Cassia County Idaho; earthquakes; economic geology; exploration; fracture zones; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; Humboldt County Nevada; Idaho; microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain; surveys; United States; Western U.S. Author(s): Kumamoto, L.H.

255

BLM Idaho Falls District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls District Office Address 1405 Hollipark Drive Place Idaho Falls, ID Zip 83401 Phone number 208-524-7500 Website http:www.blm.govidstenin References Office Directory1...

256

AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Fall Symposium AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium November 6, 2013 8:00AM EST to November 8, 2013 5:00PM EST Colorado Springs, Colorado To learn about the Symposium, visit...

257

Thermodynamic black di-rings  

SciTech Connect

Previously the five dimensional S{sup 1}-rotating black rings have been superposed in a concentric way by some solitonic methods, and regular systems of two S{sup 1}-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions 'black di-rings'). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings is shown, in which both isothermality and isorotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi [Laboratory of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Thermodynamic black di-rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previously the five dimensional $S^1$-rotating black rings have been superposed in concentric way by some solitonic methods and regular systems of two $S^1$-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions black di-rings). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution-sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings are shown, in which both iso-thermality and iso-rotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

Iguchi, Hideo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Black Hole Shadows of Charged Spinning Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method for measuring the black hole charge by imaging a black hole shadow in a galactic center by future interferometers. Even when the black hole is uncharged, it is possible to confirm the charge neutrality by this method. We first derive the analytic formulae of the black hole shadow in an optically thin medium around a charged spinning black hole, and then investigate how contours of the black hole shadow depend on the spin and the charge of the black hole for several inclination angles between the rotation axis of the black hole and the observer. This method only assumes stationary black hole and general relativity. By fitting the formula of the contours of the shadow to the observed image of the shadow, in addition to the black hole charge, one can also determine the black hole spin and the inclination angle without any degeneracy among the charge, the spin, and the inclination angle unless the inclination angle is null. If the maximum width of the shadow smaller than 4(1 + 2 1/2)M or the minimum width of the shadow smaller than 9M are measured observationally, we can safely conclude that the black hole is charged. Here, M is the gravitational radius, i.e. the half of the Schwarzschild radius. Key words: black hole physicsGalaxy: nucleusgalaxies: nuclei techniques: high angular resolutiontechniques: interferometric 1.

Rohta Takahashi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Test 2 PURE MATHEMATICS 2320 Fall 2001 Name MUN Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test 2 PURE MATHEMATICS 2320 Fall 2001 Name MUN Number Marks [9] 1. Let A = f1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 10; 11 that (A; #22;) is a poset. (this question continues...) #12; Pure Mathematics 2320 {2{ Test 2, Fall 2001(s)? iii. minimum element(s)? iv. minimal element(s)? #12; Pure Mathematics 2320 {3{ Test 2, Fall 2001 [4

deYoung, Brad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Experiments with computer vision methods for fall detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of a fall detection system is to automatically detect cases where a human falls and may have been injured. A natural application of such a system is in home monitoring of patients and elderly persons, so as to automatically alert relatives and/or ... Keywords: Gaussian model, fall detection, non-parametric model

Zhong Zhang; Eric Becker; Roman Arora; Vassilis Athitsos

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

263

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Urb Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Upriver bright [URB] Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of at two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

01_fall_rev1.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Meeting on Fossil R&D China Meeting on Fossil R&D ..... 1 News Bytes ................................... 1 DOE CCT Conference ................... 2 Sequestration Conference ............ 3 APFBC Repowering ...................... 4 R&D Milestones ........................... 6 Thermal Barrier Coatings .............. 7 Mined Land a Carbon Sink ........... 8 Upcoming Events .......................... 8 UCR Advances Coal Science ....... 9 NAS Validates FE R&D .............. 10 Lasers to Enhance Gasifiers ....... 11 International Initiatives ............... 12 Status of CCT Projects ................ 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0215P-46 ISSUE NO. 46, FALL 2001 See "News Bytes" on page 5 ...

266

04_fall_CCToday_AAs_fixed.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wabash Coal-Fired Fuel Cell Wabash Coal-Fired Fuel Cell ...... 1 News Bytes .................................... 1 Hydrates Capture CO 2 ................... 3 Controlling Zebra Mussels ............ 4 Upcoming Events ........................... 5 Mercury Speciation Data ............... 6 Advanced Membranes ................... 7 Internship Program ......................... 9 International Initiatives ................ 10 Status Report ............................... 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0476* ISSUE NO. 59, FALL 2004 See "News Bytes" on page 9... See "Wabash" on page 2 ... WORLD'S LARGEST CLEAN COAL-POWERED FUEL CELL A FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) 2-megawatt (MW) carbonate fuel cell -

267

Charged black holes from near extremal black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We recover the properties of a wide class of far from extremal charged black branes from the properties of near extremal black branes, generalizing the results of Danielsson, Guijosa and Kruczenski.

Gilad Lifschytz

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Furnace Black Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Black Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher 005F 2 Definitions Particle Aggregate = 20nm to 100nm "Diameter" = 200nm to 1,000nm "Length" = Set of Percolated Aggregates Particle (?) Aggregate Agglomerate Constituents Size = Tech/Scientific Challenge 005F 3 Furnace Process High Temperature Refractory Feedstock Oil Air Natural Gas Reaction Zone Quench 005F 4 Specific Surface Area 005F 5 Structure 3-D Morphology Key Characteristic Summary of Crystallographic Studies 005F 7 Methodologies 005F 8 Summary * For all furnace carbon black 12Å < L C < 17Å * Crystallite L a ≈ 25Å * Amorphous Carbon * No micropores * Very few surface groups (hetero atoms) { 005F 9 Effect of Heat Treatment on Amorphous Carbon

269

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

270

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as outstanding...

271

Migratory Behavior of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon in the Willamette River and its Tributaries: Completion report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Migration patterns of adult spring chinook salmon above Willamette Falls differed depending on when the fish passed the Falls, with considerable among-fish variability. Early-run fish often terminated their migration for extended periods of time, in association with increased flows and decreased temperatures. Mid-run fish tended to migrate steadily upstream at a rate of 30-40 km/day. Late-run fish frequently ceased migrating or fell back downstream after migrating 10-200 km up the Willamette River or its tributaries; this appeared to be associated with warming water during summer and resulted in considerable mortality. Up to 40% of the adult salmon entering the Willamette River System above Willamette Falls (i.e. counted at the ladder) may die before reaching upriver spawning areas. Up to 10% of the fish passing up over Willamette Falls may fall-back below the Falls; some migrate to the Columbia River or lower Willamette River tributaries. If rearing conditions at hatcheries affect timing of adult returns because of different juvenile development rates and improper timing of smolt releases, then differential mortality in the freshwater segment of the adult migrations may confound interpretation of studies evaluating rearing practices.

Schreck, Carl B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Although commonly obscured by simple shear, pure shear fabrics occur locally within many metamorphic core complexes. The cover rocks to the Raft River metamorphic core complex exposed within the Black Pine Mountains display an early coaxial strain history which developed prior to the formation of low-angle fault-bounded allochthons. At higher structural levels this is documented by pressure shadows with straight sutures, and

273

Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: $50,000 Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount General: up to $50,000 Provider Idaho Falls Power Idaho Falls Power is offering a zero interest loan program to qualifying commercial customers to install efficient lighting and other energy

274

String-Corrected Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for black holes and strings, Phys. Rev. D 55, 6189 (1997) [black holes and elementary string states, Mod. Phys. Lett. A= 2 supergravity and Calabi-Yau string back- grounds, Phys.

Hubeny, Veronika

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems and rock fall source and impact areas, it possible to a rock fall source area in the possible to a rock fall source area. There are

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

Matthews, R. A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12 Relativity? · What are some of the consequences of GR? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What can we learn from Gravity Waves? · To do all

Cook, Greg

278

5, 40834113, 2005 Black Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 4083­4113, 2005 Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area J. C and Physics Discussions Measurements of Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area License. 4083 #12;ACPD 5, 4083­4113, 2005 Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

Black Cat 2 Aufgenommene Mewerte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Cat 2 Aufgenommene Me?werte Version: 0 Stand: 13.05.2005 Autor: Henry Westphal Tigris: X:\\2003_2004_Roehrenverstaerker\\Black_Cat_2\\REV0\\Documents\\2006-07-15_Black_Cat_2_Messwerte.doc #12

Wichmann, Felix

280

Acoustic black holes Matt Visser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic black holes Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint Louis USA Ole Miss you develop a number of use- ful connections between supersonic uid ow and black holes in general is the basis underlying a deep and fruitful analogy between the black holes of Einstein gravity and supersonic

Visser, Matt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Numerical Simulations of Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Simulations of Black Holes 26 Aug 2009 Frank Herrmann (fherrman@umd.edu) Department · merger of compact objects Much more than just black hole evolutions · Formulations · Hyperboloidal)/2.0; . . . high arithmetic intensity Operator Number of times used 12,961 + 5,398 - 3,438 / 69 14 #12;Black Hole

Maryland at College Park, University of

282

Dave Kaminsky Charles L. Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1935 $50.00 Dave Kaminsky 1938 $200.00 Charles L. Black 1940 $50.00 Harold S. Miropol 1941 $67,770.00 Phillip B. Bandel Robert C. Batson Charles L. Black Russell Blaylock Barry Boston Lawrence J. Danna James $5,650.00 Robert A. Alexander Bradley C. Black James C. Boothe Joseph C. Bremer Theodore W. Burns

283

BLACK BOX CHECKING DORON PELED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK BOX CHECKING DORON PELED Bell Laboratories 600 Mountain Ave. Murray Hill, NJ 07974, USA MOSHE properties. We propose and formalize this problem of black box checking and suggest several algorithms. Since the input to black box checking is not given initially, as is the case in the classical model of computation

Vardi, Moshe Y.

284

"Exotic" black holes with torsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of three-dimensional gravity with torsion, the concepts of standard and "exotic" Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes are generalized by going over to black holes with torsion. This approach provides a unified insight into thermodynamics of black holes, with or without torsion.

Blagojevi?, M; Vasili?, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Extremal black disks in QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that in the high energy QCD a true black disk wave function necessarily contains many quarks. This corresponds to necessity of non-vacuum reggeon loops in formation of a black disk. The result comes from decomposition of the black disk S-matrix in characters on group manifold.

Alexey V. Popov

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Black holes and black strings in plane waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the construction of black holes and black strings in vacuum plane wave spacetimes using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. We find solutions of the linearised equations of motion in the asymptotic region for a general source on a plane wave background. We observe that these solutions do not satisfy our previously defined conditions for being asymptotically plane wave. We consider the solution in the near region, treating the plane wave as a perturbation of a black object, and find that there is a regular black string solution but no regular black hole solution.

Witt, Julian Le

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Black Diamond Internal network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? ? ??Ð ? ? ? ?? ?????Ð ´? µ Ð ? Ð ?? ? ? ?? #12;Black Diamond Internet 123456 789101112 A B 12x 6x

Imperial College, London

288

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediately above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone. 2 figs.

Kohl, A.L.

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediatley above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone.

Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Algorithm Design Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia #12;Red-Black Tree A red-black tree is a binary search tree, and each node contains one extra field: its color, it can be either black or red of the binary search tree. If a binary search tree satisfies all the following red-black properties, it is a red-black

Chen, Yangjun

291

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol IOP Aerosol IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Stephen Schwartz For data sets, see below. Summary The Aerosol IOP was highlighted by the Gulfstream-1 aircraft flying clear-sky aerosol missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on clear sky radiation fields, with weather particularly favorable for these flights during the first and third weeks of the IOP. A secondary but important goal of this IOP was to fly cloudy-sky missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on cloud microphysics, and the effect of the microphysics on cloud optical properties. The Gulfstream obtained aerosol data in support of some of the

292

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1995 UAV IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UAV IOP UAV IOP Campaign Links ARM UAV Program Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1995 UAV IOP 1995.09.01 - 1995.09.30 Lead Scientist : John Vitko For data sets, see below. Description ARESE, the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment, concluded a very successful deployment to Oklahoma on November 1, 1995. The purpose of this five week long campaign was to conduct a series of instrumented flights to measure the interaction of solar energy with clear and cloudy skies to provide additional insight into recent observations of enhanced absorption in cloudy atmospheres.As such, ARESE focused on two scientific objectives: (1) the direct measurement of the absorption of solar radiation by clear

293

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Shortwave IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave IOP Shortwave IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Shortwave IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Graeme Stephens For data sets, see below. Summary The Shortwave Radiation IOP, the first in a series of three such IOPs, was devoted to exploring the measurement of broadband and spectral radiation with an array of ground-based ARM and guest instrumentation, including the RCF suite, and with airborne radiometric sensors on all of the IOP aircraft. Whereas much of the debate on solar radiative transfer has centered on the topic of clouds, there are also a significant number of issues related to clear sky transfer that this IOP hoped to address. Two key aspects of the underlying problem relate to the baseline measurement of solar radiation

294

Cedar Falls Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedar Falls Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 3203 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All-Electric Residential Service Residential Demand Space Heating Service Commercial Electric Street Lighting Service Lighting

295

Minority energy assessment report. Fall 1992  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy`s Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Category:International Falls, MN | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MN MN Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "International Falls, MN" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 88 KB SVHospital International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVHospital Internation... 84 KB SVLargeHotel International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVLargeHotel Internati... 85 KB SVLargeOffice International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVLargeOffice Internat... 83 KB SVMediumOffice International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png

297

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips October 21, 2013 - 8:44am Addthis Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are free and can be used on a daily basis to increase your savings; others are simple and inexpensive actions you can take to ensure maximum savings through the winter. If you haven't already, conduct an energy assessment to find out where you

298

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips October 21, 2013 - 8:44am Addthis Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are free and can be used on a daily basis to increase your savings; others are simple and inexpensive actions you can take to ensure maximum savings through the winter. If you haven't already, conduct an energy assessment to find out where you

299

How Will You Save Energy This Fall? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will You Save Energy This Fall? Will You Save Energy This Fall? How Will You Save Energy This Fall? September 10, 2009 - 3:00am Addthis While summer is officially in full swing until later this month, Labor Day has come and gone and-for many Americans-the fall season has unofficially started. Fewer hours of sunlight and cooler temperatures mean you may already be thinking about how you'll save energy this fall. How will you save energy this fall? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Save Energy in Your Apartment or Rental? How Should Energy Savers Use Facebook? How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently

300

Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall September 19, 2013 - 9:38am Addthis If you live in an apartment, you can still take some energy-saving steps this fall. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/buzbuzzer If you live in an apartment, you can still take some energy-saving steps this fall. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/buzbuzzer Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program How can I participate? Take some small actions, like using fans and unplugging electronics, to save energy this fall. A couple of weeks ago, my friend Rutherford told me that this month's electric bill for his three-bedroom apartment was $300. It was August, so I'm sure that was part of it, but, still - $300 for just one month?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Black-hole astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

Bender, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bloom, E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cominsky, L. [Sonoma State Univ., Rohnert Park, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

304

American Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon American Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

305

The rise and fall of presidential power in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project explores the power dynamics within the Iranian political system, asking what accounts for the rise and fall of a president's power relative to (more)

Jacobsen, Donavan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Big Falls, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigFalls,Wisconsin&oldid227753" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

307

Big Falls, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigFalls,Minnesota&oldid227752" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

308

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Uranium Ore Stockpile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Ore Stockpile - TX 04A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Falls City Uranium Ore Stockpile (TX.04A ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations:...

309

Idaho Falls Power- Commercial Energy Conservation Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In addition to loan programs, Idaho Falls Power offers rebates for customers meeting certain criteria. An energy audit will inspect the following measures and recommend upgrades as needed:...

310

,"International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

311

Ecology of the river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, in the Cinaruco River, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cinaruco River is a tributary of the Orinoco River, and forms the southern boundary of Venezuela's newest national park, Santos Luzardo. Like other rivers of this region, the Cinaruco River undergoes an extreme seasonal flood cycle. River dolphins were studied from November 1993 to June 1994 to gather baseline data regarding their ecology, including distribution, habitat affinity, group size, population composition, and prey availability. Transects from watercraft were used to count river dolphins, and observation effort was recorded. River dolphin habitat was characterized by broad hydrologic features (i.e., river, lagoon, side channel or confluence), structural composition (i.e., beach, rocks, cutbank, submerged vegetation) and complexity. Population composition by age class was determined according to size. Photo-identification was used to recognize individual dolphins. Potential preyfish availability within habitats was determined by using seine nets and gillnets. Dolphin diet was inferred from one stomach sample and the literature. Dolphins were seen most often during falling water, and least often during rising water. Dolphins were most often seen in confluence areas, and were seldom seen in side channels. The presence of rocks or beaches was associated with a greater frequency of dolphin sightings, and sightings increased with habitat complexity. Average group size for the 8-mo study was 2.0 (O?.05) dolphins, and was greatest during rising water. Greatest densities occurred during failing water, at 3.8 (+O.54) dolphins/km. Calves were first sighted at the end of the dry season and became more common as the waters rose. Six individuals were recognized and resighted by photo-identification; one of these was sighted 8 times over a period of 186 days. The fish diversity of the study area was high, and comprised at least 161 species. The stomach of one Inia contained 15 fish, representing at least 4 species.

McGuire, Tamara Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Black Holes with Skyrme Hair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is intended to give a review of the recent developments on black holes with Skyrme hair. The Einstein-Skyrme system is known to possess black hole solutions with Skyrme hair. The spherically symmetric black hole skyrmion with B=1 was the first discovered counter example of the no-hair conjecture for black holes. Recently we found the B=2 axially symmetric black hole skyrmion. In this system, the black hole at the center of the skyrmion absorbs the baryon number partially, leaving fractional charge outside the horizon. Therefore the baryon number is no longer conserved. We examine the B=1, 2 black hole solutions in detail in this paper. The model has a natural extension to the gauged version which can describe monopole black hole skyrmions. Callan and Witten discussed the monopole catalysis of proton decay within the Skyrme model. We apply the idea to the Einstein-Maxwell-Skyrme system and obtain monopole black hole skyrmions. Remarkably there exist multi-black hole skyrmion solutions in which the gravitational, electromagnetic, and strong forces between the monopoles are all in balance. The solutions turn out to be stable under spherically symmetric linear perturbations.

Noriko Shiiki; Nobuyuki Sawado

2005-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Fall 2004 SDSS Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In preparation for the Supernova Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II, a proposed 3-year extension to the SDSS, we have conducted an early engineering and science run during the fall of 2004, which consisted of approximately 20 scheduled nights of repeated imaging of half of the southern equatorial stripe. Transient supernova-like events were detected in near real-time and photometric measurements were made in the five SDSS filter bandpasses with a cadence of ~2 days. Candidate type Ia supernovae (SNe) were pre-selected based on their colors, light curve shape, and the properties of the host galaxy. Follow-up spectroscopic observations were performed with the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope and the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope to confirm their types and measure the redshifts. The 2004 campaign resulted in 22 spectroscopically confirmed SNe, which includes 16 type Ia, 5 type II, and 1 type Ib/c. These SN Ia will help fill in the sparsely sampled redshift interval of z = 0.05 - 0.35,...

Sako, M; Frieman, J A; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Becker, A; De Jongh, F; Dilday, B; Estrada, J; Hendry, J; Holtzman, J; Kaplan, J; Kessler, R; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J P; Miknaitis, G; Riess, A; Tucker, D; Barentine, J; Blandford, R D; Brewington, H; Dembicky, J; Harvanek, M; Hawley, S; Hogan, C; Johnston, D; Kahn, S; Ketzeback, B; Kleinman, S; Krzesnski, J; Lamenti, D; Long, D; McMillan, R; Newman, P; Nitta, A; Nichol, R; Scranton, R; Sheldon, E S; Snedden, S A; Stoughton, C; York, D; Sako, Masao; Romani, Roger; Frieman, Josh; Carthy, Jen Adelman-Mc; Becker, Andrew; Jongh, Fritz De; Dilday, Ben; Estrada, Juan; Hendry, John; Holtzman, Jon; Kaplan, Jared; Kessler, Rick; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Riess, Adam; Tucker, Douglas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

5D Black Rings and 4D Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has recently been shown that the M theory lift of a IIA 4D BPS Calabi-Yau black hole is a 5D BPS black hole spinning at the center of a Taub-NUT-flux geometries, and a certain linear relation between 4D and 5D BPS partition functions was accordingly proposed. In the present work we fortify and enrich this proposal by showing that the M-theory lift of the general 4D multi-black hole geometry are 5D black rings in a Taub-NUT-flux geometry.

Davide Gaiotto; Andrew Strominger; Xi Yin

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Black-Hole Spin Dependence in the Light Curves of Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A star orbiting a supermassive black hole can be tidally disrupted if the black hole's gravitational tidal field exceeds the star's self gravity at pericenter. Some of this stellar tidal debris can become gravitationally bound to the black hole, leading to a bright electromagnetic flare with bolometric luminosity proportional to the rate at which material falls back to pericenter. In the Newtonian limit, this flare will have a light curve that scales as t^-5/3 if the tidal debris has a flat distribution in binding energy. We investigate the time dependence of the black-hole mass accretion rate when tidal disruption occurs close enough the black hole that relativistic effects are significant. We find that for orbits with pericenters comparable to the radius of the marginally bound circular orbit, relativistic effects can double the peak accretion rate and halve the time it takes to reach this peak accretion rate. The accretion rate depends on both the magnitude of the black-hole spin and its orientation with respect to the stellar orbit; for orbits with a given pericenter radius in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates, a maximal black-hole spin anti-aligned with the orbital angular momentum leads to the largest peak accretion rate.

Michael Kesden

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Information Storage in Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The information loss paradox for Schwarzschild black holes is examined, using the ADS/CFT correspondence extended to the $M_6 (4,2)$ bulk. It is found that the only option compatible with the preservation of the quantum unitarity is when a regular remnant region of the black hole survives to the black hole evaporation process, where information can be stored and eventually retrieved.

M. D. Maia

2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop a conceptual model to explain the exposed rocks. Notes Although commonly obscured by simple shear, pure shear fabrics occur locally within many metamorphic core complexes. The cover rocks of the Raft River metamorphic core complex exposed within the Black Pine Mountains display an early coaxial strain history which developed prior to the formation of low-angle fault-bounded allochthons. At higher structural levels this is documented by pressure shadows with straight sutures, and oppositely-rotated antitaxial calcite veins.

318

The Fall Rate of the T-7 XBT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical model of expendable bathythermograph (XBT) fall rate is reviewed, and a new form of fall-rate equation is proposed to include new-surface transient effects. Comparisons are made of T-7 XBT and CTD (conductivity, temperature, and ...

Zachariah R. Hallock; William J. Teague

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Master of Social Work Program Application Instructions for Fall 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master of Social Work Program Application Instructions for Fall 2012 Admission Admission to the Master of Social Work (MSW) program is limited to the Fall semester only. Application materials may-year program. The full-time MSW program is administered by the Department of Social Work and delivered

de Lijser, Peter

320

Master of Social Work Program Application Instructions for Fall 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master of Social Work Program Application Instructions for Fall 2011 Admission Admission to the Master of Social Work (MSW) program is limited to the Fall semester only. Application materials may-year program. The full-time MSW program is administered by the Department of Social Work and delivered

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Master of Social Work Program Application Instructions for Fall 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master of Social Work Program Application Instructions for Fall 2013 Admission Admission to the Master of Social Work (MSW) program is limited to the Fall semester only. Application materials may by the Department of Social Work; all classes are conducted on Fullerton's main campus. The MSW program (3 year

de Lijser, Peter

322

The Interplay Between Galaxies and Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Interplay Between Galaxies and Black Holes A Theoretical Overview Massimo Ricotti (U · Formation of "Seed Black Holes" 1. Primordial Black Holes 2. Pop III Stars Remnants 3. Direct Collapse 4. Stellar Dynamics · Black Hole Growth 1. Gas Accretion vs BH-BH Mergers 2. Feeding Black Holes » M

Maryland at College Park, University of

323

Black-Scholes 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black-Scholes #12;1 2 2 5 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2-Ocone) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 4 Black-Scholes 25 4.1 Black-Scholes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 4}(d) . , (t) , (t)S t dWt . = 1 [8] , Black-Scholes . [8] , Black-Scholes . , . , 1 t log(St S0 ) . , [8] [6

Hattori, Tetsuya

324

Black entrepreneurship| Literature and reality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation provides two major contributions to the entrepreneurship literature. First, it provides the first comprehensive survey of the papers published on black entrepreneurship (more)

Crump, Micah E. S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Quantum Mechanics and Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the existence of black holes from the foundations of quantum mechanics. It is found that quantum mechanics rule out a possible gravitational collapse.

Jose N. Pecina-Cruz

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

326

Umatilla River Basin Trap and Haul Program : Annual Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam is the major counting and collection point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were collected at Threemile Dam from October 23, 1992 to July 14, 1993. A total of 1,913 summer steelhead; 239 adult and 64 jack fall chinook; 355 adult and 174 jack coho; and 1,205 adult and 16 jack spring chinook were collected. Fish collected were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam using either a 370 or 3,000 gallon liberation unit. The Westland Canal facility, the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts was in operation from February 15 to July 29, 1993. During that period, fish were trapped 46 days. An estimated 3,228 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland Canal trap to the Umatilla River boat ramp at rivermile 0.5.

Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of fall chinook salmon spawning adjacent to the In-Situ Redox Manipulation treatability test site, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) experiment is being evaluated as a potential method to remove contaminants from groundwater adjacent to the Columbia River near the 100-D Area. The ISRM experiment involves using sodium dithionate (Na{sub 2}O{sub 6}S{sub 2}) to precipitate chromate from the groundwater. The treatment will likely create anoxic conditions in the groundwater down-gradient of the ISRM treatability test site; however, the spatial extent of this anoxic plume is not exactly known. Surveys were conducted in November 1997, following the peak spawning of fall chinook salmon. Aerial surveys documented 210 redds (spawning nests) near the downstream island in locations consistent with previous surveys. Neither aerial nor underwater surveys documented fall chinook spawning in the vicinity of the ISRM treatability test site. Based on measurements of depth, velocity, and substrate, less than 1% of the study area contained suitable fall chinook salmon spawning habitat, indicating low potential for fall chinook salmon to spawn in the vicinity of the ISRM experiment.

Mueller, R.P.; Geist, D.R.

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Heat Pumps: $7,500 Weatherization: $5000 Appliances: $2,000 Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $100-$7500 Provider Idaho Falls Power Idaho Falls Power's Energy Efficiency Loan Program offers zero interest loans for qualifying customers to purchase and install efficient electric appliances. The program will loan up to 100% of the actual cost of eligible measures for qualifying customers. Electric appliances eligible for financing include, but are not limited to, the following:

329

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential New Construction Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential New Construction Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential New Construction Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential New Construction Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% electric rate discount for 4 years (if home is heated with natural gas) 25% electric rate discount for 2 years (if home is heated with electricity) Provider Cedar Falls Utilities Cedar Falls Utilities offers incentives to residential customers who construct new energy efficient homes. A rate discount of 25% is available to customers who meet the 5 Star Home Program criteria for new home

330

Open cycle OTEC system with falling jet evaporator and condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A configuration for the open cycle (OC) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system is presented incorporating a countercurrent falling jet evaporator and a concurrent falling jet condenser. The parameters governing performance of the proposed configuration are discussed and the sizing of equipment for a 100-MWe net power output OC OTEC plant is performed, based on recent experimental falling jet heat and mass transfer results. The performance of an OC OTEC plant with falling jet evaporator-condenser is compared with the Westinghouse conceptual design that uses an open-channel evaporator and a surface condenser. Preliminary calculations indicate that falling jet heat and mass transfer, when applied in the proposed configuration, leads to a very simple and compact plant assembly resulting in substantial capital cost savings.

Kogan, A.; Johnson, D. H.; Green, H. J.; Olson, D. A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

332

Fish Passage Improvements at Three Mile Falls Diversion Dam, Umatilla River, Oregon, Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results and conclusions from the biological assessment and outlines several alternative plans for solving fish passage problems at the dam. A recommended plan, based on consensus of the fisheries agencies and the tribes, is described, and the rationale for that decision is discussed. Data needs for final designs, a tentative construction schedule, and a discussion of operation and maintenance needs are presented.

Unknown Author

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Fall 2004 SDSS Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In preparation for the Supernova Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II, a proposed 3-year extension to the SDSS, we have conducted an early engineering and science run during the fall of 2004, which consisted of approximately 20 scheduled nights of repeated imaging of half of the southern equatorial stripe. Transient supernova-like events were detected in near real-time and photometric measurements were made in the five SDSS filter bandpasses with a cadence of ~2 days. Candidate type Ia supernovae (SNe) were pre-selected based on their colors, light curve shape, and the properties of the host galaxy. Follow-up spectroscopic observations were performed with the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope and the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope to confirm their types and measure the redshifts. The 2004 campaign resulted in 22 spectroscopically confirmed SNe, which includes 16 type Ia, 5 type II, and 1 type Ib/c. These SN Ia will help fill in the sparsely sampled redshift interval of z = 0.05 - 0.35, the so-called 'redshift desert', in the Hubble diagram. Detailed investigation of the spectral properties of these moderate-redshift SNe Ia will also provide a bridge between local SNe and high-redshift objects, and will help us understand the systematics for future cosmological applications that require high photometric precision. Finally, the large survey volume also provides the opportunity to select unusual supernovae for spectroscopic study that are poorly sampled in other surveys. We report on some of the early results from this program and discuss potential future applications.

Masao Sako; Roger Romani; Josh Frieman; Jen Adelman-McCarthy; Andrew Becker; Fritz DeJongh; Ben Dilday; Juan Estrada; John Hendry; Jon Holtzman; Jared Kaplan; Rick Kessler; Hubert Lampeitl; John Marriner; Gajus Miknaitis; Adam Riess; Douglas Tucker; J. Barentine; R. Blandford; H. Brewington; J. Dembicky; M. Harvanek; S. Hawley; C. Hogan; D. Johnston; S. Kahn; B. Ketzeback; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Lamenti; D. Long; R. McMillan; P. Newman; A. Nitta; R. Nichol; R. Scranton; E. Sheldon; S. Snedden; C. Stoughton; D. York; the SDSS Collaboration

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Savannah River National Laboratory  

At a glance Remote Electrical Throw Device Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory ... sufficient manufacturing capacity, established dist ...

335

Black Strings, Black Rings and State-space Manifold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State-space geometry is considered, for diverse three and four parameter non-spherical horizon rotating black brane configurations, in string theory and $M$-theory. We have explicitly examined the case of unit Kaluza-Klein momentum $D_1D_5P$ black strings, circular strings, small black rings and black supertubes. An investigation of the state-space pair correlation functions shows that there exist two classes of brane statistical configurations, {\\it viz.}, the first category divulges a degenerate intrinsic equilibrium basis, while the second yields a non-degenerate, curved, intrinsic Riemannian geometry. Specifically, the solutions with finitely many branes expose that the two charged rotating $D_1D_5$ black strings and three charged rotating small black rings consort real degenerate state-space manifolds. Interestingly, arbitrary valued $M_5$-dipole charged rotating circular strings and Maldacena Strominger Witten black rings exhibit non-degenerate, positively curved, comprehensively regular state-space configurations. Furthermore, the state-space geometry of single bubbled rings admits a well-defined, positive definite, everywhere regular and curved intrinsic Riemannian manifold; except for the two finite values of conserved electric charge. We also discuss the implication and potential significance of this work for the physics of black holes in string theory.

Stefano Bellucci; Bhupendra Nath Tiwari

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Deschutes River Spawning Gravel Study, Volume I, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spawning habitat in the Deschutes River was inventoried, gravel permeability and composition were sampled at selected gravel bars, historical flow records for the Deschutes were analyzed, salmon and trout utilization of spawning habitat was examined, and potential methods of enhancing spawning habitat in the river were explored. Some changes in river conditions since the mid-1960's were identified, including a reduction in spawning habitat immediately downstream from the hydroelectric complex. The 1964 flood was identified as a factor which profoundly affected spawning habitat in the river, and which greatly complicated efforts to identify recent changes which could be attributed to the hydrocomplex. A baseline on present gravel quality at both chinook and steelhead spawning areas in the river was established using a freeze-core methodology. Recommendations are made for enhancing spawning habitat in the Deschutes River, if it is independently determined that spawning habitat is presently limiting populations of summer steelhead or fall chinook in the river. 53 refs., 40 figs., 21 tabs.

Huntington, Charles W.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Black holes, AdS, and CFTs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

count all states inside the black hole, but only those thatis the bag of gold? . . . . . Black hole entropy AdS/CFT 12000) [arXiv:hep-th/9911230] Black holes, AdS, and CFTs 11.

Marolf, Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located along the Columbia River at Underwood, Washington, approximately 30 miles upstream of Bonneville Dam. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary Dams; 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 1999 to 30 September 2000. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations; and (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates.

van der Naald, Wayne; Spellman, Bryant; Clark, Roy (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

Tanmay Vachaspati

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nonlinear Electrodynamics and black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is addressed the issue of black holes with nonlinear electromagnetic field, focussing mainly in the Born-Infeld case. The main features of these systems are described, for instance, geodesics, energy conditions, thermodynamics and isolated horizon aspects. Also are revised some black hole solutions of alternative nonlinear electrodynamics and its inconveniences.

Nora Breton; Ricardo Garcia-Salcedo

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009 Experiment Planning COPS Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan (PDF, 12.4M) Outreach COPS Backgrounder (PDF, 306K) Posters AMF Poster, German Vesion Researching Raindrops in the Black Forest News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany Main Site: 48° 32' 24.18" N, 08° 23' 48.72" E Altitude: 511.43 meters In March 2007, the third deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will take place in the Black Forest region of Germany, where scientists will study rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. ARM

343

Pressure Effects on Black Liquor Gasification .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gasification of black liquor is an alternative to the combustion of black liquor, which is currently the dominant form of chemical recovery in the paper (more)

Young, Christopher Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

BlackGold Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BlackGold Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name BlackGold Biofuels Place Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Zip 19107 Product Philadelphia-based developer of a waste...

345

Black Hills Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Hills Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Hills Corporation Place Rapid City, South Dakota Zip 57709 Product Diversified energy and communications company....

346

Black optic display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Black hole remnant of black hole-neutron star coalescing binaries with arbitrary black hole spin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for determining the dimensionless spin parameter and mass of the black hole remnant of black hole-neutron star mergers with arbitrary initial black hole spin angular momentum, binary mass ratio, and neutron star mass and cold equation of state is formulated. Tests against numerical-relativity results are carried out, showing that both the dimensionless spin parameter and the final mass are accurately reproduced. For the first time, the behaviour of both quantities and of the l = 2, m = 2, n = 0 quasinormal mode frequency is inspected throughout the parameter space. Predictions of this frequency may be exploited to guide gravitational wave modelling and detection efforts, and to extract physical information from detected gravitational wave signals that would help us break degeneracies between binary black hole and black hole-neutron star systems, improve our understanding of compact binary formation, and constrain the neutron star equation of state.

Francesco Pannarale

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

Red-Black Trees Red-black trees are binary search trees that sat-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Red-Black Trees Red-black trees are binary search trees that sat- isfy: 1. Every node is either red or black. 2. If a node is red, then its parent is black. 3. For a given node, every path to a nil has the same number of black nodes, called black- height. A red-black tree with n nodes has h 2 lg

Bylander, Tom

349

Boralex Beaver Livermore Falls Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Livermore Falls Biomass Facility Livermore Falls Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boralex Beaver Livermore Falls Biomass Facility Facility Boralex Beaver Livermore Falls Sector Biomass Location Androscoggin County, Maine Coordinates 44.1912416°, -70.1707037° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1912416,"lon":-70.1707037,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 Indian Energy Beat: News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country Fall 2012 Issue: DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects Message from the Director Sharing Knowledge: DOE Office of Indian Energy Commissions Regional Transmission and Renewable Energy Analysis Opening Doors: Seminole Tribe to Host Grant Proposal Writing Workshop Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Building Bridges: ICEIWG Quarterly Meeting Held in Portland DOE-IE Sponsors Two Sandia Student Interns Tribal Energy Transmission Webinars Leading the Charge: Women in Power Andrea Alexander Kathy Mayo

351

Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season October 18, 2011 - 6:42am Addthis Andrea Spikes Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory I'm sure you've noticed the change in seasons by now. Fall brings cooler weather, and with it my thoughts turn to warm things like putting blankets on the couch, enjoying my fireplace, and adjusting my thermostat (as little as possible, of course). One thing we did over the weekend is we insulated our water heater. Depending on how efficient your water heater tank is, adding insulation can reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you around 4%-9% in water heating costs. Since water heating contributes an average of 18% to the typical home utility bill, it's definitely worth it to add insulation!

352

TOPS: A Free-Fall Velocity and CTD Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A free-fall instrument, TOPS, measures vertical profiles of horizontal ocean velocity, conductivity and temperature. Profiling capability extends throughout the full water column (6000 db pressure limitation). Larger vertical wavelength (water ...

S. P. Hayes; H. B. Milburn; E. F. Ford

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A New Free-Fall Profiler for Measuring Biophysical Microstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the performance of a newly developed free-falling microstructure profiler. The instrument is equipped with standard turbulence sensors for measuring turbulent velocity shear and temperature gradient, as well as bio-optical ...

Fabian Wolk; Hidekatsu Yamazaki; Laurent Seuront; Rolf G. Lueck

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

HONEY: A Multimodality Fall Detection and Telecare System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide home-based telecare instead of institutionalized healthcare. Falling is one of the most common. To facilitate a reliable, safe and real-time home-based healthcare environment, we propose the HONEY system

Shi, Weisong

355

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: Hertz ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: Hertz Rent-a-Car ... Hertz has been selected as the official car rental company for the Lead-Zinc 2000 ...

356

Department of Electrical Engineering Fall 2009 Electridyne Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Electrical Engineering Fall 2009 Electridyne Motor Overview Our sponsored project was to design an elecrtic motor for an urban transportation vehicle, the challenges involved included research into motor design, consideration of the materials, and the electromagnetic parameters

Demirel, Melik C.

357

International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

per Thousand Cubic Feet) International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

358

Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2011: 9,497: 6,894: 4,421: 2,459 ...

359

International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

360

Massive black hole pairs in clumpy, self-gravitating circumnuclear disks: stochastic orbital decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of massive black hole pairs in clumpy gaseous circumnuclear disks. We track the orbital decay of the light, secondary black hole M_{\\bullet2} orbiting around the more massive primary at the center of the disk, using N-body/SPH simulations. We find that the gravitational interaction of M_{\\bullet2} with massive clumps M_cl erratically perturbs the otherwise smooth orbital decay. In close encounters with massive clumps, gravitational slingshots can kick the secondary black hole out of the disk plane. The black hole moving on an inclined orbit then experiences the weaker dynamical friction of the stellar background, resulting in a longer orbital decay timescale. Interactions between clumps can also favor orbital decay when the black hole is captured by a massive clump which is segregating toward the center of the disk. The stochastic behavior of the black hole orbit emerges mainly when the ratio M_{\\bullet2}/M_cl falls below unity, with decay timescales ranging from ~1 to ~50 Myr. This sugg...

Colpi, Monica

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Black carbon snow albedo reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black carbon snow albedo reduction Black carbon snow albedo reduction Title Black carbon snow albedo reduction Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hadley, Odelle L., and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Nature Climate Change Volume 2 Pagination 437-440 Abstract Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black-carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and near-worldwide melting of ice1, 2. In this study, we generated and characterized pure and black-carbon-laden snow in the laboratory and verified that black-carbon contamination appreciably reduces snow albedo at levels that have been found in natural settings1, 3, 4. Increasing the size of snow grains in our experiments decreased snow albedo and amplified the radiative perturbation of black carbon, which justifies the aging-related positive feedbacks that are included in climate models. Moreover, our data provide an extensive verification of the Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation model1, which will be included in the next assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change5.

362

Black Holes in Brane Worlds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a Randall-Sundrum theory (RS1) 3+1 dimensional black holes and higher dimensional black holes are not the natural continuations of each other. 3+1 dimensional black holes decay into a large number of 4+1 dimensional black holes at a critical mass, Mcrit ? 10 32 TeV. Those black holes themselves may become unstable above another, albeit much smaller critical mass, M0 ? 10 3 TeV. Models of the universe with extra dimensions larger than the Planck length have been under intense investigation during the last few years [1, 2, 3, 4]. The general feature of these models is that standard model particles are compelled to live on 3-branes, to satisfy momentum conservation in 3+1 dimensions and to conform to other phenomenological bounds, while gravity pervades all dimensions. Many of these models predict the observation of black holes at future accelerators [1, 5, 6, 7]. The models either use flat but compact extra dimensions(ADD scenario) [1] or a number of branes embedded in AdS space, with warped extra dimension(s) [2, 3]. Black holes in theories with extra dimensions have been studied widely. The classic paper of Myers and Perry [8] found solutions in D-dimensional flat space. Black hole solutions were also found in AdS space [9, 10]. No non-trivial black hole solutions have been found in closed form in brane theories of the Randall Sundrum type. Yet, it is important to learn as much as possible about black holes in such models. The black string solution [11] that extends in a uniform manner from the brane into the extra dimension has the Gregory-Laflamme instability in the ADD scenario [11, 12]. It is easy to invoke an entropy argument [13], to show that an instability will occur at a critical mass. An alternative interpretation is given in [14]. To understand the arguments by Gregory and Laflamme, compare the entropies of standard 3+1 and 4+1 dimensional Schwarzschild black holes of the same mass. Then one obtains a critical mass

P. Suranyi; L. C. R. Wijewardhana; Mcrit M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

364

Temperature Sensitivity of Black Carbon Decomposition and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature Sensitivity of Black Carbon Decomposition and Oxidation B I N H T H A N H N G U Y E N to physical protection, chemical recalcitrance influences SOC decomposition rates. Black carbon (BC isotope geochemistry and nanomorphology of soil black carbon: Black chernozemic soils in central Europe

Lehmann, Johannes

365

PERSPECTIVE Quantum Mechanics of Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERSPECTIVE Quantum Mechanics of Black Holes Edward Witten The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived

366

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

367

Savannah River National Laboratory  

located in every town and city have the potential to be used as environmental ... Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC. SRNS is responsible for

368

Savannah River Remediation Procurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and procedures, rules and regulations, terms and conditions and the orders and directives under which Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) develops, issues, administers and...

369

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Field Sites SREL is supported largely by external funding. Major sources include DOE Environmental Management, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, USGS, US Department of the...

370

Savannah River National Laboratory  

The coupling also provided excellent response to impact. ... used as a means of remote camera and equipment, ... Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, ...

371

Savannah River National Laboratory  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC. SRNS is responsible for transferring its technologies to the private sector so that these technologies may have ...

372

Black in the Non-Black Imagination: How Anti-Black Ideology Shapes Non-Black Racial Discourse.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the (re)production of anti-Black ideology in critical discourses on race. Though contemporary critical discourses on race have been concerned with theorizing about (more)

Howard, Natasha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Black Peak and Enchantments - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Peak, North Cascades. A nice two day outing. We hiked on the Maple Pass trail, from Hwy. 20, to Heather Pass, and then on a path to Lewis lake, where...

374

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Washington, Volume IIA, Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage, 1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering feasibility and predesign report on the Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage Project provides BPA with information for planning purposes and will serve as a discussion document for interested agencies. Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dams, both on the Wenatchee River, were built in the early 1900's as diversions for hydropower, and irrigation and hydropower, respectively. The present fishway facilities at both sites are inadequate to properly pass the anadromous fish runs in the Wenatchee River. These runs include spring and summer chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon and steelhead trout. Predesign level drawings are provided in this report that represent fishway schemes capable of adequately passing present and projected fish runs. The effects of present passage facilities on anadromous fish stocks is addressed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The quantitative treatment assesses losses of adult migrants due to the structures and places an estimated value on those fish. The dollar figure is estimated to be between $391,000 and $701,000 per year for both structures. The qualitative approach to benefits deals with the concept of stock vigor, the need for passage improvements to help ensure the health of the anadromous fish stock. 29 references, 27 figures, 5 tables.

Unknown Author

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Of the Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About thirty years ago, Bekenstein and Hawking introduced three basic concepts relating to black hole, namely, the "area entropy", "gravitation temperature" and "thermal radiation". The author analyzes these concepts systematically and concludes that they are mostly inadequate or wrong. He points out that a black hole's taking in thermal radiation from the space is an energy-gathering process. It is special, even extraordinary. It reduces entropy, violating Clausius' second law.

Xinyong Fu

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Are Black Holes Elementary Particles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum black holes are the smallest and heaviest conceivable elementary particles. They have a microscopic size but a macroscopic mass. Several fundamental types have been constructed with some remarkable properties. Quantum black holes in the neighborhood of the Galaxy could resolve the paradox of ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected in Earths atmosphere. They may also play a role as dark matter in cosmology. 1 1

Yuan K. Ha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Regular black hole in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find a new black hole in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space by introducing an anisotropic perfect fluid inspired by the noncommutative black hole. This is a regular black hole with two horizons. We compare thermodynamics of this black hole with that of non-rotating BTZ black hole. The first-law of thermodynamics is not compatible with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

Yun Soo Myung; Myungseok Yoon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Rotating Black Holes in Higher Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of higher-dimensional black holes can differ significantly from those of black holes in four dimensions, since neither the uniqueness theorem, nor the staticity theorem or the topological censorship theorem generalize to higher dimensions. We first discuss black holes of Einstein-Maxwell theory and Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with spherical horizon topology. Here new types of stationary black holes are encountered. We then discuss nonuniform black strings and present evidence for a horizon topology changing transition.

Burkhard Kleihaus; Jutta Kunz; Francisco Navarro-Lerida

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fishing in Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

A. Brotas

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

382

about Savannah River National Laboratory  

S R N The Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and are managed and operated by Savannah River ...

383

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Savannah River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

384

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties NY -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties NY - NY 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties, NY Alternate Name(s): Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW) Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) DOE-Niagara Falls Storage Site NY.17-1 NY.17-3 Location: Lewiston , New York NY.17-5 Historical Operations: Stored, shipped, and buried radioactive equipment and waste for MED and AEC containing uranium, radium, and thorium. Portions of the former site are privately owned, creating a "site" for the vicinity properties. NY.17-1 NY.17-2 NY.17-14 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NY.17-4 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Surveys NY.17-3 NY.17-5 NY.17-6 NY.17-7 NY.17-8 NY.17-9 NY.17-10 NY.17-11 NY.17-12 NY.17-14 Site Status: Certification Basis, including Federal Register Notice for 23 properties. Cleanup in progress for additional 3 VPs. NY.17-13

385

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix C Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird Introduction The red-winged black bird is one of the most abundant birds in North America (Marshall et al. 2003). Red-winged Blackbirds are extremely adaptable; successfully colonizing many small

386

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

387

from Savannah River National Laboratory  

operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. SRNL offers innovative solutions ... The decommissioning of F Area at the Savannah River Site involves long-term management

388

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2001. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations. (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates. Specific tasks conducted by ODFW and WDFW during this period were: (1) Documentation of fall chinook and chum spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary dams using on-water observations; (2) Collection of biological data to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (3) Determination of spawning population estimates and age composition, average size at return, and sex ratios in order to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (4) Collection of data to determine stock origin of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1; (5) Determination of possible stock origins of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1 using tag rates based on coded-wire tag recoveries and genetic baseline analysis; (6) Determination of emergence timing and hatching rate of juvenile fall chinook and chum below Bonneville Dam; (7) Determination of migration time and size for juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (8) Investigation of feasibility of determining stock composition of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (9) Documentation of entrapment in low-lying areas of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; and (10) Investigation of feasibility of determining juvenile to adult survival rate from coded-wire tagged juvenile fall chinook captured and tagged in the area described in Task 6.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary Dams; 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 1998 to 30 September 1999. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations; and (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates. Specific tasks conducted by ODFW and WDFW during this period were: (1) Documentation of fall chinook and chum spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary dams using on-water observations; (2) Collection of biological data to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (3) Determination of spawning population estimates and age composition, average size at return, and sex ratios in order to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (4) Collection of data to determine stock origin of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1; (5) Determination of possible stock origins of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1 using tag rates based on coded-wire tag recoveries and genetic baseline analysis; (6) Determination of emergence timing and hatching rate of juvenile fall chinook and chum below Bonneville Dam; (7) Determination of migration time and size for juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (8) Investigation of feasibility of determining stock composition of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (9) Documentation of stranding and entrapment in low-lying areas of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; and (10) Investigation of feasibility of coded-wire tagging juvenile fall chinook captured in the area described in Task 6 to determine juvenile to adult survival rate.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Red-Black Trees 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red-Black Trees 1© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees 6 3 8 4 v z #12;Red-Black Trees 2© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia From (2,4) to Red-Black Trees A red-black tree is a representation of a (2,4) tree by means of a binary tree whose nodes are colored red or black In comparison with its associated (2,4) tree

Alechina, Natasha

391

Area spectra of near extremal black holes and Kerr black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by Maggiore's new interpretation of quasinormal modes, starting from the first law of thermodynamics of black holes, we investigate area spectra of a near extremal Schwarzschild de sitter black hole and a higher dimensional near extremal Reissner-Nordstrom de sitter black hole. Then we apply the method to the Kerr black hole. We show that the logarithmic term does not appear and the area spectra of all these black holes are equally spaced and irrelevant to the parameters of black holes.

Chen, Deyou; Zu, Xiaotao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus bonus for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump: $100 - $200, plus bonus for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton, plus $25/ton for each 1 EER above minimum requirement Refrigerators: $25, plus $50 for recycling an old, working unit

393

Are You Ready for Fall? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Are You Ready for Fall? Are You Ready for Fall? Are You Ready for Fall? October 21, 2011 - 6:38am Addthis This week, Andrea talked about insulating her water heater tank in preparation for cooler weather (of course, that's something you can do any time of year to save money and energy at home). She also listed many other ways to reduce your water heating costs. Erin blogged about something we don't often think about: the historical perspective of using renewable energy. For example, Leonardo da Vinci had designed a solar powered water heater among other things. As for geothermal energy, archaeological evidence shows that the first human use of geothermal resources in North America occurred more than 10,000 years ago. Whether you're using renewables or energy efficiency (or both), what are

394

Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount General Weatherization: $0.25/kWh Air Source Heat Pumps Upgrade (Ducts Sealed): $850 Air Source Heat Pumps Upgrade (Ducts Not Sealed): $450 Air Source Heat Pumps Conversion (Ducts Sealed): $1,600 Air Source Heat Pumps Conversion (Ducts Not Sealed): $1,200 Ground Source Heat Pumps: $2,500

395

Are You Ready for Fall? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Are You Ready for Fall? Are You Ready for Fall? Are You Ready for Fall? October 21, 2011 - 6:38am Addthis This week, Andrea talked about insulating her water heater tank in preparation for cooler weather (of course, that's something you can do any time of year to save money and energy at home). She also listed many other ways to reduce your water heating costs. Erin blogged about something we don't often think about: the historical perspective of using renewable energy. For example, Leonardo da Vinci had designed a solar powered water heater among other things. As for geothermal energy, archaeological evidence shows that the first human use of geothermal resources in North America occurred more than 10,000 years ago. Whether you're using renewables or energy efficiency (or both), what are

396

City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District Heating District Heating Low Temperature District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Klamath Falls District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

397

Village of Enosburg Falls, Vermont (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enosburg Falls, Vermont (Utility Company) Enosburg Falls, Vermont (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Enosburg Falls Place Vermont Service Territory Vermont Website www.villageofenosburgfall Green Button Reference Page www.efficiencyvermont.com Green Button Committed Yes Utility Id 5915 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Industrial Demand Rate - Rate 04 Industrial

398

City of Klamath Falls Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Klamath Falls Sector Geothermal energy Type Snowmelt Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

399

Idaho Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources (Redirected from Idaho Falls, ID) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.4665808°, -112.0341374° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.4665808,"lon":-112.0341374,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

400

UNION CARBIDE MZALS DIVISION tiiAGARA FALLS, NEW YDRK  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PRELIF",INARY SURVEY 0' PRELIF",INARY SURVEY 0' ELECTRDMET iORPDF.&TiCIN UNION CARBIDE MZALS DIVISION tiiAGARA FALLS, NEW YDRK Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Dak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Fornierly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program ,ELECTRD?'ISi 60RPOR:TION UNiON CARBIDE METALS DIVlSIOti NiASARA FALLS, NEA YORK At the requests o f the Department of Energy (DOE, then ERDA), a preliminary survey was performed at the former Electromet Plant (cur- rently Union Carbide Corporation - Metals Division plant) in Niagara Falls, Neh' York (see Fig. l), on August 24, 1976, to assess the radio- logical status 0 f those facilities utilized under~Manhattan Engineer

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401

Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Energy Resources (Redirected from Menomonee Falls, WI) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.1788967°, -88.1173132° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1788967,"lon":-88.1173132,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

402

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Kraft black liquor delivery systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improvement of spray nozzles for black liquor injection into kraft recovery furnaces is expected to result from obtaining a controlled, well-defined droplet size distribution. Work this year has centered on defining the capabilities of commercial black liquor nozzles currently in use. Considerations of the observed mechanism of droplet formation suggest a major revision is needed in the theory of how droplets form from these nozzles. High resolution, high sensitivity video has been shown to be superior to flash x-ray as a technique for measuring the droplet size distribution as well as the formation history. An environmentally sound spray facility capable of spraying black liquor at temperatures up to normal firing conditions is being constructed before data acquisition continues. Preliminary correlations have been developed between liquor properties, nozzle design, and droplet size. Three aspects of nozzle design have been investigated: droplet size distribution, fluid sheet thickness, and flow and pressure drop characteristics. The standard deviation about the median droplet size for black liquor is nearly the same as the for a wide variety of other fluids and nozzle types. Preliminary correlation for fluid sheet thickness on the plate of a splashplate nozzle show the strong similarities of black liquor to other fluids. The flow and pressure drop characteristic of black liquor nozzle, follow a simple two-term relationship similar to other flow devices. This means that in routine mill operation of black liquor nozzles only the fluid acceleration in the nozzle is important, viscous losses are quiet small. 21 refs., 53 figs., 10 tabs.

Adams, T.N.; Empie, H.L.; Obuskovic, N.; Spielbauer, T.M.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc. National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc. The cooperative agreement enhances the National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc., members'...

405

Conceptual model of the Klamath Falls, Oregon geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last 50 years significant amounts of data have been obtained from the Klamath Falls geothermal resource. To date, the complexity of the system has stymied researchers, leading to the development of only very generalized hydrogeologic and geothermal models of the area. Recently, the large quantity of available temperature data have been re-evaluated, revealing new information on subsurface heat flow and locations of faults in the system. These inferences are supported by borehole, geochemical, geophysical, and hydrologic data. Based on re-evaluation of all available data, a detailed conceptual model for the Klamath Falls geothermal resource is proposed.

Prucha, R.H.; Benson, S.M.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Small-Area Study of Environmental Risk Assessment of Outdoor Falls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Falls in public places are an issue of great health concern especially for the elderly. Falls among the elderly is also a major health burden in many countries. This study describes a spatial approach to assess environmental causes of outdoor falls using ... Keywords: Environmental risk assessment, GIS, Outdoor falls, Small-area study, Spatial clustering

Poh-Chin Lai; Wing-Cheung Wong; Chien-Tat Low; Martin Wong; Ming-Houng Chan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

1.061 Transport Processes in the Environment, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to momentum and scalar transport in environmental flows, with emphasis given to river and lake systems. Derivation and solutions to the differential form of mass conservation equations. Topics include: molecular ...

Nepf, Heidi

408

Schroedinger Equation of the Schwarzschild Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the gravitational degrees of freedom of the Schwarzschild black hole by one free variable. We introduce an equation which we suggest to be the Schroedinger equation of the Schwarzschild black hole corresponding to this model. We solve the Schroedinger equation explicitly and obtain the mass spectrum of the black hole as such as it can be observed by an observer very far away and at rest relative to the black hole. Our equation implies that there is no singularity inside the Schwarzschild black hole, and that the black hole has a certain ground state in which its mass is non-zero.

Jarmo Makela

1996-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Massive Black Holes: formation and evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive black holes are nowadays believed to reside in most local galaxies. Observations have revealed us vast information on the population of local and distant black holes, but the detailed physical properties of these dark massive objects are still to be proven. Accretion of gas and black hole mergers play a fundamental role in determining the two parameters defining a black hole: mass and spin. We briefly review here the basic properties of the population of supermassive black holes, focusing on the still mysterious formation of the first massive black holes, and their evolution from early times to now.

Martin J. Rees; Marta Volonteri

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers, 1999-2000 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Idaho Supplementation Studies, fisheries crews from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes have been snorkeling tributaries of the Salmon River to estimate chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) parr abundance; conducting surveys of spawning adult chinook salmon to determine the number of redds constructed and collect carcass information; operating a rotary screw trap on the East Fork Salmon River and West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River to enumerate and PIT-tag emigrating juvenile chinook salmon; and collecting and PIT-tagging juvenile chinook salmon on tributaries of the Salmon River. The Tribes work in the following six tributaries of the Salmon River: Bear Valley Creek, East Fork Salmon River, Herd Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Valley Creek, and West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River. Snorkeling was used to obtain parr population estimates for ISS streams from 1992 to 1997. However, using the relatively vigorous methods described in the ISS experimental design to estimate summer chinook parr populations, results on a project-wide basis showed extraordinarily large confidence intervals and coefficients of variation. ISS cooperators modified their sampling design over a few years to reduce the variation around parr population estimates without success. Consequently, in 1998 snorkeling to obtain parr population estimates was discontinued and only General Parr Monitoring (GPM) sites are snorkeled. The number of redds observed in SBT-ISS streams has continued to decline as determined by five year cycles. Relatively weak strongholds continue to occur in the South Fork Salmon River and Bear Valley Creek. A rotary screw trap was operated on the West Fork Yankee Fork during the spring and fall of 1999 and the spring of 2000 to monitor juvenile chinook migration. A screw trap was also operated on the East Fork of the Salmon River during the spring and fall from 1993 to 1997 and 1999 (fall only) to 2000. Significant supplementation treatments have occurred in the South Fork Salmon River (IDFG). The East Fork Salmon River received supplementation treatments yearly through 1995. There have been no treatments since 1995, and no significant future treatments from local broodstock are conceivable due to extremely poor escapement. The West Fork Yankee Fork received a single presmolt treatment in 1994. Similarly, no significant future treatments are planned for the WFYF due to extremely poor escapement. However, small scale experimental captive rearing and broodstock techniques are currently being tested with populations from the EFSR and WFYF. Captive rearing/broodstock techniques could potentially provide feedback for evaluation of supplementation. The other three SBT-ISS streams are control streams and do not receive hatchery treatments.

Kohler, Andy; Taki, Doug; Teton, Angelo

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Collawash Falls Fish Passage Project began in August of 1987, and resulted in completion of Phase I of the construction of the fish passage facility. A core team of Forest Service personnel. led by fish passage specialists from R-10, Alaska, excavated a trench in the bedrock face of the falls that is approximately 95 feet long, 8 feet deep and 10 feet wide. Implementation of Phase II of the project was put on hold in July of 1988. when 50 yards of rock from the adjacent headwall sloughed into the trench. During September and October of 1988 the larger rocks were reduced in size by blasting. High water flows in November moved the blasted rock from the trench. The project is being done by the Mt. Hood National Forest with funds supplied by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703(c). Action Item 4.2, in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W). Successful modification of the Collawash Falls will allow anadromous fish full access to over 10 miles of acknowledged high quality spawning and rearing habitat. The total anadromous fish production benefits gained from utilization of this habitat, assuming a 10 year project life with a 4% discount factor is $1,690,019.00. In 1974, several partial barriers to anadromous fish in the form of small falls and cataracts located immediately above the trench, were modified for full passage by blasting. This work conducted by the Forest Service was fully successful in allowing fish passage through all but the main barrier in Collawash Falls. Other Collawash River fisheries projects include the 1984 construction of a fish liberation access site above the falls for the PGE/ODFW spring chinook trap and haul program. Funding for the project came from revenues generated by an adjacent Forest Service timber sale. In summer of 1985, 30,000 spring chinook presmolts were stocked at this liberation site. In spring of 1987. 10,000 coho pre-smolts were stocked above the falls in the first of a three-year program to increase the runs of native winter run coho to the Collawash River system.

Bettin, Scott (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Quantum Criticality and Black Holes  

SciTech Connect

I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

Sachdev, Subir (Harvard)

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

Suites Catering Menu --Fall 2011 ScholarshipSuites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, horseradish sauce, stone ground mustard, and vegetable garnish Nacho Bar $50 Start with seasoned ground beef and ranch dip Assorted Cheese Tray $40 (Local and Imported) Garnished with berries and grapes, served garnish St. Louis Style Ribs $25 Fall-off-the-bone tender and slathered with carmelized BBQ sauce, a slab

Peterson, Blake R.

414

Seeding Tests on Supercooled Stratus Using Vertical Fall Pyrotechnics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Michigan in early 1977, an experiment was conducted to test the ability of silver iodide (AgI) ice nucleus curtains generated by vertical-fall pyrotechnics to produce clearings in supercooled stratus. A second objective of the experiment was ...

Joe L. Sutherland; John R. Thompson; Don A. Griffith; Bruce Kunkel

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Sidley & Austin, where he primarily worked on energy issues, before joining the University of IllinoisEnergy and Resources Group Fall 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295) October 23, 2013 In the wake, Berkeley. He is also the Co-Director of the Center for Law, Energy, and the Environment. Professor Farber

Kammen, Daniel M.

416

Fast fall-time ion beam in neutron generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion beam with a fast fall time is useful in building neutron generators for the application of detecting hidden, gamma-shielded SNM using differential die-away (DDA) technique. Typically a fall time of less than 1 {micro}s can't be achieved by just turning off the power to the ion source due to the slow decay of plasma density (partly determined by the fall time of the RF power in the circuit). In this paper, we discuss the method of using an array of mini-apertures (instead of one large aperture beam) such that gating the beamlets can be done with low voltage and a small gap. This geometry minimizes the problem of voltage breakdown as well as reducing the time of flight to produce fast gating. We have designed and fabricated an array of 16 apertures (4 x 4) for a beam extraction experiment. Using a gating voltage of 1400 V and a gap distance of 1 mm, the fall time of extracted ion beam pulses is less than 1 {micro}s at various beam energies ranging between 400 eV to 800 eV. Usually merging an array of beamlets suffers the loss of beam brightness, i.e., emittance growth, but that is not an important issue for neutron source applications.

Ji, Q.; Kwan, J.; Regis, M.; Wu, Y.; Wilde, S.B.; Wallig, J.

2008-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295) September 12, 2012 Severin Borenstein E.T. Grether Chair in Business Administration and Public Policy Co-Director, Energy Institute at Haas Director, U.C. Energy Institute U.C. Berkeley "An Economic Framework for Analyzing Energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

418

Proceedings of the 33rd annual ACM SIGUCCS fall conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Conference Planning and Program Committees are pleased to publish the Proceedings for the 33rd Annual ACM SIGUCCS User Services Conference, held in Monterey, California, November 6-9, 2005.The SIGUCCS Fall Conference is your chance to tell your colleagues ...

Cynthia Murnan; Kelly Wainwright; Chris Jones

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Proceedings of the 35th annual ACM SIGUCCS fall conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We welcome you to the 35th SIGUCCS 2007 Fall Conference in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. Now, more than any time in the past, this year of "Inspiring Magical Outcomes" has transformed our approach to teaching and learning. Even as 2007 brought an end to ...

Jayne Ashworth; Lynnell Lacy; Lisa Brown; Carol Rhodes

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Physics 5555 Solid State Physics, Part I Syllabus Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 5555­ Solid State Physics, Part I Syllabus ­ Fall 2003 Instructor: Massimiliano Di Ventra. The following sources are the most used: · Ashcroft and Mermin, "Solid State Physics" · Ziman, "Principles" · Harrison, "Solid State Theory" · Kittel, "Quantum Theory of Solids" · Kittel and Kroemer, "Thermal Physics

Di Ventra, Massimiliano

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Physics 5555 Solid State Physics, Part I Syllabus Fall 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 5555­ Solid State Physics, Part I Syllabus ­ Fall 2001 Instructor: Massimiliano Di Ventra. The following sources are the most used: · Ashcroft and Mermin, "Solid State Physics" · Ziman, "Principles" · Harrison, "Solid State Theory" · Kittel, "Quantum Theory of Solids" · Kittel and Kroemer, "Thermal Physics

Di Ventra, Massimiliano

422

A Tethered Free-Fall Glider to Measure Ocean Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tethered free-fall microstructure glider, designed to make quasi-horizontal profiles of the ocean mixed layer, was tested at Emerald Bank on the Scotian Shelf in June 1996. The vehicle attained a 4:1 gliding ratio with the angle of attack close ...

B. J. W. Greenan; N. S. Oakey

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Bachelor of Science in Wind Energy Fall Spring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bachelor of Science in Wind Energy FIRST YEAR Fall Spring WE 1300, Introduction to Wind Energy 3, Analytical Meth. in Wind Energy 3 WE 1311, Prin. of Wind Power Conversion 3 WE 2300, Social Impacts of Wind Energy 3 WE 2310, Meth. for Wind Res. Character. 3 ENGL 2000-Level Literature^ 3 HIST 2301, History of U

Gelfond, Michael

424

Educational Curriculum Supports Tribal Energy Development Efforts Summer/Fall 2013 (Newsletter), Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN ENERGY BEAT INDIAN ENERGY BEAT On THe HOrizOn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Summer/Fall 2013 News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country U.S. DOE OFFICE OF INDIAN ENERGY Educational Curriculum Supports Tribal Energy Development Efforts Vernon Masayesva of Black Mesa Trust, Gerald Warrington of the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin, Vince Gomez of the Pueblo of Isleta, and Lori Bear of Skull Valley Band of Geschute Indians playing a game of Jeopardy during the Commercial-Scale Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop held in July. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL 26517 UpCOmING WORkShOpS Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop September 18-20, 2013, Denver, Colorado Will walk tribal leaders and staff through five

425

Enhanced Black Hole Horizon Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possible role of quantum horizon fluctuations on black hole radiance, especially whether they can invalidate Hawking's analysis based upon transplanckian modes. We are particularly concerned with ``enhanced'' fluctuations produced by gravitons or matter fields in squeezed vacuum states sent into the black hole after the collapse process. This allows for the possibility of increasing the fluctuations well above the vacuum level. We find that these enhanced fluctuations could significantly alter stimulated emission but have little effect upon the spontaneous emission. Thus the thermal character of the Hawking radiation is remarkably robust.

R. T. Thompson; L. H. Ford

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

426

Information Loss in Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of whether information is lost in black holes is investigated using Euclidean path integrals. The formation and evaporation of black holes is regarded as a scattering problem with all measurements being made at infinity. This seems to be well formulated only in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. The path integral over metrics with trivial topology is unitary and information preserving. On the other hand, the path integral over metrics with non-trivial topologies leads to correlation functions that decay to zero. Thus at late times only the unitary information preserving path integrals over trivial topologies will contribute. Elementary quantum gravity interactions do not lose information or quantum coherence.

S. W. Hawking

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

427

Thermodynamic curvature and black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give a relatively broad survey of thermodynamic curvature $R$, one spanning results in fluids and solids, spin systems, and black hole thermodynamics. $R$ results from the thermodynamic information metric giving thermodynamic fluctuations. $R$ has a unique status in thermodynamics as being a geometric invariant, the same for any given thermodynamic state. In fluid and solid systems, the sign of $R$ indicates the character of microscopic interactions, repulsive or attractive. $|R|$ gives the average size of organized mesoscopic fluctuating structures. The broad generality of thermodynamic principles might lead one to believe the same for black hole thermodynamics. This paper explores this issue with a systematic tabulation of results in a number of cases.

Ruppeiner, George

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Thermodynamic curvature and black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give a relatively broad survey of thermodynamic curvature $R$, one spanning results in fluids and solids, spin systems, and black hole thermodynamics. $R$ results from the thermodynamic information metric giving thermodynamic fluctuations. $R$ has a unique status in thermodynamics as being a geometric invariant, the same for any given thermodynamic state. In fluid and solid systems, the sign of $R$ indicates the character of microscopic interactions, repulsive or attractive. $|R|$ gives the average size of organized mesoscopic fluctuating structures. The broad generality of thermodynamic principles might lead one to believe the same for black hole thermodynamics. This paper explores this issue with a systematic tabulation of results in a number of cases.

George Ruppeiner

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Alumni and Development Team Helen Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alumni and Development Team Helen Black Development Coordinator (Fundraising) Ph 8302 0974 Fax 8302 0970 helen.black@unisa.edu.au Chris Crabbe Development Officer (Corporate & Named Scholarships) Ph

South Australia, University of

430

A Use for Inheritance Andrew P. Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Use for Inheritance Andrew P. Black Department of Computer Science & Engineering, OGI School of Science & Engineering, Oregon Health & Science University black@cse.ogi.edu Abstract. There are, of course

Black, Andrew P.

431

BlackCyanMagentaYellow 203023451040506070808590100  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BlackCyanMagentaYellow 203023451040506070808590100 My colleagues in the United Campus Ministry on linen (collection of the artist) of Willy Black Hanover resident and former Town Moderator (Left

Lotko, William

432

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive stars in the early universe gave supermassive black holes a head start March 25, 2013 simulations suggest that star formation conditions back then allowed the first stars to become supermassive themselves In this simulation, a black hole that was just formed by the collapse of a supermassive star is surrounded by a distribution of gas (color indicates density). Because the black hole (located at the center but too small to see) grows by consuming the available gas, simulations like this one help determine how quickly the black hole can grow. The progenitor of this black

433

Blacks in Government | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blacks in Government Blacks in Government August 13, 2012 10:00AM EDT to August 17, 2012 6:00PM EDT Detroit, Michigan Contact Gloria Smith, diversity@hq.doe.gov...

434

Does phantom energy produce black hole?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have found an exact solution of spherically symmetrical Einstein equations describing a black hole with a special type phantom energy source. It is surprising to note that our solution is analogous to Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole.

F. Rahaman; A. Ghosh; M. Kalam

2006-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Spacetime and orbits of bumpy black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our Universe contains a great number of extremely compact and massive objects which are generally accepted to be black holes. Precise observations of orbital motion near candidate black holes have the potential to determine ...

Vigeland, Sarah Jane

436

Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

437

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams; 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2001 a total of 309 adult fall chinook and 264 chum were sampled in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 48. The peak redd count for chum was 181. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 16 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 26 November. There were estimated to be a total of 721 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2001. The 2001 chum population below Bonneville Dam was estimated to be 532 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2001 brood chinook emergence began on 11 March 2002 and ended 18 May 2002, with peak emergence occurring 26 April. 2001 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 29 January and continued through 31 March 2002. Peak chum emergence took place 25 February. A total of 5,487 juvenile chinook and 678 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 22 January and 30 July 2002 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place from mid June through early July 2002 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2001 and 2002 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ACCRETION-JET CONNECTION IN BLACK HOLES THE ORIGIN OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCRETION-JET CONNECTION IN BLACK HOLES THE ORIGIN OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES & THEIR ROLE a very large kinetic energy...Moon @ >.9c" #12;POWERFUL DARK JETS FROM BLACK HOLES Radio (Dubner et al IN BLACK HOLES Fender, Belloni, Gallo (2006) Low-hard X-rays Persistent, flat spectrum radio source: G

Maryland at College Park, University of

439

Paradigms of Black BoxParadigms of Black Box Software TestingSoftware Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paradigms of Black BoxParadigms of Black Box Software TestingSoftware Testing Cem Kaner -- kaner · Black box testing groups vary widely in their approach to testing. · Tests that seem essential to one rather to define schools than to produce agreement. #12;5Kaner & Bach, Paradigms Black Box Testing

440

Harry Black Mr. Harry Black currently serves as the Director of Finance for the City of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harry Black Mr. Harry Black currently serves as the Director of Finance for the City of Baltimore of Risk Management. Mr. Black has served as: Executive Vice President & COO of Global Commerce Solutions. Mr. Black is the author of "Achieving Economic Development Success: Tools that work," a nuts

Noakes, David R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) www.er.ethz.ch Didier;12 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS #12;Crises are not but "Dragon-kings" Dragon-king hypothesis #12;Black Swan story;17 Traditional emphasis on Daily returns do not reveal any anomalous events Financial crashes as "Black swans

442

4d neutral dilatonic black holes and (4+p) dimensional nondilatonic black p-branes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that, in contrast to the case of extreme 4d dilatonic black holes, 4d neutral dilatonic black holes with horizon singularities can not be interpreted as nonsingular nondilatonic black p-branes in (4+p) dimensions, regardless of the number of extra dimensions p. That is, extra dimensions do not remove naked singularities of 4d neutral dilatonic black holes.

J. R. Morris

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

443

Growing Supermassive Black Holes by Chaotic Accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is recent observational evidence (Barth et al., 2003, Willott et al, 2003) for supermassive black holes (SMBH)

A. R. King; J. E. Pringle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

Don N. Page

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

a BLACK HOLES AND FUNDAMENTAL PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a review of classical, thermodynamic and quantum properties of black holes relevant to fundamental physics. 1.

Jos P. S. Lemos; Centro Multidisciplinar; Astrofsica Centra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Call for Papers and Panels Unleashing the Black Erotic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Hypersexuality of Black Women Alternative Modes of Black Love and Family The Politics and Economics of Porn

Kunkle, Tom

447

NonBlackBox Techniques in Cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non­Black­Box Techniques in Cryptography Thesis for the Ph.D. Degree by Boaz Barak Under ``Black­Box'' as ``A device or theoretical construct with known or specified performance characteristics a program as a black­box means to use only its input/output relation by executing the program on chosen

Goldreich, Oded

448

6, 34193463, 2006 Black carbon or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous;ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

449

Black Carbon A Review and Policy Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Carbon A Review and Policy Recommendations Authors Karen Bice, Andrew Eil, Bilal Habib to integrate air quality and climate mitigation efforts, with a focus on black carbon. The group set out the latest science behind black carbon and researched possible mitigation policies. The latter included

Mauzerall, Denise

450

Paradigms of Black Box Software Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paradigms of Black Box Software Testing Tutorial at Quality Week, 2002 Cem Kaner, J.D., Ph of the American Law Institute. #12;Copyright (c) 1994-2001 Cem Kaner. All Rights Reserved. 3 Paradigms of Black stakeholder interests #12;Copyright (c) 1994-2001 Cem Kaner. All Rights Reserved. 7 The Puzzle Black box

451

Slavery, Insurance, and Sacrifice in the Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

__ ls __ le __ ll 167 CHAPTER 9 Slavery, Insurance, and Sacrifice in the Black Atlantic TIM;Slavery, Insurance, and Sacrifice in the Black Atlantic · 169 __ ls __ le __ ll residence, age and quality as 1781, it is by analogy with ransom provisions that the French began to insure the lives of "black

Sheldon, Nathan D.

452

Non-Black-Box Techniques in Cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-Black-Box Techniques in Cryptography Thesis for the Ph.D. Degree by Boaz Barak Under dictionary defines the term "Black-Box" as "A device or theoretical construct with known or specified of Computer Science, to use a program as a black-box means to use only its input/output relation by executing

Barak, Boaz

453

COMMENTARIES Opening the Black Boxes: Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMENTARIES Opening the Black Boxes: Ecosystem Science and Economic Valuation Stephen R. Carpenter and nature, then diverse disciplines must learn to view each other as more than just another black box. ``The'' must become more than just another state variable to the economist. As the black boxes have opened up

Turner, Monica G.

454

6, 1187711912, 2006 Scavenging of black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 11877­11912, 2006 Scavenging of black carbon in mixed phase clouds J. Cozic et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Scavenging of black carbon in mixed phase clouds at the high alpine site, 11877­11912, 2006 Scavenging of black carbon in mixed phase clouds J. Cozic et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

455

Supermassive Black Holes and the Warm Ionized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive Black Holes and the Warm Ionized Gas in Early-type Galaxies Renbin Yan University stars actively. (late-type galaxies) #12;Prevalence of Supermassive Black Holes in Massive Galaxies MBH merging Right after coalescing Post-merger Star Formation Rate Black Hole Accretion Rate #12;Maintenance

Wang, Ming-Jye

456

8, 98839929, 2008 Black carbon at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 9883­9929, 2008 Black carbon at Syowa station, Antarctica K. Hara et al. Title Page.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Measurement of black carbon at Syowa station on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9883 #12;ACPD 8, 9883­9929, 2008 Black carbon at Syowa station

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

457

BlackCyanMagentaYellow 203023451040506070808590100  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BlackCyanMagentaYellow 203023451040506070808590100 Page 4 D artmouth hosts more than 20 different #12;BlackCyanMagentaYellow bringcrosshairtobottomofshadedbox 20 30 2 3 4 5 10 40 50 60 70 80 85 90 100, Russian (b. 1866), Circling, 1924 Pen, black ink, graphite, and watercolor Gift of Wallace K. Harrison

Lotko, William

458

Implementation Update Black and Gold Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implementation Update Black and Gold Commission June, 2003 1 Action Item/ Major Initiative Outcomes Policies and Practices of UWM with principles and goals of Black & Gold Commission UWM culture supports Senate; Student Association; Classified Employee Groups; Deans & Division Heads Spirit of the Black

Saldin, Dilano

459

4, 871891, 2007 Mobility of black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 871­891, 2007 Mobility of black carbon J. Leifeld et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Mobility of black carbon in drained­891, 2007 Mobility of black carbon J. Leifeld et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

460

Accretion Processes in BlackHole Binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accretion Processes in Black­Hole Binaries Roberto Soria A thesis submitted for the degree presented in ``Measuring the Mass of the Black Hole in GRO J1655\\Gamma40'', Soria, R., Wickramasinghe, D. T processes in black­hole bina­ ries, theoretically and observationally, focussing on the role of outflows

Soria, Roberto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black river falls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

3, 211271, 2006 Black carbon in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 3, 211­271, 2006 Black carbon in the boreal C. M. Preston and M. W. I. Schmidt Title Page Discussions Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Black Correspondence to: C. M. Preston (cpreston@pfc.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca) 211 #12;BGD 3, 211­271, 2006 Black carbon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

462

Black Hole Spectrum: Continuous or Discrete?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate a qualitative argument, based on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, to support the claim that when the effects of matter fields are assumed to overshadow the effects of quantum mechanics of spacetime, the discrete spectrum of black hole radiation, as such as predicted by Bekenstein's proposal for a discrete black hole area spectrum, reduces to Hawking's black-body spectrum.

Jarmo Makela

1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

Charged Black Holes in New Massive Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct charged black hole solutions to three-dimensional New Massive Gravity (NMG), by adding electromagnetic Maxwell and Chern-Simons actions. We find charged black holes in the form of warped AdS_3 and "log" solutions in specific critical point. The entropy, mass and angular momentum of these black holes are computed.

Ghodsi, Ahmad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Gravitational lensing of STU black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study gravitational lensing by STU black holes. We considered extremal limit of two special cases of zero-charged and one-charged black holes, and obtain the deflection angle. We find that the black hole charge increases the deflection angle.

Hassan Saadat

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Gravitational lensing of STU black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study gravitational lensing by STU black holes. We considered extremal limit of two special cases of zero-charged and one-charged black holes, and obtain the deflection angle. We find that the black hole charge increases the deflection angle.

Saadat, Hassan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

tyvek8 inch black sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

????? ??? ?? ? Ð ? Ð ? ½¼ ? ? ? ?? ? ? ?? Ý ? ? ? ??ÐÝ ¿??º ½¿ #12;tyvek8 inch PMT black sheet 20

Tokyo, University of

467

Black Hole's Life at colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the series of papers by Ida, Oda and Park, the complete description of Hawking radiation to the brane localized Standard Model fields from mini black holes in the low energy gravity scenarios are obtained. Here we briefly review what we have learned in those papers.

Seong Chan Park

2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

FORCE-FEEDING BLACK HOLES  

SciTech Connect

We propose that the growth of supermassive black holes is associated mainly with brief episodes of highly super-Eddington infall of gas ({sup h}yperaccretion{sup )}. This gas is not swallowed in real time, but forms an envelope of matter around the black hole that can be swallowed gradually, over a much longer timescale. However, only a small fraction of the black hole mass can be stored in the envelope at any one time. We argue that any infalling matter above a few percent of the hole's mass is ejected as a result of the plunge in opacity at temperatures below a few thousand degrees kelvin, corresponding to the Hayashi track. The speed of ejection of this matter, compared to the velocity dispersion {sigma} of the host galaxy's core, determines whether the ejected matter is lost forever or returns eventually to rejoin the envelope, from which it can be ultimately accreted. The threshold between matter recycling and permanent loss defines a relationship between the maximum black hole mass and {sigma} that resembles the empirical M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation.

Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [Also at Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, CO, USA. (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

Black Hole fragmentation and holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the entropy change due to fragmentation for black hole solutions in various dimensions. We find three different types of behavior. The entropy may decrease, increase or have a mixed behavior, characterized by the presence of a threshold mass. For two-dimensional (2D) black holes we give a complete characterization of the entropy behavior under fragmentation, in the form of sufficient conditions imposed on the function J, which defines the 2D gravitational model. We compare the behavior of the gravitational solutions with that of free field theories in d dimensions. This excludes the possibility of finding a gravity/field theory realization of the holographic principle for a broad class of solutions, including asymptotically flat black holes. We find that the most natural candidates for holographic duals of the black hole solutions with mixed behavior are field theories with a mass gap. We also discuss the possibility of formulating entropy bounds that make reference only to the energy of a system.

Mariano Cadoni

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

470

Gold and Black Group Paws Training Plans Gold Group Black Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gold and Black Group Paws Training Plans Gold Group Black Group Week Day Distance Description Day://www.badgerlandstriders.org/home/Races/TheDeerRun.htm. Black Group The goal of the Black Group is to go from moderate running to 13 miles over a ten week include periodic walking breaks as needed. The Black Group should run four days a week on a Monday

Saldin, Dilano

471