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1

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediatley above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone.

Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Chapter 2 - Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black liquor gasification (BLG) is being considered primarily as an option for production of biofuels in recent years due to the focus on the transport sector’s high oil dependence and climate impact. BLG may be performed either at low temperatures or at high temperatures, based on whether the process is conducted above or below the melting temperature range of the spent pulping chemicals. The development of various BLG technologies—SCA-Billerud process, the Copeland recovery process, Weyerhaeuser’s process, the St. Regis hydropyrolysis process, the Texaco process, VTT’s circulating fluidized bed BLG process, Babcock and Wilcox’s bubbling fluidized bed gasification process, NSP process (Ny Sodahus Process), DARS (Direct Alkali Recovery System) process, BLG with direct causticization, Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International fluidized bed gasification, Chemrec gasification, catalytic hydrothermal gasification of black liquor—is discussed in this chapter. The two main technologies under development are pressurized gasification and atmospheric gasification, being commercialized by Chemrec AB and ThermoChem Recovery International, respectively.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Big Island  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report provides an account of the project for the demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific LLC's Big Island, VA facility. This report covers the period from May 5, 2000 through November 30, 2006.

Robert DeCarrera

2007-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

4

Conceptual design of a black liquor gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

In July 1985, Champion International completed a study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in a combined cycle cogeneration system based on gas turbines. That study indicated that gasification had high potential as an alternative to recovery boiler technology and offered many advantages. This paper describes the design of the plant, the construction of the pilot plant, and finally presents data from operation of the plant.

Kelleher, E. G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Chapter 4 - Obstacles to Implementation of Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Obstacles hindering the commercialization of black liquor gasification are discussed. The most important of them include financial risks, protection of the gasifier, increase in the causticizing demand, tar condensation, hot gas cleanup, and steam deficit. Gasification system demands significant capital investment. The high temperature and pressure and the alkaline conditions create aggressive environment. Protection from an aggressive environment is very important in the operation of a gasifier because it determines the lifetime and hence the feasibility of gasification as a technology as a whole.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Chapter 5 - Environmental Impact of Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental impact of black liquor gasification (BLG) is discussed. Biofuels from a BLG process excel in terms of well-to-wheel carbon dioxide emission reduction and energy efficiency. Forest biorefinery utilizing gasification (in a black liquor gasification combined cycle (BLGCC) configuration) rather than a Tomlinson boiler is predicted to produce significantly fewer pollutant emissions due to the intrinsic characteristics of the BLGCC technology. Syngas cleanup conditioning removes a considerable amount of contaminants and gas turbine combustion is more efficient and complete than boiler combustion. Also, there could be reductions in pollutant emissions and hazardous wastes resulting from cleaner production of chemicals and fuels that are now manufactured using fossil energy resources. Production of power, fuels, chemicals, and other products from biomass resources creates a net zero generation of carbon dioxide as plants are renewable carbon sinks. BLG whether conducted at high or low temperatures is still superior to the current recovery boiler combustion technology. Implementation of IGCC power plants will cause net savings in cooling water requirements and net reductions in wastewater discharges. The most significant environmental impact caused by BLG will occur in air emissions. The overall reduction of Total reduced sulphur (TRS) gases using gasification technology will also reduce odor, which will improve public acceptance of pulp and paper mills, particularly in populated areas.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Black liquor gasification. Phase 2 final report  

SciTech Connect

The experimental work included 23 bench-scale tests in a 6-in.-diameter gasifier and two extended runs in a 33-in.-ID pilot-scale unit. The two pilot-scale runs included 26 test periods, each evaluated separately. The engineering analysis work consisted primarily of the correlation of test results and the development of a computer model describing the gasification process. 4 refs., 13 figs., 23 tabs.

Kohl, A.L.; Barclay, K.M.; Stewart, A.E.; Estes, G.R.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Biomass gasification project gets funding to solve black liquor safety and landfill problems  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on biomass gasifications. The main by-product in pulp making is black liquor from virgin fiber; the main by-product in paper recycling is fiber residue. Although the black liquor is recycled for chemical and energy recovery, safety problems plague the boilers currently used to do this. The fiber residue is usually transported to a landfill. The system being developed by MTCI will convert black liquor and fiber residue into a combustible gas, which can then be used for a wide variety of thermal or power generation applications.

Black, N.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Improved Materials for High-Temperature Black Liquor Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory immersion test system built and operated at ORNL was found to successfully screen samples from numerous refractory suppliers, including both commercially available and experimental materials. This system was found to provide an accurate prediction of how these materials would perform in the actual gasifier environment. Test materials included mullites, alumino-silicate bricks, fusion-cast aluminas, alumina-based and chrome-containing mortars, phosphate-bonded mortars, coated samples provided under an MPLUS-funded project, bonded spinels, different fusion-cast magnesia-alumina spinels with magnesia content ranging from 2.5% to about 60%, high-MgO castable and brick materials, spinel castables, and alkali-aluminate materials. This testing identified several candidate material systems that perform well in the New Bern gasifier. Fusion-cast aluminas were found to survive for nearly one year, and magnesia-alumina spinels have operated successfully for 18 months and are expected to survive for two years. Alkali-aluminates and high-MgO-content materials have also been identified for backup lining applications. No other material with a similar structure and chemical composition to that of the fusion-cast magnesium-aluminum spinel brick currently being used for the hot-face lining is commercially available. Other materials used for this application have been found to have inferior service lives, as previously discussed. Further, over 100 laboratory immersion tests have been performed on other materials (both commercial and experimental), but none to date has performed as well as the material currently being used for the hot-face lining. Operating experience accumulated with the high-temperature gasifier at New Bern, North Carolina, has confirmed that the molten alkali salts degrade many types of refractories. Fusion-cast alumina materials were shown to provide a great improvement in lifetime over materials used previously. Further improvement was realized with fusion-cast magnesia-alumina spinel refractory, which appears to be the most resistant to degradation found to date, exhibiting over a year of service life and expected to be capable of over two years of service life. Regarding the use of refractory mortar, it was found that expansion of the current chrome-alumina mortar when subjected to black liquor smelt is likely contributing to the strains seen on the vessel shell. Additionally, the candidate high-alumina mortar that was originally proposed as a replacement for the current chrome-alumina mortar also showed a large amount of expansion when subjected to molten smelt. A UMR experimental mortar, composed of a phosphate bonded system specifically designed for use with fusion-cast magnesium-aluminum spinel, was found to perform well in the molten smelt environment. Strain gauges installed on the gasifier vessel shell provided valuable information about the expansion of the refractory, and a new set of strain gauges and thermocouples has been installed in order to monitor the loading caused by the currently installed spinel refractory. These results provide information for a direct comparison of the expansion of the two refractories. Measurements to date suggest that the fusion-cast magnesia-alumina spinel is expanding less than the fusion-cast {alpha}/{beta}-alumina used previously. A modified liquor nozzle was designed and constructed to test a number of materials that should be more resistant to erosion and corrosion than the material currently used. Inserts made of three erosion-resistant metallic materials were fabricated, along with inserts made of three ceramic materials. The assembled system was sent to the New Bern mill for installation in the gasifer in 2005. Following operation of the gasifier using the modified nozzle, inserts should be removed and analyzed for wear by erosion/corrosion. Although no materials have been directly identified for sensor/thermocouple protection tubes, several of the refractory material systems identified for lining material applications may be applicable for use in this

Keiser, J.R.; Hemrick, J.G.; Gorog, J.P.; Leary, R.

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Black liquor gasification combined cycle with Co2 capture – Technical and economic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The pulp and paper sector is intensive in the use of energy, and presents a high participation in the industrial context, specially based in the black liquor, a renewable source generated in the pulp process. Black liquor gasification is not still completely dominated; however, it has the potential of becoming an important alternative for the pulp and paper sector. In this article, the traditional steam cycle based on chemical recovery and biomass boilers associated to backpressure/extraction turbine is compared to black liquor gasification combined cycle schemes, associated to biomass boiler, considering the technical and economic attractiveness of capturing and sequestering CO2. Results show that despite its interesting exergetic efficiency, the adoption CO2 capture system for BLGCC did not prove to be attractive under the prescribed conditions without major incentive.

Elzimar Tadeu de Freitas Ferreira; José Antonio Perrella Balestieri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Gasification behavior of carbon residue in bed solids of black liquor gasifier  

SciTech Connect

Steam gasification of carbon residue in bed solids of a low-temperature black liquor gasifier was studied using a thermogravimetric system at 3 bar. Complete gasification of the carbon residue, which remained unreactive at 600 C, was achieved in about 10 min as the temperature increased to 800 C. The rate of gasification and its temperature dependence were evaluated from the non-isothermal experiment results. Effects of particle size and adding H{sub 2} and CO to the gasification agent were also studied. The rate of steam gasification could be taken as zero order in carbon until 80% of carbon was gasified, and for the rest of the gasification process the rate appeared to be first order in carbon. The maximum rate of carbon conversion was around 0.003/s and the activation energy was estimated to be in the range of 230-300 kJ/mol. The particle size did not show significant effect on the rate of gasification. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide appeared to retard the onset of the gasification process. (author)

Preto, Fernando; Zhang, Xiaojie (Frank); Wang, Jinsheng [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment  

SciTech Connect

The University of Utah's project 'Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment' (U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42261) was a response to U.S. DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS36-04GO94002, 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative' Topical Area 4-Kraft Black Liquor Gasification. The project began September 30, 2004. The objective of the project was to improve the understanding of black liquor conversion in high pressure, high temperature reactors that gasify liquor through partial oxidation with either air or oxygen. The physical and chemical characteristics of both the gas and condensed phase were to be studied over the entire range of liquor conversion, and the rates and mechanisms of processes responsible for converting the liquor to its final smelt and syngas products were to be investigated. This would be accomplished by combining fundamental, lab-scale experiments with measurements taken using a new semi-pilot scale pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. As a result of insufficient availability of funds and changes in priority within the Office of Biomass Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy, the research program was terminated in its second year. In total, only half of the budgeted funding was made available for the program, and most of this was used during the first year for construction of the experimental systems to be used in the program. This had a severe impact on the program. As a consequence, most of the planned research was unable to be performed. Only studies that relied on computational modeling or existing experimental facilities started early enough to deliver useful results by the time to program was terminated Over the course of the program, small scale (approx. 1 ton/day) entrained-flow gasifier was designed and installed at the University of Utah's off-campus Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility. The system is designed to operate at pressures as high as 32 atmospheres, and at temperatures as high as 1500 C (2730 F). Total black liquor processing capacity under pressurized, oxygen-blown conditions should be in excess of 1 ton black liquor solids per day. Many sampling ports along the conversion section of the system will allow detailed analysis of the environment in the gasifier under industrially representative conditions. Construction was mostly completed before the program was terminated, but resources were insufficient to operate the system. A system for characterizing black liquor sprays in hot environments was designed and constructed. Silhouettes of black liquor sprays formed by injection of black liquor through a twin fluid (liquor and atomizing air) nozzle were videoed with a high-speed camera, and the resulting images were analyzed to identify overall characteristics of the spray and droplet formation mechanisms. The efficiency of liquor atomization was better when the liquor was injected through the center channel of the nozzle, with atomizing air being introduced in the annulus around the center channel, than when the liquor and air feed channels were reversed. Atomizing efficiency and spray angle increased with atomizing air pressure up to a point, beyond which additional atomizing air pressure had little effect. Analysis of the spray patterns indicates that two classifications of droplets are present, a finely dispersed 'mist' of very small droplets and much larger ligaments of liquor that form at the injector tip and form one or more relatively large droplets. This ligament and subsequent large droplet formation suggests that it will be challenging to obtain a narrow distribution of droplet sizes when using an injector of this design. A model for simulating liquor spray and droplet formation was developed by Simulent, Inc. of Toronto. The model was able to predict performance when spraying water that closely matched the vendor specifications. Simulation of liquor spray indicates that droplets on the order 200-300 microns can be expected, and that higher liquor flow will result in be

Kevin Whitty

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Material Characterization and Analysis for Selection of Refractories Used in Black Liquor Gasification  

SciTech Connect

Black liquor gasification provides the pulp and paper industry with a technology which could potentially replace recovery boilers with equipment that could reduce emissions and, if used in a combined cycle system, increase the power production of the mill allowing it to be a net exporter of electrical power. In addition, rather than burning the syngas produced in a gasifier, this syngas could be used to produce higher value chemicals or fuels. However, problems with structural materials such as the refractory lining of the reactor vessel have caused unplanned shutdowns and resulted in component replacement much sooner than originally planned. Through examination of exposed materials, laboratory corrosion tests and cooperative efforts with refractory manufacturers, many refractory materials issues in high-temperature black liquor gasification have been addressed and optimized materials have been selected for this application. In this paper, an updated summary of the characterization and analysis techniques used for refractory screening and selection will be discussed along with characteristic results from these methods which have led to the selection of optimized materials for both the hot-face and back-up linings used in this application.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fundamental study of black liquor gasification kinetics using a pressurized entrained-flow reactor (PEFR). Quarterly progress report for the period July 1999 to September 1999  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the program is to identify the optimal operating window for black liquor gasification. The goals during this year are to prepare the PEFR for operation, conduct a series of preliminary screening tests to bracket BLG operating conditions, and develop a process model that can guide identification of the optimal operating window.

NONE

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

Pilot scale gasification of spent cooking liquor from sodium sulfite based delignification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a pilot scale high pressure entrained flow gasification experiment with spent cooking liquor from a sodium sulfite based delignification process in the DP-1 black liquor gasifier in Piteå, Sweden. Approximately 92 tons of sulfite ...

Erik Furusjö; Ragnar Stare; Ingvar Landälv; Patrik Löwnertz

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the materials problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LFHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. Material development will be divided into 2 tasks: Task 1, Development and property determinations of improved and existing refractory systems for black liquor containment. Refractory systems of interest include magnesia aluminate and baria aluminate spinels for binder materials, both dry and hydratable, and materials with high alumina contents, 85-95 wt%, aluminum oxide, 5.0-15.0 wt%, and BaO, SrO, CaO, ZrO and SiC. Task 2, Finite element analysis of heat flow and thermal stress/strain in the refractory lining and steel shell of existing and proposed vessel designs. Stress and strain due to thermal and chemical expansion has been observed to be detrimental to the lifespan of existing black liquor gasifiers. The thermal and chemical strain as well as corrosion rates must be accounted for in order to predict the lifetime of the gasifier containment materials.

William L. Headrick Jr; Alireza Rezaie

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The University of Missouri-Rolla identified materials that permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project was to resolve the material problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LPHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study attempted to define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials were selected or developed that reacted with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; and were functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical and physical properties and chemical stability; and are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. Material development was divided into 2 tasks: Task 1 was development and property determinations of improved and existing refractory systems for black liquor containment. Refractory systems of interest include magnesium aluminate and barium aluminate for binder materials, both dry and hydratable, and materials with high alumina contents, 85-95 wt%, aluminum oxide, 5.0-15.0 wt%, and BaO, SrO, CaO, ZrO2 and SiC. Task 2 was finite element analysis of heat flow and thermal stress/strain in the refractory lining and steel shell of existing and proposed vessel designs. Stress and strain due to thermal and chemical expansion has been observed to be detrimental to the lifespan of existing black liquor gasifiers. The thermal and chemical strain as well as corrosion rates must be accounted for in order to predict the lifetime of the gasifier containment materials.

William L. Headrick Jr; Alireza Rezaie; Xiaoting Liang; Musa Karakus; Jun Wei

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

REFRACTORY FOR BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIERS  

SciTech Connect

The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the materials problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LFHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. Material development will be divided into 2 tasks: Task 1, Development and property determinations of improved and existing refractory systems for black liquor containment. Refractory systems of interest include magnesia aluminate and baria aluminate spinels for binder materials, both dry and hydratable, and materials with high alumina contents, 85-95 wt%, aluminum oxide, 5.0-15.0 wt%, and BaO, SrO, CaO, ZrO and SiC. Task 2, Finite element analysis of heat flow and thermal stress/strain in the refractory lining and steel shell of existing and proposed vessel designs. Stress and strain due to thermal and chemical expansion has been observed to be detrimental to the lifespan of existing black liquor gasifiers. The thermal and chemical strain as well as corrosion rates must be accounted for in order to predict the lifetime of the gasifier containment materials.

William L. Headrick Jr.; Alireza Rezaie

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the materials problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LFHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. Material development will be divided into 2 tasks: Task 1, Development and property determinations of improved and existing refractory systems for black liquor containment. Refractory systems of interest include magnesia aluminate and baria aluminate spinels for binder materials, both dry and hydratable, and materials with high alumina contents, 85-95 wt%, aluminum oxide, 5.0-15.0 wt%, and BaO, SrO, CaO, ZrO and SiC. Task 2, Finite element analysis of heat flow and thermal stress/strain in the refractory lining and steel shell of existing and proposed vessel designs. Stress and strain due to thermal and chemical expansion has been observed to be detrimental to the lifespan of existing black liquor gasifiers. The thermal and chemical strain as well as corrosion rates must be accounted for in order to predict the lifetime of the gasifier containment materials.

William L. Headrick Jr; Alireza Rezaie

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the materials problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LFHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. Material development will be divided into 2 tasks: Task 1, Development and property determinations of improved and existing refractory systems for black liquor containment. Refractory systems of interest include magnesia aluminate and baria aluminate spinels for binder materials, both dry and hydratable, and materials with high alumina contents, 85-95 wt%, aluminum oxide, 5.0-15.0 wt%, and BaO, SrO, CaO, ZrO and SiC. Task 2, Finite element analysis of heat flow and thermal stress/strain in the refractory lining and steel shell of existing and proposed vessel designs. Stress and strain due to thermal and chemical expansion has been observed to be detrimental to the lifespan of existing black liquor gasifiers. The thermal and chemical strain as well as corrosion rates must be accounted for in order to predict the lifetime of the gasifier containment materials.

Robert E. Moore; William L. Headrick; Alireza Rezaie

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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21

Report on the WORKSHOP ON COMMERCIALIZATION OF BLACK LIQUOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

!iers have not seen convIncIng evidence of cycle (BLGCC) and biomass-gasifier/combined market opportunity -Denny Hunter gasification/combined cycle technology, sufficient Weyerhaeuser Company research exists for Key ideas from the workshop... commercializing black liquor gasifier/ combined Techno~og~ supp

22

Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery  

SciTech Connect

MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and agglomeration problems of the conversion of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium) titanates during gasification of black liquor in the presence of (low sodium) titanates or TiO{sub 2} (Task 2). MTCI/ThermoChem tested the performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization in their Process Development Unit (PDU) (Task 3). The specific objectives were: (1) to investigate how split sulfidity and polysulfide (+ AQ) pulping can be used to increase pulp fiber yield and properties compared to conventional kraft pulping; (2) to determine the economics of black liquor gasification combined with these pulping technologies in comparison with conventional kraft pulping and black liquor recovery; (3) to determine the effect of operating conditions on the kinetics of the titanate-based direct causticization reaction during black liquor gasification at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); (4) to determine the mechanism of particle agglomeration during gasification of black liquor in the presence of titanates at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); and (5) to verify performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization of black liquor in a pilot scale fluidized bed test facility.

Adriaan van Heiningen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 2: Comparisons between different liquors  

SciTech Connect

This continuation of earlier work reports fuel nitrogen release for black liquors at two temperatures during pyrolysis of single droplets in an oxygen-free environment. Approximately half of the 20--60% fuel nitrogen released was ammonia and half was molecular nitrogen. The total amount of fixed nitrogen released during pyrolysis was almost linearly proportional to the liquor nitrogen content. The yield of fixed nitrogen for birch liquors was significantly higher than for pine liquors, and the yield for bagasse liquor was extremely high.

Aho, K.; Nikkanen, S. (A. Ahlstrom Corp., Varkaus (Finland)); Hupa, M. (Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

NETL: News Release - DOE Opens Competition for Black Liquor/Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 7, 2000 January 7, 2000 DOE Opens Competition for Black Liquor/Biomass Gasification Program Intended to Boost Efficiency, Reduce Greenhouse Gases from Pulp and Paper Mills A new competition begun this week by the Department of Energy could make the pulp and paper mills of the 21st century cleaner and more energy efficient by demonstrating improved technologies to convert their spent cooking liquor streams into new sources of energy. The advanced processes would also simultaneously recover and recycle pulping chemicals. MORE INFO Download the solicitation The department's National Energy Technology Laboratory has issued a call for projects to demonstrate advanced ways to gasify the black liquor or biomass of pulp and paper mills. The gases can be more easily cleaned of

25

Proceedings of the black liquor research program review fifth meeting  

SciTech Connect

On June 14--17, 1988 the participants and invited guests of the Cooperative Program in Kraft Recovery gathered in Charleston, South Carolina, to review progress on four major black liquor research programs being executed at the Institute of Paper Chemistry, the University of Maine, the National Bureau of Standards, and the University of Florida. These programs include: (1) Black Liquor Properties; (2) Black Liquor Droplet Formation; (3) Black Liquor Nozzle Evaluation; and (4) Black Liquor Combustion. In addition to the objectives of previous meetings, this meeting made a direct attempt to gather ideas on how to improve our ability to move from new technology concepts to commercial implementation. Also attached is the agenda for the Charleston meeting. The first two days were involved with updates and reviews of the four major black liquor programs. A half day was spent discussing pathways to implementation and developing thoughts on what industry, DOE and academia could do to facilitate commercial implementation of the research results. This publication is a summary of the presentations made in Charleston and the industry responses to the research work. Readers are cautioned that the contents are in-progress updates on the status of the research and do not represent referred technical papers. Any questions regarding the content should be referred to the principal investigators of the project.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Raw Gas Composition from a Black Liquor Gasifier—Comparison with Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Raw Gas Composition from a Black Liquor Gasifier—Comparison with Experiments ... The black liquor spray was represented by 1003 discrete particles having a fitted Rosin Rammler distribution of power 2 and a characteristic size of 200 ?m. ... Additional PFR calculations were performed using different inlet gas compositions with similar results (not presented here), i.e. the Jones and Lindstedt model showed a significantly higher reformation rate of methane than GRI-Mech at gasification conditions in the medium temperature range (1150 < T < 1500 K). ...

Per Carlsson; Kristiina Iisa; Rikard Gebart

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the program was to develop correlations to predict physical properties within requirements of engineering precision from a knowledge of pulping conditions and of kraft black liquor composition, if possible. These correlations were to include those relating thermodynamic properties to pulping conditions and liquor composition. The basic premise upon which the research was based is the premise that black liquor behaves as a polymer solution. This premise has proven to be true, and has been used successfully in developing data reduction methods and in interpreting results. A three phase effort involving pulping, analysis of liquor composition, and measurement of liquor properties was conducted.

Fricke, A.L.; Zaman, A.A.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

MOLTEN SALT CORROSION OF SUPERHEATERS IN BLACK LIQUOR RECOVERY BOILERS John Bohling, University of Tennessee Georgia Tech SURF 2010 Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOLTEN SALT CORROSION OF SUPERHEATERS IN BLACK LIQUOR RECOVERY BOILERS John Bohling, University Goodman Introduction In the papermaking industry, black liquor recovery boilers burn black liquor into the superheater region of the boiler, where the salt-deposit, or smelt, forms a scale on the superheater tubes.1

Li, Mo

29

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of experimental techniques have been used in this work, and many of these have been developed completely or improved significantly in the course of the research done during this program. Therefore, it is appropriate to describe these techniques in detail as a reference for future workers so that the techniques can be used in future work with little additional effort or so that the results reported from this program can be compared better with future results from other work. In many cases, the techniques described are for specific analytical instruments. It is recognized that these may be superseded by future developments and improvements in instrumentation if a complete description of techniques used successfully in the past on other instrumentation is available. The total pulping and liquor preparation research work performed included chip and white liquor preparation, digestion, pulp washing, liquor and wash recovery, liquor sampling, weak liquor concentration in two steps to about 45--50% solids with an intermediate soap skimming at about 140F and 27--30% solids, determination of pulp yield and Kappa number, determination of total liquor solids, and a check on the total material balance for pulping. All other research was performed either on a sample of the weak black liquor (the combined black liquor and washes from the digester) or on the skimmed liquor that had been concentrated.

Fricke, A.L.; Zaman, A.A.; Stoy, M.O.; Schmidl, G.W.; Dong, D.J.; Speck, B.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Black Liquor Gasification Process Review and Status Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilities (0.2 tph) focused on developing pressurized gasifiers. Their work is complemented by research at VIT (The Technical Research Centre of Finland) who have a 0.2 tph pressurized fluid bed test facility. The purpose of this paper is to describe...

Brown, C.

31

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 1: Laboratory measurements at different conditions  

SciTech Connect

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis is high. There is only minor release during the drying stage. Ammonia is the main fixed nitrogen species formed. The rate of fixed nitrogen release increases with increasing temperature. The level of fixed nitrogen released by birch liquor is almost twice the level for pine liquor. Assuming complete conversion to NO, fixed nitrogen yields gave NO concentrations near typically measured values for flue gases in full scale recovery boilers. The purpose of this work was to gain more detailed information about the behavior of the fuel nitrogen in black liquor combustion. The work focused on the pyrolysis or devolatilization of the combustion process. Devolatilization is the stage at which the majority (typically 50--80%) of the liquor organics release from a fuel particle or droplet as gaseous species due to the rapid destruction of the organic macromolecules in the liquor. In this paper, the authors use the terms devolatilization and pyrolysis interchangeably with no difference in their meaning.

Aho, K.; Vakkilainen, E. (A. Ahistrom Corp., Varkaus (Finland)); Hupa, M. (Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Formation of fuel NO[sub x] during black-liquor combustion  

SciTech Connect

Fuel NOx and thermal NOx were measured in combustion gases from black liquors in two laboratory furnaces. Combustion at 950 C in air (8% O[sub 2]) produced NOx concentrations of 40-80ppm. Combustion at 950 C in synthetic air containing no nitrogen (21% 0[sub 2] in Ar) produced the same result, demonstrating that all of the NOx produced during combustion at 950 C was fuel NOx. Formation of fuel NOx increased moderately with increasing temperature in the range of 800-1,000 C, but temperature sensitivity of fuel NOx was much less than that of thermal NOx. The results imply that the major source of NOx in recovery furnace emissions is the fuel NOx in recovery furnace formed by conversion of liquor-bound nitrogen during combustion. This is consistent with thermal NOx theory, which postulates that black-liquor combustion temperatures are too low to generate significant amounts of thermal NOx.

Nichols, K.M. (Weyerhaeuser Paper Co., Tacoma, WA (United States)); Lien, S.J. (Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling, five-year report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The project originated in October 1990 and was scheduled to run for four years. At that time, there was considerable emphasis on developing accurate predictions of the physical carryover of macroscopic particles of partially burnt black liquor and smelt droplets out of the furnace, since this was seen as the main cause of boiler plugging. This placed a major emphasis on gas flow patterns within the furnace and on the mass loss rates and swelling and shrinking rates of burning black liquor drops. As work proceeded on developing the recovery boiler furnace model, it became apparent that some recovery boilers encounter serious plugging problems even when physical carryover was minimal. After the original four-year period was completed, the project was extended to address this issue. The objective of the extended project was to improve the utility of the models by including the black liquor chemistry relevant to air emissions predictions and aerosol formation, and by developing the knowledge base and computational tools to relate furnace model outputs to fouling and plugging of the convective sections of the boilers. The work done to date includes CFD model development and validation, acquisition of information on black liquor combustion fundamentals and development of improved burning models, char bed model development, and model application and simplification.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler  

SciTech Connect

This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for the physical properties of Kraft black liquor. Interim report No. 2  

SciTech Connect

Experimental effort for the program to evaluate physical properties of kraft black liquors is now proceeding well. Experimental work includes pulping, liquor analysis, lignin purification and characterization, vapor-liquid equilibria, heat capacity, heats of solution and combustion, and viscosity measurements. Measurement of thermal conductivity has not yet begun. Collection of the data necessary for development of generalized correlations is proceeding, but will require about two more years. The digester is operating very well. It is now possible to operate the digester as a closed, rotating reactor or as a batch reactor with liquor circulation. When operated with liquor circulation, temperatures within the chip bed can be monitored during cooking. Cooking is reproducible, and cooks are being performed to produce liquors for experimental studies. The digester could be further modified to permit us to conduct rapid exchange batch pulping or to permit us to simulate continuous pulping. Liquors to be used in experimental studies are concentrated in our large scale evaporator or in our small scale evaporator. The large scale evaporator is used to concentrate liquors to about 50% solids for storage and for use in studies requiring high solids liquors. The small scale evaporator is used for preparing final samples to as high as 85% solids and for measuring vapor-liquid equilibria. Liquors are now routinely analyzed to determine all components, except higher molecular weight organic acids and extractives. Lignin determination by uv-visible means has been improved. Lignin purification from black liquor has been improved and lignin molecular weights are determined routinely. Work on lignin molecular weight distribution is still not satisfactory, but recent developments holds promise.

Fricke, A.L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Kraft Liquor Corrosion Margaret Gorog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Kraft Liquor Corrosion Margaret Gorog Federal Way, WA Pulp and Paper Corrosion Symposium Georgia Tech Renewable Bioproducts Institute November 2014 · Brown Stock Corrosion · Alkaline Liquor Corrosion · Black Liquor Corrosion ­ Evaporators ­ Research · High Solids Black Liquor Corrosion of Stainless Steel

Das, Suman

37

Cracking and Corrosion of Composite Tubes in Black Liquor Recovery Boiler Primary Air Ports  

SciTech Connect

Black liquor recovery boilers are an essential part of kraft mills. Their design and operating procedures have changed over time with the goal of providing improved boiler performance. These performance improvements are frequently associated with an increase in heat flux and/or operating temperature with a subsequent increase in the demand on structural materials associated with operation at higher temperatures and/or in more corrosive environments. Improvements in structural materials have therefore been required. In most cases the alternate materials have provided acceptable solutions. However, in some cases the alternate materials have solved the original problem but introduced new issues. This report addresses the performance of materials in the tubes forming primary air port openings and, particularly, the problems associated with use of stainless steel clad carbon steel tubes and the solutions that have been identified.

Keiser, James R.; Singbeil, Douglas L.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Kish, Joseph R.; Yuan, Jerry; Frederick, Laurie A.; Choudhury, Kimberly A.; Gorog, J. Peter; Jetté, Francois R.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Singh, Prett M.; Maziasz, Phillip J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The intoxicating brew of black liquor and son of black liquor: Deciphering the tax planning, research, policy and financial statement implications of tax credits via financial reporting income tax disclosures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2007, a change in the law regarding the alternative fuel mixture credit opened the door for paper mills to qualify a byproduct of paper manufacturing, black liquor, as a fuel eligible for the credit. The credit is a refundable credit of $0.50 per gallon. Paper mills can produce hundreds of millions of gallons of black liquor per year and qualified for the credit in 2009. In addition, in 2010 the IRS determined that these firms qualified for the cellulosic biofuels producer credit. Paper mill companies could amend their 2009 tax returns and swap their alternative fuel mixture credits for cellulosic biofuels producer credits worth $1.01 per gallon. The catch was that the alternative fuels mixture credit was refundable; the cellulosic biofuels producer credit was nonrefundable. This paper provides a series of mini cases exploring the tax planning, tax research, tax policy and financial statement implications of Packaging Corporation of America’s use of the alternative fuel mixture tax credit and subsequent amendment of its 2009 tax return in 2010 to swap its alternative fuel mixture tax credits for cellulosic biofuel producer credits. These cases may be directed for use in either upper-division undergraduate courses or graduate courses.

Beth B. Kern

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

40

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Waste to energy by industrially integrated supercritical water gasification – Effects of alkali salts in residual by-products from the pulp and paper industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a method by which biomass can be converted into a hydrogen-rich gas product. Wet industrial waste streams, which contain both organic and inorganic material, are well suited for treatment by SCWG. In this study, the gasification of two streams of biomass resulting from the pulp and paper industry, black liquor and paper sludge, has been investigated. The purpose is to convert these to useful products, both gaseous and solids, which can be used either in the papermaking process or in external applications. Simple compounds, such as glucose, have been fully gasified in SCWG, but gasification of more complex compounds, such as biomass and waste, have not reached as high conversions. The investigated paper sludge was not easily gasified. Improving gasification results with catalysts is an option and the use of alkali salts for this purpose was studied. The relationship between alkali concentration, temperature, and gasification yields was studied with the addition of KOH, K2CO3, NaOH and black liquor to the paper sludge. Addition of black liquor to the paper sludge resulted in similarly enhancing effects as when the alkali salts were added, which made it possible to raise the dry matter content and gasification yield without expensive additives.

I. Rönnlund; L. Myréen; K. Lundqvist; J. Ahlbeck; T. Westerlund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Catalytic Conversion of Tars, Carbon Black and Methane from Pyrolysis/Gasification of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of catalysts in biomass gasification has been suggested for a long time.1 Fung and Graham found that potassium carbonate and calcium oxide have catalytic influences on the gasification rate and the produc...

Clas Ekström; Nils Lindman; Rune Pettersson

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS...

45

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Challenges for Gasification The widespread market penetration of gasification continues to face some challenges. Over the years, gasification challenges related to gasifier and supporting unit availability, operability, and maintainability have been addressed with substantial success, and new implementations of gasification will continue to improve in this area. At present, perhaps the most significant remaining challenge is the relatively high capital costs of gasification plants, particularly given the low capital investment required for NGCC-based power production combined with low natural gas prices currently being experienced in the domestic market. Accordingly, technology that can decrease capital costs of gasification systems and plant supporting systems will be most important towards further deployment of gasification.

46

Coal Gasification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

47

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifiers and Impact of Coal Rank and Coal Properties The available commercial gasification technologies are often optimized for a particular rank of coal or coal properties, and in some cases, certain ranks of coal might be unsuitable for utilization in a given gasification technology. On the other hand, there is considerable flexibility in most of the common gasifiers; this is highlighted by the following table, which provides an overview of the level of experience for the various commercially available gasifiers by manufacturer for each coal type. This experience will only continue to expand as more gasification facilities come online and more demonstrations are completed. SOLID FUEL GASIFICATION EXPERIENCE1 High Ash Coals

48

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coal gasification projects throughout the world. These databases track proposed gasification projects with approximate outputs greater than 100 megawatts electricity...

49

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Plant Databases News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

50

NETL: Coal Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification Systems News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

51

Gasification Systems Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International...

52

CORN STEEP LIQUOR IN MICROBIOLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is a by-product of the corn wet-milling industry it would be insufficient...invention of much of the modern wet milling process, suggested corn steep liquor as a nutrient...general flowsheet of the corn wet-milling process; and to Dr. L...

R. Winston Liggett; H. Koffler

1948-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility As important as coal is as a primary gasification feedstock, gasification technology offers the important ability to take a wide range of feedstocks and process them into syngas, from which a similarly diverse number of end products are possible. Gasifiers have been developed to suit all different ranks of coal, and other fossil fuels, petcoke and refinery streams, biomass including agricultural waste, and industrial and municipal waste. The flexibility stems from the ability of gasification to take any carbon and hydrogen containing feedstock and then thermochemically break down the feedstock to a gas containing simple compounds which are easy to process into several marketable products.

54

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Commercial Technologies for Oxygen Production Gasification processes require an oxidant, most commonly oxygen; less frequently air or just steam may suffice as the gasification agent depending on the process. Oxygen-blown systems have the advantage of minimizing the size of the gasification reactor and its auxiliary process systems. However, the oxygen for the process must be separated from the atmosphere. Commercial large-scale air separation plants are based on cryogenic distillation technology, capable of supplying oxygen at high purity1 and pressure. This technology is well understood, having been in practice for over 75 years. Cryogenic air separation is recognized for its reliability, and it can be designed for high capacity (up to 5,000 tons per day).

55

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia Coal: Feedstock Flexibility Refinery Streams Gasification is a known method for converting petroleum coke (petcoke) and other refinery waste streams and residuals (vacuum residual, visbreaker tar, and deasphalter pitch) into power, steam and hydrogen for use in the production of cleaner transportation fuels. The main requirement for a gasification feedstock is that it contains both hydrogen and carbon. Below is a table that shows the specifications for a typical refinery feedstock. Specifications for a typical refinery feedstock A number of factors have increased the interest in gasification applications in petroleum refinery operations: Coking capacity has increased with the shift to heavier, more sour crude oils being supplied to the refiners.

56

Big Island Demonstration Project – Black Liquor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program research and development project.

57

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-03GO13175 and DE-FC36-02GO12024) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. This multi-year effort to develop methods to effectively monitor gaseous species produced in thermochemical process streams resulted in a sampling and analysis approach that is continuous, sensitive, comprehensive, accurate, reliable, economical, and safe. The improved approach for sampling thermochemical processes that GTI developed and demonstrated in its series of field demonstrations successfully provides continuous transport of vapor-phase syngas streams extracted from the main gasification process stream to multiple, commercially available analyzers. The syngas stream is carefully managed through multiple steps to successfully convey it to the analyzers, while at the same time bringing the stream to temperature and pressure conditions that are compatible with the analyzers. The primary principle that guides the sample transport is that throughout the entire sampling train, the temperature of the syngas stream is maintained above the maximum condensation temperature of the vapor phase components of the conveyed sample gas. In addition, to minimize adsorption or chemical changes in the syngas components prior to analysis, the temperature of the transported stream is maintained as hot as is practical, while still being cooled only as much necessary prior to entering the analyzer(s). The successful transport of the sample gas stream to the analyzer(s) is accomplished through the managed combination of four basic gas conditioning methods that are applied as specifically called for by the process conditions, the gas constituent concentrations, the analyzer requirements, and the objectives of the syngas analyses: 1) removing entrained particulate matter from the sample stream; 2) maintaining the temperature of the sample gas stream; 3) lowering the pressure of the sample gas stream to decrease the vapor pressures of all the component vapor species in the sample stream; and 4) diluting the gas stream with a metered, inert gas, such as nitrogen. Proof-of-concept field demonstrations of the sampling approach were conducted for gasification process streams from a black liquor gasifier, and from the gasification of biomass and coal feedstocks at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility. In addition to the descriptions and data included in this Final Report, GTI produced a Special Topical Report, Design and Protocol for Monitoring Gaseous Species in Thermochemical Processes, that explains and describes in detail the objectives, principles, design, hardware, installation, operation and representative data produced during this successful developmental effort. Although the specific analyzers used under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were referenced in the Topical Report and this Final Report, the sampling interface design they present is generic enough to adapt to other analyzers that may be more appropriate to alternate process streams or facilities.

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ...

C. Y. Wen; T. Z. Chaung

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

60

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application of gasification offers some water-saving advantages over other technologies for producing electricity from coal. Regions with limited water resources, typical of many parts of the western United States, could conserve resources by meeting increasing electricity demand with IGCC generation. Many of these areas have good coal resources and a need for new generating capacity. Water use in a thermoelectric power plant is described by two separate terms: water withdrawal and water consumption. Water withdrawal is the amount of water taken into the plant from an outside source. Water consumption refers to the portion of the withdrawn water that is not returned directly to the outside source - for example, water lost to evaporative cooling.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs Specific Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs from CO2 Capture In foregoing discussion, results of NETL's comprehensive study comparing the performance and cost of various fossil fuel-based power generation technologies with and without CO2 capture were reviewed. Of particular interest in that study was the companion set of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) designs, using GE's gasification technology, which can be used to illustrate the design changes needed for CO2 capture. Current Technology - IGCC Plant Design Figure 1 shows a simplified block flow diagram (BFD) of a market-ready IGCC design without CO2 capture. As shown, the IGCC plant consists of the following processing islands, of which a more detailed description of each can be found in the cited NETL referenced report: 1

62

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning Conditioning Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Sulfur is a component of coal and other gasification feed stocks. Sulfur compounds need to be removed in most gasification applications due to environmental regulations or to avoid catalyst poisoning. Whether it is electricity, liquid fuels, or some other product being output, sulfur emissions are regulated, and sulfur removal is important for this reason, along with the prevention of downstream component fouling. In addition to these constraints, recovering saleable sulfur is an important economic benefit for a gasification plant. To illustrate the previous point, in 2011 8.1 million tons of elemental sulfur was produced, with the majority of this coming from petroleum refining, natural gas processing and coking plants. Total shipments were valued at $1.6 billion, with the average mine or plant price of $200 per ton, up from $70.48 in 2010. The United States currently imports sulfur (36% of consumption, mostly from Canada), meaning the market can support more domestic sulfur production.

65

2007 gasification technologies conference papers  

SciTech Connect

Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping This factsheet describes a...

67

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Acid Gas Removal (AGR) Acid gases produced in gasification processes mainly consist of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Syngas exiting the particulate removal and gas conditioning systems, typically near ambient temperature at 100°F, needs to be cleaned of the sulfur-bearing acid gases to meet either environmental emissions regulations, or to protect downstream catalysts for chemical processing applications. For integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) applications, environmental regulations require that the sulfur content of the product syngas be reduced to less than 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in order to meet the stack gas emission target of less than 4 ppmv sulfur dioxide (SO2)1. In IGCC applications, where selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is required to lower NOx emissions to less than 10 ppmv, syngas sulfur content may have to be lowered to 10 to 20 ppmv in order to prevent ammonium bisulfate fouling of the heat recovery steam generator's (HRSG) cold end tubes. For fuels production or chemical production, the downstream synthesis catalyst sulfur tolerance dictates the sulfur removal level, which can be less than 0.1 ppmv.

68

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Major Commercial Examples of IGCC Plants While there are many coal gasification plants in the world co-producing electricity, chemicals and/or steam, the following are four notable, commercial-size IGCC plants currently in operation solely for producing electricity from coal and/or coke. Tampa Electric, Polk County 250 MW GE Gasifier Wabash, West Terre Haute 265 MW CoP E-Gas(tm) Gasifier Nuon, Buggenum 250 MW Shell Gasifier Elcogas, Puertollano 300 MW Prenflo Gasifier All of the plants began operation prior to 2000 and employ high temperature entrained-flow gasification technology. GE (formerly Texaco-Chevron) and ConocoPhillips (CoP) are slurry feed gasifiers, while Shell and Prenflo are dry feed gasifiers. None of these plants currently capture carbon dioxide (CO2). A simplified process flow diagram of the 250-MW Tampa Electric IGCC plant is shown in Figure 1 to illustrate the overall arrangement of an operating commercial scale IGCC plant. The Tampa Electric plant is equipped with both radiant and convective coolers for heat recovery, generating high pressure (HP) steam.

69

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Gasification Systems Technologies - Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding provided for any one project. It then becomes critical to test the technology at a pre-existing facility willing to test experimental technologies. Not surprisingly, most commercial facilities are hesitant to interfere with their operations to experiment, but others, with a view towards the future, welcome promising technologies. Below is a list of major partner test sites that actively host DOE supported research activities. Many of the test sites were built with DOE support, but many were not. Some are commercial, and were designed to perform experimental work. All play an important role in developing technologies with minimal expense to the project, and to the U.S. taxpayer.

70

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture R&D Capture R&D DOE/NETL's pre-combustion CO2 control technology portfolio of R&D projects is examining various CO2 capture technologies, and supports identification of developmental pathways linking advanced fossil fuel conversion and CO2 capture. The Program's CO2 capture activity is being conducted in close coordination with that of advanced, higher-efficiency power generation and fossil fuel conversion technologies such as gasification. Links to the projects can be found here. Finally, an exhaustive and periodically updated report on CO2 capture R&D sponsored by NETL is available: DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (also referred to as the CO2 Handbook). Carbon Dioxide CO2 Capture Commercial CO2 Uses & Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery

71

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

72

Gasification: redefining clean energy  

SciTech Connect

This booklet gives a comprehensive overview of how gasification is redefining clean energy, now and in the future. It informs the general public about gasification in a straight-forward, non-technical manner.

NONE

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Current Gasification Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer...

74

Gasification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification Gasification Gasification The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant Gasification Technology R&D Coal gasification offers one of the most versatile and clean ways to convert coal into electricity, hydrogen, and other valuable energy products. Coal gasification electric power plants are now operating commercially in the United States and in other nations, and many experts predict that coal gasification will be at the heart of future generations of clean coal technology plants. Rather than burning coal directly, gasification (a thermo-chemical process) breaks down coal - or virtually any carbon-based feedstock - into its basic chemical constituents. In a modern gasifier, coal is typically exposed to steam and carefully controlled amounts of air or oxygen under high

75

Coal gasification development intensifies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification development intensifies ... Three almost simultaneous developments in coal gasification, although widely divergent in purpose and geography, rapidly are accelerating the technology's movement into an era of commercial exploitation. ... A plant to be built in the California desert will be the first commercialsize coal gasification power plant in the U.S. In West Germany, synthesis gas from a coal gasification demonstration plant is now being used as a chemical feedstock, preliminary to scaleup of the process to commercial size. ...

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Gasification Systems Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project Portfolio Project...

77

Gasification Systems Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project...

78

2010 Worldwide Gasification Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

79

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification ... The steam–carbon reaction, which is the essential reaction of the gasification processes of carbon-based feed stocks (e.g., coal and biomass), produces synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a synthetically flexible, environmentally benign energy source. ... Coal Gasification in CO2 and Steam:? Development of a Steam Injection Facility for High-Pressure Wire-Mesh Reactors ...

C. W. Zielke; Everett. Gorin

1957-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Weyburn Project The Great Plains Synfuels Plant (GPSP) has had the ability to capture CO2 through the Rectisol process for sequestration or sale as a byproduct. However, no viable market was found for the CO2 in the early years of operation, and the captured CO2 was simply discharged to the atmosphere. This changed in 2000, when the GPSP began selling CO2 emissions, becoming one of the first commercial coal facilities to have its CO2 sequestered. The program had begun in 1997, when EnCana (formerly PanCanadian Resources) sought a solution to declining production in their Weyburn Oil Fields. Dakota Gasification Company, owners of the GPSP, and EnCana made an agreement to sell CO2 for use in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). DGC installed two large CO2 compressors and began shipping 105 million standard cubic feet per day of compressed CO2 (60% of the total CO2 produced at the plant) through a 205 mile pipeline from Beulah, North Dakota, to the Weyburn Oil Fields, located in Saskatchewan, Canada, for EOR. The pipeline was constructed and operated by a BEPC subsidiary. The CO2, about 95.5% pure and very dry, is injected into the mature fields where it has doubled the oil recovery rate of the field. In 2006, a third compressor was installed and an additional agreement was reached with Apache Canada Ltd. to supply CO2 for EOR to their nearby oilfields. The three compressors increased CO2 delivery to 160 million standard cubic feet (MMSCF; or 8,000 tonnes) per day. Through 2007, over 12 million tons of CO2 had been sold, and over the current expected lifetime of the program, an anticipated 20 million tons of CO2 will be stored.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Recovering Soaps and Greases from Wool-Scouring liquors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recovering Soaps and Greases from Wool-Scouring liquors ... A NEW process, illustrated in the accompanying flowsheet, has been devised for recovering soaps and greases from waste wool-scouring liquors. ...

C.H.S. TUPHOLME

1939-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Catalytic steam gasification of coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic steam gasification of coals ... Steam–Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ... Steam–Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ...

P. Pereira; G. A. Somorjai; H. Heinemann

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NETL: Gasification Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Archived Projects Archived Projects | Active Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems Reaction-Driven Ion Transport Membranes Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Coal/Biomass Gasification at Colorado School of Mines Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-Based Catalyst Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity via Catalytic Coal Gasification Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development

85

2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, coal to liquids, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

NONE

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Downdraft gasification of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this research were to investigate the parameters affecting the gasification process within downdraft gasifiers using biomass feedstocks. In addition to investigations with… (more)

Milligan, Jimmy B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Coal Gasification Systems Solicitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas; FE0023577 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation; FE0023497 OTM-Enhanced...

88

Coal Gasification in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... P. S. Andrews gave a full account of the Federal project for the pressure gasification of non-coking coals for the combined purpose of town's gas ' and the ... of town's gas ' and the production of synthetic liquid fuel. Work on the gasification of brown coal in. Victoria was commenced in 1931 by the technical staff of ...

1955-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

89

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

SciTech Connect

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Incentives boost coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Higher energy prices are making technologies to gasify the USA's vast coal reserves attractive again. The article traces the development of coal gasification technology in the USA. IGCC and industrial gasification projects are now both eligible for a 20% investment tax credit and federal loan guarantees can cover up to 80% of construction costs. 4 photos.

Hess, G.

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

2006 gasification technologies conference papers  

SciTech Connect

Sessions covered: business overview, industry trends and new developments; gasification projects progress reports; industrial applications and opportunities; Canadian oil sands; China/Asia gasification markets - status and projects; carbon management with gasification technologies; gasification economics and performance issues addressed; and research and development, and new technologies initiatives.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Stoichiometric Analysis of Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Stoichiometric Analysis of Coal Gasification ... Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study ... Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study ...

James Wei

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

NETL: Gasification Systems Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shelf Shelf Gasification Systems Reference Shelf TABLE OF CONTENTS Brochures Conferences and Workshops Gasification Systems Projects National Map Gasification Systems Projects and Performers Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifipedia Multi-phase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX) Patents Program Presentations Project Information Projects Summary Table by State Solicitations Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technical Presentations & Papers Technology Readiness Assessment (Comprehensive Report | Overview Report) Video, Images & Photos Gasification Plant Databases CD Icon Request Gasification Technologies Information on a CD. Gasification RSS Feed Subscribe to the Gasification RSS Feed to follow website updates. LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program Group Subscribe to the LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program group for more information and discussion.

95

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-02GO12024 and DE-FC36-03GO13175) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. The primary objectives of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were the selection, acquisition, and application of a suite of gas analyzers capable of providing near real-time gas analyses to suitably conditioned syngas streams. A review was conducted of sampling options, available analysis technologies, and commercially available analyzers, that could be successfully applied to the challenging task of on-line syngas characterization. The majority of thermochemical process streams comprise multicomponent gas mixtures that, prior to crucial, sequential cleanup procedures, include high concentrations of condensable species, multiple contaminants, and are often produced at high temperatures and pressures. Consequently, GTI engaged in a concurrent effort under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-03GO13175 to develop the means to deliver suitably prepared, continuous streams of extracted syngas to a variety of on-line gas analyzers. The review of candidate analysis technology also addressed safety concerns associated with thermochemical process operation that constrain the location and configuration of potential gas analysis equipment. Initial analyzer costs, reliability, accuracy, and operating and maintenance costs were also considered prior to the assembly of suitable analyzers for this work. Initial tests at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility (FFTF) in late 2004 and early 2005 successfully demonstrated the transport and subsequent analysis of a single depressurized, heat-traced syngas stream to a single analyzer (an Industrial Machine and Control Corporation (IMACC) Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR)) provided by GTI. In March 2005, our sampling approach was significantly expanded when this project participated in the U.S. DOE’s Novel Gas Cleaning (NGC) project. Syngas sample streams from three process locations were transported to a distribution manifold for selectable analysis by the IMACC FT-IR, a Stanford Research Systems QMS300 Mass Spectrometer (SRS MS) obtained under this Cooperative Agreement, and a Varian micro gas chromatograph with thermal conductivity detector (?GC) provided by GTI. A syngas stream from a fourth process location was transported to an Agilent Model 5890 Series II gas chromatograph for highly sensitive gas analyses. The on-line analyses made possible by this sampling system verified the syngas cleaning achieved by the NGC process. In June 2005, GTI collaborated with Weyerhaeuser to characterize the ChemrecTM black liquor gasifier at Weyerhaeuser’s New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill. Over a ten-day period, a broad range of process operating conditions were characterized with the IMACC FT-IR, the SRS MS, the Varian ?GC, and an integrated Gas Chromatograph, Mass Selective Detector, Flame Ionization Detector and Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detector (GC/MSD/FID/SCD) system acquired under this Cooperative Agreement from Wasson-ECE. In this field application, a single sample stream was extracted from this low-pressure, low-temperature process and successfully analyzed by these devices. In late 2005,

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

17 - Fluidized bed gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter describes the state-of-the-art of fluidized bed gasification of solid fuels, starting from the key role played by hydrodynamics, and its strong correlation with physical and chemical phenomena of the process and operating performance parameters of the reactor. The possible configurations of fluidized bed gasification plants are also assessed, and an analysis of the main methods for syngas cleaning is reported. Finally, the chapter describes some of the most interesting commercial experiences. The analysis indicates that the gasification of biomass and also of municipal and industrial solid wastes appear to be the most interesting sectors for the industrial development and utilization of fluidized bed gasifiers.

U. Arena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Gasification Technologie: Opportunities & Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This course has been put together to provide a single source document that not only reviews the historical development of gasification but also compares the process to combustion. It also provides a short discussion on integrated gasification and combined cycle processes. The major focus of the course is to describe the twelve major gasifiers being developed today. The hydrodynamics and kinetics of each are reviewed along with the most likely gas composition from each of the technologies when using a variety of fuels under different conditions from air blown to oxygen blown and atmospheric pressure to several atmospheres. If time permits, a more detailed discussion of low temperature gasification will be included.

Breault, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Gasification Â… Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Gasification Technologies Advances for Future Energy Plants Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 Oxygen Membrane - APCI - 25% capital cost reduction - 5.0% COE reduction Warm Gas Cleaning - RTI in combination with H 2 /CO 2 Membrane - Eltron - 2.9 % pt efficiency increase - 12% COE decrease Oxygen CO 2 H 2 rich stream Water Gas Shift*

99

NETL: Gasification Systems - Solicitations  

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Shelf > Solicitations Shelf > Solicitations Gasification Systems Solicitations All NETL Solicitations / Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOA) Gasification RSS Feed NETL RSS Feeds: List of available NETL RSS feeds. Business & Solicitations RSS: Subscribe to this to be notified of all NETL solicitations or FOA postings. Gasification RSS: Subscribe to this to be notified of Gasification news, solicitations and FOA postings. Business Alert Notification System Official notification is available through the Business Alert Notification System. *These notifications are provided as a courtesy and there may be a delay between the opportunity announcement and the arrival of the alert. SOLICITATION TITLE / AWARDS ANNOUNCEMENT PROJECT PAGE(S) 12.11.13: Fossil Energy's Request for Information DE-FOA-0001054; titled "Novel Crosscutting Research and Development to Support Advanced Energy Systems." Application due date is January 15, 2014. Applications and/or instructions can be found with this Funding Opportunity Announcement on FedConnect.

100

Gasification Â… Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th Annual International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation, Costa Mesa, CA, February 7, 2012 An Overview of U.S. DOE's Gasification Systems Program Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 U.S. Coal Resources Low rank: lignite and sub-bituminous coal - About 50% of the U.S. coal reserves - Nearly 50% of U.S. coal production - Lower sulfur Bituminous coal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Coal gasification: Belgian first  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... hope for Europe's coal production came with the announcement this month that the first gasification of coal at depths of nearly 1,000 metres would take place this May in ... of energy.

Jasper Becker

1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

102

Characterization of cellulosic wastes and gasification products from chicken farms  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gas chromatography indicated the variable quality of the producer gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The char had appreciable NPK values, and can be used as a fertiliser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bio-oil produced was of poor quality, having high moisture content and low pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mass and energy balances showed inadequate level energy recovery from the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future work includes changing the operating parameters of the gasification unit. - Abstract: The current article focuses on gasification as a primary disposal solution for cellulosic wastes derived from chicken farms, and the possibility to recover energy from this process. Wood shavings and chicken litter were characterized with a view to establishing their thermal parameters, compositional natures and calorific values. The main products obtained from the gasification of chicken litter, namely, producer gas, bio-oil and char, were also analysed in order to establish their potential as energy sources. The experimental protocol included bomb calorimetry, pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC), thermo-gravimetric analyses (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD), mineral content analyses and gas chromatography. The mass and energy balances of the gasification unit were also estimated. The results obtained confirmed that gasification is a viable method of chicken litter disposal. In addition to this, it is also possible to recover some energy from the process. However, energy content in the gas-phase was relatively low. This might be due to the low energy efficiency (19.6%) of the gasification unit, which could be improved by changing the operation parameters.

Joseph, Paul, E-mail: p.joseph@ulster.ac.uk [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Tretsiakova-McNally, Svetlana; McKenna, Siobhan [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gasification of Canola Meal and Factors Affecting Gasification Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-catalytic gasification of canola meal for the production of ... in order to study the effects of different gasification parameters on gas composition, H2/CO ratio, gas yield, syngas yield, lower heating value...

Ashwini Tilay; Ramin Azargohar; Regan Gerspacher; Ajay Dalai…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Status of Coal Gasification: 1977  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-pressure technology is important to coal gasification for several reasons. When the end product ... of high pressures in all types of coal gasification reduces the pressure drop throughout the equipment,...

F. C. Schora; W. G. Bair

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Gasification of selected woody plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article contains laboratory data comparing the rate of gasification of five types of woody plants—beech, ... oak, willow, poplar and rose. The gasification rate was determined thermogravimetrically. Carbon di...

Buryan Petr

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Chapter 5 - Gasification Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary There is a broad range of reactor types that are used in the practical realization of the gasification process. For most purposes, these reactor types can be grouped into one of three categories: moving-bed gasifiers, fluid-bed gasifiers, and entrained-flow gasifiers. Moving-bed processes are the oldest processes, and two processes in particular, the producer gas process and the water gas process, have played an important role in the production of synthesis gas from coal and coke. In moving bed processes, there are the sasol-lurgi dry bottom process, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) slagging gasifier, that are detailed in the chapter along with their applications. Following this, fluid-bed processes are discussed in which the blast has two functions: that of blast as a reactant and that of the fluidizing medium for the bed. The best known fluid-bed gasifiers that have no tar problem are regenerators of catalytic cracking units that often operate under reducing, that is, gasification conditions that can be found in many refineries. HRL process, BHEL gasifier, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) processes, the KBR transport gasifier, agglomerating fluid-bed processes, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) gasifier, the GEE gasification process, the Shell Gasification Process (SGP), Lurgi’ s Multi-Purpose Gasification process (MPG), etc. are the various processes discussed in the chapter.

Christopher Higman; Maarten van der Burgt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

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Integrated Coal Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Recommendations and Strategies Produced for the Department of Energy (DOE)/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Gasification Technologies Council (GTC) September 2004 Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Strategies and Recommendations Final Report Study Performed by:

109

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water† ... A packed bed of carbon within the reactor catalyzed the gasification of these organic vapors in the water; consequently, the water effluent of the reactor was clean. ... A method for removing plugs from the reactor was developed and employed during an 8-h gasification run involving potato wastes. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Stephen Glen Allen; Deborah Schulman; Xiaodong Xu; Robert J. Divilio

2000-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

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Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

111

The Use of Reverse Osmosis for the Purification of Coal Gasification Liquors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory trials have been conducted at the Westfield Development Centre to assess the potential of reverse osmosis as a stage in the treatment of ... effluent suitable for sewer or estuary discharge. Reverse osmosis

A. R. Williams

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Karel, E-mail: svoboda@icpf.cas.cz [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the ASCR, v.v.i., Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri [D.S.K. Ltd., Ujezdecek - Dukla 264, 415 01 Teplice I (Czech Republic); Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr [Dept. of Gas, Coke and Air protection, Institute of Chemical Technol., Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

NETL: 2010 World Gasification Database Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Gasification Systems 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Archive DOE/NETL 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Worldwide Gasification Database Analysis The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

114

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Based on Pressurized Fluidized Bed Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enviropower Inc. has developed a modern power plant concept based on an integrated pressurized fluidized bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC)....

Kari Salo; J. G. Patel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamentals Fundamentals Gasification is a partial oxidation process. The term partial oxidation is a relative term which simply means that less oxygen is used in gasification than would be required for combustion (i.e., burning or complete oxidation) of the same amount of fuel. Gasification typically uses only 25 to 40 percent of the theoretical oxidant (either pure oxygen or air) to generate enough heat to gasify the remaining unoxidized fuel, producing syngas. The major combustible products of gasification are carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2), with only a minor amount of the carbon completely oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. The heat released by partial oxidation provides most of the energy needed to break up the chemical bonds in the feedstock, to drive the other endothermic gasification reactions, and to increase the temperature of the final gasification products.

116

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the...

117

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

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Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

118

NETL: Gasification Project Information  

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Project Information Project Information Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Project Information Active Projects | Archived Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads [SC0010151] Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications [FE0012065] Dry Solids Pump Coal Feed Technology [FE0012062] Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers [FE0012500] National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility [FE0000749] Modification of the Developmental Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) Feeder [NT0000749] Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems [DE-FC26-98FT40343]

119

The Complete Gasification of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... plant designed by C. B. Tully, and operated at Bedford, for the complete gasification of coal. Altogether, since 1919, about two hundred such plants have been erected ...

J. S. G. THOMAS

1923-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Analysis of energy recovery potential using innovative technologies of waste gasification  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy recovery from waste by gasification was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two processes: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of feeding waste: Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and pulper residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different configurations for the energy cycles were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with performances from conventional Waste-to-Energy process. - Abstract: In this paper, two alternative thermo-chemical processes for waste treatment were analysed: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma process. The two processes were analysed from the thermodynamic point of view, trying to reconstruct two simplified models, using appropriate simulation tools and some support data from existing/planned plants, able to predict the energy recovery performances by process application. In order to carry out a comparative analysis, the same waste stream input was considered as input to the two models and the generated results were compared. The performances were compared with those that can be obtained from conventional combustion with energy recovery process by means of steam turbine cycle. Results are reported in terms of energy recovery performance indicators as overall energy efficiency, specific energy production per unit of mass of entering waste, primary energy source savings, specific carbon dioxide production.

Lombardi, Lidia, E-mail: lidia.lombardi@unifit.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Carnevale, Ennio [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Corti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 56100 Siena (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

NETL: Gasification - Request Gasification Systems Information on a CD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Request Gasification Systems Information on a CD Please fill in the form below to receive the CDs of your choice. * Denotes required field Requestor Contact Information Requested By (Agency/Company): First Name: * Last Name: * Address: * PO Box: City: * State: * Zip: * Country: Email: * Phone: CD Request Select CD(s):* Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasification Technologies Training Course Special Instructions: Submit Request Reset Contacts Program Contact: Jenny Tennant (304) 285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Close Contacts Disclaimer Disclaimer of Liability: This system is made available by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, the Department of Energy, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, nor any of

123

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Gasification Systems Program Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products more easily with gasification-based technologies compared to conventional combustion of solid feedstocks. Gasification can generate clean power, and by adding steam to the syngas and performing water-gas-shift to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2), additional hydrogen can be produced. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for enhanced oil recovery (see Gasification Systems Program Research and Development Areas figure). In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Furthermore, polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies.

124

Gasification of Coal and Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , said the Gas Council is spending £120,000 this year on research into coal gasification, and the National Coal Board and the Central Electricity Generating Board £680,000 and ... coal utilization. The Gas Council is spending about £230,000 on research into the gasification of oil under a programme intended to contribute also to the improvement of the economics ...

1960-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

125

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Modelling coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification processes in a slurry-feed-type entrained-flow gasifier are studied. Novel simulation methods as well as numerical results are presented. We use the vorticity-stream function method to study the characteristics of gas flow and a scalar potential function is introduced to model the mass source terms. The random trajectory model is employed to describe the behaviour of slurry-coal droplets. Very detailed results regarding the impact of the O2/coal ratio on the distribution of velocity, temperature and concentration are obtained. Simulation results show that the methods are feasible and can be used to study a two-phase reacting flow efficiently.

Xiang Jun Liu; Wu Rong Zhang; Tae Jun Park

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PNNL Coal Gasification Research  

SciTech Connect

This report explains the goals of PNNL in relation to coal gasification research. The long-term intent of this effort is to produce a syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in materials, catalysts, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, system modifications to increase operational flexibility and reliability or accommodate other fuel sources that can be used for syngas production could be useful.

Reid, Douglas J.; Cabe, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

Pyrolytic Gasification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyrolytic Gasification Pyrolytic Gasification Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyrolytic Gasification Sector Biomass References Balboa Pacific Corp[1] Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

130

NETL: Gasification Systems Program Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Contacts Gasification Systems Program Contacts Jenny Tennant Gasification Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Phone: (304) 285-4830 Email: Jenny.Tennant@netl.doe.gov Pete Rozelle Division of Advanced Energy System - Program Manager, Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy FE-221/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-1209 Phone: (301) 903-2338 Email: Peter.Rozelle@hq.doe.gov Heather Quedenfeld Gasification Division Director U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Phone: (412) 386-5781 Email: Heather.Quedenfeld@netl.doe.gov Kristin Gerdes Performance Division

131

AVESTAR® - Training - Gasification Process Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Process Operations Gasification Process Operations This course is designed as a familiarization course to increase understanding of the gasification with CO2 capture process. During the training, participants will startup and shutdown the simulated unit in an integrated manner and will be exposed to simple and complex unit malfunctions in the control room and in the field. Course objectives are as follows: Introduce trainees to gasification and CO2 capture process systems and major components and how they dynamically interact Familiarize trainees with the Human Machine Interface (HMI) and plant control and how safe and efficient operation of the unit can be affected by plant problems Provide the trainees with hands-on operating experiences in plant operations using the HMI

132

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gasification Systems 2013 Project Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy in 2013 selected ten projects that will focus on reducing the cost of gasification with carbon capture for producing electric power, fuels, and chemicals. The projects will...

134

Coal gasification vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXTILE DRYING VIA WOOD GASIFICATION Thomas F. ;McGowan, Anthony D. Jape Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement... for dryers. In addition to the experimental program described above, the DOE grant covered two other major areas. A survey of the textile industry was made to assess the market for gasification equip ment. The major findings were that a large amount...

McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Materials of Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

NETL: Gasifipedia - What is Gasification?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Drivers for Gasification Technology The need for low-cost power produced in an environmentally sound way is certain, even if the future of regulations limiting the emission and/or encouraging the capture of CO2, and the price and availability of natural gas and oil are not. Gasification is not only capable of efficiently producing electric power, but a wide range of liquids and/or high-value chemicals (including diesel and gasoline for transportation) can be produced from cleaned syngas, providing the flexibility to capitalize on a range of dynamic changes to either domestic energy markets or global economic conditions. Polygeneration-plants that produce multiple products-is uniquely possible with gasification technologies. Continued advances in gasification-based technology will enable the conversion of our nation's abundant coal reserves into energy resources (power and liquid fuels), chemicals, and fertilizers needed to displace the use of imported oil and, thereby, help mitigate its high price and security supply concerns and to support U.S. economic competitiveness with unprecedented environmental performance.

138

CHAMPAIGN-URBANA FOOD AND LIQUOR GUIDE 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(217) 352-7467. Excellent Mexican and Latin American- influenced food. Service can be a bit slowCHAMPAIGN-URBANA FOOD AND LIQUOR GUIDE 1. Introduction This is a short, incomplete, and personally. It is standard to tip 15-20% for reasonable service. A indicates a place that we like, and indicates a place we

Athreya, Jayadev

139

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory% postconsumer waste #12;i Independent Review Panel Summary Report September 28, 2011 From: Independent Review Panel, Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE

140

Underground Coal Gasification in the USSR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By accomplishing in a single operation the extraction of coal and its conversion into a gaseous fuel, underground gasification makes it possible to avoid the heavy capital investments required for coal gasification

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

June 2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture and sequestration, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, co-production, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

NONE

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Transport and Other Effects in Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper summarizes the kinetics of coal char gasification excepted surface reactions (mechanisms). The following subjects controlling coal char gasification are treated: Coal as the raw material ... of particle...

K. J. Hüttinger

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

144

Beluga Coal Gasification - ISER  

SciTech Connect

ISER was requested to conduct an economic analysis of a possible 'Cook Inlet Syngas Pipeline'. The economic analysis was incorporated as section 7.4 of the larger report titled: 'Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study, DOE/NETL-2006/1248, Phase 2 Final Report, October 2006, for Subtask 41817.333.01.01'. The pipeline would carry CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} from a synthetic gas plant on the western side of Cook Inlet to Agrium's facility. The economic analysis determined that the net present value of the total capital and operating lifecycle costs for the pipeline ranges from $318 to $588 million. The greatest contributor to this spread is the cost of electricity, which ranges from $0.05 to $0.10/kWh in this analysis. The financial analysis shows that the delivery cost of gas may range from $0.33 to $0.55/Mcf in the first year depending primarily on the price for electricity.

Steve Colt

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Biothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Gasification of Glucose in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of Glucose in Supercritical Water ... Gasification of 0.6 M glucose in supercritical water was investigated at a temperature range from 480 to 750 °C and 28 MPa with a reactor residence time of 10?50 s. ... Carbon gasification efficiency reached 100% at 700 °C. ...

In-Gu Lee; Mi-Sun Kim; Son-Ki Ihm

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrothermal gasification of biomass and organic wastes. Thewaste, and organic waste from anaerobic wastewater digester and black liquid from paper pulping process have been investigated in the supercritical water gasificationgasification normally exceeds 22MPa [131]. Flowable feedstocks, such as woody waste,

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Process and technological aspects of municipal solid waste gasification. A review  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical assessment of the main commercially available MSW gasifiers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed discussion of the basic features of gasification process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of configurations of gasification-based waste-to-energy units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance analysis, on the basis of independent sources data. - Abstract: The paper proposes a critical assessment of municipal solid waste gasification today, starting from basic aspects of the process (process types and steps, operating and performance parameters) and arriving to a comparative analysis of the reactors (fixed bed, fluidized bed, entrained bed, vertical shaft, moving grate furnace, rotary kiln, plasma reactor) as well as of the possible plant configurations (heat gasifier and power gasifier) and the environmental performances of the main commercially available gasifiers for municipal solid wastes. The analysis indicates that gasification is a technically viable option for the solid waste conversion, including residual waste from separate collection of municipal solid waste. It is able to meet existing emission limits and can have a remarkable effect on reduction of landfill disposal option.

Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

150

Current Gasification Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » Current Gasification » Current Gasification Research Current Gasification Research Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer significant improvements in efficiency, fuel flexibility, economics and environmental sustainability. Fuel flexibility is especially important. Tomorrow's gasification plants conceivably could process a wide variety of low-cost feedstocks, handling

151

Coal gasification 2006: roadmap to commercialization  

SciTech Connect

Surging oil and gas prices, combined with supply security and environmental concerns, are prompting power generators and industrial firms to further develop coal gasification technologies. Coal gasification, the process of breaking down coal into its constituent chemical components prior to combustion, will permit the US to more effectively utilize its enormous, low cost coal reserves. The process facilitates lower environmental impact power generation and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional generation techniques. The study is designed to inform the reader as to this rapidly evolving technology, its market penetration prospects and likely development. Contents include: Clear explanations of different coal gasification technologies; Emissions and efficiency comparisons with other fuels and technologies; Examples of US and global gasification projects - successes and failures; Commercial development and forecast data; Gasification projects by syngas output; Recommendations for greater market penetration and commercialization; Current and projected gasification technology market shares; and Recent developments including proposals for underground gasification process. 1 app.

NONE

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gasdynamic lasers utilizing carbon gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation was made of the influence of the processes of carbon gasification by combustion products and oxidants on the chemical composition of the active medium and the energy characteristics of a gasdynamic CO2 laser. Conditions were found under which the stored energy of the active medium was greater than 100 J/g.

A S Biryukov; V M Marchenko; A M Prokhorov

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...been operated as a "pure" gasifier but to supply power gas for...was the air-blown Winkler gasifier pro-ducing power gas at Leuna...fines, additional gasification medium (air or oxygen-steam) is...partial pressure of steam in a gasifier blown with oxygen and steam...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...appreciably larger sizes than coal to other...they grew to a size to fall upon an...air-blown Winkler gasifier pro-ducing power...additional gasification medium (air or oxygen-steam...provide "pure" gasifier Test revamp Develop larger sizes Develop pressure...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

October 2005 Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 2005 Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass, without......................................................................... 9 3.1.1 Biomass Gasification, and production cost estimates for gasification-based thermochemical conversion of switchgrass into Fischer

158

Catalytic gasification of tars from a dumping site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work deals with catalytic gasification, pyrolysis and non-catalytic gasification of tar from an industrial dumping site. ... were carried out in a vertical stainless steel gasification reactor at 800 °C. Crus...

Lukáš Gašparovi?; Lukáš Šugár…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » Pioneering Gasification » Pioneering Gasification Plants Pioneering Gasification Plants In the 1800s, lamplighters made their rounds in the streets of many of America's largest cities lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the end of the 19th Century, electric power. These early gasifiers were called "gas producers," and the gas that they generated was called "producer gas." During the early 20th Century, improvements in the availability of petroleum and natural gas products, along with the extension of the infrastructure associated with these products, led to their widespread use, which replaced coal-based producer gas in the energy market.

160

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: Gasification Systems Video, Images & Photos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video, Images, Photos Video, Images, Photos Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Video, Images & Photos The following was established to show a variety of Gasification Technologies: Gasfication powerplant photo Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology (Mar 2008) Movie Icon Windows Media Video (WMV-26MB) [ view | download ] NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants. Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process* TRDU and Hot-Gas Vessel in the EERC Gasification Tower Transport reactor development unit

162

Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status  

SciTech Connect

Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX February 18, 2009 EIS-0412:...

164

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Breakout Session 2A-Conversion...

165

Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of...

166

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Cleaning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleaning Cleaning Chemicals from Coal Complex Chemicals from Coal Complex (Eastman Company) Novel gas cleaning and conditioning are crucial technologies for achieving near-zero emissions, while meeting gasification system performance and cost targets. DOE's Gasification Systems program supports technology development in the area of gas cleaning and conditioning, including advanced sorbents and solvents, particulate filters, and other novel gas-cleaning approaches that remove and convert gas contaminants into benign and marketable by-products. To avoid the cost and efficiency penalties associated with cooling the gas stream to temperatures at which conventional gas clean-up systems operate, novel processes are being developed that operate at mild to high temperatures and incorporate multi-contaminant control to

167

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Chapter 2 - Chemistry of Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of any carbonaceous or hydrocarbonaceous material is, essentially, the conversion of the carbon constituents by any one of a variety of chemical processes to produce combustible gases. The process includes a series of reaction steps that convert the feedstock into synthesis gas (syngas, carbon monoxide, CO, plus hydrogen, H2) and other gaseous products. This conversion is generally accomplished by introducing a gasifying agent (air, oxygen, and/or steam) into a reactor vessel containing the feedstock where the temperature, pressure, and flow pattern (moving bed, fluidized, or entrained bed) are controlled. The gaseous products – other than carbon monoxide and hydrogen – and the proportions of these product gases (such as carbon dioxide, CO2, methane, CH4, water vapor, H2O, hydrogen sulfide, H2S, and sulfur dioxide, SO2) depends on the: (1) type of feedstock, (2) the chemical composition of the feedstock, (3) the gasifying agent or gasifying medium, as well as (4) the thermodynamics and chemistry of the gasification reactions as controlled by the process operating parameters. In addition, the kinetic rates and extents of conversion for the several chemical reactions that are a part of the gasification process are variable and are typically functions of: (1) temperature, (2) pressure, and (3) reactor configuration, and (4) the gas composition of the product gases and whether or not these gases influence the outcome of the reaction. It is the purpose of this chapter to present descriptions of the various reactions involved in gasification of carbonaceous and hydrocarbonaceous feedstocks as well as the various thermodynamic aspects of these reactions which dictate the process parameters used to produce the various gases.

James G. Speight

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Associations between Beer, Wine, and Liquor Consumption and Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...literature on beer, wine, and liquor intake and...alcoholic beverage (beer, wine, or liquor) and lung...per bottle, 150 mL of wine per glass, and 40 mL...beverage could potentially increase the risk of lung cancer...alcoholic beverages, and quality of smoking adjustment...

Chun Chao

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Gasifiers Commercial Gasifiers Types of Gasifiers Although there are various types of gasifers (gasification reactors), different in design and operational characteristics, there are three main gasifier classifications into which most of the commercially available gasifiers fall. These categories are as follows: Fixed-bed gasifiers (also referred as moving-bed gasifiers) Entrained-flow gasifiers Fluidized-bed gasifiers Commercial gasifiers of GE Energy, ConocoPhillips E-Gas(tm) and Shell SCGP are examples of entrained-flow types. Fixed-or moving-bed gasifiers include that of Lurgi and British Gas Lurgi (BGL). Fluidized-bed gasifiers include the catalytic gasifier technology being commercialized by Great Point Energy, the Winkler gasifier, and the KBR transport gasifiers. For more specific information on these gasifiers, follow the links for the bulleted gasifier types above. NOTE: Although specific gasifiers named above are described in detail throughout this website, it is realized that other gasification technologies exist. The gasifiers discussed herein were not preferentially chosen by NETL.

172

Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Integrated Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Cost and Performance Analysis of Biomass-Based Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (BIGCC) Power Systems Project ID: 106 Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann Brief Description: This project examines the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems--high-pressure air blown, low-pressure air blown, and low-pressure indirectly heated. Purpose Examine the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems - a high pressure air-blown, a low pressure indirectly heated, and a low pressure air-blown. Performer Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann

174

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier Opt & Plant Supporting Systems Gasifier Opt & Plant Supporting Systems Gasification Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems The gasifier is the core system component in the gasification process. It determines both the primary requirements for raw material inputs and the product gas composition. The gasifier is generally a high temperature/pressure vessel where oxygen (or air) and steam are directly contacted with a fuel, such as coal, causing a series of chemical reactions to occur that result in production of a fuel gas. This fuel gas (also referred to either as synthesis gas or syngas) consists primarily of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Minor constituents present in the feedstock are converted to such products as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and ash/slag (mineral residues from coal). These products can be separated and captured for use or safe disposal. After cleaning to remove contaminants, the syngas consists mainly of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. According to the Department of Energy's vision for coal gasification, at this point steam may be added and the syngas sent through a water-gas shift (WGS) reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to nothing but carbon dioxide and additional hydrogen. After a gas separation process, the carbon dioxide is ready for utilization (such as for Enhanced Oil Recovery) or safe storage, and the hydrogen can be fired in a gas-turbine/steam-turbine generator set to produce electricity with stack emissions containing no greenhouse gases. Alternately, syngas or hydrogen can be used to produce highly-valued fuels and chemicals. Co-production of combinations of these products and electricity is also possible.

175

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Simulating Charring, Intumescent, Smoldering, and Noncharring Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Nonflaming Transient Gasification of PMMA and PE duringT. , & Werner, K. , “Wood Gasification at Fire Level HeatConcentration on Nonflaming Gasification Rates and Evolved

Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higman, C. and M. Burgt, Gasification . 2003: Elsevier/Gulfand N.P. Cheremisinoff, Gasification technologies: a primerbiomass (part 3): gasification technologies. Bioresource

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal-gasification technical Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification to Produce SNG (Beulah, North Dakota, USA) (Source:DakotaGasification Petcoke... Source: NETL, 2009 12;12 Dakota Coal Gasification ... Source: Center for...

178

Fluidized bed catalytic coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents (16) are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 volume percent and 21 volume percent oxygen at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 250.degree. C. in an oxidation zone (24) and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone (44) at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

Euker, Jr., Charles A. (15163 Dianna La., Houston, TX 77062); Wesselhoft, Robert D. (120 Caldwell, Baytown, TX 77520); Dunkleman, John J. (3704 Autumn La., Baytown, TX 77520); Aquino, Dolores C. (15142 McConn, Webster, TX 77598); Gouker, Toby R. (5413 Rocksprings Dr., LaPorte, TX 77571)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Simultaneous and rapid determination of multiple component concentrations in a Kraft liquor process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a rapid method of determining the concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. The present invention is also a simple, low cost, device of determining the in-situ concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. In particular, the present invention provides a useful method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate in aqueous kraft pulping liquors through use of an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) tunnel flow cell or optical probe capable of producing a ultraviolet absorbency spectrum over a wavelength of 190 to 300 nm. In addition, the present invention eliminates the need for manual sampling and dilution previously required to generate analyzable samples. The inventive method can be used in Kraft pulping operations to control white liquor causticizing efficiency, sulfate reduction efficiency in green liquor, oxidation efficiency for oxidized white liquor and the active and effective alkali charge to kraft pulping operations.

Li, Jian (Marietta, GA); Chai, Xin Sheng (Atlanta, GA); Zhu, Junyoung (Marietta, GA)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Gasification of Ponderosa Pine Charcoal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of wood chars with CO2 and steam is an important process step in the conversion of biomass to fuel and synthesis gases. Wood fuels can be gasified in a wide variety of sizes, shapes and densities...

Richard Edrich; Timothy Bradley…

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

McKee, Douglas W. (Burnt Hills, NY); Spiro, Clifford L. (Scotia, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A New Approach to Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... carbon monoxide plus hydrogen respectively, under the usual conditions of temperature and pressure applying in gasification practice, the rates of reaction measured by the number of gm. moles of product ...

J. D. BLACKWOOD; F. K. McTAGGART

1959-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

Biomass Gasification in Dual Fluidized Bed Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dual fluidized bed gasification technology is prospective because it produces high...2...dilution even when air is used to generate the required endothermic heat via in situ combustion. This study is devoted ...

Toshiyuki Suda; Takahiro Murakami…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet...

Garrard, C. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Role of Oxygen in Coal Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Products supplies oxygen to a number of coal gasification and partial oxidation facilities worldwide. At the high operating pressures of these processes, economics favor the use of 90% and higher oxygen purities. The effect of inerts...

Klosek, J.; Smith, A. R.; Solomon, J.

186

Partial Gasification for CO2Emissions Reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical reaction during partial gasification of coal follows the form (Nag and Raha, 1994) which is based on the Amagat model for ideal gas mixtures: (9.1) ...

Nirmal V. Gnanapragasam; Bale V. Reddy; Marc A. Rosen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Potassium Retention in Updraft Gasification of Wood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wood gasifiers are equipment used for a controlled combustion of wood in limited supply of air as the oxidizing medium to generate a combustible product gas. ... Other oxidizing media, such as oxygen and steam, or a combination of any two media can be used in the gasification process. ... The zone where high rates of char combustion and gasification occur is about 15 mm wide above the grate, as determined in a similar-sized gasifier by Di Blasi. ...

Joseph Olwa; Marcus Öhman; Pettersson Esbjörn; Dan Boström; Mackay Okure; Björn Kjellström

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process for solid waste valorisation: Technical review and preliminary thermodynamic modelling of sulphur emissions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate sulphur during MSW gasification within a fluid bed-plasma process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the literature on the feed, sulphur and process principles therein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The need for research in this area was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We perform thermodynamic modelling of the fluid bed stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial findings indicate the prominence of solid phase sulphur. - Abstract: Gasification of solid waste for energy has significant potential given an abundant feed supply and strong policy drivers. Nonetheless, significant ambiguities in the knowledge base are apparent. Consequently this study investigates sulphur mechanisms within a novel two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process. This paper includes a detailed review of gasification and plasma fundamentals in relation to the specific process, along with insight on MSW based feedstock properties and sulphur pollutant therein. As a first step to understanding sulphur partitioning and speciation within the process, thermodynamic modelling of the fluid bed stage has been performed. Preliminary findings, supported by plant experience, indicate the prominence of solid phase sulphur species (as opposed to H{sub 2}S) - Na and K based species in particular. Work is underway to further investigate and validate this.

Morrin, Shane, E-mail: shane.morrin@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Advanced Plasma Power, South Marston Business park, Swindon, SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Lettieri, Paola, E-mail: p.lettieri@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Chapman, Chris, E-mail: chris.chapman@app-uk.com [Advanced Plasma Power, South Marston Business park, Swindon, SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Mazzei, Luca, E-mail: l.mazzei@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Gasification Process First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 16, 2001 May 16, 2001 Jeff Seabright Jeff Seabright Texaco Inc. Texaco Inc. Presentation Highlights Presentation Highlights * * Texaco and climate change Texaco and climate change * * Introduction to gasification Introduction to gasification * * Environmental benefits of gasification Environmental benefits of gasification * * CO CO 2 2 capture & sequestration capture & sequestration * * Challenges going forward Challenges going forward Texaco's Climate Change Policy Texaco's Climate Change Policy * * Know enough to take action now Know enough to take action now

190

Effect of Microstructural Changes on Gasification Reactivity of Coal Chars during Low Temperature Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Microstructural Changes on Gasification Reactivity of Coal Chars during Low Temperature Gasification ... Pocahontas No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Beulah-Zap coal char samples were gasified in 1% O2 at 500 °C or 600 °C up to 90% (daf) conversion, and their structure were observed under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). ...

Atul Sharma; Hayato Kadooka; Takashi Kyotani; Akira Tomita

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Kinetics of steam gasification of bituminous coals in terms of their use for underground coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The kinetics of steam gasification was examined for bituminous coals of a low coal rank. The examined coals can be the raw material for underground coal gasification. Measurements were carried out under isothermal conditions at a high pressure of 4 MPa and temperatures of 800, 900, 950, and 1000 °C. Yields of gasification products such as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane were calculated based on the kinetic curves of formation reactions of these products. Also carbon conversion degrees are presented. Moreover, calculations were made of the kinetic parameters of carbon monoxide and hydrogen formation reaction in the coal gasification process. The parameters obtained during the examinations enable a preliminary assessment of coal for the process of underground coal gasification.

Stanis?aw Porada; Grzegorz Czerski; Tadeusz Dziok; Przemys?aw Grzywacz; Dorota Makowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE November 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions. The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database, a comprehensive collection of gasification plant data, describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas

193

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Submitted Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Utilization takes place during catalytic decomposition. This thesis focuses on the utilization of char as a catalyst

194

Thermochemical Conversion Research and Development: Gasification and Pyrolysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Biomass gasification and pyrolysis research and development activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

196

Apparatus for fixed bed coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for fixed-bed coal gasification is described in which coal such as caking coal is continuously pyrolyzed with clump formation inhibited, by combining the coal with a combustible gas and an oxidant, and then continually feeding the pyrolyzed coal under pressure and elevated temperature into the gasification region of a pressure vessel. The materials in the pressure vessel are allowed to react with the gasifying agents in order to allow the carbon contents of the pyrolyzed coal to be completely oxidized. The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

J Luche; Q Falcoz; T Bastien; J P Leninger; K Arabi; O Aubry; A Khacef; J M Cormier; J Lédé

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

5 - Gasification reaction kinetics for synthetic liquid fuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The gasification process is a chemically and physically complex operation. This chapter presents a description of the chemistry of gasification reactions. It also discusses the assorted reactions involved in gasification and the various thermodynamic aspects of these reactions that dictate the process parameters used to produce the various gases.

J.G. Speight

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium* Ljubisa R on the gasification in air and 3.1 kPa steam of North Dakota lignitic chars prepared under slow and rapid pyrolysis of calcium is related to its sintering via crystallite growth. (Keywords: coal; gasification; catalysis

200

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Simon Shackley #12;The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Dr Simon Shackley of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) in the United Kingdom. The objectives were to identify the main dangers

Watson, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Gasification of woody biomass Tessa Jansen (s0140600)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Gasification of woody biomass Tessa Jansen (s0140600) University of Twente Internship at SINTEF costs. So I would be working on biomass gasification and perform thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA process and char reactivity has been investigated by performing multiple gasification, pyrolysis

Luding, Stefan

202

Analysis of thermomechanical and failure behavior of refractory linings in a high temperature black liquor gasifier .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"A coupled thermal-mechanical model accounting for chemical reaction is developed and implemented into a commercial finite element code to simulate the operational behavior of a… (more)

Liang, Xiaoting, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Biomass Gasification in Fluidized Bed:? Where To Locate the Dolomite To Improve Gasification?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 5 Steam content in the flue gas vs relative amount of dolomite used for two different locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures, GR = 0.86?1.16, ... Figure 6 Low heating value of the flue gas for two locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures, GR = 0.86?1.16, ... Figure 7 Gas yield for two locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures; GR = 0.86?1.16, ...

José Corella; María-Pilar Aznar; Javier Gil; Miguel A. Caballero

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Process for fixed bed coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Selection of Coal Gasification Parameters for Injection of Gasification Products Into a Blast Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical study was performed on the influence of blast parameters on the course of the processes in the volume of a blast furnace and smelting rates by injection of low-grade coal gasification products. It w...

I. G. Tovarovsky; A. E. Merkulov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

208

Heavy metals behaviour in a gasification reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sludge coming from cleaning processes of wastewater, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) can be exploited for producing energy because of their heating value. Cleaning the produced syngas is important because of environmental troubles, ... Keywords: heavy metals, syngas, thermodynamic, waste gasification

Martino Paolucci; Carlo Borgianni; Paolo De Filippis

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Gasification characteristics of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is evaluating the gasification characteristics of Eastern oil shales as a part of a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and HYCRUDE Corporation to expand the data base on moving-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification of shale fines will improve the overall resource utilization by producing synthesis gas or hydrogen needed for the hydroretorting of oil shale and the upgrading of shale oil. Gasification characteristics of an Indiana New Albany oil shale have been determined over temperature and pressure ranges of 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Carbon conversion of over 95% was achieved within 30 minutes at gasification conditions of 1800/sup 0/F and 15 psig in a hydrogen/steam gas mixture for the Indiana New Albany oil shale. This paper presents the results of the tests conducted in a laboratory-scale batch reactor to obtain reaction rate data and in a continuous mini-bench-scale unit to obtain product yield data. 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Biomass Gasification at The Evergreen State College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification at The Evergreen State College Written by Students of the Winter 2011 Program "Applied Research: Biomass, Energy, and Environmental Justice" At The Evergreen State College, Olympia://blogs.evergreen.edu/appliedresearch/ #12; i Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction to Biomass at the Evergreen State College by Dani

211

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions.

212

Optimum Design of Coal Gasification Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the optimum design of heat recovery systems using the Texaco Coal Gasification Process (TCGP). TCGP uses an entrained type gasifier and produces hot gases at approximately 2500oF with high heat flux. This heat is removed...

Pohani, B. P.; Ray, H. P.; Wen, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

NETL: Gasification Systems and Industry Analyses Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyses Studies Analyses Studies Gasification Systems Reference Shelf – Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Table of Contents Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Gasification Systems Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies The Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants studies establish up-to-date estimates for the cost and performance of combustion and gasification based power plants as well as options for co-generating synthetic natural gas and fuels, all with and without carbon dioxide capture and storage. Several ranks of coal are being assessed in process configurations that are based on technology that could be constructed today such that the plant could be operational in the 2010 - 2015 timeframe. The analyses were performed on a consistent technical and economic basis that accurately reflects current market conditions.

214

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 SULPHUR #1SULPHUR #1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ·· HH22S (gasification) highly poisonousS (gasification) highly poisonous oxidation to SOoxidation to SO. · natural gases / raw fuel gases á H2S · unrefined oil / heavy fuel oils á small amounts of sulphur · waste-derived fuels á e.g. vulcaniser, food-derived waste (garlic, onion), "black liquor" etc. organic á sulphides

Zevenhoven, Ron

215

Fast high-pressure freezing of protein crystals in their mother liquor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Protein crystals were vitrified using high-pressure freezing in their mother liquor at 210 MPa and 77 K without cryoprotectants or oil coating. The method was successfully applied to photosystem II, which is representative of a membrane protein with a large unit cell and weak crystal contacts.

Burkhardt, A.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1 *, Yew , Krishnan Subramaniam5 , Soon-Sen Leow1 , Kenneth C. Hayes6 and Mohd Basri Wahid1 1 Malaysian Palm Oil Board, 6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang Selangor, Malaysia 2 Malaysian Palm Oil

Sinskey, Anthony J.

217

Coal properties and system operating parameters for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Through the model experiment for underground coal gasification, the influence of the properties for gasification agent and gasification methods on underground coal gasifier performance were studied. The results showed that pulsating gasification, to some extent, could improve gas quality, whereas steam gasification led to the production of high heating value gas. Oxygen-enriched air and backflow gasification failed to improve the quality of the outlet gas remarkably, but they could heighten the temperature of the gasifier quickly. According to the experiment data, the longitudinal average gasification rate along the direction of the channel in the gasifying seams was 1.212 m/d, with transverse average gasification rate 0.069 m/d. Experiment indicated that, for the oxygen-enriched steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio was 2:1, gas compositions remained stable, with H{sub 2} + CO content virtually standing between 60% and 70% and O{sub 2} content below 0.5%. The general regularities of the development of the temperature field within the underground gasifier and the reasons for the changes of gas quality were also analyzed. The 'autopneumatolysis' and methanization reaction existing in the underground gasification process were first proposed.

Yang, L. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gasification of Organosolv-lignin Over Charcoal Supported Noble Metal Salt Catalysts in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Charcoal supported metal salt catalysts showed activities for the lignin gasification at 673 K, especially the catalysts without chloride anion showed the complete gasification. The order of activity for the gasification

Aritomo Yamaguchi; Norihito Hiyoshi; Osamu Sato; Masayuki Shirai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Fixed Bed Counter Current Gasification of Mesquite and Juniper Biomass Using Air-steam as Oxidizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal gasification of biomass is being considered as one of the most promising technologies for converting biomass into gaseous fuel. Here we present results of gasification, using an adiabatic bed gasifier with air, steam as gasification medium...

Chen, Wei 1981-

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

The O{sub 2}-enriched air gasification of coal, plastics and wood in a fluidized bed reactor  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of the O{sub 2} in the gasification stream of a BFB gasifier has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main advantage of the O{sub 2}-enriched air is the increasing of the bed temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No remarkable effects on tar reduction. Decreasing of recognized PAHs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification reactions completed inside the dense bed and splashing zone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polycondensation reactions occur mainly in the freeboard region. - Abstract: The effect of oxygen-enriched air during fluidized bed co-gasification of a mixture of coal, plastics and wood has been investigated. The main components of the obtained syngas were measured by means of on-line analyzers and a gas chromatograph while those of the condensate phase were off-line analysed by means of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The characterization of condensate phase as well as that of the water used as scrubbing medium completed the performed diagnostics. The experimental results were further elaborated in order to provide material and substances flow analyses inside the plant boundaries. These analyses allowed to obtain the main substance distribution between solid, gaseous and condensate phases and to estimate the conversion efficiency of carbon and hydrogen but also to easily visualise the waste streams produced by the process. The process performance was then evaluated on the basis of parameters related to the conversion efficiency of fuels into valuable products (i.e. by considering tar and particulate as process losses) as well as those related to the energy recovery.

Mastellone, Maria Laura, E-mail: mlaura.mastellone@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences-Second University of Naples, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy); Zaccariello, Lucio; Santoro, Donato; Arena, Umberto [Department of Environmental Sciences-Second University of Naples, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

222

Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT) Place New York, New York Zip 10036 Product Company set up by UTEK specifically for its sale to Xethanol, holding the exclusive license for microgasification technology developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota. References Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT) is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT)"

223

How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » How Coal Gasification » How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work The heart of a gasification-based system is the gasifier. A gasifier converts hydrocarbon feedstock into gaseous components by applying heat under pressure in the presence of steam. A gasifier differs from a combustor in that the amount of air or oxygen available inside the gasifier is carefully controlled so that only a relatively small portion of the fuel burns completely. This "partial oxidation" process provides the heat. Rather than burning, most of the carbon-containing feedstock is chemically broken apart by the gasifier's heat and pressure, setting into motion chemical reactions that produce "syngas." Syngas is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide, but can include

224

Method for increasing steam decomposition in a coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gasification of coal in the presence of steam and oxygen is significantly enhanced by introducing a thermochemical water-splitting agent such as sulfuric acid, into the gasifier for decomposing the steam to provide additional oxygen and hydrogen usable in the gasification process for the combustion of the coal and enrichment of the gaseous gasification products. The addition of the water-splitting agent into the gasifier also allows for the operation of the reactor at a lower temperature.

Wilson, Marvin W. (Fairview, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Method for increasing steam decomposition in a coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gasification of coal in the presence of steam and oxygen is significantly enhanced by introducing a thermochemical water- splitting agent such as sulfuric acid, into the gasifier for decomposing the steam to provide additional oxygen and hydrogen usable in the gasification process for the combustion of the coal and enrichment of the gaseous gasification products. The addition of the water-splitting agent into the gasifier also allows for the operation of the reactor at a lower temperature.

Wilson, M.W.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - adiabatic fixed-bed gasification Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State University ABSTRACT Gasification is a globally emerging technology in commercial markets... of the most developed and versatile gasification technologies is based upon...

227

NETL: 2013 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Gasification Systems 2013 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifier Optimization Gas Separation Gas Separation Gasifier Optimization Gasifier Optimization Gas Cleaning Gasifier Optimization Gas Cleaning Gas Separation U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Separation Gasifier Optimization U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gasifier Optimization U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Cleaning Gasifier Optimization Gas Cleaning Gasifier Optimization Gas Separation U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Separation U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Cleaning Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Global Environmental Benefits Gas Separation Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Gas Separation Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Gas Cleaning Systems Analyses Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Systems Analyses Systems Analyses Gas Cleaning Systems Analyses Systems Analyses Systems Analyses

228

Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone (12) with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m.sup.3. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step.

Aquino, Dolores C. (Houston, TX); DaPrato, Philip L. (Westfield, NJ); Gouker, Toby R. (Baton Rouge, LA); Knoer, Peter (Houston, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 °C.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

EIS-0383: Southern Company's Orlando Gasification Project, Orlando, FL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide cost-shared funding for construction, design, and operation of a new gasification plant in Orlando, Florida.

231

Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Michigan exempts certain energy production related farm facilities from real and personal property taxes. Among exempted property are certain methane digesters, biomass gasification equipment,...

232

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal ... Structural Characterization of Coal Tar Pitches Obtained by Heat Treatment under Different Conditions ...

Robert L. McCormick; Mahesh C. Jha

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Underground coal gasification : overview of an economic and environmental evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper examines an overview of the economic and environmental aspects of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) as a viable option to the above ground Surface… (more)

Kitaka, Richard Herbertson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fluidized bed injection assembly for coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coaxial feed system for fluidized bed coal gasification processes including an inner tube for injecting particulate combustibles into a transport gas, an inner annulus about the inner tube for injecting an oxidizing gas, and an outer annulus about the inner annulus for transporting a fluidizing and cooling gas. The combustibles and oxidizing gas are discharged vertically upward directly into the combustion jet, and the fluidizing and cooling gas is discharged in a downward radial direction into the bed below the combustion jet.

Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA); Salvador, Louis A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Coal Gasification in a Transport Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These simulations were used to compare the response of coals gasified to those combusted substoichiometrically, to evaluate the optimum operating conditions and to predict the performance in larger-scale units with less heat loss. ... Entrained-flow gasifiers use high temperatures (1350?1550 °C) and gasify coals in 2?3 s. ... Kinetic studies were carried out to elucidate the mechanisms of steam and CO2 gasification of char and the interactions of these gasifying agents. ...

Lawrence J. Shadle; Esmail R. Monazam; Michael L. Swanson

2001-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The gasifier selected for development under this contract is an innovative and patented hybrid technology which combines the best features of both fixed-bed and fluidized-bed types. PyGas{trademark}, meaning Pyrolysis Gasification, is well suited for integration into advanced power cycles such as IGCC. It is also well matched to hot gas clean-up technologies currently in development. Unlike other gasification technologies, PyGas can be designed into both large and small scale systems. It is expected that partial repowering with PyGas could be done at a cost of electricity of only 2.78 cents/kWh, more economical than natural gas repowering. It is extremely unfortunate that Government funding for such a noble cause is becoming reduced to the point where current contracts must be canceled. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project was initiated to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology at a cost approaching $1,000 per kilowatt for electric power generation applications. The project was to include an innovative, advanced, air-blown, pressurized, fixed-bed, dry-bottom gasifier and a follow-on hot metal oxide gas desulfurization sub-system. To help defray the cost of testing materials, the facility was to be located at a nearby utility coal fired generating site. The patented PyGas{trademark} technology was selected via a competitive bidding process as the candidate which best fit overall DOE objectives. The paper describes the accomplishments to date.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Improved Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fac Fac ts Materials Science contact Bryan Morreale Focus Area Leader (Acting) Materials Science Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15326 412-386-5929 bryan.morreale@netl.doe.gov Partner Harbison-Walker Refractories Company Improved Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasification Systems Advances in technology are often directly linked to materials development. For

238

Interrelated Effects of Aeration and Mixed Liquor Fractions on Membrane Fouling for Submerged Membrane Bioreactor Processes in Wastewater Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interrelated Effects of Aeration and Mixed Liquor Fractions on Membrane Fouling for Submerged Membrane Bioreactor Processes in Wastewater Treatment ... using hollow fibers was applied to wastewater treated by the activated-sludge process. ...

Fengshen Fan; Hongde Zhou

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).… (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Co-gasification Reactivity of Coal and Woody Biomass in High-Temperature Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(20) Although the total pressure was 0.5 MPa and lower than the usual conditions of the gasifier, it has been confirmed that the total pressure has little influence on the gasification rate of char when the partial pressure of the gasifying agent is the same and the total pressure is less than 2 MPa. ... While the pyrolysis and the char gasification were tested separately in the above experiments, raw samples of coals, cedar bark, and the mixtures were gasified with carbon dioxide at high temperature using the PDTF facility in this section, the same as the reductor in the air-blown two-stage entrained flow coal gasifier. ...

Shiro Kajitani; Yan Zhang; Satoshi Umemoto; Masami Ashizawa; Saburo Hara

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

1 - Gasification and synthetic liquid fuel production: an overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter discusses general considerations on gasification processes and synthetic liquid fuel production. It provides an overview of state-of-the-art gasification technologies, feedstocks and applications in power generation, and synthetic fuels production, together with some recent future trends in the field.

R. Luque; J.G. Speight

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Study on the Nitric Compounds during Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This investigation involved the formation and evolution of NO? HCN and NH3 during coal gasification. Since HCN and NH3 are the precursors of NOX, their summation are considered to show the characteristics of the precursors in this paper. The experiments ... Keywords: gasification, NOX precursors, particle size, agent

Jun Xiang; Qingsen Zhao; Song Hu; Lushi Sun; Sheng Su; Kai Xu; Tengfei Lu; Gang Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Methods for sequestering carbon dioxide into alcohols via gasification fermentation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to improvements in gasification for use with synthesis gas fermentation. Further, the present invention is directed to improvements in gasification for the production of alcohols from a gaseous substrate containing at least one reducing gas containing at least one microorganism.

Gaddy, James L; Ko, Ching-Whan; Phillips, J. Randy; Slape, M. Sean

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

Pyrolysis, combustion and gasification characteristics of miscanthus and sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energetic conversion of biomass into syngas is considered as reliable energy source. In this context, biomass (miscanthus) and sewage sludge have been investigated. A simultaneous thermal analyzer and mass spectrometer was used for the characterization of samples and identified the volatiles evolved during the heating of the sample up to 1100 °C under combustion and gasification conditions. The TG and DTA results were discussed in argon, oxygen, steam and steam blended gas atmospheres. Different stages of pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples have been examined. It was shown that the combustion and gasification of char were occurred in two different temperature zones. The DTA–MS profile of the sample gives information on combustion and gasification process of the samples (ignition, peak combustion and burnout temperatures) and gases released (H2, O2, CO and CO2). The results showed that the different processes were mainly dependent on temperature. The evolution of the gas species was consistent with the weight loss of the samples during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification process. The effect of the ambiences during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples were reported. The appropriate temperature range to the sludge and miscanthus gasification was evaluated. The kinetic parameters of the biomass and sewage sludge were estimated for TGA using two models based on first-order reactions with distributed activation energies. The presence of ash in the biomass char was more influential during the gasification process.

Kandasamy Jayaraman; Iskender Gökalp

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Gasification of an Indonesian subbituminous coal in a pilot-scale coal gasification system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indonesian Roto Middle subbituminous coal was gasified in a pilot-scale dry-feeding gasification system and the produced syngas was purified...2, and 5–8% CO2. Particulates in syngas were 99.8% removed by metal f...

Yongseung Yun; Seok Woo Chung

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Wabash River Coal Gasification Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report August 2000 Work Performed Under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-92MC29310 For: The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia Prepared by: The Men and Women of Wabash River Energy Ltd. For Further Information Contact: Roy A. Dowd, CHMM Environmental Supervisor Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project 444 West Sandford Avenue West Terre Haute, IN 47885 LEGAL NOTICE/DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture pursuant to a Cooperative Agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, and neither the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering

248

A Texas project illustrates the benefits of integrated gasification  

SciTech Connect

Gasification can be an attractive option for converting a variety of petroleum feedstocks to chemicals. Natural gas is commonly sued to produce acetic acid, isocyanates, plastics, and fibers. But low-cost, bottom-of-the-barrel feeds, such as vacuum resid, petroleum coke, and asphaltenes, also can be used. In any case, gasification products include synthesis gas, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, steam, carbon dioxide, and power. The more a gasification facility is integrated with utilities and other non-core operations of a production complex, the more economical the products are for all consumers. The paper discusses gasification of natural gas, light hydrocarbons (ethane, propanes, and butanes), and heavy hydrocarbons (distillates, heavy residues, asphalts, coals, petroleum coke). The paper then describes a Texas City Gasification Project, which gasifies methane to produce carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and alcohol. The plant is integrated with a cogeneration plant. Economics are discussed.

Philcox, J. [Praxair Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Fenner, G.W. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1997-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Integration Strategy of Gasification Technology:? A Gateway to Future Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The historical evidence of the operation of a coal gasification plant goes as far back in time as 1878.1 The United State's first power plant based on coal gasification technology was installed in 1980.2 The concept of gasification has begun to attract much attention from the refining industry because of stringent environmental regulations on transportation fuel, slashing demands for fuel oils, and uncertainty in the availability of good crude oils. ... Therefore, it is a challenging task for refining industries to economically integrate gasification technology, and this is the major theme of the paper. ... Gasification is superior to many of the available power production and waste disposal technologies by addressing various issues together regarding environmental emissions, maintaining quality of refining products, and waste management. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; X. X. Zhu

2002-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Key tests set for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is about to undergo some tests. The tests will be conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in a coal seam owned by Washington Irrigation and Development Co. A much-improved UCG system has been developed by Stephens and his associates at LLNL - the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) method. Pritchard Corp., Kansas City, has done some conceptual process design and has further studied the feasibility of using the raw gas from a UCG burn as a feedstock for methanol synthesis and/or MTG gasoline. Each method was described. (DP)

Haggin, J.

1983-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

Chemical kinetics parameters of nuclear graphite gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides chemical kinetics parameters for the gasification of nuclear graphite grades of IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18 and NBG-25 and presents empirical correlations for their surface areas of free active sites as a function of mass. The kinetics parameters for the four elementary chemical reactions of gasification of these grades of nuclear graphite include the values and Gaussian distributions of the specific activation energies and the values of the pre-exponential rate coefficients for the adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO and CO2 gases. The values of these parameters and the surface area of free active sites for IG-110 and NB-25, with fine and medium petroleum coke filler particles, are nearly the same, but slightly different from those of NBG-18 and IG-430, with medium and fine coal tar pitch coke filler particles. Recommended parameters are applicable to future safety analysis of high and very high temperature gas cooled reactors in the unlikely event of a massive air ingress accident.

Mohamed S. El-Genk; Jean-Michel P. Tournier

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Site clean up of coal gasification residues  

SciTech Connect

The coal gasification plant residues tested in this research consists of various particle sizes of rock, gravel, tar-sand agglomerates, fine sand and soil. Most of the soils particles were tar free. One of the fractions examined contained over 3000 ppM polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The residues were subjected to high pressure water jet washing, float and sink tests, and soil washing. Subsequent PAH analyses found less than 1 ppM PAHs in the water jet washing water. Soils washed with pure water lowered PAH concentrations to 276 ppM; the use of surfactants decreased PAHs to 47, 200, and 240 ppM for different test conditions. In the 47 ppM test, the surfactant temperature had been increased to 80 C, suggesting that surfactant washing efficiency can be greatly improved by increasing the solution temperature. The coal tar particles were not extracted by the surfactants used. Coke and tar-sand agglomerates collected from the float and sink gravimetric separation were tested for heating value. The tar exhibited a very high heating value, while the coke had a heating value close to that of bituminous coal. These processes are believed to have the potential to clean up coal gasification plant residues at a fairly low cost, pending pilot-scale testing and a feasibility study.

Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Regeneration of FGD waste liquors: Production of ammonium and potassium sulfate mixed fertilizer. Quarterly technical report, July 1993--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Regeneration of the Fe{sup II}-EDTA scrubbing liquors for simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in flue gas involves removing the nitrogen-sulfur (N-S) compounds accumulated in the liquor. In this paper, the authors investigated a simple regeneration process which selectively precipitates the N-S compounds as potassium salts and then hydrolyzes them to yield ammonium/potassium sulfate as a marketable byproduct. They believe this is the first report on precipitation and hydrolysis characteristics of the N-S compounds in actual waste scrubbing liquor. Precipitation of the N-S compounds was achieved by adding K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to the scrubbing liquor. Effects of the amount of added K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} on the amount of removed N-S compounds, precipitated crystals, and the potassium left over in the scrubbing liquor were studied. Hydrolysis of the precipitated N-S compounds to ammonium sulfate was performed in a sulfuric acid environment. Effects of acidity, concentration of N-S compounds, and temperature on the hydrolysis are discussed. Analysis of the observed hydrolysis pattern showed that the reaction proceeded following first order kinetics in terms of N-S compound concentration.

Randolph, A.D.; Kwon, T.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Plasma gasification of waste as a method of energy saving  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several versions of the organizations of the process of plasma-chemical gasification with the use of air, carbon dioxide, steam and their mixtures as the plasma-forming gas are considered in the presentation. The results of the calculation-theoretical evaluations of the quality of synthesis gas and efficiency of gasification, and also the results of experiments on plasma gasification of wood waste carried out on the experimental IEE RAS test-bench are given. The results of calculations are compared with experimental data.

V E Popov; A N Bratsev; V A Kuznetsov; S V Shtengel; A A Ufimtsev

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification 1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA's) project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 5, 2013

258

Reducing NO[sub x] emissions from magnesium sulfite liquor boilers  

SciTech Connect

The Current design of liquor-combustion boilers is reviewed, along with options for lowering exhaust-gas emissions, particularly NOx. In many cases, modern boilers are being operated at or near optimal conditions for minimum NOx emissions. Possible upgrades to further reduce NOx emissions include addition of a selective noncatalytic reduction step, design modifications to lower the sectional load, a flue-gas recirculation system, and air staging. Calculated and experimental results show that these applications can lower NOx emissions by 40% or more.

Bobik, M. (Austrian Energy and Environment, Graz (Austria))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Project Summary Full Title: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass, without and with Carbon Capture and Storage Project ID: 226 Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Keywords: Biomass; Fischer Tropsch; hydrogen Purpose Develop and analyze process designs for gasification-based thermochemical conversion of switchgrass into Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, dimethyl ether (DME), and hydrogen. All process designs will have some level of co-production of electricity, and some will include capture of byproduct CO2 for underground storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Organization: Princeton University Telephone: 609-258-4966 Email: elarson@princeton.edu

260

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Ronald Breault Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4486 ronald.breault@netl.doe.gov Herbert E. andrus, Jr. Principal Investigator ALSTOM Power 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 860-285-4770 herbert.e.andrus@power.alstom.com Hybrid Combustion-GasifiCation CHemiCal loopinG Coal power teCHnoloGy development Description Gasification technologies can provide a stable, affordable energy supply for the nation, while also providing high efficiencies and near zero pollutants. With coal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gasification of waste rigid polyurethane foam: optimizing operational conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of temperature and catalyst type on production of combustible gas during the air gasification of waste rigid polyurethane foam has been...16 (43...) of three parameters was employed to optimize the...

Xiaoya Guo; Lixin Wang; Shouguang Li…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Underground coal gasification: a brief review of current status  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification is a promising option for the future use of coal. Similarly to gasification in industrial reactors, underground coal gasification (UCG) produces syngas, which can be used for power generation or for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels and other valuable chemical products. As compared with conventional mining and surface gasification, UCG promises lower capital/operating costs and also has other advantages, such as no human labor underground. In addition, UCG has the potential to be linked with carbon capture and sequestration. The increasing demand for energy, depletion of oil and gas resources, and threat of global climate change lead to growing interest in UCG throughout the world. In this article, we review the current status of this technology, focusing on recent developments in various countries.

Shafirovich, E.; Varma, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Biomass Gasification for Electricity and Fuels , Large Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is commonly agreed that gasification of biomass has a large potential for a more sustainable energy system in the future. However, a lot of research and demonstration efforts have been carried out during t...

Dr. Hermann Hofbauer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Biomass Gasification for Electricity and Fuels , Large Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is commonly agreed that gasification of biomass has a large potential for a more sustainable energy system in the future. However, a lot of research and demonstration efforts have been carried out during t...

Dr. Hermann Hofbauer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Thermodynamic Analysis of the Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The focus here is on biomass-water reacting system. The reaction process (gasification) is aimed at producing a syngas rich in combustible species, such as H2, CH4 and CO. According to the syngas final use (burner

Luca Fiori; Daniele Castello

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Gasification characteristics and kinetics for an eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Gasification tests of Indiana New Albany oil shale fines have been conducted. Thermobalance test results indicate that over 95% of the organic carbon in the shale can be gasified at 1700{degree}F and 135 psig with 30 minutes residence time under a synthesis gas atmosphere and at 1800{degree}F and 15 psig with 30 minutes residence time under a hydrogen/steam atmosphere. A simple kinetic expression for hydrogen/steam gasification weight loss has been developed. Weight loss has been described as the sum of the weight loss from two independent, simultaneous reaction paths: a rapid (<2 minutes) first order reaction and a slower gasification reaction that can be expressed in terms of the steam/carbon reaction. Work is in progress to study the gasification of other Eastern shales and improve the kinetic description of weight loss.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification may be an attractive alternative for converting heavy oil residue – petroleum coke into valuable synthetic gas. Due to the low reactivity of petroleum coke, it is maybe preferable to convert it in combination with other fuels such as biomass. Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass was studied in an atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed reactor and a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) at KTH Royal University of Technology. Biomass ash in the blends was found to have a catalytic effect on the reactivity of petroleum coke during co-gasification. Furthermore, this synergetic effect between biomass and petcoke was observed in the kinetics data. The activation energy Ea determined from the Arrhenius law for pure petcoke steam gasification in the TGA was 121.5 kJ/mol, whereas for the 50/50 mixture it was 96.3, and for the 20/80 blend – 83.5 kJ/mol.

Vera Nemanova; Araz Abedini; Truls Liliedahl; Klas Engvall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Storing Syngas Lowers the Carbon Price for Profitable Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are currently eight gasification facilities operating worldwide producing about 1.7 GW of electricity from coal or petcoke feedstock (10), and in all of these facilities, the syngas is used immediately after it is produced. ...

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Materials Challenges for Advanced Combustion and Gasification Fossil Energy Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through gasification, carbonaceous feedstock such as coal, petroleum coke (petcoke), and biomass is converted into synthesis...12–18] through, e.g., combustion or electrochemical conversion in fuel cells. Syngas ...

S. Sridhar; P. Rozzelle; B. Morreale…

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gasification and combustion modeling for porous char particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification and combustion of porous char particles occurs in many industrial applications. Reactor-scale outputs of importance depend critically on processes that occur at the particle-scale. Because char particles often ...

Singer, Simcha Lev

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This independent review report assesses the 2009 state-of-the-art and 2020 projected capital cost, energy efficiency, and levelized cost for hydrogen production from biomass via gasification.

273

Wood Gasification: Where It's At, Where It's Going  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the principles and practice of various designs of biomass/wood gasifiers. In general, the basic principle of gasification is reviewed. A look at existing gasifier schemes, including packed bed updraft, downdraft, and fluidized...

Murphy, M. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification is a thermo-chemical process which transforms biomass into valuable synthesis gas. Integrated with a biorefinery it can address the facility’s residue handling challenges and input demands. A number of feedstock, technology, oxidizer...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

Simulation of biomass gasification in a dual fluidized bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass gasification with steam in a dual-fluidized bed gasifier (DFBG) was simulated with ASPEN Plus. ... that the content of char transferred from the gasifier to the combustor decreases from 22.5...2 concentra...

Jie He; Kristina Göransson; Ulf Söderlind…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Downdraft Gasification Of Various Biomass Feedstocks For Energy Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Gasification of biomass for energy production has the potential to be a cost effective and environmentally sustainable technology. Small scale, 20-250 kWth, downdraft gasifiers… (more)

Roesch, Hans Patric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

278

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations, Papers, and Publications Presentations, Papers, and Publications ITM Oxygen Development for Advanced Oxygen Supply (Oct 2011) Ted Foster, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. presented at the Gasification Technologies Conference, San Francisco, CA Oct 9-12, 2011. ASU/IGCC Integration Strategies (Oct 2009), David McCarthy, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Taking the Next Step (Oct 2009), VanEric Stein, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Scaling Up a Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Technology (Oct 2006) Philip Armstrong, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2006 Gasification Technologies Conference, Washington, D.C. ITM Oxygen: The New Oxygen Supply for the New IGCC Market (Oct 2005)

279

NETL: Gasification - Systems and Industry Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&P Technologies Gas Hydrates T&D and Refining Contacts E&P Technologies Gas Hydrates T&D and Refining Contacts Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification Turbines Fuel Cells FutureGen Advanced Research Contacts Industrial Capture & Storage Carbon Sequestration Program Overview Core R&D Infrastructure Global Collaborations FAQs Reference Shelf Contacts Hydrogen & Clean Fuels Hydrogen-from-Coal RD&D Contacts ENERGY ANALYSIS About Us Search Products Contacts SMART GRID ANALYSIS BASELINE STUDIES NETL-RUA About NETL-RUA Research Technology Transfer Business Development Education News & Events Contacts Members Only Access TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER Available Technologies How to Partner Outreach Contacts SOLICITATIONS & BUSINESS Solicitations & Funding Opps. Related Links & Forms CDP/Financial Asst. Resources Unsolicited Proposals Available NETL Property Business Alert Notification IRS Tax Credit Program NETL Business Contacts

280

Heat exchanger for coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a heat exchanger, particularly useful for systems requiring cooling of hot particulate solids, such as the separated fines from the product gas of a carbonaceous material gasification system. The invention allows effective cooling of a hot particulate in a particle stream (made up of hot particulate and a gas), using gravity as the motive source of the hot particulate. In a preferred form, the invention substitutes a tube structure for the single wall tube of a heat exchanger. The tube structure comprises a tube with a core disposed within, forming a cavity between the tube and the core, and vanes in the cavity which form a flow path through which the hot particulate falls. The outside of the tube is in contact with the cooling fluid of the heat exchanger.

Blasiole, George A. (Greensburg, PA)

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

SciTech Connect

With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

NETL: Gasification Systems - Conversion and Fouling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion and Fouling Conversion and Fouling NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 3 Project Description The objective for this NETL in-house conversion and fouling project is to improve the reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM) of gasification plants by providing tools that can be used to evaluate the impact that fuel properties have on slag and refractory interaction, and to reduce plugging and fouling throughout the syngas cooling system. Utilizing these tools will aid in minimizing plugging and fouling-increasing overall plant efficiency due to improved heat transfer in heat exchangers. Particle deposition experimental schematic Particle deposition experimental schematic (click to enlarge) Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits

284

Steam gasification of various feedstocks at a dual fluidised bed gasifier: Impacts of operation conditions and bed materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of biomass is an attractive technology for...2, CO, CO2 and CH4. The DFB steam gasification process has been developed at Vienna University ... fuel moisture content, steam/fuel ratio and gasification

Christoph Pfeifer; Stefan Koppatz; Hermann Hofbauer

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control With Monolith Traps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Technologies Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Jenny Tennant Technology/Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Michael Swanson Principal Investigator University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 15 North 23rd Street Grand Forks, ND 58202 701-777-5239 MSwanson@undeerc.org PARTNERS Corning, Inc. PROJECT DURATION

286

Updraft Gasification at Pilot Scale of Hydrolytic Lignin Residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air at a low equivalence ratio was used as gasification medium. ... Air, oxygen, steam, or mixes of these can be used as gasification media; the gas flow is introduced at the bottom of the gasifier under the grate. ... The coalescence is achieved by means of cartridges of silicate of 0.3 m × 0.07 m in size placed inside the filters (from Pall Corp.). ...

N. Cerone; F. Zimbardi; L. Contuzzi; E. Alvino; M. O. Carnevale; V. Valerio

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) demonstration test  

SciTech Connect

As concern about the environment generates interest in ultra-clean energy plants, fuel cell power plants can respond to the challenge. Fuel cells convert hydrocarbon fuels to electricity at efficiencies exceeding conventional heat engine technologies while generating extremely low emissions. Emissions of SOx and NOx are expected to be well below current and anticipated future standards. Nitrogen oxides, a product of combustion, will be extremely low in this power plant because power is produced electrochemically rather than by combustion. Due to its higher efficiencies, a fuel cell power plant also produces less carbon dioxide. Fuel cells in combination with coal gasification, are an efficient and environmentally acceptable means to utilize the abundant coal reserves both in the US and around the world. To demonstrate this technology, FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), is planning to build and test a 2-MW Fuel Cell Power Plant for operation on coal derived gas. This power plant is based on Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{trademark}) technology and will be part of a Clean Coal V IGCC project supported by the US DOE. A British Gas Lurgi (BGL) slagging fixed-bed gasification system with cold gas clean up is planned as part of a 400 MW IGCC power plant to provide a fuel gas slip stream to the fuel cell. The IGFC power plant will be built by Kentucky Pioneer Energy, A subsidiary of Global Energy, in Clark County, KY. This demonstration will result in the world's largest fuel cell power plant operating on coal derived gas. The objective of this test is to demonstrate fuel cell operation on coal derived gas at a commercial scale and to verify the efficiency and environmental benefits.

Steinfeld, G.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Sanderson, R.; Abens, S.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Gasification Studies Task 4 Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

A key objective of the Task 4 activities has been to develop simulation tools to support development, troubleshooting and optimization of pressurized entrained-flow coal gasifiers. The overall gasifier models (Subtask 4.1) combine submodels for fluid flow (Subtask 4.2) and heat transfer (Subtask 4.3) with fundamental understanding of the chemical processes (Subtask 4.4) processes that take place as coal particles are converted to synthesis gas and slag. However, it is important to be able to compare predictions from the models against data obtained from actual operating coal gasifiers, and Subtask 4.6 aims to provide an accessible, non-proprietary system, which can be operated over a wide range of conditions to provide well-characterized data for model validation. Highlights of this work include: • Verification and validation activities performed with the Arches coal gasification simulation tool on experimental data from the CANMET gasifier (Subtask 4.1). • The simulation of multiphase reacting flows with coal particles including detailed gas-phase chemistry calculations using an extension of the one-dimensional turbulence model’s capability (Subtask 4.2). • The demonstration and implementation of the Reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) radiation algorithm in the ARCHES code (Subtask 4.3). • Determination of steam and CO{sub 2} gasification kinetics of bituminous coal chars at high temperature and elevated pressure under entrained-flow conditions (Subtask 4.4). In addition, attempts were made to gain insight into the chemical structure differences between young and mature coal soot, but both NMR and TEM characterization efforts were hampered by the highly reacted nature of the soot. • The development, operation, and demonstration of in-situ gas phase measurements from the University of Utah’s pilot-scale entrained-flow coal gasifier (EFG) (Subtask 4.6). This subtask aimed at acquiring predictable, consistent performance and characterizing the environment within the gasifier.

Whitty, Kevin; Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald; Smith, Philip; Sutherland, James; Thornock, Jeremy; Boshayeshi, Babak; Hunsacker, Isaac; Lewis, Aaron; Waind, Travis; Kelly, Kerry

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NETL: Gasification Systems - Syngas Processing Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Gasification Systems Syngas Processing Systems The various downstream uses of syngas require that most of the contaminants present in raw syngas be removed to very low levels prior to use. Many of these contaminants can contribute to erosion, corrosion, and loss of strength in gas turbine components, and can act as poisons to the catalysts often used in syngas conversion and utilization processes. These same contaminants include or result in regulated air pollutants such as SOx, NOx, particulates, and mercury and other trace metals, which must be removed to increasingly low levels to meet stringent regulatory limits on air emissions. Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. However, after contaminant removal, the gas has to be reheated prior to its use in a gas turbine or other chemical synthesis process; in the case of downstream hydrogen production, additional steam needs to be added back to the syngas. These process swings adversely impact the plant's thermal efficiency and cost. Techno-economic analysis shows that gas-cleaning processes amenable to higher operating temperatures could significantly reduce this efficiency loss and improve the gasification plant's commercial viability. It is also critical that, while improving efficiency and reducing cost, the gas cleaning removes a wide variety of coal contaminants (including hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and carbonyl sulfide, as well as various forms of trace metals, including arsenic, mercury, selenium, and cadmium) to extremely low levels. Accordingly, the R&D approach in this area focuses on the development of high-efficiency processes that operate at moderate to high temperatures and provide multi-contaminant control to meet the highest environmental standards.

290

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

291

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

292

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Conceptual design report -- Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)  

SciTech Connect

The problems heretofore with coal gasification and IGCC concepts have been their high cost and historical poor performance of fixed-bed gasifiers, particularly on caking coals. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project is being developed to solve these problems through the development of a novel coal gasification invention which incorporates pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification (fixed-bed). It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration caused in the conventional process of gradually heating coal through the 400 F to 900 F range. In so doing, the coal is rapidly heated sufficiently such that the coal tar exists in gaseous form rather than as a liquid. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can become chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NH{sub 3} and HCN from fuel born nitrogen, steam injection is minimized, and residual nitrogen compounds are partially chemically reduced in the cracking stage in the upper gasifier region. Assuming testing confirms successful deployment of all these integrated processes, future IGCC applications will be much simplified, require significantly less mechanical components, and will likely achieve the $1,000/kWe commercialized system cost goal of the GPIF project. This report describes the process and its operation, design of the plant and equipment, site requirements, and the cost and schedule. 23 refs., 45 figs., 23 tabs.

Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; House, L.S.; Duck, R.R. [CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Lisauskas, R.A.; Dixit, V.J. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States); Morgan, M.E.; Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States). PowerServe Div.; Boni, A.A. [PSI-Environmental Instruments Corp., Andover, MA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, William R. (Livermore, CA); Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course  

SciTech Connect

Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Kevin Galbreath

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Forward and reverse combustion gasification of coal with production of high-quality syngas in a simulated pilot system for in situ gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This research focused on the feasibility and stability of applying the forward and reverse combustion approach to the in situ gasification of lignite and bituminous coal with oxygen or oxygen–steam mixtures as gasification agents, especially reverse combustion gasification. A high-quality syngas (H2 and CO) could be obtained using the reverse combustion gasification technique combined with forward combustion gasification in a pilot system for in situ gasification. The gasification time was extended more than 25% using the reverse combustion approach. The controlling conditions for reverse combustion gasification were obtained by comparing and analyzing experimental data. The results show the relationship between the inject gas flow within certain limits and velocity of the gasification flame was linear during reverse combustion. The underground conditions of the coal seam and strata were simulated in a pilot-scale underground gasifier during experiments. The combustion gasification of coal was carried out experimentally for over 5 days. The average effective content (H2 and CO) of syngas was in the range of 60–70%, meeting the requirement of synthesis gas. The optimal ranges of gasifying lignite and bituminous coal were found to be 1.5–2.0 and 1.3–1.75, respectively. The product gas flow was proportional to oxygen blast. These are expected to provide useful guidance on practical underground coal gasification operations and to give experimental evidence in support of theory.

Yong Cui; Jie Liang; Zhangqing Wang; Xiaochun Zhang; Chenzi Fan; Dongyu Liang; Xuan Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Application of the integrated gasification combined cycle technology and BGL gasification design for power generation  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology promises to be the power generation technology of choice in the late 1990s and beyond. Based on the principle that almost any fuel can be burned more cleanly and efficiently if first turned into a gas, an IGCC plant extracts more electricity from a ton of coal by burning it as a gas in a turbine rather than as a solid in a boiler. Accordingly, coal gasification is the process of converting coal to a clean-burning synthetic gas. IGCC technology is the integration of the coal-gasification plant with a conventional combined-cycle plant to produce electricity. The benefits of this technology merger are many and result in a highly efficient and environmentally superior energy production facility. The lGCC technology holds significant implications for Asia-Pacific countries and for other parts of the world. High-growth regions require additional baseload capacity. Current low prices for natural gas and minimal emissions that result from its use for power generation favor its selection as the fuel source for new power generation capacity. However, fluctuations in fuel price and fuel availability are undermining the industry`s confidence in planning future capacity based upon gas-fueled generation. With the world`s vast coal reserves, there is a continuing effort to provide coal-fueled power generation technologies that use coal cleanly and efficiently. The lGCC technology accomplishes this objective. This chapter provides a summary of the status of lGCC technology and lGCC projects known to date. It also will present a technical overview of the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) technology, one of the leading and most promising coal gasifier designs.

Edmonds, R.F. Jr.; Hulkowich, G.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD waste liquors. First quarterly technical report, [January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

Hydrolysis of Nitrogen-Sulfur Containing Compounds (N-SCC) derived from desulfurization liquors was carried out at high temperature and pressure with varying sulfuric acid concentration in order to determine the influence of temperature and acid concentration on time required for complete hydrolysis. An ammonia specific electrode (gas sensing) was used to monitor the concentration of ammonium ion in the hydrolyzed liquor. The results indicated a large shortening of time for complete hydrolysis of the Ca salt of N-SCC but varying acid concentration did influence the rate of hydrolysis. Since the physical-chemical analysis of the N-SCC obtained by re-liming the waste scrubbing liquor (containing the Fe-EDTA complex) was found to contain a high quantity of sodium, the N-SCC is believed to be a double salt of calcium and sodium. The final product, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, was obtained in experimentation using an evaporative crystallizer. The clean hydrolyzed liquor was neutralized with a strong NH{sub 2} solution before the final crystallization of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

Randolph, A.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Unrau, E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gasification characteristics of combustible wastes in a 5 ton/day fixed bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification characteristics of combustible wastes were determined in ... To capture soot or unburned carbon from the gasification reaction, solid/gas separator and water fluidized...2: 10.7%, CH4: 6.0%, CO2:...

See Hoon Lee; Kyong Bin Choi; Jae Goo Lee…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - allothermal gasification gas- Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the gasifer, could cause... 2002. 13. Hansen, Martin, Gas Cleaning and Gas Engines for Small-Scale Biomass Gasification... , Orlando, Florida, USA NAWTEC18-3521 STATUS OF...

302

Experimental Study on Gasification of Jatropha Shells in a Downdraft Open Top Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few major attractions of gasification are that it can convert waste or low-priced fuels, such as biomass, coal, and petcoke, into high-value chemicals. Utilization of...4]. Biomass gasification is the latest ge...

Lalta Prasad

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The development of Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carried-Heat Partial Gasification Combined cycle is a novel combined cycle which was proposed by Thermal Engineering Department ... technology, Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle, as the imp...

Li Zhao; Xiangdong Xu

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Simulation of Bio-syngas Production from Biomass Gasification via Pressurized Interconnected Fluidized Beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bio-syngas production from biomass gasification via pressurized interconnected fluidized...T g), gasification pressure (p g) and steam to biomass ratio (S/B) on bio-syngas production

Fei Feng; Guohui Song; Laihong Shen…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Syngas Production from Coal Gasification with CO2 Rich Gas Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification with CO2 rich gas mixture is one of several promising new technologies associated with CO2 reduction in the atmosphere. Coal gasification with high CO2 concentration is suitable for producing la...

M. S. Alam; A. T. Wijayanta; K. Nakaso…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

307

Reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors by the addition of pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors which can be accomplished by the addition of pulverized coal to increase the heat content and generate the proper reducing conditions. Samples from a 78%-yield sodium bisulfite pulping process employing a hardwood furnish were mixed with 10-50% pulveriized coal and burned at 950[degrees]C under reducing conditions in a box furnace. Even in these uncontrolled combustion conditions 76. 5% of the sulfur found in the soluble portion of the smelt was converted from lignousulfonates to useful sulfide ion. For the remainder of the sulfur, analyses determined it to be 19. 5% as sulfite ion, 3. 1% as thiosulfate ion, and 0.9% as sulfate ion.

Sell, N.J.; Norman, J.C. (Natural and Applied Sciences, Univ. of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Green Bay, WI (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fluidized-bed gasification of an eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The current conceptual HYTORT process design for the hydroretorting of oil shales employs moving-bed retorts that utilize shale particles larger than 3 mm. Work at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is in progress to investigate the potential of high-temperature (1100 to 1300 K) fluidized-bed gasification of shale fines (<3 mm size) using steam and oxygen as a technique for more complete utilization of the resource. Synthesis gas produced from fines gasification can be used for making some of the hydrogen needed in the HYTORT process. After completing laboratory-scale batch and continuous gasification tests with several Eastern oil shales, two tests with Indiana New Albany shale were conducted in a 0.2 m diameter fluidized-bed gasification process development unit (PDU). A conceptual gasifier design for 95% carbon conversion was completed. Gasification of 20% of the mined shale can produce the hydrogen required by the HYTORT reactor to retort 80% of the remaining shale. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research  

SciTech Connect

This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frdric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani, Laurent Fulcheri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Waste Gasification by Thermal Plasma: A Review Frédéric Fabry*, Christophe Rehmet, Vandad Rohani proposes an overview of waste-to-energy conversion by gasification processes based on thermal plasma, of various waste gasification processes based on thermal plasma (DC or AC plasma torches) at lab scale versus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

311

Formation of CO precursors during char gasification with O2, CO2 and H2O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of CO precursors during char gasification with O2, CO2 and H2O Alejandro Montoya a are presented to get insight into an unified mechanism of uncatalyzed carbon gasification. D 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Gasification; Chemisorption; Molecular simulation; Surface

Truong, Thanh N.

312

Mar., 1955 GASIFICATIONOF CARBONRODSWITH CARBONDIOXIDE 241 GASIFICATION OF CARBON RODS WITH CARBON DIOXIDE1*2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar., 1955 GASIFICATIONOF CARBONRODSWITH CARBONDIOXIDE 241 GASIFICATION OF CARBON RODS WITH CARBON commercial carbons and their gasification rates with carbon dioxide at a series of temperatures between 900. No general correlation between these properties and the carbon gasification rates was found. Introduction

313

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies ... This paper presents a theoretical assessment of energy, exergy, and syngas cleaning performances in a biomass gasification combined heat and power (CHP) plant with varying operating parameters. ... The analysis is carried out using a detailed model of a biomass gasification CHP plant developed with Aspen Plus. ...

Jessica François; Guillain Mauviel; Michel Feidt; Caroline Rogaume; Yann Rogaume; Olivier Mirgaux; Fabrice Patisson; Anthony Dufour

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using ASPEN. ASPEN is a steady-state chemical process-flow Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. This study aims at developing a base case analysis

Frey, H. Christopher

315

Stability of Supported Ruthenium Catalysts for Lignin Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, low-temperature methods for lignin gasification are desirable, because waste heat available from high-temperature processes in industry can be utilized for energy generation.1 ... The gasification of lignin proceeded in supercritical water, and all lignin was gasified completely over Ru/TiO2 after 180 min during the first use. ... water for gasification technique of wastes. ...

Mitsumasa Osada; Osamu Sato; Kunio Arai; Masayuki Shirai

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size ... Plasma gasification is widely applied because of its clean syngas production performance and high chemical reactivity accelerated by the free radicals produced by plasma. ... The syngas composition produced from plasma gasification at same conditions is affected by the physicochemical properties of coals. ...

Sang Jun Yoon; Jae Goo Lee

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

ADVANCED GASIFICATION NETL Team Technical Coordinator: James Bennett  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION NETL Team Technical Coordinator: James Bennett GASIFICATION NETL Team Technical Coordinator: James Bennett Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Bhattacharyya, Debangsu CO-PI WVU Turton, Richard CO-PI WVU Jones, Dustin Grad Student WVU Weiland, Nathan PI WVU C3M Kinetic Development Baseline Co-Gasification Kinetics Support Turton, Richard PI WVU Chaudhari, Kiran Grad Student WVU Pisupati, Sarma PI PSU Devolatilization and Char Kinetics Support Song, Xueyan PI WVU Different Gasifier Liner Wear Support Song, Xueyan PI WVU High Vanadium Oxide Study Support Musser, Jordan PI WVU Implement Heat & Mass Transfer to MFIX-PIC Support Dietiker, Jean- Francois PI WVU MFIX Development Verification and Validation Support Kuhlman, John PI WVU Model Development Support Weiland, Nathan PI WVU Bedick, Clinton Researcher

318

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and Fuel Cells for Farming Operations Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and Fuel Cells for Farming Operations Project Summary Full Title: Opportunities for Hydrogen: An Analysis of the Application of Biomass Gasification to Farming Operations Using Microturbines and Fuel Cells Project ID: 133 Principal Investigator: Darren Schmidt Purpose To determine the feasibility of a hydrogen based biomass fueled power installation for farming operations. Performer Principal Investigator: Darren Schmidt Organization: University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center Address: 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Telephone: 701-777-5120 Email: dschmidt@undeerc.org Additional Performers: J.R Gunderson, University of North Dakota Period of Performance Start: June 1999

319

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility National Carbon Capture Center Participants The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. The PSDF now houses the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to address the nation's need for cost-effective, commercially viable CO2 capture options for flue gas from pulverized coal power plants and syngas from coal gasification power plants. The NCCC focuses national efforts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through technological innovation, and serve as a neutral test center for emerging carbon capture technologies. PSDF-NCCC Background

320

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-99FT40675; W(A)-03-001, CH-1127 The Petitioner, ChevronTexaco Worldwide Power & Gasification (ChevronTexaco) is a subcontractor to Research Triangle Institute (RTI) under the subject cost plus fixed fee agreement for the performance of work entitled, Novel Technologies for Gaseous Containment Control. The purpose of the agreement is to prove the feasibility of synthesis gas clean up techniques, including the warm synthesis gas process based on the RVS-1 sorbent developed by the Department of Energy and RTI and, for reverse selective membrane technology developed by Dupont and Air Liquide, Membrane Dupont Air Liquide (MEDAL) and RTI.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Thermophysical models of underground coal gasification and FEM analysis  

SciTech Connect

In this study, mathematical models of the coupled thermohydromechanical process of coal rock mass in an underground coal gasification panel are established. Combined with the calculation example, the influence of heating effects on the observed values and simulated values for pore water pressure, stress, and displacement in the gasification panel are fully discussed and analyzed. Calculation results indicate that 38, 62, and 96 days after the experiment, the average relative errors for the calculated values and measured values for the temperature and water pressure were between 8.51-11.14% and 3-10%, respectively; with the passage of gasification time, the calculated errors for the vertical stress and horizontal stress gradually declined, but the simulated errors for the horizontal and vertical displacements both showed a rising trend. On the basis of the research results, the calculated values and the measured values agree with each other very well.

Yang, L.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas-phase chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas: Coal gasification Carbon gasification Detailed chemistry Heterogeneous surface reactions Radiation Multi-physics numerical modeling a b s t r a c t Fuel synthesis through coal and biomass gasification

Qiao, Li

323

Synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from the gasification products of oil shale from the Leningrad and Kashpir deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experimental results of the gasification of oil shale from the Leningrad and Kashpir deposits and...

T. A. Avakyan; Yu. A. Strizhakova; A. S. Malinovskii; A. L. Lapidus

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Flow Simulation and Optimization of Plasma Reactors for Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a 3-d numerical simulation system to analyze the complicated flow in plasma reactors for coal gasification, which involve complex chemical reaction, two-phase flow and plasma effect. On the basis of analytic results, the distribution of the density, temperature and components' concentration are obtained and a different plasma reactor configuration is proposed to optimize the flow parameters. The numerical simulation results show an improved conversion ratio of the coal gasification. Different kinds of chemical reaction models are used to simulate the complex flow inside the reactor. It can be concluded that the numerical simulation system can be very useful for the design and optimization of the plasma reactor.

Ji Chunjun; Zhang Yingzi; Ma Tengcai

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Release of Fuel-Bound Nitrogen during Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of four biomass feedstocks (leucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass) with significantly different fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) content was investigated to determine the effects of operational parameters and nitrogen content of biomass on the partitioning of FBN among nitrogenous gas species. ... The present study attempts to clarify the effects of gasification conditions and fuel on the release and evolution of biomass FBN through parallel experiments utilizing four different biomass feedstocks having significantly different FBN contents. ... Four types of biomass feedstocks were used in the experimentsleucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass. ...

Jiachun Zhou; Stephen M. Masutani; Darren M. Ishimura; Scott Q. Turn; Charles M. Kinoshita

2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser  

SciTech Connect

In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

Breault, Ronald W [U.S. DOE; Li, Tingwen [URS; Nicoletti, Phillip [URS

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 16. Gasification of 2-inch Minnesota peat sods  

SciTech Connect

A single, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scubber used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and government agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) group. This report is the sixteenth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific test report describes the gasification of two-inch Minnesota peat sods, which began on June 24, 1985 and was completed on June 27, 1985. 4 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY (B&W)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY (B&W) BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY (B&W) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO.. DE-FC36-94GO 10002; W(A)-94-030; CH-0847 This waiver request is for domestic and foreign rights for all subject inventions made by the Babcock & Wilcox Company's (B&W's) employees under the subject cooperative agreement. The object of the work to be performed under this cooperative agreement is to develop technologies to improve high solids firing of black liquor in pulp mill recovery boilers or to recover kraft pulping or mill process chemicals by alternate means involving black liquor gasification. Principally, the work involves evaluating and selecting either the high solids advanced combustion or black liquor gasification technology, designing, constructing and using a pilot scale unit to develop

329

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

green waste for use in a biomass gasification process togasification method to process some of the 1.4 million tons of wastegasification / power generation model, accessed April 2008 from http://biomass.ucdavis.edu/calculator.html 10. California Integrated Waste

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Advances in mathematical modeling of fluidized bed gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of solid fuel into the gas which contains mainly hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen. In gasification, fluidized bed technology is widely used due to its various advantageous features which include high heat transfer, uniform and controllable temperature and favorable gas–solid contacting. Modeling and simulation of fluidized bed gasification is useful for optimizing the gasifier design and operation with minimal temporal and financial cost. The present work investigates the different modeling approaches applied to the fluidized bed gasification systems. These models are broadly classified as the equilibrium model and the rate based or kinetic model. On the other hand, depending on the description of the hydrodynamic of the bed, fluidized bed models may also be classified as the two-phase flow model, the Euler–Euler model and the Euler–Lagrange model. Mathematical formulation of each of the model mentioned above and their merits and demerits are discussed. Detail reviews of different model used by different researchers with major results obtained by them are presented while the special focus is given on Euler–Euler and Euler–Lagrange CFD models.

Chanchal Loha; Sai Gu; Juray De Wilde; Pinakeswar Mahanta; Pradip K. Chatterjee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 2A—Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Santosh Gangwal, Director–Business Development, Energy Technologies, Southern Research Institute

332

Gasification characteristics and kinetics for an Eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Gasification reactivity of an Eastern oil shale was studied in a three-year research project under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, and HYCRUDE Corp. to expand the data base on the hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification tests were conducted with the Indiana New Albany oil shale during the first year of the program. A total of six Eastern oil shales are planned to be tested during the program. A laboratory thermobalance and a 2-inch diameter fluidized bed were used to conduct gasification tests with Indiana New Albany oil shale. Temperature and pressure ranges used were 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Fifteen thermobalance tests were made in hydrogen/steam and synthesis gas/steam mixtures. Six fluidized-bed tests were made in the same synthesis gas/steam mixture. Carbon conversions as high as 95% were achieved. Thermobalance test results and a kinetic description of weight loss during hydrogen/steam gasification are presented. 14 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

334

Underground Gasification: An Alternate Way to Exploit Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quality of the product gas were pre-dictable...spec-ulate that the cost of gas from the Soviet process...gasification could allow gas to leak out of the chamber...future, and the sole remaining question will be the economics...how it affects marine life are among the most complex...

THOMAs H. MAUGH II

1977-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIS-0409: Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Mississippi  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide funding for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project in Kemper County, Mississippi to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project proposed by Southern Power Company, through its affiliate Mississippi Power Company, which has been selected by DOE for consideration under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program.

336

Prospects for the Gasification of Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluidized-bed gasification of wood waste is now a commercially proven technology. An Omnifuel gasifier in Hearst, Ontario, has been in operation since early 1981. It produces a low-BTU gas which is used to displace natural gas in existing boilers...

Woodruff, K. L.; Guard, R. F. W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

EIS-0072: Great Plains Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Fossil Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the impacts of a project to construct a 125 million cubic feet per day coal gasification facility located in Mercer County, North Dakota. The Office of Fossil Energy adopted three environmental impact evaluation documents prepared by other Federal agencies to develop this EIS.

338

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC20  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coal. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of the first demonstration of the Transport Gasifier following significant modifications of the gasifier configuration. This demonstration took place during test campaign TC20, occurring from August 8 to September 23, 2006. The modifications proved successful in increasing gasifier residence time and particulate collection efficiency, two parameters critical in broadening of the fuel operating envelope and advancing gasification technology. The gasification process operated for over 870 hours, providing the opportunity for additional testing of various gasification technologies, such as PCD failsafe evaluation and sensor development.

Southern Company Services

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Gasification of rice husk in a cyclone gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experimental results of air gasification of rice husk in the cyclone gasifier were presented at the fuel rate of...3 to 3.11 MJ/Nm3 and the cold gas efficiency decreases from 64% to 31%. However, the tar cont...

Shaozeng Sun; Yijun Zhao; Fengming Su; Feng Ling

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC16  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR (formerly Kellogg Brown & Root) Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report discusses Test Campaign TC16 of the PSDF gasification process. TC16 began on July 14, 2004, lasting until August 24, 2004, for a total of 835 hours of gasification operation. The test campaign consisted of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal and high sodium lignite from the North Dakota Freedom mine. The highest gasifier operating temperature mostly varied from 1,760 to 1,850 F with PRB and 1,500 to 1,600 F with lignite. Typically, during PRB operations, the gasifier exit pressure was maintained between 215 and 225 psig using air as the gasification oxidant and between 145 and 190 psig while using oxygen as the oxidant. With lignite, the gasifier operated only in air-blown mode, and the gasifier outlet pressure ranged from 150 to 160 psig.

Southern Company Services

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gasification and co-gasification of biomass wastes: Effect of the biomass origin and the gasifier operating conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of different biomass fuels, including forestry (pinus pinaster pruning) and agricultural (grapevine and olive tree pruning) wastes as well as industry wastes (sawdust and marc of grape), has been carried out in a circulating flow gasifier in order to evaluate the potential of using these types of biomass in the same equipment, thus providing higher operation flexibility and minimizing the effect of seasonal fuel supply variations. The potential of using biomass as an additional supporting fuel in coal fuelled power plants has also been evaluated through tests involving mixtures of biomass and coal–coke, the coke being a typical waste of oil companies. The effect of the main gasifier operating conditions, such as the relative biomass/air ratio and the reaction temperature, has been analysed to establish the conditions allowing higher gasification efficiency, carbon conversion and/or fuel constituents (CO, H2 and CH4) concentration and production. Results of the work encourage the combined use of the different biomass fuels without significant modifications in the installation, although agricultural wastes (grapevine and olive pruning) could to lead to more efficient gasification processes. These latter wastes appear as interesting fuels to generate a producer gas to be used in internal combustion engines or gas turbines (high gasification efficiency and gas yield), while sawdust could be a very adequate fuel to produce a H2-rich gas (with interest for fuel cells) due to its highest reactivity. The influence of the reaction temperature on the gasification characteristics was not as significant as that of the biomass/air ratio, although the H2 concentration increased with increasing temperature.

Magín Lapuerta; Juan J. Hernández; Amparo Pazo; Julio López

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

NETL: C&CBTL - Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Project Number: FE0005476 Project Description The objectives of the proposed study are to obtain experimental reactor data and develop kinetic rate expressions for pyrolysis and char gasification for the coal-biomass blends under conditions free from transport limitations, to develop a detailed understanding of the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the porous char structure, to build mathematical models that combine true kinetic rate expressions with transport models for predicting gasification behavior for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, and to investigate the physical and chemical parameters that might lead to synergistic effects in coal-biomass blends gasification.

343

Development of Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetics and Mathematical Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends Background Significant progress has been made in recent years in controlling emissions resulting from coal-fired electricity generation in the United States through the research, development, and deployment of innovative technologies such as gasification. Gasification is a process that converts solid feedstocks such as coal, biomass, or blends

344

Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper  

SciTech Connect

This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Orlando Gasification Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE ORLANDO GASIFICATION PROJECT ORLANDO, FLORIDA August 2006 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COVER SHEET August 2006 RESPONSIBLE AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) T ITLE Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Orlando Gasification Project L OCATION Orlando, Florida C ONTACTS Additional copies or information concerning this draft environmental impact statement (EIS) can be obtained from Mr. Richard A. Hargis, Jr., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Document Manager, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940. Telephone: 412-386-6065. E-mail: Richard.Hargis@netl.doe.gov. For general information on DOE's NEPA process, contact Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director, Office

347

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biofuels Production Based on Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Production Based on Biofuels Production Based on Gasification Ryan M. Swanson, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University Alexandru Platon ConocoPhillips Company David D. Hsu National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-46587 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biofuels Production Based on Gasification Ryan M. Swanson, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University Alexandru Platon

348

NETL: Gasification Systems - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Project No.: DE-FE0007952 Reaction Engineering International (REI) is working to develop practical solutions to mitigate the plugging and fouling of syngas coolers (SC) - fire tube heat exchangers located between the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is generally lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The principle downtime events associated with syngas coolers are typically a result of ash deposits that: form on (wall) surfaces upstream of the syngas cooler, break loose, and then lodge in the tubes; or form on the fireside surface of the syngas cooler tubes that lead to fouling and reduced heat transfer. Both ash deposit mechanisms result in reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs.

349

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Power Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Jeff Seabright Arthur Lee Richard Weissman, PhD. Texaco Inc. White Plains, New York Presented at: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington D.C. ABSTRACT Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a commercially proven clean coal technology that offers significant environmental and economic benefits today, including decreased air and solids emissions. It also offers the potential to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. Coal IGCC provides electric utilities strategic options in meeting today's growing demand for energy products (electricity, fuel, chemicals) while protecting public health and the environment and providing a pathway to zero emissions coal-based power generation.

350

Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Production Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Project Number: FE0012066 Project Description The project will assess the potential for integrated advanced technologies to substantially reduce capital and production costs for hydrogen-rich syngas with near-zero emissions from coal gasification for power production with carbon capture and for coal-to-liquids (specifically methanol) with carbon capture. These integrated technologies include those already tested successfully at pilot-scale with a new and innovative water-gas-shift technology, to show how multiple advanced technologies will leverage each other for significant cost and efficiency gains.

351

NETL: Gasification: Arrowhead Center to Promote Prosperity and Public  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems - Systems and Industry Analyses Gasification Systems - Systems and Industry Analyses Arrowhead Center to Promote Prosperity and Public Welfare Project Number: DE-FC26-08NT0004397 New Mexico State University The Arrowhead Center to Promote Prosperity and Public Welfare (PROSPER) of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) is conducting research analyzing the relationships between the fossil fuel energy sector and economic development issues in New Mexico. The project is a policy research and economic modeling initiative to enhance fossil fuel energy production and use in New Mexico in an environmentally progressive manner that contributes to the economic development of the state and creates a strong, vibrant economy that better serves the citizens of New Mexico. The project is engaging stakeholders in the research process and assessing (1) the impact

352

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC14  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details test campaign TC14 of the PSDF gasification process. TC14 began on February 16, 2004, and lasted until February 28, 2004, accumulating 214 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. The gasifier operating temperatures varied from 1760 to 1810 F at pressures from 188 to 212 psig during steady air blown operations and approximately 160 psig during oxygen blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

353

Dual-Bed Gasification of Petcoke: Model Development and Validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dual-Bed Gasification of Petcoke: Model Development and Validation ... A series of sensitivity analyses is performed with regard to a conventional gasifier fed by petcoke, and the effects of residence time and oxygen/carbon mass ratio in the feed are investigated over three process variables: char conversion at the gasifier exit, temperature at the gasifier exit, and amount of useful syngas (H2 and CO) produced, in terms of N?m3 per ton of petcoke. ... Different from most literature publications, such as refs 5 and 6, where coal and/or petcoke gasification models are checked against available data, with respect to the syngas composition obtained, and to the process cold gas efficiency, one of the purposes of our paper is to correlate experimental data to a parameter that is important both for simulation and for reactor design: the value of the residence time of the gasifier. ...

Maria Sudiro; Carlos Zanella; Alberto Bertucco; Luigi Bressan; Marco Fontana

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Integrated catalytic coal devolatilization and steam gasification process  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon liquids and a methane-containing gas are produced from carbonaceous feed solids by contacting the solids with a mixture of gases containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a devolatilization zone at a relatively low temperature in the presence of a carbon-alkali metal catalyst. The devolatilization zone effluent is treated to condense out hydrocarbon liquids and at least a portion of the remaining methane-rich gas is steam reformed to produce the carbon monoxide and hydrogen with which the carbonaceous feed solids are contacted in the devolatilization zone. The char produced in the devolatilization zone is reacted with steam in a gasification zone under gasification conditions in the presence of a carbon-alkali metal catalyst and the resultant raw product gas is treated to recover a methane-containing gas.

Ryan, D.F.; Wesselhoft, R.D.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

355

NETL, USDA design coal-stabilized biomass gasification unit  

SciTech Connect

Coal, poultry litter, contaminated corn, rice hulls, moldly hay, manure sludge - these are representative materials that could be tested as fuel feedstocks in a hybrid gasification/combustion concept studied in a recent US Department of Energy (DOE) design project. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) collaborated to develop a design concept of a power system that incorporates Hybrid Biomass Gasification. This system would explore the use of a wide range of biomass and agricultural waste products as gasifier feedstocks. The plant, if built, would supply one-third of electrical and steam heating needs at the USDA's Beltsville (Maryland) Agricultural Research Center. 1 fig., 1 photo.

NONE

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Pilot-Plant Gasification of Olive Stone: a Technical Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of pilot-plant gasification tests carried out at atmospheric pressure and temperatures within the range of 700?820 °C in order to assess the technical viability of gasifying untreated olive stone, also called “orujillo”, a byproduct of the olive oil industry that comprises both olive stone and pulp. ... Atmospheric air gasification of biomass/waste in a bubbling-fluidized-bed (BFB) reactor is an attractive simple process to convert a solid material to a gaseous fuel. ... Their different characteristics (mainly volatile and ash content) affect the plant operation because of the energy content and the ash fusibility, but both types were gasified efficiently and the problems found were similar. ...

A. Gómez-Barea; R. Arjona; P. Ollero

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Alkaline subcritical water gasification of dairy industry waste (Whey)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The near-critical water gasification of dairy industry waste in the form of Whey, a product composed of mixtures of carbohydrates (mainly lactose) and amino acids such as glycine and glutamic acid, has been studied. The gasification process involved partial oxidation with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NaOH. The reactions were studied over the temperature range from 300 °C to 390 °C, corresponding pressures of 9.5–24.5 MPa and reaction times from 0 min to 120 min. Hydrogen production was affected by the presence of NaOH, the concentration of H2O2, temperature, reaction time and feed concentration. Up to 40% of the theoretical hydrogen gas production was achieved at 390 °C. Over 80% of the Whey nitrogen content was found as ammonia, mainly in the liquid effluent.

Rattana Muangrat; Jude A. Onwudili; Paul T. Williams

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

359

Hydrogen Production from Biomass via Indirect Gasification: The Impact of NREL Process Development Unit Gasifier Correlations  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a set of updated gasifier correlations developed by NREL to predict biomass gasification products and Minimum Hydrogen Selling Price.

Kinchin, C. M.; Bain, R. L.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - allothermal steam gasification Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Utilization 79 Reproducedwith pennissionfrom ElsevierPergamon Biomass and Bioenerg..' Vol: 10, :os 2-3, pp..149-l66, 1996 Summary: with gasification have been...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sawdust Pyrolysis and Petroleum Coke CO2 Gasification at High Heating Rates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Clean and efficient electricity can be generated using an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). Although IGCC is typically used with coal, it can also be… (more)

Lewis, Aaron D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Study of the mechanism of pyrolysis and gasification of Mallee biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mechanisms of pyrolysis/gasification (steam and carbon dioxide) of mallee biomass were investigated. Wood biochar obtained under slow pyrolysis kept botanical structure but lost its original… (more)

Yang, Yanwu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Site Characterization, Sustainability Evaluation and Life Cycle Emissions Assessment of Underground Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground Coal Gasification (UCG), although not a new concept, is now attracting considerable global attention as a viable process to provide a âcleanâ and economic… (more)

Hyder, Zeshan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

THERMODYNAMIC MODELLING OF BIOMASS INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE (BIGCC) POWER GENERATION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An attractive and practicable possibility of biomass utilization for energy production is gasification integrated with a combined cycle. This technology seems to have the possibility… (more)

Desta, Melaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reaction Pathway for Catalytic Gasification of Lignin in Presence of Sulfur in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generally, very high temperatures of over 1073 K are needed for steam reformation of the lignin in the gasification process.1 Hence, low-temperature methods for lignin gasification are the most desirable, so that the waste heat from high-temperature processes in industry can be utilized for energy generation. ... While in the presence of the Ru/TiO2 catalyst, formaldehyde was completely gasified in supercritical water, similar to the gasification of lignin and 4-propylphenol. ... water for gasification technique of wastes. ...

Mitsumasa Osada; Norihito Hiyoshi; Osamu Sato; Kunio Arai; Masayuki Shirai

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Model-based estimation of adiabatic flame temperature during coal gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal gasification temperature distribution in the gasifier is one of the importantissues. High temperature may increase the risk of corrosion of the gasifier wall or… (more)

Sarigul, Ihsan Mert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CFD Modeling of Biomass Gasification Using a Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass, as a renewable energy resource, can be utilized to generate chemicals, heat, and electricity. Compared with biomass combustion, biomass gasification is more eco-friendly because… (more)

Liu, Hui

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

A study on ultra heavy oil gasification technology  

SciTech Connect

Raising the thermal efficiency of a thermal power plant is an important issue from viewpoints of effective energy utilization and environmental protection. In view of raising the thermal efficiency, a gas turbine combined cycle power generation is considered to be very effective. The thermal efficiency of the latest LNG combined cycle power plant has been raised by more than 50%. On the other hand, the diversification of fuels to ensure supply stability is also an important issue, particularly in Japan where natural resources are scarce. Because of excellent handling characteristics petroleum and LNG which produces clean combustion are used in many sectors, and so the demand for such fuels is expected to grow. However, the availability of such fuels is limited, and supplies will be exhausted in the near future. The development of a highly efficient and environment-friendly gas turbine combined cycle using ultra heavy oil such as Orimulsion{trademark} (trademark of BITOR) is thus a significant step towards resolving these two issues. Chubu Electric Power Co, Inc., the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) conducted a collaboration from 1994 to 1998 with the objective of developing an ultra heavy oil integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Construction of the ultra heavy oil gasification testing facility (fuel capacity:2.4t/d) was completed in 1995, and Orimulsion{trademark} gasification tests were carried out in 1995 and 1996. In 1997, the hot dedusting facility with ceramic filter and the water scrubber used as a preprocessor of a wet desulfurization process were installed. Gasification and clean up the syngs tests were carried out on Orimulsion{trademark}, Asmulsion{trademark} (trademark of Nisseki Mitsubishi K.K.), and residue oil in 1997 and 1998. The results of the collaboration effort are described below.

Kidoguchi, Kazuhiro; Ashizawa, Masami; Taki, Masato; Ishimura, Masato; Takeno, Keiji

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy recovery from solid waste fuels using advanced gasification technology  

SciTech Connect

Since the mid-1980s, TPS Termiska Processer AB has been working on the development of an atmospheric-pressure gasification process. A major aim at the start of this work was the generation of fuel gas from indigenous fuels to Sweden (i.e. biomass). As the economic climate changed and awareness of the damage to the environment caused by the use of fossil fuels in power generation equipment increased, the aim of the development work at TPS was changed to applying the process to heat and power generation from feedstocks such as biomass and solid wastes. Compared with modern waste incineration with heat recovery, the gasification process will permit an increase in electricity output of up to 50%. The gasification process being developed is based on an atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized bed gasifier coupled to a tar-cracking vessel. The gas produced from this process is then cooled and cleaned in conventional equipment. The energy-rich gas produced is clean enough to be fired in a gas boiler without requiring extensive flue gas cleaning, as is normally required in conventional waste incineration plants. Producing clean fuel gas in this manner, which facilitates the use of efficient gas-fired boilers, means that overall plant electrical efficiencies of close to 30% can be achieved. TPS has performed a considerable amount of pilot plant testing on waste fuels in their gasification/gas cleaning pilot plant in Sweden. Two gasifiers of TPS design have been in operation in Greve-in-Chianti, italy since 1992. This plant processes 200 tonnes of RDF (refuse-derived fuel) per day.

Morris, M.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)] [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Gasification of New Zealand coals: a comparative simulation study  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. Gasification of these coals was simulated in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application and associated preliminary economics compared. A simple method of coal characterization was developed for simulation purposes. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen content of the coal was represented by a three component vapor solid system of carbon, methane, and water, the composition of which was derived from proximate analysis data on fixed carbon and volatile matter, and the gross calorific value, both on a dry, ash free basis. The gasification process was modeled using Gibb's free energy minimization. Data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Shell Gasifier base cases using Illinios No. 6 coal was used to verify both the gasifier and the IGCC flowsheet models. The H:C and O:C ratios of the NZ coals were adjusted until the simulated gasifier output composition and temperature matched the values with the base case. The IGCC power output and other key operating variables such as gas turbine inlet and exhaust temperatures were kept constant for study of comparative economics. The results indicated that 16% more lignite than sub-bituminous coal was required. This translated into the requirement of a larger gasifier and air separation unit, but smaller gas and steam turbines were required. The gasifier was the largest sole contributor (30%) to the estimated capital cost of the IGCC plant. The overall cost differential associated with the processing of lignite versus processing sub-bituminous coal was estimated to be of the order of NZ $0.8/tonne. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improved System Integration for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improved System Integration for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems ... The model is applied to evaluate integration schemes involving nitrogen injection, air extraction, and combinations of both, as well as different ASU pressure levels. ... The optimal nitrogen injection only case in combination with an elevated pressure ASU had the highest efficiency and power output and approximately the lowest emissions per unit output of all cases considered, and thus is a recommended design option. ...

H. Christopher Frey; Yunhua Zhu

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

Use of Biomass Gasification Fly Ash in Lightweight Plasterboard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition, the overall environmental benefit of waste gasification plus ash utilization of a difficult fly ash makes the overall process attractive. ... Only the Autonomous Government of Catalonia has established regional regulations for waste management, including limited recycling for some wastes considered as byproducts. ... viability of gasifying untreated olive stone, also called "orujillo", a byproduct of the olive oil industry that comprises both olive stone and pulp. ...

C. Leiva; A. Gómez-Barea; L. F. Vilches; P. Ollero; J. Vale; C. Fernández-Pereira

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Gasification of Model Compounds and Wood in Hot Compressed Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Examples of wet waste streams include the following:? vegetable, fruit and garden waste; waste streams from agricultural, food and beverage industries; manure; sewage sludge; and some household wastes. ... Lignin itself is difficult to gasify and it has been observed that lignin blocks the conversion of wood's other constituents:? cellulose and hemi-cellulose. ... The raw biomass feedstock of sawdust with some CMC was also gasified in this system, the gasification efficiency in excess of 95% was reached. ...

Sascha R. A. Kersten; Biljana Potic; Wolter Prins; Wim P. M. Van Swaaij

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Staged Catalytic Gasification/Steam Reforming of Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While the slag can be used in the current industry infrastructure as a construction material, up-scaling of biomass utilization will lead to land depletion because the mineral and metal balances are not closed. ... Table 4 shows gasification results at similar temperatures for two different types of pyrolysis oil (pine and beech) and of another liquid biomass stream, a “light” and a “heavy” sugar waste stream. ... The sugar waste streams that were gasified are a side product from lactic acid production. ...

Guus van Rossum; Sascha R. A. Kersten; Wim P. M. van Swaaij

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Using gasification as a reliable source of fuel  

SciTech Connect

The low cost and ready availability of coal has brought about a renewed interest in the gasification process. A new two-stage fixed-bed gasifier is presented as a reliable and economical source of industrial fuels. The relative heating value of low-Btu gas is compared with other fuels, and applications in the pulp and paper industry are discussed, along with a cash flow analysis of a sample installation.

Coffeen, W.G.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

Snell, George J. (Fords, NJ); Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

None

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Catalytic gasification of automotive shredder residues with hydrogen generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a clean and new energy carrier to generate power through the Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. Hydrogen can be effectively turned out through the catalytic gasification of organic material such as automotive shredder residues (ASR). The main objective of this manuscript is to present an analysis of the catalytic gasification of ASR for the generation of high-purity hydrogen in a lab-scale fixed-bed downdraft gasifier using 15 wt.% NiO/Al2O3 catalysts at 760–900 K. In the catalytic gasification process, reduction of Ni(II) catalyst into Ni(0) has been confirmed through XANES spectra and consequently EXAFS data shows that the central Ni atoms have Ni–O and Ni–Ni bonds with bond distances of 2.03 ± 0.05 and 2.46 ± 0.05 Å, respectively. ASR is partially oxidized and ultimately converts into hydrogen rich syngas (CO and H2) and increases of the reaction temperature are favored the generation of hydrogen with decomposition of the CO. As well, approximately 220 kg h?1 of ASR would be catalytically gasified at 760–900 K and 46.2 atm with the reactor volume 0.27 m3 to obtain approximately 3.42 × 105 kcal h?1 of thermal energy during over 87% syngas generation with the generation of 100 kW electric powers.

Kuen-Song Lin; Sujan Chowdhury; Ze-Ping Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Incineration versus gasification: A comparison in waste to energy plants  

SciTech Connect

Waste thermodestruction has obvious advantages; nevertheless, it encounters problems not very easy to solve, such as those related to gas cleaning and to restricting standards for emission control. One important aspect is the possibility of heat recovery with production of valuable energy such as electric energy. A new technology, at least as far as its application to waste disposal (mainly municipal waste) is concerned, is represented by gasification. It becomes interesting to establish a comparison between this new technology and the traditional one. This comparison does not appear, however, to be very simple, since for gasification only few documented experiments can be found, and these are often difficult to relate to a common evaluation factor. The present paper describes the state of the art of the traditional technology in the thermodestruction field to define a comparison basis. Then, a general discussion is given for the gasification technology, emphasizing different possible solutions to allow for a quantitative evaluation. At last the various aspects of the problem (related to plant, environment, energy, economics, etc.) are specifically compared for the purpose of finding elements which allow for a quantitative evaluation or for emphasizing parameters useful for a final choice.

Ghezzi, U.; Pasini, S.; Ferri, L.D.A. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

Southern Company Services

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Crystalline structure transformation of carbon anodes during gasification  

SciTech Connect

The crystalline structure transformation of five carbon anodes during gasification in air and carbon dioxide was studied using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis and HRTEM observations confirmed that anodes have a highly ordered graphitic structure. The examination of partially gasified samples indicated that crystalline structure transformation occurred in two stages during gasification. The first stage involved the consumption of disorganized carbon matter in the initial 15% conversion. Oxygen was found to be more reactive toward disorganized carbon at this stage of the gasification process compared to carbon dioxide. Following this stage, as more carbon was consumed, especially with the removal of smaller crystallites, it was found that the crystalline structure became more ordered with increasing conversion levels. This is due to the merging of neighboring crystallites, required to maintain the minimum energy configuration. In addition, the interaction between the pitch and the coke components was found to be strongly linked to the initial coke structure. 'Stress graphitization' occurred at the pitch-coke interface, which helps to enhance the structural development of the anodes. 26 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Kien N. Tran; Adam J. Berkovich; Alan Tomsett; Suresh K. Bhatia [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld. (Australia). Division of Chemical Engineering

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC17  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR (formerly Kellogg Brown & Root) Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results gasification operation with Illinois Basin bituminous coal in PSDF test campaign TC17. The test campaign was completed from October 25, 2004, to November 18, 2004. System startup and initial operation was accomplished with Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, and then the system was transitioned to Illinois Basin coal operation. The major objective for this test was to evaluate the PSDF gasification process operational stability and performance using the Illinois Basin coal. The Transport Gasifier train was operated for 92 hours using PRB coal and for 221 hours using Illinois Basin coal.

Southern Company Services

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

CO{sub 2}-gasification reactivity of different carbonaceous materials at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

At the atmospheric pressure and at the temperatures between 1,223 and 1,673 K, the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of seven different carbonaceous materials comprising coal tar pitch coke, petroleum coke, natural graphite, carbon black and three coal chars was investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis. Their crystalline structures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the reactivity of the chars, pitch coke and petroleum coke produced from liquid phase carbonization, is several times poorer than that of the coal chars produced from solid phase carbonization and even lower than that of natural graphite. At the same time, it is obtained that under the condition of the chemical reaction control, the apparent activation energies of the former are in the range of 135.82-174.92 kJ/mol, while those of the latter are between 89.95 kJ/mol and 110.05 kJ/mol. Besides, the reactivity of the sample has a certain correlation with the crystalline structure of the sample, i.e., the larger the fraction of the relatively better crystalline structure is, the poorer the reactivity of the sample is.

Gu, J.; Wu, S.; Wu, Y.; Gao, J. [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Co-gasification of Biomass and Non-biomass Feedstocks: Synergistic and Inhibition Effects of Switchgrass Mixed with Sub-bituminous Coal and Fluid Coke During CO2 Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of biomass, namely, switchgrass, with coal and fluid coke was performed to investigate the availability of the gasification catalysts to the mixed feedstock, especially alkali and alkaline earth elements, naturally present on switchgrass. ...

Rozita Habibi; Jan Kopyscinski; Mohammad S. Masnadi; Jill Lam; John R. Grace; Charles A. Mims; Josephine M. Hill

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Effects of Feed Composition and Gasification Parameters on Product Gas from a Pilot Scale Fluidized Bed Gasifier.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass gasification is an integral part of a holistic project where low-value feedstocks are converted into ethanol via a gasification-fermentation process. Because microbial catalysts are… (more)

Cateni, Bruno Ghislain

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

389

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-04NT42259; W(A)-04-078; CH-1257 The Petitioner, Weyerhaeuser Company (Weyerhaeuser), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification Technology." In this program, Weyerhaeuser use its New Bern, North Carolina gasification facility as a test bed to investigate key factors limiting process performance and reliability and then to demonstrate certain advancements to the Chemrec black liquor gasification technology or auxiliary processes to overcome those limitations. The approach used will be to first gain a fundamental understanding of the process issues limiting process

390

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well-Stirred Reactor: Effects of Devolatilization and Moisture Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well- Stirred Reactor: Effects in coal and biomass play an important role on the gasification performance of these fuels to simulate the gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor. This model is a first

Qiao, Li

391

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

Research on mild gasification is discussed. The report is divided into three sections: literature survey of mild gasification processes; literature survey of char, condensibles, and gas upgrading and utilization methods; and industrial market assessment of products of mild gasification. Recommendations are included in each section. (CBS) 248 refs., 58 figs., 62 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.; Jha, M.C.; Breault, R.W.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Underground Gasification of Coal in the U.S.S.R  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... S.S.R., however, the first practical work was begun in 1933 on the gasification of the coal in tlie seam. This is reached by two shafts connected by ... necessitates the labour of miners to sink the shafts and to tunnel the seam before gasification can begin. In a new installation in the Donetz coalfield, the seam will be ...

1941-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Case-study of a coal gasification-based energy supply system for China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clean fuels derived via coal gasification. Emissions of air pollutants in the SC scenario are compared polygeneration technologies to meet energy needs of coal-rich areas. Polygeneration systems, based on coalCase-study of a coal gasification-based energy supply system for China Zheng Hongtao Department

394

Instrumentation and Evaluation of a Pilot Scale Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasification System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature and pressure profile .................................. 24 Figure 14 Woodchips temperature and pressure profile .................................... 24 Figure 15 Gasification efficiency and reaction temperature, Tr vs the oxygen... Page Table 1 Modules used for CompactDAQ. ...................................................... 11 Table 2 Bulk density and loading factor ........................................................ 18 Table 3 Sample gasification data readings...

Maglinao, Amado L

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Gasification kinetics of six eastern shales in steam and synthesis gas atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

Gasification reactivities have been determined for six Eastern shales with conversions described by a model incorporating fast and slow gasification reactions. A simple model, based on Indiana New Albany shale, was developed to describe the fast and slow weight loss as well as the slow sulfur and organic carbon gasification rates. The slow sulfur and organic carbon reactions are described by rate equations that are first order in sulfur and organic carbon and include the steam pressure. Terms in the organic carbon rate expression account for hydrogen and carbon monoxide inhibition of the steam-carbon reaction. The fraction of shale species lost by fast and slow gasification and the rate of slow sulfur gasification are similar (and assumed to be equal) for the six Eastern shales studied. Eastern shale organic carbon reactivities are different and have been described with different kinetic parameters in the slow organic carbon gasification rate equation. The kinetic expressions developed for Eastern shale gasification are valid in steam and steam; synthesis gas mixtures and for residence times of more than 3 minutes. Gasification is described for temperature and pressure ranges of 1144 to 1311 K and 0.20 to 3.55 MPa, respectively.

Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Effect of Iron Species and Calcium Hydroxide on High-Sulfur Petroleum Coke CO2 Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of iron species on petroleum coke CO2 gasification was studied in the present work. The effects of the temperature (1173–1673 K), the catalyst types, catalyst loading (ranging from 0 to 5 wt %), and composition during the gasification of ...

Zhi-jie Zhou; Qi-jing Hu; Xin Liu; Guang-suo Yu; Fu-chen Wang

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

MODELLING THE LOW-TAR BIG GASIFICATION CONCEPT Lars Andersen, Brian Elmegaard, Bjrn Qvale, Ulrik Henriksen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and gasification chamber are bubbling fluid beds, fluidised with steam. For moist fuels, the gasifier can be integrated with a steam drying process, where the produced steam is used in the pyrolysis plant systems: Gas engine, Simple cycle gas turbine, Recuperated gas turbine and Integrated Gasification

398

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units ... This paper investigates the alternative of precombustion capture of carbon dioxide from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants using membrane reactors equipped with H2-selective zeolite membranes for the water gas shift reaction. ...

Fernando V. Lima; Prodromos Daoutidis; Michael Tsapatsis; John J. Marano

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Transformation of Alkali Metals during Pyrolysis and Gasification of a Lignite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

North China has large reserves of low rank coal deposits such as lignite that are suitable to be used in fluidized-bed gasification. ... Influence of Temperature on the Release of Inorganic Species from Victorian Brown Coals and German Lignites under CO2 Gasification Conditions ...

Xiaofang Wei; Jiejie Huang; Tiefeng Liu; Yitian Fang; Yang Wang

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification April 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. Washington, DC - Gasification. It's a versatile technology that uses coal to produce power, chemicals, and fuels. Inherently low in air emissions, solid byproducts, and wastewater, commercial gasification plants have proven capable of exceeding the most stringent regulations for air- and solids-emissions. However, capital and operational costs have prohibited the widespread adoption of gasification, especially for power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

402

Analysis of the energy efficiency of solar aided biomass gasification for pure hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a simulative analysis of the energy efficiency of solar aided biomass gasification for pure hydrogen production. Solar heat has been considered as available at 250 °C in three gasification processes: i) gasification reactor followed by two water gas shift reactors and a pressure swing adsorber; ii) gasification reactor followed by an integrated membrane water gas shift reactor; iii) supercritical gasification reactor followed by two flash separators and a pressure swing adsorber. Simulations are performed with the commercial software Aspen Plus® by considering biomass moisture content and the amount of solar heat as system variables. Results are presented in terms of energy and exergy system efficiency and are discussed and compared with the case of no solar integration.

Lucia Salemme; Marino Simeone; Riccardo Chirone; Piero Salatino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

Southern Company Services

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

"Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" ,"Revolutionary","Evolutionary","Mature" "Pulverized Coal",,,"X" "Pulverized Coal with CCS" " - Non-CCS portion of Pulverized Coal Plant",,,"X" " - CCS","X" "Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle" " - Advanced Combustion Turbine",,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Gasifier",,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X" "Conventional Natural Gas Combined Cycle" " - Conventional Combustion Turbine",,,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X"

406

Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR) destruction in a plasma gasification reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Test results on Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR), or car fluff, demonstrated destruction efficiency and safe conversion to synthesis gas and a glass residue, in a plasma gasification system. The synthesis gas consists primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the range between 20 and 22 vol-% respectively, or 45 and 55 vol-% dry basis, when corrected for nitrogen. In dry reforming operation, carbon dioxide conversion approached 90%. The system is designed to work with oxygen in autothermal conditions, reducing thus the electric power requirement for the plasma reactor. The vitrified residue leach rate makes the product suitable for construction works.

Marco G. Tellini; Paolo Centola; James A. Batdorf; William J. Quapp

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with much progress. However, the current state of biological technology is not deemed to be ready commercially. A preliminary estimate of capital and operating costs of a 12000 gallon per day gasification/biological facility was developed for comparison purposes. In addition, during the biological organism screening and testing, some possible alternative products were identified. One such possibility is the biological production of bio-diesel. Additional research is necessary for further evaluation of all of the biological concepts.

Pearson, Larry, E.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Development of Foster Wheeler's Vision 21 Partial Gasification Module  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Foster Wheeler Development Corporation a contract to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx} 2500 to 2800F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This paper describes the test program and pilot plant that will be used to develop the PGM.

Robertson, A.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coalbed methane production enhancement by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

The sub-surface of the Netherlands is generally underlain by coal-bearing Carboniferous strata at greater depths (at many places over 1,500 m). These coal seams are generally thinner than 3 meter, occur in groups (5--15) within several hundred meters and are often fairly continuous over many square kilometers. In many cases they have endured complex burial history, influencing their methane saturation. In certain particular geological settings, a high, maximum coalbed methane saturation, may be expected. Carboniferous/Permian coals in the Tianjin-region (China) show many similarities concerning geological settings, rank and composition. Economical coalbed methane production at greater depths is often obstructed by the (very) low permeabilities of the coal seams as with increasing depth the deformation of the coal reduces both its macro-porosity (the cleat system) and microporosity. Experiments in abandoned underground mines, as well as after underground coal gasification tests indicate ways to improve the prospects for coalbed methane production in originally tight coal reservoirs. High permeability areas can be created by the application of underground coal gasification of one of the coal seams of a multi-seam cycle with some 200 meter of coal bearing strata. The gasification of one of the coal seams transforms that seam over a certain area into a highly permeable bed, consisting of coal residues, ash and (thermally altered) roof rubble. Additionally, roof collapse and subsidence will destabilize the overburden. In conjunction this will permit a better coalbed methane production from the remaining surrounding parts of the coal seams. Moreover, the effects of subsidence will influence the stress patterns around the gasified seam and this improves the permeability over certain distances in the coal seams above and below. In this paper the effects of the combined underground coal gasification and coalbed methane production technique are regarded for a single injection well. Known geotechnical aspects are combined with results from laboratory experiments on compaction of thermally treated rubble. An axi-symmetric numerical model is used to determine the effects induced by the gasified coal seam. The calculation includes the rubble formation, rubble compaction and induced stress effects in the overlying strata. Subsequently the stress effects are related to changes in coal permeability, based on experimental results of McKee et al.

Hettema, M.H.H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Neumann, B.V.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

The SEI facility for fluid-bed wood gasification  

SciTech Connect

In mid 1985, construction was begun on the world's largest fluidized bed, wood gasification plant at the clay processing plant in Quincy, Fla. In March 1986, the plant was purchased by Southern Electric International (SEI). This paper describes how SEI coordinated the redesign of many of the plant systems and supervised the completion of construction and startup. In late 1986, the gasifier plant was sold. SEI remains involved as the operations and maintenance contractor on-site and is now responsible for design changes and equipment maintenance.

Bullpitt, W.S.; Rittenhouse, O.C. (Southern Electric International, Inc. North Atlanta, GA (US)); Masterson, L.D. (Southern Electric International Quincy, FL (US))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. ... Coal is a nonrenewable resource; however, the world’s coal reserves amount to twice the combined oil and gas reserves. ... The reasons for the entrained flow gasifier selection include its high suitability to low rank coals (lignites) and the use of entrained flow gasifiers for an IGCC as the industrially preferred choice dictated through experience. ...

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

NETL Publications: The 2011 University Coal Research/Historically Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

011 University Coal Research/Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions Contractors Review Conference. 011 University Coal Research/Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions Contractors Review Conference. June 7-8, 2011 Table of Contents Disclaimer Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 Session 4 PRESENTATIONS Introduction and Opening Remarks Robert Romanosky, Technology Manager, Advanced Research Power Systems, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Presentation [PDF-883KB] Keynote Address Dr. Ahsan Choudhuri, Director of the University of Texas at El Paso's NASA Center for Space Exploration and Technology Research Presentation [PDF-3.18MB] Session 1 Moderator: Susan Maley, Project Manager, Gasification Division, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Plasmonics Based Harsh Environment Compatible Chemical Sensors

413

NETL Publications: 2012 University Coal Research/ Historically Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 University Coal Research/ Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions Contractors Review Conference 2012 University Coal Research/ Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions Contractors Review Conference May 30-31, 2012 Table of Contents Disclaimer Sensors & Controls Advanced Materials (Day 1) Advanced Materials (Day 2) Computational Energy Sciences PRESENTATIONS Introduction and Opening Remarks Robert Romanosky, Technology Manager, Crosscutting Research Robie Lewis, UCR Program Coordinator, Federal Project Manager, Fuels Division Steven Markovich, HBCU Program Coordinator, Federal Project Manager, Fuels Division Presentation [PDF-783KB] Sensor & Controls Moderator: Rick Dunst, Federal Project Manager, Gasification Division U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Heat Activated Plasmonics Based Harsh Environment Chemical Sensors

414

NETL: Gasification Systems - Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring Project Number: FE0005712 General Electric (GE) Global Research is developing an advanced model-based optimal sensor network to monitor the condition of the gasification section in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant. The work builds on model-based controls aimed at enhancing efficiency and operational flexibility through increased automation. Within an overall strategy of employing model-based online monitoring and predictive controls, GE Global Research is extending existing models for the gasifier and radiant syngas cooler to include the effects of degradation and fouling on the sensed variables like temperature etc., and will implement an estimation algorithm to assess the extent of gasifier refractory degradation and radiant syngas cooler fouling. An optimization-based solution will be employed to optimally place the hardware sensors utilized in the estimation algorithm in order to achieve the monitoring requirements at the lowest cost. The performance of the sensor placement algorithm and resulting monitoring solution will be demonstrated through simulations using representative test cases. The overall approach is one of the first to be applicable to condition monitoring of critical components in IGCC plants.

415

Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

Rogers, R. III

1994-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

Catalytic gasification of glucose to H2 in supercritical water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification of glucose in supercritical water with and without catalysts (NaOH and Ni based) was investigated at 400 °C and 500 °C with a residence time of 30 min. The products from glucose gasification without catalyst consist of ~ 8–17 wt.% gas, 21–24 wt.% solid, 9–16 wt.% acetone phase and 8–10 wt.% water phase. As expected, all the gas product yields increased by an increase in process temperature and higher water to biomass ratio benefits the yields of gas phase and water phase. For the experimental runs with catalysts, NaOH had the best activity for improving H2 formation, the H2 yield increased by 135% with NaOH compared to that for run without catalyst at 500 °C with water to biomass ratio of 3. At the same operating conditions, the presence of Ni/activated carbon (AC) contributed to 81% increase in H2 yield, followed by 62% with Ni/MgO, 60% with Ni/CeO2/Al2O3 and 52% with Ni/Al2O3. The net effect of Ni was studied by using activated carbon and Ni/AC at 500 °C with water to biomass ratio of 7 for 30 min. The results showed that the hydrogen production was further increased by 6.9% with activated carbon and 36.9% with Ni/AC.

Ning Ding; Ramin Azargohar; Ajay K. Dalai; Janusz A. Kozinski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Effect of potassium carbonate on char gasification by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa) and temperatures between 922 and 1046 K. The rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains the catalyzed gasification data. Moreover, the activation energy for desorption of carbon-oxygen complex is lower for the catalyzed case than for the uncatalyzed case. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 560 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalyst's role is to enhance CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface, and lowering the activation energy for desorption of the resultant carbon-oxygen species.

Koenig, P.C.; Squires, R.G.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1-September 30, 2002 time period.

A. Robertson

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effect of petroleum coke addition on coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main fuel for power generation is combustion of coal and/or natural gas. Natural gas is expensive but clean and less problematic whereas coal is the reverse of natural gas. Natural gas resources are expected to last until 2020 where else coal has another 200 years expectancy. To replace the natural gas synthetic gas (syngas) can be used as a substitute fuel. Syngas can be produced using coal as fuel. In this study we blend petcoke a cheap solid carboneous fuel as an alternative to coal for the production of syngas using a 30 Kwattheat bubbling fluidized bed gasifier. The equivalent ratio (ER) was set at 2.8 and a gasification temperature was maintained between 680 to 710°C by manipulating between the feed flow rates and fluidizing medium. This condition was chosen as it proved to be the optimum based on the work by the same group. Various blend of coal:petcoke between 0 to 100% was analyzed. It was found that a 20:80 petcoke to coal gives a good correlation with 100% coal gasification.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1--December 31, 2002 time period.

Unknown

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

422

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1--September 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 - December 31, 2003 time period.

A. Robertson

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2002 time period.

Archie Robertson

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags  

SciTech Connect

Praxis is working on a DOE/METC funded project to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of making lightweight and ultra- lightweight aggregates from slags left as solid by-products from the coal gasification process. These aggregates are produced by controlled heating of the slags to temperatures ranging between 1600 and 1900{degrees}F. Over 10 tons of expanded slag lightweight aggregates (SLA) were produced using a direct-fired rotary kiln and a fluidized bed calciner with unit weights varying between 20 and 50 lb/ft{sup 3}. The slag-based aggregates are being evaluated at the laboratory scale as substitutes for conventional lightweight aggregates in making lightweight structural concrete, roof tiles, blocks, insulating concrete, and a number of other applications. Based on the laboratory data, large-scale testing will be performed and the durability of the finished products evaluated. Conventional lightweight aggregates made from pyroprocessing expansible shales or clays are produced for $30/ton. The net production costs of SLA are in the range of $22 to $24/ton for large systems (44 t/d) and $26-$30/ton for small systems (220 t/d). Thus, the technology provides a good opportunity for economic use of gasification slags.

NONE

1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mineral phases of green liquor dregs, slaker grits, lime mud and wood ash of a Kraft pulp and paper mill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four residues generated in a Kraft, pulp and paper plant, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimmetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A quantitative phase composition model, that accounts for the observed data and for the physico-chemical conditions of formation, was postulated for each material. Emphasis was given on the identification of the mineral components of each material. The green liquor dregs and the lime mud contain Calcite and Gipsite. The slaker grits contains Calcite, Portlandite, Pirssonite, Larnite and Brucite. The Calcite phase, present in the dregs and in the lime mud, has small amounts of magnesium replacing calcium. The wood ash contains Quartz as the major crystalline mineral phase.

Fernanda Machado Martins; Joaniel Munhoz Martins; Luiz Carlos Ferracin; Carlos Jorge da Cunha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

SciTech Connect

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

SciTech Connect

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Study developed a methodology for the evaluation of gasification for MSW treatment. • Study was conducted comparatively for USA, UAE, and Thailand. • Study applies a thermodynamic model (Gibbs free energy minimization) using the Gasify software. • The energy efficiency of the process and the compatibility with different waste streams was studied. - Abstract: Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify®) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration.

Arafat, Hassan A., E-mail: harafat@masdar.ac.ae; Jijakli, Kenan

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD waste liquors. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

During this quarterly period, an experimental investigation was performed to study the precipitation kinetics and hydrolysis characteristics of calcium imido disulfonate crystals (CaADS). The CaADS crystals were precipitated by a metathetical reaction of lime, supplied by Dravo Lime Co., with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste liquor. Before approaching for the continuous Double Draw-Off (DDO) crystallization studies, the influence of a Dravo lime slurry on the precipitation characteristics of N-S compounds will be established. A series of N-S compound batch crystallization studies were completed in a wide range of pH (7.0--9.0), and the influence of pH on the amount of lime required, as well as the amount of precipitate obtained, was investigated. Although the amount of precipitate increased with increase in solution pH, the safe or optimum pH for the precipitation of CaADS lies in the vicinity of 8.2 to 8.3. For studying the crystallization characteristics of CaADS crystals, a bench scale 7.0 liter DDO crystallizer was built. DDO crystallizer is found to be superior compared to Mixed Suspension Mixed Product Removal (MSMPR) crystallizer. The precipitated crystals were analyzed for elemental composition by chemical analysis. The crystals were also examined under optical microscope for their morphological features. The present studies confirmed our prediction that N-S compounds in the waste liquor can be precipitated by a reaction with lime slurry. The precipitated crystals were mostly calcium imido disulfonate.

Randolph, A.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Unrau, E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

CO2 Gasification Kinetics of Biomass Char Derived from High-Temperature Rapid Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Gasification Kinetics of Biomass Char Derived from High-Temperature Rapid Pyrolysis ... The rapid pyrolysis char produced was isothermally gasified in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) under a CO2 atmosphere. ... In the study by Zhang and co-workers, where as much as 14 biomass chars were gasified, gasification rates of all of the wooden biomass chars present a similar feature as Figure 7a (PS char), but this feature has not been found from gasification rates of the herbaceous biomass char. ...

Shuai Yuan; Xue-li Chen; Jun Li; Fu-chen Wang

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fluidized-bed catalytic coal-gasification process. [US patent; pretreatment to minimize agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 vol % and 21 vol % oxygen at a temperature between 50 and 250/sup 0/C in an oxidation zone and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

Euker, C.A. Jr.; Wesselhoft, R.D.; Dunkleman, J.J.; Aquino, D.C.; Gouker, T.R.

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas ... Thus, the terminology of heavy oil or heavy residue can be also used to indicate all such heavy petroleum oils. ... Notwithstanding, for the RCG process it is ideal to develop the catalyst that has moderate cracking activity for heavy residues or heavy oils but meanwhile good activity for catalyzing the deposited coke gasification so that the gasification can be at reasonably low temperatures to maintain the catalytic activity for cracking heavy fractions. ...

Yuming Zhang; Deping Yu; Wangliang Li; Yin Wang; Shiqiu Gao; Guangwen Xu

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

Laboratory Study on Gasification Reactivity of Coals and Petcokes in CO2/Steam at High Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diffusion term associated with the carbon structure may be needed for modelling the gasification behaviors of the petcoke-like materials. ... Gasification technology is used to convert feedstocks, not only coal but also petcoke and other carbonaceous materials, to fuel gas or syngas,(1, 2) which can be used to generate electricity and heat or to synthesize liquid fuel and chemicals. ... It is certain that petcoke, derived from oil refinery coke units or other cracking processes, has a much lower gasification reactivity than coal chars, especially at low temperatures. ...

Liwei Ren; Jianli Yang; Feng Gao; Jinding Yan

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Status of health and environmental research relative to coal gasification 1976 to the present  

SciTech Connect

Health and environmental research relative to coal gasification conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under DOE sponsorship is summarized. The studies have focused on the chemical and toxicological characterization of materials from a range of process streams in five bench-scale, pilot-plant and industrial gasifiers. They also address ecological effects, industrial hygiene, environmental control technology performance, and risk assessment. Following an overview of coal gasification technology and related environmental concerns, integrated summaries of the studies and results in each area are presented and conclusions are drawn. Needed health and environmental research relative to coal gasification is identified.

Wilzbach, K.E.; Reilly, C.A. Jr. (comps.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Behavior of Inorganic Matter in a Dual Fluidized Steam Gasification Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principle of DFB steam gasification is based on the separation of the endothermic gasification process and the external heat supply from a separate combustion chamber. ... The precoat material described in Table 8 shows a typical composition of the natural mineral dolomite, whose main components are calcium and magnesium oxide, with a high ignition loss at 1050 °C, when the carbonates are released. ... On the basis of a dual fluidized bed system, steam gasification of biomass is coupled with in situ CO2 absorption to enhance the formation of hydrogen. ...

Friedrich Kirnbauer; Markus Koch; Reinhard Koch; Christian Aichernig; Hermann Hofbauer

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Study of Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste Using a Double Inverse Diffusion Flame Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Study of Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste Using a Double Inverse Diffusion Flame Burner ... Furthermore, the experiences of the waste incineration industry driven in the past by regulatory as well as technical issues may facilitate their commercial potentials outside the common market, especially in highly populated developing countries such as Korea with scarce landfill sites. ... Recently, several new technologies that involve gasification or combinations of pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification processes are currently being brought into the market for energy-efficient, environmentally friendly and economically sound methods of thermal processing of wastes. ...

Tae-Heon Kwak; Seungmoon Lee; Sanjeev Maken; Ho-Chul Shin; Jin-Won Park; Young Done Yoo

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

438

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Investigation of gasification chemical looping combustion combined cycle performance  

SciTech Connect

A novel combined cycle based on coal gasification and chemical looping combustion (CLC) offers a possibility of both high net power efficiency and separation of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. The technique involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier, which transfers oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel, and the avoidance of direct contact between fuel and combustion air. The fuel gas is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, an oxygen-containing compound, in the fuel reactor. The oxygen carrier in this study is NiO. The reduced oxygen carrier, Ni, in the fuel reactor is regenerated by the air in the air reactor. In this way, fuel and air are never mixed, and the fuel oxidation products CO{sub 2} and water vapor leave the system undiluted by air. All that is needed to get an almost pure CO{sub 2} product is to condense the water vapor and to remove the liquid water. When the technique is combined with gas turbine and heat recovery steam generation technology, a new type of combined cycle is formed which gives a possibility of obtaining high net power efficiency and CO{sub 2} separation. The performance of the combined cycle is simulated using the ASPEN software tool in this paper. The influence of the water/coal ratio on the gasification and the influence of the CLC process parameters such as the air reactor temperature, the turbine inlet supplementary firing, and the pressure ratio of the compressor on the system performance are discussed. Results show that, assuming an air reactor temperature of 1200{sup o}C, a gasification temperature of 1100 {sup o}C, and a turbine inlet temperature after supplementary firing of 1350{sup o}C, the system has the potential to achieve a thermal efficiency of 44.4% (low heating value), and the CO{sub 2} emission is 70.1 g/(kW h), 90.1% of the CO{sub 2} captured. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of the Ministry of Education

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective, the following goals were established for the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Project: Provide sufficient quantity of products for full-scale test burns; Develop data for the design of future commercial plants; Demonstrate plant and process performance; Provide capital and O&M cost data; and Support future LFC{trademark} technology licensing efforts. Each of these goals has been met and exceeded. The plant has been in operation for nearly 5 years, during which the LFC{trademark} process has been demonstrated and refined. Fuels were made, successfully burned, and a commercial-scale plant is now under contract for design and construction.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Testing of an advanced thermochemical conversion reactor system  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of work conducted by MTCI to verify and confirm experimentally the ability of the MTCI gasification process to effectively generate a high-quality, medium-Btu gas from a wider variety of feedstock and waste than that attainable in air-blown, direct gasification systems. The system's overall simplicity, due to the compact nature of the pulse combustor, and the high heat transfer rates attainable within the pulsating flow resonance tubes, provide a decided and near-term potential economic advantage for the MTCI indirect gasification system. The primary objective of this project was the design, construction, and testing of a Process Design Verification System for an indirectly heated, thermochemical fluid-bed reactor and a pulse combustor an an integrated system that can process alternative renewable sources of energy such as biomass, black liquor, municipal solid waste and waste hydrocarbons, including heavy oils into a useful product gas. The test objectives for the biomass portion of this program were to establish definitive performance data on biomass feedstocks covering a wide range of feedstock qualities and characteristics. The test objectives for the black liquor portion of this program were to verify the operation of the indirect gasifier on commercial black liquor containing 65 percent solids at several temperature levels and to characterize the bed carbon content, bed solids particle size and sulfur distribution as a function of gasification conditions. 6 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

443

Pyrolysis, combustion and steam gasification of various types of scrap tires for energy recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy recovery from carbonaceous materials is considered as reliable energy source. In this context, pyrolysis, combustion and gasification characteristics of scrap truck and car tire samples were investigated using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer ...

Jayaraman KANDASAMY; Iskender Gökalp

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

444

Analysis of a coal fired combined cycle with carried-heat gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the research of a more efficient, less costly, more environmentally responsible and less technically difficult method for generating electrical power from coal, the Carried-heat Gasification Combined Cycle (CG...

Xiangdong Xu; Weimin Zhu; Li Zhao; F. N. Fett

445

Steam gasification of epoxy circuit board in the presence of carbonates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To recover useful metals from end-of-life electronic devices and to convert plastic components from these devices into clean fuel gas, steam gasification of epoxy board samples was carried out ... monoxide were d...

Shangzhong Zhang; Kunio Yoshikawa…

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Underground coal gasification field experiment in the high-dipping coal seams  

SciTech Connect

In this article the experimental conditions and process of the underground gasification in the Woniushan Mine, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province are introduced, and the experimental results are analyzed. By adopting the new method of long-channel, big-section, and two-stage underground coal gasification, the daily gas production reaches about 36,000 m{sup 3}, with the maximum output of 103,700 m{sup 3}. The daily average heating value of air gas is 5.04 MJ/m{sup 3}, with 13.57 MJ/m{sup 3} for water gas. In combustible compositions of water gas, H{sub 2} contents stand at over 50%, with both CO and CH{sub 4} contents over 6%. Experimental results show that the counter gasification can form new temperature conditions and increase the gasification efficiency of coal seams.

Yang, L.H.; Liu, S.Q.; Yu, L.; Zhang, W. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources & Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Preparation of liquid motor fuel components from oil shale gasification products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of shale from two domestic deposits (Kashpirskoe and Leningradskoe) and the subsequent transformation of the products of this process into the components of liquid motor fuels were studied.

B. I. Katorgin; A. L. Lapidus

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Experimental Study on Co-gasification of Coal Liquefaction Residue and Petroleum Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study on co-gasification of coal liquefaction residue and petroleum coke in carbon dioxide was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The temperature of the experiment was 1173–1323 K, and the isothermal (1273 K) kinetics were ...

Xin Liu; Zhi-jie Zhou; Qi-jing Hu; Zheng-hua Dai; Fu-chen Wang

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Biomass characterization and reduced order modeling of mixed-feedstock gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been much effort to characterize and model coal for use in combustion and gasification. This work seeks to delineate the differences and similarities between biomass and coal, with emphasis on the state of the ...

Chapman, Alex J. (Alex Jacob)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DOE Pens New Agreement with Southern Company to Test Advanced Carbon-Capture & Gasification Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a new 5-year cooperative agreement with Southern Company to evaluate advanced carbon-capture and gasification technologies at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, Ala.

453

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

454

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Characteristics of air-blown gasification in a pebble bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature air-blown gasification is a new concept to utilize the waste heat from gasifier that is called multi-staged enthalpy extraction ... study, we have constructed a pebble bed gasifier and operated i...

Young Chan Choi; Jae Goo Lee; Jae Ho Kim…

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Co-Gasification of Biomass and Coal in a Pressurised Fluidised Bed Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a 3 year (1996 – 1998) project, partly funded by the EU as part of their JOULE 3 programme, experimental and theoretical research will be done on co-gasification of biomass and coal in a pressurised fluidi...

J. Andries; K. R. G. Hein

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

CFD simulation on the gasification of asphalt water slurry in an entrained flow gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification technology is suggested to utilize asphalt particles, which are produced in the heavy oil deep separation process of using coupled low temperature separation of solvent and post extraction residue. I...

Xingying Lan; Hanbin Zhong; Jinsen Gao

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Biomass gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel study on biomass-air gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas has been conducted. The study was designed… (more)

Legonda, Isack Amos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Simulation Analysis of Biomass Gasification in an Autothermal Gasifier Using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on simulation, biomass gasification in an autothermal gasifier is analyzed, the effects of the equivalence ... The results indicate that the temperature in the gasifier increases when the ER increases, whil...

Zhongbin Fu; Yaning Zhang; Hui Liu; Bo Zhang…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Influence of Proteins on the Hydrothermal Gasification and Liquefaction of Biomass. 1. Comparison of Different Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrothermal gasification of glucose with the addition of K2CO3 and two biomass feedstocks was performed in a continuous stirred tank reactor at 500 °C and 30 MPa. ...

Andrea Kruse; Andrzej Krupka; Valentin Schwarzkopf; Céline Gamard; Thomas Henningsen

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black liquor gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Technoeconomic Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment of an Integrated Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A biomass gasification combined-cycle power plant, consisting of a low pressure...®...Economic analyses were then performed to determine the levelized cost of electricity. The economic viability and efficiency of...

M. K. Mann; P. L. Spath

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Studies of the thermal circuit of an advanced integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results obtained from a study of the thermal circuit of a combined-cycle plant with coal gasification are presented, and ... of producer gas and calculated values of the combined-cycle power plant efficiency ...

D. G. Grigoruk; A. V. Turkin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

An update technology for integrated biomass gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A discussion is presented on the technical analysis of a 6.4 MWe integrated biomass gasification combined cycle (IBGCC) plant. It features three numbers ... producing 5.85 MW electrical power in open cycle and 55...

Paritosh Bhattacharya; Suman Dey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Gasification of Coffee Grounds in Dual Fluidized Bed:? Performance Evaluation and Parametric Investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of Coffee Grounds in Dual Fluidized Bed:? Performance Evaluation and Parametric Investigation ... Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. ... With a national technical program, we recently worked on converting this biomass waste into middle-caloric product gas. ...

Guangwen Xu; Takahiro Murakami; Toshiyuki Suda; Yoshiaki Matsuzawa; Hidehisa Tani

2006-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

Application of Gasification to the Conversion of Wood, Urban and Industrial Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification is widely accepted as a technological option for the production of synthesis gas (SG) via partial oxidation of heterogeneous organic matter such as, residual biomass, classified urban wastes (RDF)...

N. Abatzoglou; J.-C. Fernandez; L. Laramée…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Thermochemical Gasification of Biomass: Fuel Conversion, Hot Gas Cleanup and Gas Turbine Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-blown fluidized bed biomass gasification integrated with a gas- and steam turbine combined cycle (BIGCC) is a potentially attractive way to convert biomass into electricity and heat with a high efficiency.

J. Andries; W. de Jong; P. D. J. Hoppesteyn…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

468

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Orlando Gasification Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This environmental impact statement (EIS) has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) as amended (42 USC 4321 et seq.), Council on Environmental Quality regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR Part 1021). The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project which was proposed by Southern Company in partnership with the Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) and which has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program. The proposed project would demonstrate advanced power generation systems using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)

469

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant availability and reducing total installed costs in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. GE is evaluating the IGCC technology effects of total installed cost and availability through deployment of a multi-faceted approach in technology evaluation, constructability, and design methodology. Eastman Chemical Company will be supporting the GE effort on certain technologies by providing consulting on the evaluations and technology transfer phases of the project. The end result is aimed at reducing the time to technological maturity and enabling plants to reach higher values of availability in a shorter period of time and at a lower installed cost.

470

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-Up and Demonstration Project Research Triangle Institute Project Number: FE0000489 Project Description Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is designing, building, and testing the Warm Temperature Desulfurization Process (WDP) at pre-commercial scale (50 megawatt electric equivalent [MWe]) to remove more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). RTI is integrating this WDP technology with an activated methyl diethanolamine (aMDEA) solvent technology to separate 90% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from shifted syngas. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply approximately 20% of its coal-derived syngas as a slipstream to feed into the pre-commercial scale technologies being scaled-up.

471

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

71 71 The ENCOAL ® Mild Coal Gasification Project A DOE Assessment March 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

472

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-51726 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

473

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/ CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

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INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE VOLUME I - CONCEPTUAL COMMERCIAL EVALUATION OPTIONAL PROGRAM FINAL REPORT September 1, 2001 - December 31, 2005 By Dennis A. Horazak (Siemens), Program Manager Richard A. Newby (Siemens) Eugene E. Smeltzer (Siemens) Rachid B. Slimane (GTI) P. Vann Bush (GTI) James L. Aderhold, Jr. (GTI) Bruce G. Bryan (GTI) December 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-AC26-99FT40674 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Siemens Power Generation, Inc. 4400 Alafaya Trail Orlando, FL 32826 & Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

474

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

SciTech Connect

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Preparation and gasification of a Thailand coal-water fuel  

SciTech Connect

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a four-task program to assess the responsiveness of Wiang Haeng coal to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 37.4 wt% for the raw coal to about 20 wt% for the HWD coals. The energy density, determined at 500 cP, indicates an increase from 4450 to 6650 Btu/lb by hydrothermal treatment. Raw and HWD coal were then gasified at various mild gasification conditions of 700 C and 30 psig. The tests indicated that the coal is probably similar to other low-rank coals and will produce high levels of hydrogen and be fairly reactive.

Ness, R.O. Jr.; Anderson, C.M.; Musich, M.A.; Richter, J.J.; Dewall, R.A.; Young, B.C. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Nakanart, A. [Ministry of Industry, Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z