National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for black carbon mass

  1. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore »used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  2. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore »used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  3. Exploiting simultaneous observational constraints on mass and absorption to estimate the global direct radiative forcing of black carbon and brown carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, J. P.

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a leading climate warming agent, yet uncertainties on the global direct radiative forcing (DRF) remain large. Here we expand a global model simulation (GEOS-Chem) of BC to include the ...

  4. Black Holes of Negative Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-05-06

    I demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, regions of negative energy density can undergo gravitational collapse into a black hole. The resultant exterior black hole spacetimes necessarily have negative mass and non-trivial topology. A full theory of quantum gravity, in which topology-changing processes take place, could give rise to such spacetimes.

  5. Black carbon contribution to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, P.; Johnson, B.; Kou, L.; Wong, J.

    1996-12-31

    Before the onset of industrial revolution the only important source of black carbon in the atmosphere was biomass burning. Today, black carbon production is divided between the biomass and fossil fuel burning. Black carbon is a major agent responsible for absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols. Thus black carbon makes other aerosols less efficient in their role of reflecting solar radiation and cooling the earth-atmosphere system. Black carbon also contributes to the absorption of solar radiation by clouds and snow cover. The authors present the results of black carbon concentrations measurements in the atmosphere, in cloud water, in rain and snow melt water collected during the 1992--1996 time period over the southern Nova Scotia. Their results are put into the global and historical perspective by comparing them with the compilation of past measurements at diverse locations and with their measurements of black carbon concentrations in the Greenland and Antarctic ice cores. Black carbon contribution to the global warming is estimated, and compared to the carbon dioxide warming, using the radiative forcing caused by the black carbon at the top of the atmosphere.

  6. Extraneous Carbon Assessments in Radiocarbon Measurements of Black Carbon in Environmental Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coppola, Alysha; Ziolkowski, L. A.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    2013-01-01

    rived (black/elemental) carbon in soils and sediments usingbon measurements of black carbon in aerosols and oceanMWI, Noack AG. 2000. Black carbon in soils and sediments:

  7. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    black carbon and carbon dioxide emissions. Energ. Policyreduces predicted carbon dioxide emissions estimation by upincrease rates of carbon dioxide emissions [135,136]. Due to

  8. Morphology of PolyethyleneCarbon Black Composites G. BEAUCAGE,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    -ray scattering (SAXS) study of a conductive grade of carbon black and carbon black­polymer composites and a power-law scaling of polydispersity. One use of conductive black­polyethylene composites is in circuit(methyl methacrylate); carbon black; filler; composite; conductivity; percolation INTRODUCTION The morphology

  9. Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Uehara

    2002-05-25

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

  10. Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions Liquid Hydrogen. Note: Black carbon does not deplete ozone. What happens is the black carbon emissions from the rocket. Other black carbon emissions: The number one contributor to black carbon is burning biomass. Also

  11. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a...

  12. The mass function of high redshift seed black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Lodato; Priyamvada Natarajan

    2007-02-13

    In this paper we derive the mass function of seed black holes that result from the central mass concentrated via disc accretion in collapsed haloes at redshift $z\\approx 15$. Using standard arguments including stability, we show that these pre-galactic discs can assemble a significant mass concentration in the inner regions, providing fuel for the formation and initial growth of super-massive black holes. Assuming that these mass concentrations do result in central seed black holes, we determine the mass distribution of these seeds as a function of key halo properties. The seed mass distribution determined here turns out to be asymmetric and skewed to higher masses. Starting with these initial seeds, building up to $10^9$ solar masses by $z = 6$ to power the bright quasars is not a problem in the standard LCDM cosmogony. These seed black holes in gas rich environments are likely to grow into the supermassive black holes at later times via mergers and accretion. Gas accretion onto these seeds at high redshift will produce miniquasars that likely play an important role in the reionization of the Universe. Some of these seed black holes on the other hand could be wandering in galaxy haloes as a consequence of frequent mergers, powering the off-nuclear ultra-luminous X-ray sources detected in nearby galaxies.

  13. Accretion onto the First Stellar Mass Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo A. Alvarez; John H. Wise; Tom Abel

    2008-11-07

    The first stars in the universe, forming at redshifts z>15 in minihalos with masses of order 10^6 Msun, may leave behind black holes as their remnants. These objects could conceivably serve as "seeds" for much larger black holes observed at redshifts z~6. We study the growth of the remnant black holes through accretion including for the first time the emitted accretion radiation with adaptive mesh refinement cosmological radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. The effects of photo-ionization and heating dramatically affect the accretion flow from large scales, resulting in negligible mass growth of the black hole. We compare cases with the accretion luminosity included and neglected to show that the accretion radiation drastically changes the environment within 100 pc of the black hole, where gas temperatures are increased by an order of magnitude. The gas densities are reduced and further star formation in the same minihalo prevented for the two hundred million years of evolution we followed. These calculations show that even without the radiative feedback included most seed black holes do not gain mass as efficiently as has been hoped for in previous theories, implying that black hole remnants of Pop III stars that formed in minihalos are not likely to be the origin of miniquasars. Most importantly, however, these calculations demonstrate that if early stellar mass black holes are indeed accreting close to the Bondi-Hoyle rate with ten percent efficiency they have a dramatic local effect in regulating star formation in the first galaxies.

  14. Masses of Stellar Black Holes and Testing Theories of Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Postnov; A. M. Cherepashchuk

    2004-01-22

    We analyze the mass distribution of stellar black holes derived from the light and radial velocity curves of optical stars in close binary systems using dynamical methods. The systematic errors inherent in this approach are discussed. These are associated primarily with uncertainties in models for the contribution from gaseous structures to the optical brightness of the systems under consideration. The mass distribution is nearly flat in the range 4-15M_sun. This is compared with the mass distribution for black holes in massive close binaries, which can be manifest as ultraluminous X-ray sources (L_x > 10^39 erg/s) observed in other galaxies. If the X-ray luminosities of these objects correspond to the Eddington limit, the black-hole mass distribution should be described by a power law, which is incompatible with the flat shape derived dynamically from observations of close binaries in our Galaxy. One possible explanation of this discrepancy is the rapid evaporation of stellar-mass black holes predicted in recent multi-dimensional models of gravity. This hypothesis can be verifed by measuring the stellar black-hole mass spectrum or finding isolated or binary black holes with masses below 3M_sun.

  15. The mass function of high redshift seed black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodato, G; Lodato, Giuseppe; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we derive the mass function of seed black holes that result from the central mass concentrated via disc accretion in collapsed haloes at redshift $z\\approx 15$. Using standard arguments including stability, we show that these pre-galactic discs can assemble a significant mass concentration in the inner regions, providing fuel for the formation and initial growth of super-massive black holes. Assuming that these mass concentrations do result in central seed black holes, we determine the mass distribution of these seeds as a function of key halo properties. The seed mass distribution determined here turns out to be asymmetric and skewed to higher masses. Starting with these initial seeds, building up to $10^9$ solar masses by $z = 6$ to power the bright quasars is not a problem in the standard LCDM cosmogony. These seed black holes in gas rich environments are likely to grow into the supermassive black holes at later times via mergers and accretion. Gas accretion onto these seeds at high redshift ...

  16. Does black carbon and humic materials in snow and ice Supervisor: Martin D. King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    ) burner technology changes the and optics properties of black carbon change. As little as 10 ng of Black carbon in snowpack is a factor of two more effective than carbon dioxide in changing global air with different black carbon and humic loadings, modeling the optical properties of the snow/ice and measuring

  17. Proposed Studentship Does black carbon and humic materials in snow and ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    ) black carbon is increasing or (b) burner technology changes the and optics properties of black carbon carbon dioxide in changing global air temperatures.2 The successful candidate will set-up and conductProposed Studentship Does black carbon and humic materials in snow and ice decay? Supervisors: Dr

  18. Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo Stephen Warren, University wavelengths: ice is nearly transparent. Absorptive impurities: Black carbon (soot) Brown carbon (organics broadband albedo: 83% 71% (2) by addition of black carbon (BC) (20 ppb): 0.5% for r = 100 µm 1.6% for r

  19. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tami C. Bond; Haolin Sun

    2005-08-15

    Field measurements and model results have recently shown that aerosols may have important climatic impacts. One line of inquiry has investigated whether reducing climate-warming soot or black carbon aerosol emissions can form a viable component of mitigating global warming. Black carbon is produced by poor combustion, from our example hard coal cooking fires for and industrial pulverized coal boilers. The authors review and acknowledge scientific arguments against considering aerosols and greenhouse gases in a common framework, including the differences in the physical mechanisms of climate change and relevant time scales. It is argued that such a joint consideration is consistent with the language of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Results from published climate-modeling studies are synthesized to obtain a global warming potential for black carbon relative to that of CO{sub 2} (680 on a 100 year basis). This calculation enables a discussion of cost-effectiveness for mitigating the largest sources of black carbon. It is found that many emission reductions are either expensive or difficult to enact when compared with greenhouse gases, particularly in Annex I countries. Finally, a role for black carbon in climate mitigation strategies is proposed that is consistent with the apparently conflicting arguments raised during the discussion. Addressing these emissions is a promising way to reduce climatic interference primarily for nations that have not yet agreed to address greenhouse gas emissions and provides the potential for a parallel climate agreement. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Dynamical mass ejection from black hole-neutron star binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutarou Kyutoku; Kunihito Ioka; Hirotada Okawa; Masaru Shibata; Keisuke Taniguchi

    2015-08-19

    We investigate properties of material ejected dynamically in the merger of black hole-neutron star binaries by numerical-relativity simulations. We systematically study the dependence of ejecta properties on the mass ratio of the binary, spin of the black hole, and equation of state of the neutron-star matter. Dynamical mass ejection is driven primarily by tidal torque, and the ejecta is much more anisotropic than that from binary neutron star mergers. In particular, the dynamical ejecta is concentrated around the orbital plane with a half opening angle of 10--20deg and often sweeps out only a half of the plane. The ejecta mass can be as large as ~0.1M_sun, and the velocity is subrelativistic with ~0.2--0.3c for typical cases. The ratio of the ejecta mass to the bound mass (disk and fallback components) is larger, and the ejecta velocity is larger, for larger values of the binary mass ratio, i.e., for larger values of the black-hole mass. The remnant black hole-disk system receives a kick velocity of O(100)km/s due to the ejecta linear momentum, and this easily dominates the kick velocity due to gravitational radiation. Structures of postmerger material, velocity distribution of the dynamical ejecta, fallback rates, and gravitational waves are also investigated. We also discuss the effect of ejecta anisotropy on electromagnetic counterparts, specifically a macronova/kilonova and synchrotron radio emission, developing analytic models.

  1. Controls on black carbon storage in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Masiello, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Physical and chemical protection of soil organic carbonin three agricultural soils with different contents ofcalcium carbonate, Aust. J. Soil Res. , 38, 1005 – 1016.

  2. Black carbon refractive index and morphology: a Laboratory study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    cake 2.6 Heavy fuel oil 1.5 Figure 2: Global sources by fuel types [7]. A wide range of fuel types radiative properties derived from Mie theory and therefore limited to the assumption of spherical aerosol microphysical aerosol models, such as UKCA. This study derives the refractive indices black carbon (BC) aerosol

  3. Comparative analysis of black carbon in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    mass difference, demineralization HF (2%) I•C MAS NMRexcept for a final demineralization step (HF) beforecarried out following demineralization. Although the number

  4. Mass and Free Energy of Lovelock Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Kastor; Sourya Ray; Jennie Traschen

    2011-06-20

    An explicit formula for the ADM mass of an asymptotically AdS black hole in a generic Lovelock gravity theory is presented, identical in form to that in Einstein gravity, but multiplied by a function of the Lovelock coupling constants and the AdS curvature radius. A Gauss' law type formula relates the mass, which is an integral at infinity, to an expression depending instead on the horizon radius. This and other thermodynamic quantities, such as the free energy, are then analyzed in the limits of small and large horizon radius, yielding results that are independent of the detailed choice of Lovelock couplings. In even dimensions, the temperature diverges in both limits, implying the existence of a minimum temperature for black holes. The negative free energy of sufficiently large black holes implies the existence of a Hawking-Page transition. In odd dimensions the temperature still diverges for large black holes, which again have negative free energy. However, the temperature vanishes as the horizon radius tends to zero and sufficiently small black holes have positive specific heat.

  5. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  6. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

    2012-04-25

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  7. CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-06-20

    We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

  8. Void morphology in polyethylene/carbon black composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, D.W.M.; Wartenberg, M.; Schwartz, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and contrast matching techniques is used to determine the size and quantity of voids incorporated during fabrication of polyethylene/carbon black composites. The analysis used to extract void morphology from SANS data is based on the three-phase model of microcrack determination via small angle x-rayscattering (SAXS) developed by W.Wu{sup 12} and applied to particulate reinforced composites.

  9. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  10. Mesolensing Explorations of Nearby Masses: From Planets to Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Di Stefano

    2007-12-20

    Nearby masses can have a high probability of lensing stars in a distant background field. High-probability lensing, or mesolensing, can therefore be used to dramatically increase our knowledge of dark and dim objects in the solar neighborhood, where it can discover and study members of the local dark population (free-floating planets, low-mass dwarfs, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and stellar mass black holes). We can measure the mass and transverse velocity of those objects discovered (or already known), and determine whether or not they are in binaries with dim companions. We explore these and other applications of mesolensing, including the study of forms of matter that have been hypothesized but not discovered, such as intermediate-mass black holes, dark matter objects free-streaming through the Galactic disk, and planets in the outermost regions of the solar system. In each case we discuss the feasibility of deriving results based on present-day monitoring systems, and also consider the vistas that will open with the advent of all-sky monitoring in the era of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

  11. Measurement of Mass and Spin of Black Holes with QPOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2007-10-18

    There are now four low mass X-ray binaries with black holes which show twin resonant-like HFQPOs. Similar QPOs might have been found in Sgr A*. I review the power spectral density distributions of the three X-ray flares and the six NIR flares published for Sgr A* so far, in order to look for more similarities than just the frequencies between the microquasar black holes and Sgr A*. The three X-ray flares of Sgr A* are re-analysed in an identical way and white noise probabilities from their power density distributions are given for the periods reported around 1100 s. Progress of the resonant theory using the anomalous orbital velocity effect is summarized.

  12. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, O.L.

    2010-01-01

    on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophysical Researchresponse from black carbon in snow, Journal of Geophysicaltypes - light extinction in snow, Journal De Physique, 48,

  13. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammes, K.; Torn, M.S.; Lapenas, A.G.; Schmidt, M.W.I.

    2008-09-15

    Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m{sup -2}, or about 7-10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182-541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene poly carboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  14. Bond et al., 2012 26 March 2012 Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties, following carbon dioxide. Sources that emit black carbon also emit other short- lived species that maypage 1 Bond et al., 2012 26 March 2012 Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system

  15. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  16. GEOC: Division of Geochemistry 208 -Copper sequestration by black carbon in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    GEOC: Division of Geochemistry 208 - Copper sequestration by black carbon in contaminated soil the quality of agricultural products and underground water and impacts the stability of soil organic carbon

  17. An Intermediate-Mass Black Hole Candidate in M51?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnshaw, H M

    2015-01-01

    We present the current results of an investigation into M51 ULX-7, using archival data from XMM-Newton, Chandra and NuSTAR, and optical and radio data from HST and VLA. The source has a consistently hard power-law X-ray spectrum and high short-term variability. This is unusual variability behaviour for a ULX, as we would expect highly variable ULXs to have soft energy spectra. The power spectrum features a break at ~1e-3 Hz, from low frequency spectral index alpha=0.1 to high frequency spectral index alpha=0.8, analogous to the low frequency break found in power spectra of black holes accreting in the low/hard state. We do not observe a corresponding high frequency break, however taking the white noise level as a frequency lower limit of the break, we can calculate a black hole mass upper limit of 9.12e4 solar masses, assuming that the ULX is in the low/hard state. While there is no radio detection, we find a flux density upper limit of 87 micro-Jy/beam. Using the X-ray/radio fundamental plane, we calculate a...

  18. PROCESSING OF BLACK CARBON IN THE MIXED SACRAMENTO URBAN-BIOGENIC ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROCESSING OF BLACK CARBON IN THE MIXED SACRAMENTO URBAN-BIOGENIC ENVIRONMENT Sedlacek III, A. J Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 BNL-94426-2010-AB #12;Processing of Black Carbon in the Mixed Sacramento absorbing properties of the Sacramento BC emissions. Towards this end, the degree of BC coating

  19. Calculating the mass spectrum of primordial black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sam Young; Christian T. Byrnes; Misao Sasaki

    2015-03-04

    We reinspect the calculation for the mass fraction of primordial black holes (PBHs) which are formed from primordial perturbations, finding that performing the calculation using the comoving curvature perturbation $\\mathcal{R}_{c}$ in the standard way vastly overestimates the number of PBHs, by many orders of magnitude. This is because PBHs form shortly after horizon entry, meaning modes significantly larger than the PBH are unobservable and should not affect whether a PBH forms or not - this important effect is not taken into account by smoothing the distribution in the standard fashion. We discuss alternative methods and argue that the density contrast, $\\Delta$, should be used instead as super-horizon modes are damped by a factor $k^{2}$. We make a comparison between using a Press-Schechter approach and peaks theory, finding that the two are in close agreement in the region of interest. We also investigate the effect of varying the spectral index, and the running of the spectral index, on the abundance of primordial black holes.

  20. Effects of intermediate mass black holes on nuclear star clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-20

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  1. Black carbon in the Gulf of Maine : new insights into inputs and cycling of combustion-derived organic carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Déborah Xanat, 1978-

    2008-01-01

    Emissions of black carbon (BC), the soot and char formed during incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, have increased over the last century and are estimated to be between 8 and 270 Tg BC/yr. BC may affect ...

  2. Powerful, Rotating Disk Winds from Stellar-mass Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, J M; Kaastra, J; Kallman, T; King, A L; Proga, D; Raymond, J; Reynolds, C S

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ionized X-ray disk winds observed in the Fe K band of four stellar-mass black holes observed with Chandra, including 4U 1630-47, GRO J1655-40, H 1743-322, and GRS 1915+105. High-resolution photoionization grids were generated in order to model the data. Third-order gratings spectra were used to resolve complex absorption profiles into atomic effects and multiple velocity components. The Fe XXV line is found to be shaped by contributions from the intercombination line (in absorption), and the Fe XXVI line is detected as a spin-orbit doublet. The data require 2-3 absorption zones, depending on the source. The fastest components have velocities approaching or exceeding 0.01c, increasing mass outflow rates and wind kinetic power by orders of magnitude over prior single-zone models. The first-order spectra require re-emission from the wind, broadened by a degree that is loosely consistent with Keplerian orbital velocities at the photoionization radius. This suggests that disk winds are ro...

  3. Formation of carbon black as a byproduct of pyrolysis of light hydrocarbons in plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H.G.; Zhang, X.B.; Li, F.; Xie, K.C.; Dai, B.; Fan, Y.S.

    1997-12-31

    The light hydrocarbons undergo a complex reaction of flash hydropyrolysis in a DC arc H{sub 2}/Ar plasma jet at atmospheric pressure and average temperatures between 1,500 K and 4,000 K. The raw material was LPG. Acetylene is the major product. Carbon black is a byproduct. Carbon black is characterized with XRD, TEM, and adsorption-and-desorption of liquid nitrogen, respectively. The present work proposes to use the plasma process to replace the classical thermal process in order to produce acetylene directly from LPG with carbon black being a byproduct.

  4. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  5. Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodrow, Philip Travis

    1996-01-01

    The focus of this work is to design a bench-scale apparatus, for laboratory applications, that will perform solid processing operations for carbon black obtained through the thermal catalytic depolymerization of scrap tires. These operations...

  6. Black carbon transport and deposition to the California mountain snow pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, Odelle L.

    2008-01-01

    soils on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys Res Lett,1996), Albedo of dirty snow during conditions of melt, Waterfrom black carbon in snow, J Geophys Res-Atmos, 112, -.

  7. Modeling Carbon Black Reinforcement in Rubber Compound A. van de Walle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van de Walle, Axel

    of reinforcement and energy dissipation. Our study of the e ect of carbon black used as a ller in elastomers a behavior which compares favorably with experimental results. Ecole Polytechnique de Montr eal

  8. Does the mass of a black hole decrease due to the accretion of phantom energy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Changjun; Chen Xuelei; Faraoni, Valerio; Shen Yougen

    2008-07-15

    According to Babichev et al., the accretion of a phantom test fluid onto a Schwarzschild black hole will induce the mass of the black hole to decrease, however the backreaction was ignored in their calculation. Using new exact solutions describing black holes in a background Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, we find that the physical black hole mass may instead increase due to the accretion of phantom energy. If this is the case, and the future universe is dominated by phantom dark energy, the black hole apparent horizon and the cosmic apparent horizon will eventually coincide and, after that, the black hole singularity will become naked in finite comoving time before the big rip occurs, violating the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  9. Black Carbon Radiative Forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Gu, Yu; Qi, L.; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-11-28

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. Our best estimate of the annual BC snow albedo forcing in the Plateau is 2.9 W m-2 (uncertainty: 1.5–5.0 W m-226 ). We find that BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. Our best estimate of the annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 (uncertainty: 0.7–4.3 W m-230 ) in the Plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  10. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  11. Australian climatecarbon cycle feedback reduced by soil black carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Annual emissions of carbon dioxide from soil organic carbon are an order of magnitude greater than all anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions taken together1 . Global warming is likely to increase the decomposition of soil organic carbon, and thus the release of carbon dioxide from soils2­5 , creating a positive

  12. New methodology for estimating biofuel consumption for cooking: Atmospheric emissions of black carbon and sulfur dioxide from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    carbon and sulfur dioxide from India Gazala Habib,1 Chandra Venkataraman,1 Manish Shrivastava,2 Rangan a narrower bound than in previous works. From this new activity data and currently used black carbon emission factors, the black carbon (BC) emissions from biofuel combustion were estimated as 220 (65­760) Gg yrÀ1

  13. Stability of black carbon in soils across a climatic gradient Chih-Hsin Cheng,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    5 March 2008; published 4 June 2008. [1] The recalcitrant properties of black carbon (BC) grant carbon dioxide in soils [Lehmann et al., 2006; Lehmann, 2007a, 2007b]. [3] However, the notionStability of black carbon in soils across a climatic gradient Chih-Hsin Cheng,1,2 Johannes Lehmann

  14. Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation to seeping fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation of carbon derived from the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), the oxidation of organic matter and from sea water. Methane is the dominant component among other hydrocarbon gases in these sediments. Its

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Long-term black carbon dynamics in cultivated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    the term BC is used to describe the residual product from incomplete combustion of biomass either by land XPS Introduction Black carbon (BC) is a C-rich organic material derived from incomplete combustion climate change largely through anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide originat- ing from fossil fuel

  16. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: soil carbon sequestration; carbon budget;of an energy efficient carbon sequestration mechanism, asin the later section on carbon sequestration. In atmospheric

  17. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajan, Salil [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

    2013-01-01

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $\\textnormal W^{-1} \\textnormal m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $\\textnormal PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  18. Department of Earth Sciences www.rhul.ac.uk/earthsciences Page 1 of 1 Does black carbon and humic materials in snow and ice decay?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    the and optics properties of black carbon change. As little as 10 ng of Black carbon in 1 g of snow can cause 1 of two more effective than carbon dioxide in changing global air temperatures.2 The successful candidateDepartment of Earth Sciences www.rhul.ac.uk/earthsciences Page 1 of 1 Does black carbon and humic

  19. An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

    2012-01-10

    The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {<=} R{sub 50} < 0.70) or Class C (R{sub 50} < 0.50) recalcitrance/carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

  20. Inference on gravitational waves from coalescences of stellar-mass compact objects and intermediate-mass black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haster, Carl-Johan; Berry, Christopher P L; Stevenson, Simon; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescences of neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of $\\gtrsim 100$ solar masses represent one of the exciting possible sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors. These sources can provide definitive evidence for the existence of IMBHs, probe globular-cluster dynamics, and potentially serve as tests of general relativity. We analyse the accuracy with which we can measure the masses and spins of the IMBH and its companion in intermediate-mass ratio coalescences. We find that we can identify an IMBH with a mass above $100 ~ M_\\odot$ with $95\\%$ confidence provided the massive body exceeds $130 ~ M_\\odot$. For source masses above $\\sim200 ~ M_\\odot$, the best measured parameter is the frequency of the quasi-normal ringdown. Consequently, the total mass is measured better than the chirp mass for massive binaries, but the total mass is still partly degenerate with spin, which cannot be accurately measured. Low-frequency detector sen...

  1. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-06

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth’s climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second most important individual climate-forcing agent in the industrial era, following carbon dioxide. Sources that emit black carbon also emit other short- lived species that may either cool or warm climate. Climate forcings from co-emitted species are estimated and used in the framework described herein. When the principal effects of co- emissions, including cooling agents such as sulfur dioxide, are included in net forcing, energy-related sources (fossil-fuel and biofuel) have a net climate forcing of +0.004 (-0.62 to +0.57) W m-2 during the first year after emission. For a few of these sources, such as diesel engines and possibly residential biofuels, warming is strong enough that eliminating all emissions from these sources would reduce net climate forcing (i.e., produce cooling). When open burning emissions, which emit high levels of organic matter, are included in the total, the best estimate of net industrial-era climate forcing by all black- carbon-rich sources becomes slightly negative (-0.08 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of -1.23 to +0.81 W m-2). The uncertainties in net climate forcing from black-carbon-rich sources are substantial, largely due to lack of knowledge about cloud interactions with both black carbon and co-emitted organic carbon. In prioritizing potential black-carbon mitigation actions, non-science factors, such as technical feasibility, costs, policy design, and implementation feasibility play important roles. The major sources of black carbon are presently in different stages with regard to the feasibility for near-term mitigation. This assessment, by evaluating the large number and complexity of the associated physical and radiative processes in black-carbon climate forcing, sets a baseline from which to improve future climate forcing estimates.

  2. The balance of power: accretion and feedback in stellar mass black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fender, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the population of stellar-mass black holes in our galaxy and beyond, which are the extreme endpoints of massive star evolution. In particular we focus on how we can attempt to balance the available accretion energy with feedback to the environment via radiation, jets and winds, considering also possible contributions to the energy balance from black hole spin and advection. We review quantitatively the methods which are used to estimate these quantities, regardless of the details of the astrophysics close to the black hole. Once these methods have been outlined, we work through an outburst of a black hole X-ray binary system, estimating the flow of mass and energy through the different accretion rates and states. While we focus on feedback from stellar mass black holes in X-ray binary systems, we also consider the applicability of what we have learned to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. As an important control sample we also review the coupling between accretion an...

  3. Mass and Free energy in Thermodynamics of Squashed Kaluza-Klein Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasunari Kurita; Hideki Ishihara

    2007-08-01

    The Abbott-Deser mass, the Hamiltonian and the Komar mass of the 5-dimensional Kaluza-Klein black hole with squashed horizons take different values. Introducing a new couple of thermodynamic variables for the Komar mass, we show that each mass can be interpreted as a thermodynamic potential with its own natural variables, i.e. all masses are related to each other by the Legendre transformations. It is found that the new variables and the gravitational tension represent the squashing of the outer horizon.

  4. Steam Production from Waste Stack Gases in a Carbon Black Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istre, R. I.

    1981-01-01

    Waste stack gases from carbon black plant bag filters are used as fuel to produce superheated steam - G25 PSIG and 7500F. This steam is out into a steam header that serves Conoco plants in the Lake Charles, Louisiana area. Combustion of the waste...

  5. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols T. Novakov,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols T. Novakov,1 V. Ramanathan,2 J. E the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil- fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about

  6. Effect of Temperature on Carbon-Black Agglomeration in Hydrocarbon Liquid with Adsorbed Dispersant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction The effect of temperature on the stability of colloidal suspensions is important in many Suspensions of carbon black in oil, stabilized with adsorbed polyisobutylene succinimide (PIBSI) dispersant temperature has an effect on the stabilization of colloidal particles and, hence, an enormous impact on flow

  7. Holography, mass area relation and discrete quantum spectrum of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lochan, Kinjalk

    2015-01-01

    The quantum genesis of Hawking radiation is a long-standing puzzle in black hole physics. Semi-classically one can argue that the spectrum of radiation emitted by a black hole look very much sparse unlike what is expected from a thermal object. It was demonstrated through a simple quantum model that a quantum black hole will retain a discrete profile, at least in the weak energy regime. However, it was suggested that this discreteness might be an artifact of the simplicity of eigenspectrum of the model considered. Different quantum theories can, in principle, give rise to different complicated spectra and make the radiation from black hole dense enough in transition lines, to make them look continuous in profile. We show that such a hope from a geometry-quantized black hole is not realized as long as large enough black holes are dubbed with holographic relation which tells that the entropy of the black hole can be obtained from the area of the horizon and they have a classical mass area relation. We show that...

  8. Constraining the formation of black-holes in short-period Black-Hole Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Repetto, Serena

    2015-01-01

    The formation of stellar mass black holes is still very uncertain. Two main uncertainties are the amount of mass ejected in the supernova event (if any) and the magnitude of the natal kick the black hole receives at birth (if any). Repetto et al. (2012), studying the position of Galactic X-ray binaries containing black holes, found evidence for black holes receiving high natal kicks at birth. In this Paper we extend that study, taking into account the previous binary evolution of the sources as well. The seven short-period black-hole X-ray binaries that we use, are compact binaries consisting of a low-mass star orbiting a black hole in a period less than $1$ day. We trace their binary evolution backwards in time, from the current observed state of mass-transfer, to the moment the black hole was formed, and we add the extra information on the kinematics of the binaries. We find that several systems could be explained by no natal kick, just mass ejection, while for two systems (and possibly more) a high kick is...

  9. Modeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    . Introduction Linkages between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global thermal properties have forcedModeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake the examination of biospheric carbon flows and pools. Variability in carbon storage or the net ecosystem exchange

  10. Effect of composite microstructure on electrical and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl acetate) composites with carbon black and clay. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriyala, Sethu M.

    2009-05-15

    black with a primary particle size of 20 nm (a) and a schematic of networked high structure carbon black (b). Clay Overview Hydrous sodium or aluminium phyllosilicates which are typically less than 2 ?m in diameter are known as clay [44, 45...

  11. Enhanced Solar Energy Absorption by Internally-mixed Black Carbon in Snow Grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanner, M. G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Cheng; Penner, Joyce E.; Jiao, C.

    2012-05-30

    Here we explore light absorption by snowpack containing black carbon (BC) particles residing within ice grains. Basic considerations of particle volumes and BC/snow mass concentrations show that there are generally 0:05-109 BC particles for each ice grain. This suggests that internal BC is likely distributed as multiple inclusions within ice grains, and thus the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) (Chylek and Srivastava, 1983) is a more appropriate optical representation for BC/ice composites than coated-sphere or standard mixing approximations. DEMA calculations show that the 460 nm absorption cross-section of BC/ice composites, normalized to the mass of BC, is typically enhanced by factors of 1.8-2.1 relative to interstitial BC. BC effective radius is the dominant cause of variation in this enhancement, compared with ice grain size and BC volume fraction. We apply two atmospheric aerosol models that simulate interstitial and within-hydrometeor BC lifecycles. Although only {approx}2% of the atmospheric BC burden is cloud-borne, 71-83% of the BC deposited to global snow and sea-ice surfaces occurs within hydrometeors. Key processes responsible for within-snow BC deposition are development of hydrophilic coatings on BC, activation of liquid droplets, and subsequent snow formation through riming or ice nucleation by other species and aggregation/accretion of ice particles. Applying deposition fields from these aerosol models in offline snow and sea-ice simulations, we calculate that 32-73% of BC in global surface snow resides within ice grains. This fraction is smaller than the within-hydrometeor deposition fraction because meltwater flux preferentially removes internal BC, while sublimation and freezing within snowpack expose internal BC. Incorporating the DEMA into a global climate model, we simulate increases in BC/snow radiative forcing of 43-86%, relative to scenarios that apply external optical properties to all BC. We show that snow metamorphism driven by diffusive vapor transfer likely proceeds too slowly to alter the mass of internal BC while it is radiatively active, but neglected processes like wind pumping and convection may play much larger roles. These results suggest that a large portion of BC in surface snowpack may reside within ice grains and increase BC/snow radiative forcing, although measurements to evaluate this are lacking. Finally, previous studies of BC/snow forcing that neglected this absorption enhancement are not necessarily biased low, because of application of absorption-enhancing sulfate coatings to hydrophilic BC, neglect of coincident absorption by dust in snow, and implicit treatment of cloud-borne BC resulting in longer-range transport.

  12. TEM Observations of Corrosion Behaviors of Platinized Carbon Blacks under Thermal and Electrochemical Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.Y.; Zhang, J.L.; Yu, P.T.; Zhang, J.X.; Makharia, R.; More, Karren Leslie; Stach, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Carbon blacks such as Vulcan XC-72 are widely used to support platinum (Pt) or Pt alloy catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Despite their widespread use, carbon blacks are susceptible to corrosion during fuel cell operations. In this work, the corrosion behaviors of platinized Vulcan XC-72 nanoparticles under thermal and electrochemical conditions were monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal corrosion experiment was carried out in a gas-cell TEM, which allows for a direct observation of the thermal oxidation behavior of the nanoparticles. The electrochemical corrosion experiment was performed outside of the TEM by loading the nanoparticles on a TEM grid and then electrochemically corroding them step by step followed by taking TEM images from exactly the same nanoparticles after each step. This work revealed four types of structural changes: (i) total removal of structurally weak aggregates, (ii) breakdown of aggregates via neck-breaking, (iii) center-hollowed primary particles caused by an inside-out corrosion starting from the center to outer region, and (iv) gradual decrease in the size of primary particles caused by a uniform removal of material from the surface. These structural changes took place in sequence or simultaneously depending on the competition of carbon corrosion dynamical processes. The results obtained from this work provide insight on carbon corrosion and its effects on fuel cells' long-term performance and durability.

  13. Constraining the Lifetime of QSOs with Present-day Mass Function of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hosokawa

    2002-05-13

    Using the theoretical models of the QSO formation, we can reproduce optical QSO luminosity functions (LFs) at high redshifts (z > 2.2). Two different models can reproduce LFs successfully, though the lifetime of QSOs, t_Q, and the relation between the black hole mass and the host halo mass are different each other; t_Q = 10^6yr, in one model, t_Q > 10^7yr, in other models. Here, we propose a method to break this degeneracy. We calculate the mass function of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at z=2.5, and compare the result with the current mass function obtained by Salucci et al.(1999). In the shorter lifetime model, the mass function at z=2.5 exceeds that of z=0.0 by one order of magnitude, then it should be ruled out. We conclude that the lifetime is at least t_Q > 10^7yr. Next, we examine the difference of the formation epoch of SMBHs existing at z=3.0 for each model under the model assumptions. We simply discuss the difference of formation epoch as another possible model-discriminator.

  14. A population of relic intermediate-mass black holes in the halo of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashkov, Valery; Madau, Piero

    2014-01-10

    If 'seed' central black holes were common in the subgalactic building blocks that merged to form present-day massive galaxies, then relic intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) should be present in the Galactic bulge and halo. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate the N-body Via Lactea II high-resolution simulation with black holes, and assess the size, properties, and detectability of the leftover population. The method assigns a black hole to the most tightly bound central particle of each subhalo at infall according to an extrapolation of the M {sub BH}-?{sub *} relation, and self-consistently follows the accretion and disruption of Milky Way progenitor dwarfs and their holes in a cosmological 'live' host from high redshift to today. We show that, depending on the minimum stellar velocity dispersion, ? {sub m}, below which central black holes are assumed to be increasingly rare, as many as ?2000 (? {sub m} = 3 km s{sup –1}) or as few as ?70 (? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup –1}) IMBHs may be left wandering in the halo of the Milky Way today. The fraction of IMBHs forced from their hosts by gravitational recoil is ? 20%. We identify two main Galactic subpopulations, 'naked' IMBHs, whose host subhalos were totally destroyed after infall, and 'clothed' IMBHs residing in dark matter satellites that survived tidal stripping. Naked IMBHs typically constitute 40%-50% of the total and are more centrally concentrated. We show that, in the ? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup –1} scenario, the clusters of tightly bound stars that should accompany naked IMBHs would be fainter than m{sub V} = 16 mag, spatially resolvable, and have proper motions of 0.1-10 mas yr{sup –1}. Their detection may provide an observational tool to constrain the formation history of massive black holes in the early universe.

  15. A 5x10^9 Solar Mass Black Hole in NGC 1277 from Adaptive Optics Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Jonelle L; Gebhardt, Karl; Y?ld?r?m, Ak?n; Richstone, Douglas O; Gültekin, Kayhan; Husemann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 1277 is thought to host one of the largest black holes known, however the black hole mass measurement is based on low spatial resolution spectroscopy. In this paper, we present Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrometer observations assisted by adaptive optics. We map out the galaxy's stellar kinematics within ~440 pc of the nucleus with an angular resolution that allows us to probe well within the region where the potential from the black hole dominates. We find that the stellar velocity dispersion rises dramatically, reaching ~550 km/s at the center. Through orbit-based, stellar-dynamical models we obtain a black hole mass of (4.9 \\pm 1.6) x 10^9 Msun (1-sigma uncertainties). Although the black hole mass measurement is smaller by a factor of ~3 compared to previous claims based on large-scale kinematics, NGC 1277 does indeed contain one of the most massive black holes detected to date, and the black hole mass is an order of magnitude larger than expectations from the e...

  16. Mass and Angular Momentum of Black Holes: An Overlooked Effect of General Relativity Applied to the Galactic Center Black Hole Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2006-03-08

    I report the discovery of a new effect of General Relativity which is important to understand very rapidly rotating (Kerr) black holes. The orbital velocity of a test particle is no longer a monotonic function of the orbit radius when the spin of the black hole is >0.9953, but displays a local minimum-maximum structure for radii smaller than 1.8 gravitational radii. There the rate of change of the orbital velocity per radius unit equals the radial epicyclic frequency and is exactly one third of the polar epicyclic frequency, suggesting a 3:1 resonant oscillatory motion of the particle. If associated with the observed quasi-periods - including the most recent 2005/2006 data - the mass of the supermassive black hole Sgr A* in the centre of the our Galaxy is determined to 3.3 million solar masses and the spin is 0.99616.

  17. Myers-Perry black holes with scalar hair and a mass gap: unequal spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Herdeiro; Jutta Kunz; Eugen Radu; Bintoro Subagyo

    2015-05-10

    We construct rotating boson stars and Myers-Perry black holes with scalar hair (MPBHsSH) as fully non-linear solutions of five dimensional Einstein gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field. The MPBHsSH are, in general, regular on and outside the horizon, asymptotically flat, and possess angular momentum in a single rotation plane. They are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Such hairy BHs may be thought of as bound states of boson stars and singly spinning, vacuum MPBHs and inherit properties of both these building blocks. When the horizon area shrinks to zero, the solutions reduce to (in a single plane) rotating boson stars; but the extremal limit also yields a zero area horizon, as for singly spinning MPBHs. Similarly to the case of equal angular momenta, and in contrast to Kerr black holes with scalar hair, singly spinning MPBHsSH are disconnected from the vacuum black holes, due to a mass gap. We observe that for the general case, with two unequal angular momenta, the equilibrium condition for the existence of MPBHsSH is $w=m_1\\Omega_1+m_2\\Omega_2$, where $\\Omega_i$ are the horizon angular velocities in the two independent rotation planes and $w,m_i$, $i=1,2$, are the scalar field's frequency and azimuthal harmonic indices.

  18. The effect of mass-segregation on gravitational wave sources near massive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Hopman; Tal Alexander

    2006-03-13

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from the inspiral of compact remnants (CRs) into massive black holes (MBHs) will be observable to cosmological distances. While a CR spirals in, 2-body scattering by field stars may cause it to fall into the MBH before reaching a short period orbit that would give an observable signal. As a result, only CRs very near (~0.01 pc) the MBH can spiral in successfully. In a multi-mass stellar population, the heaviest objects sink to the center, where they are more likely to slowly spiral into the MBH without being swallowed prematurely. We study how mass-segregation modifies the stellar distribution and the rate of GW events. We find that the inspiral rate per galaxy for white dwarfs is 30 per Gyr, for neutron stars 6 per Gyr, and for stellar black holes (SBHs) 250 per Gyr. The high rate for SBHs is due to their extremely steep density profile, n_{BH}(r)\\propto r^{-2}. The GW detection rate will be dominated by SBHs.

  19. A ~50,000 solar mass black hole in the nucleus of RGG 118

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldassare, Vivienne; Gallo, Elena; Greene, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Scaling relations between black hole (BH) masses and their host galaxy properties have been studied extensively over the last two decades, and point towards co-evolution of central massive BHs and their hosts. However, these relations remain poorly constrained for BH masses below $\\sim10^{6}$ M_sun. Here we present optical and X-ray observations of the dwarf galaxy RGG 118 taken with the Magellan Echellette Spectrograph on the 6.5m Clay Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory. Based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy, RGG 118 was identified as possessing narrow emission line ratios indicative of photoionization partly due to an active galactic nucleus. Our higher resolution spectroscopy clearly reveals broad H$\\alpha$ emission in the spectrum of RGG 118. Using virial BH mass estimate techniques, we calculate a BH mass of $\\sim50,000$ \\msun. We detect a nuclear X-ray point source in RGG 118, suggesting a total accretion powered luminosity of $L=4\\times10^{40}~{\\rm erg~s^{-1}}$, and an Eddington fraction ...

  20. The relationship between X-ray variability amplitude and black hole mass in active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, P M; Papadakis, I E; Turner, T J; Neill, Paul M. O'; Nandra, Kirpal; Papadakis, Iossif E.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the relationship between the 2-10 keV X-ray variability amplitude and black hole mass for a sample of 46 radio-quiet active galactic nuclei observed by ASCA. Thirty-three of the objects in our sample exhibited variability over a time-scale of ~40 ks, and we found a significant anti-correlation between excess variance and mass. Unlike most previous studies, we have quantified the variability using nearly the same time-scale for all objects. Moreover, we provide a prescription for estimating the uncertainties in excess variance which accounts both for measurement uncertainties and for the stochastic nature of the variability. We also present an analytical method to predict the excess variance from a model power spectrum accounting for binning, sampling and windowing effects. Using this, we modelled the variance-mass relation assuming all objects have a universal twice-broken power spectrum, with the position of the breaks being dependent on mass. This accounts for the general form of the re...

  1. New concepts in energy and mass transport within carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Wonjoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    The unique structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) contributes to their distinguished properties, making them useful in nanotechnology. CNTs have been explored for energy transport in next-generation, such as light-emitting ...

  2. Long-Term Trends in California Mobile Source Emissions and Ambient Concentrations of Black Carbon and Organic Aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    mobile source emissions of BC and OA (primary + secondary). Over time, as on-road engine emissions haveLong-Term Trends in California Mobile Source Emissions and Ambient Concentrations of Black Carbon, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1710, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: A fuel

  3. 20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. McConnell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric

    20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. Mc since 1788 as a result of boreal forest fires and industrial activities. Beginning about 1850, industrial emissions resulted in a seven-fold increase in ice core BC concentrations with most change

  4. Unstable mass-outflows in geometrically thick accretion flows around black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okuda, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Accretion flows around black holes generally result in mass-outflows that exhibit irregular behavior quite often. Using 2D time-dependent hydrodynamical calculations, we show that the mass-outflow is unstable in the cases of thick accretion flows such as the low angular momentum accretion flow and the advection-dominated accretion flow. For the low angular momentum flow, the inward accreting matter on the equatorial plane interacts with the outflowing gas along the rotational axis and the centrifugally supported oblique shock is formed at the interface of both the flows, when the viscosity parameter $\\alpha$ is as small as $\\alpha \\le 10^{-3}$. The hot and rarefied blobs, which result in the eruptive mass-outflow, are generated in the inner shocked region and grow up toward the outer boundary. The advection-dominated accretion flow attains finally in the form of a torus disc with the inner edge of the disc at $3R_{\\rm g} \\le r \\le 6R_{\\rm g}$ and the center at $6R_ {\\rm g} \\le r \\le 10R_{\\rm g}$, and a series...

  5. Interpreting the possible break in the Black Hole - Bulge mass relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontanot, Fabio; Shankar, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Recent inspections of local available data suggest that the almost linear relation between the stellar mass of spheroids ($M_{\\rm sph}$) and the mass of the super massive Black Holes (BHs) residing at their centres, shows a break below $M_{\\rm sph} \\sim 10^{10}\\ {\\rm M}_\\odot$, with a steeper, about quadratic relation at smaller masses. We investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for the change in slope of this relation, by comparing data with the results of the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation MORGANA, which already predicted such a break in its original formulation. We find that the change of slope is mostly induced by effective stellar feedback in star-forming bulges. The shape of the relation is instead quite insensitive to other physical mechanisms connected to BH accretion such as disc instabilities, galaxy mergers, Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) feedback, or even the exact modelling of accretion onto the BH, direct or through a reservoir of low angular momentum gas. Our results support a s...

  6. Formation of Black Hole Low-Mass X-ray Binaries in Hierarchical Triple Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoz, Smadar; Geller, Aaron; Stephan, Alexander P; Rasio, Frederic A

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Black Hole (BH) Low-Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXB) poses a theoretical challenge, as low-mass companions are not expected to survive the common-envelope scenario with the BH progenitor. Here we propose a formation mechanism that skips the common-envelope scenario and relies on triple-body dynamics. We study the evolution of hierarchical triples, following the secular dynamical evolution up to the octupole-level of approximation, including general relativity, tidal effects and post-main-sequence evolution, such as mass loss, changes to stellar radii and supernovae. During the dynamical evolution of the triple system, the "eccentric Kozai-Lidov" mechanism can cause large eccentricity excitations in the LMXB progenitor, resulting in three main BH-LMXB formation channels. Here we define BH-LMXB candidates as systems where the inner BH companion star crosses its Roche limit. In the "eccentric" channel (~ 81% of the LMXBs in our simulations), the donor star crosses its Roche limit during an extreme ecc...

  7. Variation of the radiative properties during black carbon aging: theoretical and experimental intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, C.; Liou, K.-N.; Takano, Y.; Zhang, R.; Levy Zamora, M.; Yang, P.; Li, Q.; Leung, L. R.

    2015-10-28

    A theoretical black carbon (BC) aging model is developed to account for three typical evolution stages, namely, freshly emitted aggregates, BC coated by soluble material, and BC particles undergoing further hygroscopic growth. The geometric-optics surface-wave (GOS) approach is employed to compute the BC single-scattering properties at each aging stage, which are subsequently compared with laboratory measurements. Theoretical calculations are consistent with measurements in extinction and absorption cross sections for fresh BC aggregates with different BC sizes (i.e., mobility diameters of 155, 245, and 320 nm), with differences of ? 25 %. The measured optical cross sections for BC coated bymore »sulfuric acid and for that undergoing further hygroscopic growth are generally captured (differences i) and lower (1.75–0.63i) bounds of BC refractive index, while the variations are « less

  8. Velocity Profile of the Ionized Disk and the Mass of the Black Hole in M87

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    1994-11-10

    We present a theoretical model for the ionized disk in M87 which includes spiral shock waves. The line emission profiles computed from this model at various positions on the disk are found to be in agreement with the recent Hubble Space Telescope results. Based on this model, we find that the ionized disk comprises two-armed giant spiral shock waves which extend from around $0.1$ arc sec from the center to at least $1$ arc second or more. Our model requires that the mass of the black hole be $(4 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^9 M_\\odot$ and the inclination angle to be $(42\\pm 2)^{\\deg}$. We predict the nature of the line profiles at many other locations of the disk which could be verified in future observations.

  9. Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources. Case study of Murmansk

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Evans, M.; Kholod, N.; Malyshev, V.; Tretyakova, S.; Gusev, E.; Yu, S.; Barinov, A.

    2015-07-27

    Black carbon (BC) is a potent pollutant because of its effects on climate change, ecosystems and human health. Black carbon has a particularly pronounced impact as a climate forcer in the Arctic because of its effect on snow albedo and cloud formation. We have estimated BC emissions from diesel sources in the Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest city in the world above the Arctic Circle. In this study we developed a detailed inventory of diesel sources including on-road vehicles, off-road transport (mining, locomotives, construction and agriculture), ships and diesel generators. For on-road transport, we conducted several surveys tomore »understand the vehicle fleet and driving patterns, and, for all sources, we also relied on publicly available local data sets and analysis. We calculated that BC emissions in the Murmansk Region were 0.40 Gg in 2012. The mining industry is the largest source of BC emissions in the region, emitting 69 % of all BC emissions because of its large diesel consumption and absence of emissions controls. On-road vehicles are the second largest source, emitting about 13 % of emissions. Old heavy duty trucks are the major source of emissions. Emission controls on new vehicles limit total emissions from on-road transportation. Vehicle traffic and fleet surveys show that many of the older cars on the registry are lightly or never used. We also estimated that total BC emissions from diesel sources in Russia were 50.8 Gg in 2010, and on-road transport contributed 49 % of diesel BC emissions. Agricultural machinery is also a significant source Russia-wide, in part because of the lack of controls on off-road vehicles.« less

  10. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more »and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  11. Gravitational wave observations of galactic intermediate-mass black hole binaries with DECIGO Path Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi

    2012-03-03

    DECIGO Path Finder (DPF) is a space-borne gravitational wave (GW) detector with sensitivity in the frequency band 0.1--100Hz. As a first step mission to DECIGO, it is aiming for launching in 2016--2017. Although its main objective is to demonstrate technology for GW observation in space, DPF still has a chance of detecting GW signals and performing astrophysical observations. With an observable range up to 50 kpc, its main targets are GW signals from galactic intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) binaries. By using inspiral-merger-ringdown phenomenological waveforms, we perform both pattern-averaged analysis and Monte Carlo simulations including the effect of detector motion to find that the masses and (effective) spins of the IMBHs could be determined with errors of a few percent, should the signals be detected. Since GW signals from IMBH binaries with masses above $10^4 M_\\odot$ cannot be detected by ground-based detectors, these objects can be unique sources for DPF. If the inspiral signal of a $10^3M_\\odot$ IMBH binary is detected with DPF, it can give alert to the ringdown signal for the ground-based detectors $10^2$--$10^3$s before coalescence. We also estimate the possible bound on the graviton Compton wavelength from a possible IMBH binary in $\\omega$ Centauri. We obtain a slightly weaker constraint than the solar system experiment and an about 2 orders of magnitude stronger constraint than the one from binary pulsar tests. Unfortunately, the detection rate of IMBH binaries is rather small.

  12. A parallax distance to the microquasar GRS 1915+105 and a revised estimate of its black hole mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, M. J.; McClintock, J. E.; Steiner, J. F.; Narayan, R.; Steeghs, D.; Remillard, R. A.; Dhawan, V.

    2014-11-20

    Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have measured a trigonometric parallax for the microquasar GRS 1915+105, which contains a black hole and a K-giant companion. This yields a direct distance estimate of 8.6{sub ?1.6}{sup +2.0} kpc and a revised estimate for the mass of the black hole of 12.4{sub ?1.8}{sup +2.0} M {sub ?}. GRS 1915+105 is at about the same distance as some H II regions and water masers associated with high-mass star formation in the Sagittarius spiral arm of the Galaxy. The absolute proper motion of GRS 1915+105 is –3.19 ± 0.03 mas yr{sup –1} and –6.24 ± 0.05 mas yr{sup –1} toward the east and north, respectively, which corresponds to a modest peculiar speed of 22 ± 24 km s{sup –1} at the parallax distance, suggesting that the binary did not receive a large velocity kick when the black hole formed. On one observational epoch, GRS 1915+105 displayed superluminal motion along the direction of its approaching jet. Considering previous observations of jet motions, the jet in GRS 1915+105 can be modeled with a jet inclination to the line of sight of 60° ± 5° and a variable flow speed between 0.65c and 0.81c, which possibly indicates deceleration of the jet at distances from the black hole ? 2000 AU. Finally, using our measurements of distance and estimates of black hole mass and inclination, we provisionally confirm our earlier result that the black hole is spinning very rapidly.

  13. Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

  14. Interior phase transformations and mass-radius relationships of silicon-carbon planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Hugh F. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Militzer, Burkhard, E-mail: hughfw@gmail.com [Department of Earth and Planetary Science and Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    Planets such as 55 Cancri e orbiting stars with a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio may consist primarily of silicon and carbon, with successive layers of carbon, silicon carbide, and iron. The behavior of silicon-carbon materials at the extreme pressures prevalent in planetary interiors, however, has not yet been sufficiently understood. In this work, we use simulations based on density functional theory to determine high-pressure phase transitions in the silicon-carbon system, including the prediction of new stable compounds with Si{sub 2}C and SiC{sub 2} stoichiometry at high pressures. We compute equations of state for these silicon-carbon compounds as a function of pressure, and hence derive interior structural models and mass-radius relationships for planets composed of silicon and carbon. Notably, we predict a substantially smaller radius for SiC planets than in previous models, and find that mass radius relationships for SiC planets are indistinguishable from those of silicate planets. We also compute a new equation of state for iron. We rederive interior models for 55 Cancri e and are able to place more stringent restrictions on its composition.

  15. A tidal disruption event in a nearby galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donato, D.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kutyrev, A.; Landt, H.; Butler, N. R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 keV flux declined by a factor of ?2300 over a time span of 6 yr, following a power-law decay with index ?2.44 ± 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of ?20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kT ? 0.09 keV (?10{sup 6} K). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1? level with the cluster (z = 0.062476). We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log (M {sub BH}/M {sub ?}) ? 5.5 ± 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  16. A Black Hole Mass-Variability Time Scale Correlation at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, Geoffrey C; Markoff, Sera; Gurwell, Mark A; Rao, Ramprasad; McHardy, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic time scale $\\tau$ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on $\\tau$. For two nearby low luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure $\\tau=1.6^{+3.0}_{-0.9}$ days and $\\tau=45^{+61}_{-24}$ days, respectively ($2\\sigma$ errors). Including the previously measured $\\tau=0.33\\pm 0.16$ days for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between $\\tau$ and black hole mass for these nearby LLAGN. Other LLAGN with spectra that peak in the submm are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic time scales are comparable to the minimum time scale for emission processes...

  17. The lowest-mass stellar black holes: catastrophic death of neutron stars in gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belczynski; R. O'Shaughnessy; V. Kalogera; F. Rasio; R. Taam; T. Bulik

    2008-04-16

    Mergers of double neutron stars are considered the most likely progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient accreting torus of nuclear matter (Lee & Ramirez-Ruiz 2007, Oechslin & Janka 2006), and the conversion of a fraction of the torus mass-energy to radiation can power a gamma-ray burst (Nakar 2006). Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary calculations of double neutron star formation, we demonstrate that the fraction of mergers that can form a black hole -- torus system depends very sensitively on the (largely unknown) maximum neutron star mass. We show that the available observations and models put a very stringent constraint on this maximum mass under the assumption that a black hole formation is required to produce a short gamma-ray burst in a double neutron star merger. Specifically, we find that the maximum neutron star mass must be within 2 - 2.5 Msun. Moreover, a single unambiguous measurement of a neutron star mass above 2.5 Msun would exclude a black hole -- torus central engine model of short gamma-ray bursts in double neutron star mergers. Such an observation would also indicate that if in fact short gamma-ray bursts are connected to neutron star mergers, the gamma-ray burst engine is best explained by the lesser known model invoking a highly magnetized massive neutron star (e.g., Usov 1992; Kluzniak & Ruderman 1998; Dai et al. 2006; Metzger, Quataert & Thompson 2007).

  18. Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D.

    2005-07-16

    It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

  19. Mass production of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by metal dusting process with high yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorbani, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, A.M., E-mail: Rashidiam@ripi.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegari, S.; Mirdamadi, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alaei, M. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over Fe-Ni nanoparticles supported alloy 304L. {yields} Production of carbon nanotubes with high yield (700-1000%) and low cost catalyst. {yields} Optimum growth condition is CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C under long term repetitive thermal cycling. {yields} Possibility of the mass production by metal dusting process with low cost. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube materials were synthesized over Fe-Ni nanoparticles generated during disintegration of the surface of alloy 304L under metal dusting environment. The metal dusting condition was simulated and optimized through exposing stainless steel samples during long term repetitive thermal cycling in CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, total gas flow rate 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C for 300 h. After reaction, surface morphology of the samples and also carbonaceous deposition which had grown on sample surfaces were examined by stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes could be formed over nanocatalyst generated on the alloy surface by exploiting metal dusting process. By optimization of reaction parameters the yields of carbon nanotube materials obtained were 700-1000%. Also it has been shown herein that the amount of carbon nanotube materials remarkably increases when the reaction time is extended up to 300 h, indicating a possibility of the mass production by this easy method.

  20. ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION-LINE CORRELATIONS IN HST/COS SPECTRA OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: SINGLE-EPOCH BLACK HOLE MASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilton, Evan M.; Shull, J. Michael, E-mail: evan.tilton@colorado.edu, E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Effective methods of measuring supermassive black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are of critical importance to studies of galaxy evolution. While there has been much success in obtaining masses through reverberation mapping, the extensive observing time required by this method has limited the practicality of applying it to large samples at a variety of redshifts. This limitation highlights the need to estimate these masses using single-epoch spectroscopy of ultraviolet (UV) emission lines. We use UV spectra of 44 AGNs from HST/COS, the International Ultraviolet Explorer, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of the C IV {lambda}1549, O VI {lambda}1035, O III] {lambda}1664, He II {lambda}1640, C II {lambda}1335, and Mg II {lambda}2800 emission lines and explore their potential as tracers of the broad-line region and supermassive black hole mass. The higher signal-to-noise ratio and better spectral resolution of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) resolve AGN intrinsic absorption and produce more accurate line widths. From these, we test the viability of mass-scaling relationships based on line widths and luminosities and carry out a principal component analysis based on line luminosities, widths, skewness, and kurtosis. At L{sub 1450} {<=} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, the UV line luminosities correlate well with H{beta}, as does the 1450 A continuum luminosity. We find that C IV, O VI, and Mg II can be used as reasonably accurate estimators of AGN black hole masses, while He II and C II are uncorrelated.

  1. Lithium production on a low-mass secondary in a black hole soft X-ray transient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin-ichiro Fujimoto; Ryuichi Matsuba; Kenzo Arai

    2007-10-10

    We examine production of Li on the surface of a low-mass secondary in a black hole soft X-ray transient (BHSXT) through the spallation of CNO nuclei by neutrons which are ejected from a hot (> 10 MeV) advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) around the black hole. Using updated binary parameters, cross sections of neutron-induced spallation reactions, and mass accretion rates in ADAF derived from the spectrum fitting of multi-wavelength observations of quiescent BHSXTs, we obtain the equilibrium abundances of Li by equating the production rate of Li and the mass transfer rate through accretion to the black hole. The resulting abundances are found to be in good agreement with the observed values in seven BHSXTs. We note that the abundances vary in a timescale longer than a few months in our model. Moreover, the isotopic ratio Li6/Li7 is calculated to be about 0.7--0.8 on the secondaries, which is much higher than the ratio measured in meteorites. Detection of such a high value is favorable to the production of Li via spallation and the existence of a hot accretion flow, rather than an accretion disk corona system in quiescent BHSXT.

  2. The black hole mass of NGC 4151. II. Stellar dynamical measurement from near-infrared integral field spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Valluri, Monica; Brown, Jonathan S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); McGregor, Peter J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bentz, Misty C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Office 610, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Vestergaard, Marianne [Dark Cosmology Centre, The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Física, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Riffel, Rogemar A., E-mail: christopher.onken@anu.edu.au, E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2014-08-10

    We present a revised measurement of the mass of the central black hole (M{sub BH} ) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. The new stellar dynamical mass measurement is derived by applying an axisymmetric orbit-superposition code to near-infrared integral field data obtained using adaptive optics with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS). When our models attempt to fit both the NIFS kinematics and additional low spatial resolution kinematics, our results depend sensitively on how ?{sup 2} is computed—probably a consequence of complex bar kinematics that manifest immediately outside the nuclear region. The most robust results are obtained when only the high spatial resolution kinematic constraints in the nuclear region are included in the fit. Our best estimates for the black hole mass and H-band mass-to-light ratio are M{sub BH} ? 3.76 ± 1.15 × 10{sup 7} M{sub ?} (1? error) and Y{sub H} ? 0.34 ± 0.03 M{sub ?}/L{sub ?} (3? error), respectively (the quoted errors reflect the model uncertainties). Our black hole mass measurement is consistent with estimates from both reverberation mapping (3.57{sub ?0.37}{sup +0.45}×10{sup 7} M{sub ?}) and gas kinematics (3.0{sub ?2.2}{sup +0.75}×10{sup 7} M{sub ?}; 1? errors), and our best-fit mass-to-light ratio is consistent with the photometric estimate of Y{sub H} = 0.4 ± 0.2 M{sub ?}/L{sub ?}. The NIFS kinematics give a central bulge velocity dispersion ?{sub c} = 116 ± 3 km s{sup –1}, bringing this object slightly closer to the M{sub BH}-? relation for quiescent galaxies. Although NGC 4151 is one of only a few Seyfert 1 galaxies in which it is possible to obtain a direct dynamical black hole mass measurement—and thus, an independent calibration of the reverberation mapping mass scale—the complex bar kinematics makes it less than ideally suited for this purpose.

  3. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-01-01

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  4. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-04-01

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  5. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-10-29

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  6. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-10

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  7. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-11

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  8. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-04-28

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  9. Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and the atmosphere from biomass burning, Climatic Change, 2,Chemistry and Physics Biomass burning contribution to black2011 Y. H. Mao et al. : Biomass burning contribution to

  10. Improving snow albedo processes in WRF/SSiB regional climate model to assess impact of dust and black carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over western U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    particles in melting snow, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. , 118,response from black carbon in snow, J. Geophys. Res. , 112,on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,

  11. The powerful jet of an off-nuclear intermediate-mass black hole in the spiral galaxy NGC 2276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezcua, M; Lobanov, A P; Sutton, A D

    2015-01-01

    Jet ejection by accreting black holes is a mass invariant mechanism unifying stellar and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that should also apply for intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), which are thought to be the seeds from which SMBHs form. We present the detection of an off-nuclear IMBH of $\\sim$5 $\\times$ 10$^{4}$ M$_\\odot$ located in an unusual spiral arm of the galaxy NGC 2276 based on quasi-simultaneous \\textit{Chandra} X-ray observations and European VLBI Network (EVN) radio observations. The IMBH, NGC2276-3c, possesses a 1.8 pc radio jet that is oriented in the same direction as large-scale ($\\sim$650 pc) radio lobes and whose emission is consistent with flat to optically thin synchrotron emission between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. Its jet kinetic power ($4 \\times 10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$) is comparable to its radiative output and its jet efficiency ($\\geq$ 46\\%) is as large as that of SMBHs. A region of $\\sim$300 pc along the jet devoid of young stars could provide observational evidence of jet feedback from...

  12. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inlandmore »sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.« less

  13. Extrema of Mass, First Law of Black Hole Mechanics and Staticity Theorem in Einstein-Maxwell-axion-dilaton Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Rogatko

    1998-07-09

    Using the ADM formulation of the Einstein-Maxwell axion-dilaton gravity we derived the formulas for the variation of mass and other asymptotic conserved quantities in the theory under consideration. Generalizing this kind of reasoning to the initial dota for the manifold with an interior boundary we got the generalized first law of black hole mechanics. We consider an asymptotically flat solution to the Einstein-Maxwell axion-dilaton gravity describing a black hole with a Killing vector field timelike at infinity, the horizon of which comprises a bifurcate Killing horizon with a bifurcate surface. Supposing that the Killing vector field is asymptotically orthogonal to the static hypersurface with boundary S and compact interior, we find that the solution is static in the exterior world, when the timelike vector field is normal to the horizon and has vanishing electric and axion- electric fields on static slices.

  14. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-07-28

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  15. Black Carbon and Kerosene Lighting: An Opportunity for Rapid Action on Climate Change and Clean Energy for Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Arne; Bond, Tami C.; Lam, Nicholoas L.; Hultman, Nathan

    2013-04-15

    Replacing inefficient kerosene lighting with electric lighting or other clean alternatives can rapidly achieve development and energy access goals, save money and reduce climate warming. Many of the 250 million households that lack reliable access to electricity rely on inefficient and dangerous simple wick lamps and other kerosene-fueled light sources, using 4 to 25 billion liters of kerosene annually to meet basic lighting needs. Kerosene costs can be a significant household expense and subsidies are expensive. New information on kerosene lamp emissions reveals that their climate impacts are substantial. Eliminating current annual black carbon emissions would provide a climate benefit equivalent to 5 gigatons of carbon dioxide reductions over the next 20 years. Robust and low-cost technologies for supplanting simple wick and other kerosene-fueled lamps exist and are easily distributed and scalable. Improving household lighting offers a low-cost opportunity to improve development, cool the climate and reduce costs.

  16. Variation of the radiative properties during black carbon aging: theoretical and experimental intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, C.; Liou, K.-N.; Takano, Y.; Zhang, R.; Zamora, M. L.; Yang, P.; Li, Q.; Leung, L. R.

    2015-07-20

    A theoretical black carbon (BC) aging model is developed to account for three typical evolution stages, namely, freshly emitted aggregates, coated BC by soluble material, and BC particles undergoing further hygroscopic growth. The geometric-optics surface-wave (GOS) approach is employed to compute the BC single-scattering properties at each aging stage, which are subsequently compared with laboratory measurements. Theoretical calculations are consistent with measurements in extinction and absorption cross sections for fresh BC aggregates, but overestimate the scattering cross sections for BC mobility diameters of 155, 245, and 320 nm, because of uncertainties associated with theoretical calculations for small particles as wellmore »as laboratory scattering measurements. The measured optical cross sections for coated BC by sulfuric acid and for those undergoing further hygroscopic growth are captured by theoretical calculations using a concentric core-shell structure, with differences of less than 20 %. This suggests that the core-shell shape represents the realistic BC coating morphology reasonably well in this case, which is consistent with the observed strong structure compaction during aging. We find that the absorption and scattering properties of fresh BC aggregates vary by up to 60 % due to uncertainty in the BC refractive index, which, however, is a factor of two smaller in the case of coated BC particles. Sensitivity analyses on the BC morphology show that the optical properties of fresh BC aggregates are more sensitive to fractal dimension than primary spherule size. The absorption and scattering cross sections of coated BC particles vary by more than a factor of two due to different coating structures. We find an increase of 20–250 % in absorption and a factor of 3–15 in scattering during aging, significantly depending on coating morphology and aging stages. Applying the aging model to CalNex 2010 field measurements, we show that the resulting BC direct radiative forcing (DRF) first increases from 1.5 to 1.7 W m-2 and subsequently decreases to 1.0 W m-2 during the transport from the Los Angeles Basin to downwind regions, as a result of the competition between absorption enhancement due to coating and dilution of BC concentration. The BC DRF can vary by up to a factor of two due to differences in BC coating morphology. Thus, an accurate estimate of BC DRF requires the incorporation of a dynamic BC aging process that accounts for realistic morphology in climate models, particularly for the regional analysis with high atmospheric heterogeneity.« less

  17. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to changes in the local emissions. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect-0.3 W m-2)at the surface over the HTP, although the mean BC-in- snow forcing is likely overestimated. We find strong seasonal and sub -region variation with a peak value of 5W m-2 in the spring over Northwest Plateau. The annual mean dust-in-snow forcing is comparable to that of BC over the entire HTP but significantly larger than BC over the North east Plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat

  18. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-01-07

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fatemore »of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% to BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to local emission changes. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect (-0.3 W m-2) at the surface over the HTP. We also find strong seasonal and spatial variation with a peak value of 5 W m-2 in the spring over Northwest Plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat.« less

  19. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-06-08

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source-tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate ofmore »BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation in the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on season and location in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer, when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in the Himalayas and central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to the northeast plateau in all seasons and southeast plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching the northwest plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to local emission changes. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect (-0.3 W m-2) at the surface over the HTP. We also find strong seasonal and spatial variation with a peak value of 5 W m-2 in the spring over the northwest plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat.« less

  20. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M . G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; V. Dolique; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; K. Haris; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley

    2014-05-22

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, $\\ell=m=2$, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  1. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

    1983-02-01

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  2. Single-epoch black hole mass estimators for broad-line active galactic nuclei: recalibrating H? with a new approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Hua; Li, Hong [Department of Engineering Physics and Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Yue [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Based on an updated H? reverberation mapping (RM) sample of 44 nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we propose a novel approach for black hole (BH) mass estimation using two filtered luminosities computed from single-epoch (SE) AGN spectra around the H? region. We found that the two optimal-filter luminosities extract virial information (size and virial velocity of the broad-line region, BLR) from the spectra, justifying their usage in this empirical BH mass estimator. The major advantages of this new recipe over traditional SE BH mass estimators utilizing continuum luminosity and broad-line width are (1) it has a smaller intrinsic scatter of 0.28 dex calibrated against RM masses, (2) it is extremely simple to use in practice, without any need to decompose the spectrum, and (3) it produces unambiguous and highly repeatable results even with low signal-to-noise spectra. The combination of the two luminosities can also cancel out, to some extent, systematic luminosity errors potentially introduced by uncertainties in distance or flux calibration. In addition, we recalibrated the traditional SE mass estimators using broad H? FWHM and monochromatic continuum luminosity at 5100 Å (L {sub 5100}). We found that using the best-fit slopes on FWHM and L {sub 5100} (derived from fitting the BLR radius-luminosity relation and the correlation between rms line dispersion and SE FWHM, respectively) rather than simple assumptions (e.g., 0.5 for L {sub 5100} and 2 for FWHM) leads to more precise SE mass estimates, improving the intrinsic scatter from 0.41 dex to 0.36 dex with respect to the RM masses. We compared different estimators and discussed their applications to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar sample. Due to the limitations of the current RM sample, application of any SE recipe calibrated against RM masses to distant quasars should be treated with caution.

  3. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Goggin, L M; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs,...

  4. Primordial black holes with mass 10{sup 16}?10{sup 17} g and reionization of the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotsky, K.M.; Kirillov, A.A. E-mail: kirillov-aa@yandex.ru

    2015-01-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) with mass 10{sup 16}?10{sup 17} g almost escape constraints from observations so could essentially contribute to dark matter density. Hawking evaporation of such PBHs produces with a steady rate ?- and e{sup ±}-radiations in MeV energy range, which can be absorbed by ordinary matter. Simplified estimates show that a small fraction of evaporated energy had to be absorbed by baryonic matter what can turn out to be enough to heat the matter so it is fully ionized at the redshift z? 5... 10. The result is found to be close to a borderline case where the effect appears, what makes it sensitive to the approximation used. In our approximation, degree of gas ionization reaches 50-100% by z? 5 for PBH mass (3...7)× 10{sup 16} g with their abundance corresponding to the upper limit.

  5. Testing the Kerr-nature of stellar-mass black hole candidates by combining the continuum-fitting method and the power estimate of transient ballistic jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosimo Bambi

    2012-01-25

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity, as these objects cannot be explained otherwise without introducing new physics. However, there is no observational evidence that the space-time around them is really described by the Kerr solution. The Kerr black hole hypothesis can be tested with the already available X-ray data by extending the continuum-fitting method, a technique currently used by astronomers to estimate the spins of stellar-mass black hole candidates. In general, we cannot put a constraint on possible deviations from the Kerr geometry, but only on some combination between these deviations and the spin. The measurement of the radio power of transient jets in black hole binaries can potentially break this degeneracy, thus allowing for testing the Kerr-nature of these objects.

  6. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  7. Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    and field observations. Predominant sources are combustion related, namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions range of 2000 to 29000. However, global atmospheric absorption attributable to black Additional

  8. Fully Degenerate Self-Gravitating Fermionic Dark Matter: Implications to the Density Profile of the Cluster of Galaxies A1689, and the Mass Hierarchy of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadashi Nakajima; Masahiro Morikawa

    2005-06-25

    Equilibrium configurations of weakly interacting fully degenerate fermionic dark matter are considered at various scales in the Universe. We treat the general situations for the gravity from Newtonian to general relativity and the degeneracy from nonrelativistic to relativistic. A dimensionless equilibrium configuration is specified by a single parameter regardless of particle properties, the Fermi velocity at the center, and the scalings of mass and length are specified by the rest mass and statistical weight of the dark matter particle. We focus our attention to the flat-top nature of the mass column density profile of the cluster of galaxies, A1689, recently reported by Broadhurst et al. using gravitational lensing. We convert the column density profile to a volume density profile assuming spherical symmetry and derive a 3D encircled mass profile of A1689, which is compared with the model profiles of degenerate fermion structures. The flat-top profile is reproduced. The corresponding fermion mass ranges from 2 eV to 30 eV depending on the actual scale of the degenerate structure. If massive neutrinos are the dominant dark matter, the rest mass will be about 4.7 or 2.3 eV respectively for Majorana or Dirac neutrinos. The mass and size of the degenerate structure are $10^{14}M_\\odot$ and 100 kpc for Majorana neutrinos, and 5$\\times10^{14}M_\\odot$ and 300 kpc for Dirac neutrinos. If we identify the fermions as heavier sterile neutrinos, they yield the characteristic mass hierarchy of black holes; giant black hole at the center of a galaxy and the intermediate mass black holes. Thus we propose the possibility that the mass hierarchy of fermions determines that of black holes in the Universe.

  9. Multi-Proxy Approach on Black Carbon Characterization and Combustion Products Source Discrimination in Environmental Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo, Li-Jung

    2011-02-22

    of combustion-derived carbon inputs in different environmental systems. The present study firstly evaluated the feasibility of using levoglucosan, a marker derived from cellulose/hemocellulose combustion, to characterize and quantify char-BC in the environment...

  10. Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

  11. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-04-26

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  12. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-07-29

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  13. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-28

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  14. Is radio jet power linearly proportional to the product of central black hole mass and Eddington ratio in AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    A model for the relation between radio jet power and the product of central black hole (BH) mass and Eddington ratio of AGN is proposed, and the model is examined with data from the literature. We find that radio jet power positively correlates but not linearly with the product of BH mass ($m$ in solar mass) and Eddington ratio ($\\lambda$), and the power law indices ($\\mu$) are significantly less than unity for relatively low accretion ($\\lambda<0.1$) AGN, $P_{j}\\propto (\\lambda m)^{\\mu}$, in the radio galaxies and the Seyfert galaxies. This leads to a negative correlation between radio loudness and $\\lambda m$ for the low luminosity AGN, i.e. $R\\propto (\\lambda m)^{\\rho}$ with $\\rho=(7/6)\\mu-1<0$, which may be attributed to a contribution of BH spin to total jet power assuming that the spin induced jet is gradually suppressed as the accretion rate increases. Whereas, for the high-z quasars which often show the slope $\\mu\\geq1$, a positive correlation between the radio loudness and disc luminosity is pr...

  15. The radio luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio for quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Hao. Bian; Yan-Mei. Chen; Chen. Hu; Kai. Huang; Yan. Xu

    2008-03-24

    We investigate the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation for radio-loud quasars with redshift $zradio luminosity, including 306 radio-loud quasars, 3466 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity or upper-limit of radio luminosity (181 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity). The virial supermassive black hole mass (\\mbh) is calculated from the broad \\hb line, the host stellar velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_*$) is traced by the core \\oiii gaseous velocity dispersion, and the radio luminosity and the radio loudness are derived from the FIRST catalog. Our results are follows: (1) For radio-quiet quasars, we confirm that there is no obvious deviation from the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation defined in inactive galaxies when \\mbh uncertainties and luminosity bias are concerned. (2) We find that radio-loud quasars deviate much from the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation respect to that for radio-quiet quasars. This deviation is only partly due to the possible cosmology evolution of the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation and the luminosity bias. (3) The radio luminosity is proportional to $\\mbh^{1.28^{+0.23}_{-0.16}}(\\lb/\\ledd)^{1.29^{+0.31}_{-0.24}}$ for radio-quiet quasars and $\\mbh^{3.10^{+0.60}_{-0.70}}(\\lb/\\ledd)^{4.18^{+1.40}_{-1.10}}$ for radio-loud quasars. The weaker correlation of the radio luminosity dependence upon the mass and the Eddington ratio for radio-loud quasars shows that other physical effects would account for their radio luminosities, such as the black hole spin.

  16. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS provides an sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices.

  17. Evaluation of Preindustrial to Present-day Black Carbon and its Albedo Forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, Drew; Berntsen, T.; Bisiauxs, M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; McConnell, J.R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-03-05

    As a part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against the observations including 12 ice core records, a long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using the NCAR Community Land and Sea-Ice model 4 with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000, which includes the SNICAR BC-snow model. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations to using recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to the differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology among models; 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However,models agree well on 2.5~3 times increase in the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day, which matches with the 2.5 times increase in BC emissions. We find a large model diversity at both NH and SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfrauch and Ispra. However, the models fail to capture the Arctic BC seasonality due tosevere underestimations during winter and spring. Compared to recent snowpack measurements, the simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of observations except for Greenland and Arctic Ocean. However, model and observation differ widely due to missing interannual variations in emissions and possibly due to the choice of the prescribed meteorology period (i.e., 1996-2000).

  18. Do radio-loud AGN really follow the same relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion as normal galaxies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu Yi; D. R. Jiang

    2006-12-11

    In an examination of the relationship between the black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we studied two effects which may cause uncertainties in the black hole mass estimates of radio-loud AGNs: the relativistic beaming effect on the observed optical continuum radiation and the orientation effect on the broad emission line width. After correcting these two effects, we re-examined the relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion which derived from [OIII] line width for a sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet AGNs, and found the relation for radio-loud AGNs still deviated from that for nearby normal galaxies and radio-quiet AGNs. We also found there is no significant correlation between radio jet power and narrow [OIII] line width, indicating absence of strong interaction between radio jet and narrow line region. It may be that the deviation of the relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion of radio-loud AGNs is intrinsic, or that the [OIII] line width is not a good indicator of stellar velocity dispersion for radio-loud AGNs.

  19. Black Carbon and other refractory forms in recent sediments from the Gulf of Cadiz, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -reactive, mainly aromatic, BC has received special interest in recent years as a possible carbon sink in soils and sediments. At present, several methods have been used, with applications for soil and sediments, although. This study considers the potential of the combined use of analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) and solid state 13

  20. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  1. Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 41554163 Black carbon emissions in the United Kingdom during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    that exceeds the decline in official estimates of BC emissions based only on amount of fuel use and mostly-dependent ``technology factor'' that must multiply the rate of fossil fuel use. Current ambient BC amounts in Great. Soot is a particle-phase product of incomplete combus- tion of carbon containing fuels. Its main

  2. Mass spectrum of primordial black holes from inflationary perturbation in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld: a limit on blue spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuuiti Sendouda; Shigehiro Nagataki; Katsuhiko Sato

    2006-06-07

    The mass spectrum of the primordial black holes formed by density perturbation in the radiation-dominated era of the Randall-Sundrum type-2 cosmology is given. The spectrum coincides with standard four-dimensional one on large scales but the deviation is apparent on smaller scales. The mass spectrum is initially softer than standard four-dimensional one, while after accretion during the earliest era it becomes harder than that. We also show expected extragalactic diffuse photon background spectra varying the initial perturbation power-law power spectrum and give constraints on the blue spectra and/or the reheating temperature. The most recent observations on the small scale density perturbation from WMAP, SDSS and Lyman-\\alpha Forest are used. What we get are interpreted as constraints on the smaller scale inflation on the brane connected to the larger one at the scale of Lyman-\\alpha Forest. If we set the bulk curvature radius to be 0.1 mm and assume the reheating temperature is higher than 10^6 GeV, the scalar spectral index from the smaller scale inflation is constrained to be n \\lesssim 1.3. Typically, the constraints are tighter than standard four-dimensional one, which is also revised by us using the most recent observations.

  3. EMRI corrections to the angular velocity and redshift factor of a mass in circular orbit about a Kerr black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhay G. Shah; John L. Friedman; Tobias S. Keidl

    2012-09-26

    This is the first of two papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge for a particle moving in circular, equatorial orbit about a Kerr black hole. In the EMRI (extreme-mass-ratio inspiral) framework, with mode-sum renormalization, we compute the renormalized value of the quantity $h_{\\alpha\\beta}u^\\alpha u^\\beta$, gauge-invariant under gauge transformations generated by a helically symmetric gauge vector; and we find the related order $\\frak{m}$ correction to the particle's angular velocity at fixed renormalized redshift (and to its redshift at fixed angular velocity). The radiative part of the perturbed metric is constructed from the Hertz potential which is extracted from the Weyl scalar by an algebraic inversion\\cite{sf2}. We then write the spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics as a sum over spin-weighted spherical harmonics and use mode-sum renormalization to find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in $L=\\ell+1/2$ to the large-$L$ behavior of the expression for $H := \\frac12 h_{\\alpha\\beta}u^\\alpha u^\\beta $. The non-radiative parts of the perturbed metric associated with changes in mass and angular momentum are calculated in the Kerr gauge.

  4. Limits On The Spin Up Of Stellar-Mass Black Holes Through A Spiral Stationary Accretion Shock Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Méndez, Enrique Moreno

    2015-01-01

    The spin of a number of black holes (BHs) in binary systems has been measured. In the case of BHs found in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) the observed values are in agreement with some theoretical predictions based on binary stellar evolution. However, using the same evolutionary models, the calculated spins of BHs in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) fall short compared to the observations. A possible solution to this conundrum is the accretion of high-specific-angular-momentum material after the formation of the BH, although this requires accretion above the Eddington limit. Another suggestion is that the observed high values of the BHs spin could be the result of an asymmetry during Core Collapse (CC). The only available energy to spin up the compact object during CC is its binding energy. A way to convert it to rotational kinetic energy is by using a Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI), which can develop during CC and push angular momentum into the central compact object through a spiral mode ($m ...

  5. Nuclear Reaction Rate Uncertainties and Astrophysical Modeling. II. Carbon Yields from Low-mass Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Herwig; Sam M. Austin; John C. Lattanzio

    2005-11-14

    Calculations that demonstrate the influence of three key nuclear reaction rates on the evolution of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars have been carried out. We study the case of a star with an initial mass of 2Msun and a metallicity of Z=0.01, somewhat less than the solar metallicity. The dredge-up of nuclear processed material from the interior of the star, and the yield predictions for carbon, are sensitive to the rate of the N14(p,gamma)O15 and triple-alpha reactions. These reactions dominate the H- and He-burning shells of stars in this late evolutionary phase. Published uncertainty estimates for each of these two rates propagated through stellar evolution calculations cause uncertainties in carbon enrichment and yield predictions of about a factor of two. The other important He-burning reaction C12(alpha,gamma)O16, although associated with the largest uncertainty in our study, does not have a significant influence on the abundance evolution compared to other modelling uncertainties. This finding remains valid when the entire evolution from the main-sequence to the tip of the AGB is considered. We discuss the experimental sources of the rate uncertainties addressed here, and give some outlook for future work.

  6. Parameter estimation using a complete signal and inspiral templates for low mass binary black holes with Advanced LIGO sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hee-Suk Cho

    2015-10-12

    We study the validity of inspiral templates in gravitational wave data analysis with Advanced LIGO sensitivity for low mass binary black holes with total masses of $M \\leq 30 Msun$. We mainly focus on the nonspinning system. As our complete inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform model ($IMR$), we assume the phenomenological model, "PhenomA", and define our inspiral template model ($Imerg$) by taking the inspiral part into account from $IMR$ up to the merger frequency (fmerg). We first calculate the {\\it true} statistical uncertainties using $IMR$ signals and $IMR$ templates. Next, using $IMR$ signals and $Imerg$ templates, we calculate fitting factors and systematic biases, and compare the biases with the {\\it true} statistical uncertainties. We find that the valid criteria of the bank of $Imerg$ templates are obtained as $Mcrit \\sim 24 Msun$ for detection (if $M>Mcrit$, the fitting factor is smaller than $0.97$), and $Mcrit \\sim 26 Msun$ for parameter estimation (if $M>Mcrit$, the systematic bias is larger than the {\\it true} statistical uncertainty where the signal to noise ratio is $20$), respectively. In order to see the dependence on the cutoff frequency of the inspiral waveforms, we define another inspiral model $Iisco$ which is terminated at the innermost-stable-circular-orbit frequency ($fiscomodels considering various signal to noise ratios, and compare those to the {\\it true} statistical uncertainties. We also consider the aligned-spinning system with fixed mass ratio ($m_1/m_2=3$) and spin ($\\chi=0.5$) by employing the recent phenomenological model, "PhenomC".

  7. A Study of the Optical Properties of Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arienti, Marco; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Kopacz, Adrian M; Geier, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The report focu ses on the modification of the optical properties of ice crystals due to atmospheric black car bon (BC) contamination : the objective is to advance the predictive capabilities of climate models through an improved understanding of the radiative properties of compound particles . The shape of the ice crystal (as commonly found in cirrus clouds and cont rails) , the volume fraction of the BC inclusion , and its location inside the crystal are the three factors examined in this study. In the multiscale description of this problem, where a small absorbing inclusion modifies the optical properties of a much la rger non - absorbing particle, state - of - the - art discretization techniques are combined to provide the best compromise of flexibility and accuracy over a broad range of sizes .

  8. SYNTHESIS AND EMERGING IDEAS Decomposition of soil organic matter from boreal black

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    using pyrolysis gas chromatography- mass spectrometry prior to incubation, and after incubation on soils Pyrolysis GC/MS Á Soil organic carbon Introduction Boreal soils have been accumulating carbon (C) sinceSYNTHESIS AND EMERGING IDEAS Decomposition of soil organic matter from boreal black spruce forest

  9. Simulating Black Carbon and Dust and their Radiative Forcing in Seasonal Snow: A Case Study over North China with Field Campaign Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chun; Hu, Zhiyuan; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Jiming; Flanner, M. G.; Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Yan, Huiping; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, D. G.

    2014-10-30

    A state-of-the-art regional model, WRF-Chem, is coupled with the SNICAR model that includes the sophisticated representation of snow metamorphism processes available for climate study. The coupled model is used to simulate the black carbon (BC) and dust concentrations and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow over North China in January-February of 2010, with extensive field measurements used to evaluate the model performance. In general, the model simulated spatial variability of BC and dust mass concentrations in the top snow layer (hereafter BCS and DSTS, respectively) are quantitatively or qualitatively consistent with observations. The model generally moderately underestimates BCS in the clean regions but significantly overestimates BCS in some polluted regions. Most model results fall into the uncertainty ranges of observations. The simulated BCS and DSTS are highest with >5000 ng g-1 and up to 5 mg g-1, respectively, over the source regions and reduce to <50 ng g-1 and <1 ?g g-1, respectively, in the remote regions. BCS and DSTS introduce similar magnitude of radiative warming (~10 W m-2) in snowpack, which is comparable to the magnitude of surface radiative cooling due to BC and dust in the atmosphere. This study represents the first effort in using a regional modeling framework to simulate BC and dust and their direct radiative forcing in snow. Although a variety of observational datasets have been used to attribute model biases, some uncertainties in the results remain, which highlights the need for more observations, particularly concurrent measurements of atmospheric and snow aerosols and the deposition fluxes of aerosols, in future campaigns.

  10. High-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulation of black hole-neutron star merger: Mass ejection and short gamma-ray burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Wada, Tomohide

    2015-01-01

    We report results of a high-resolution numerical-relativity simulation for the merger of black hole-magnetized neutron star binaries on Japanese supercomputer "K". We focus on a binary that is subject to tidal disruption and subsequent formation of a massive accretion torus. We find the launch of thermally driven torus wind, subsequent formation of a funnel wall above the torus and a magnetosphere with collimated poloidal magnetic field, and high Blandford-Znajek luminosity. We show for the first time this picture in a self-consistent simulation. The turbulence-like motion induced by the non-axisymmetric magnetorotational instability as well as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability inside the accretion torus works as an agent to drive the mass accretion and converts the accretion energy to thermal energy, which results in the generation of a strong wind. By an in-depth resolution study, we reveal that high resolution is essential to draw such a picture. We also discuss the implication for the r-process nucleosynth...

  11. High-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulation of black hole-neutron star merger: Mass ejection and short gamma-ray burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenta Kiuchi; Yuichiro Sekiguchi; Koutarou Kyutoku; Masaru Shibata; Keisuke Taniguchi; Tomohide Wada

    2015-06-22

    We report results of a high-resolution numerical-relativity simulation for the merger of black hole-magnetized neutron star binaries on Japanese supercomputer "K". We focus on a binary that is subject to tidal disruption and subsequent formation of a massive accretion torus. We find the launch of thermally driven torus wind, subsequent formation of a funnel wall above the torus and a magnetosphere with collimated poloidal magnetic field, and high Blandford-Znajek luminosity. We show for the first time this picture in a self-consistent simulation. The turbulence-like motion induced by the non-axisymmetric magnetorotational instability as well as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability inside the accretion torus works as an agent to drive the mass accretion and converts the accretion energy to thermal energy, which results in the generation of a strong wind. By an in-depth resolution study, we reveal that high resolution is essential to draw such a picture. We also discuss the implication for the r-process nucleosynthesis, the radioactively-powered transient emission, and short gamma-ray bursts.

  12. High-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulation of black hole-neutron star merger: Mass ejection and short gamma-ray burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenta Kiuchi; Yuichiro Sekiguchi; Koutarou Kyutoku; Masaru Shibata; Keisuke Taniguchi; Tomohide Wada

    2015-09-03

    We report results of a high-resolution numerical-relativity simulation for the merger of black hole-magnetized neutron star binaries on Japanese supercomputer "K". We focus on a binary that is subject to tidal disruption and subsequent formation of a massive accretion torus. We find the launch of thermally driven torus wind, subsequent formation of a funnel wall above the torus and a magnetosphere with collimated poloidal magnetic field, and high Blandford-Znajek luminosity. We show for the first time this picture in a self-consistent simulation. The turbulence-like motion induced by the non-axisymmetric magnetorotational instability as well as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability inside the accretion torus works as an agent to drive the mass accretion and converts the accretion energy to thermal energy, which results in the generation of a strong wind. By an in-depth resolution study, we reveal that high resolution is essential to draw such a picture. We also discuss the implication for the r-process nucleosynthesis, the radioactively-powered transient emission, and short gamma-ray bursts.

  13. A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2014-06-02

    Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

  14. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2015-07-10

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In-situ observations of snow cover fraction since the 1960s suggest that the snow pack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2–2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean–atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover fraction to various anthropogenic factors. Atmore »the Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. Especially, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow are coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.« less

  15. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  16. Mass estimate of the XTE J1650-500 black hole from the Extended Orbital Resonance Model for high-frequency QPOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Slany; Zdenek Stuchlik

    2008-10-01

    XTE J1650-500 is a Galactic black-hole binary system for which at least one high-frequency QPO at 250Hz was reported. Moreover there are indications that the system harbours a near-extreme Kerr black-hole with the spin near 0.998 and mass M0.9953, being analyzed in the locally non-rotating frames, reveals a hump near the marginally stable orbit. Further it was suggested that the hump could excite the epicyclic motion of particles near the ISCO with frequencies typical for high-frequency QPOs. Characteristic frequency of the hump-induced oscillations was defined as the maximal positive rate of change of the LNRF-related orbital velocity with the proper radial distance. If the characteristic "humpy frequency" and the radial epicyclic frequency are commensurable, strong resonant phenomena are expected. For the Kerr black hole with the spin a=0.9982 the "humpy frequency" and the radial epicyclic frequency are in ratio 1:3. Identifying the radial epicyclic frequency with the observed 250Hz QPO, we get the mass of the black hole in XTE J1650-500 near 5.1M_sun.

  17. Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

    2007-11-09

    We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

  18. Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

    2007-10-01

    We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

  19. Search for gravitational radiation from intermediate mass black hole binaries in data from the second LIGO-Virgo joint science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an unmodeled, all-sky search for gravitational waves from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). The search was performed on data from the second joint science run of the LIGO and Virgo detectors (July 2009 - October 2010) and was sensitive to IMBHBs with a range up to $\\sim 200$ Mpc, averaged over the possible sky positions and inclinations of the binaries with respect to the line of sight. No significant candidate was found. Upper limits on the coalescence-rate density of non-spinning IMBHBs with total masses between 100 and $450 \\ \\mbox{M}_{\\odot}$ and mass ratios between $0.25$ and $1\\,$ were placed by combining this analysis with an analogous search performed on data from the first LIGO-Virgo joint science run (November 2005 - October 2007). The most stringent limit was set for systems consisting of two $88 \\ \\mbox{M}_{\\odot}$ black holes and is equal to $0.12 \\ \\mbox{Mpc}^{-3} \\ \\mbox{Myr}^{-1}$ at the $90\\%$ confidence level. This paper also presents the first esti...

  20. Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    85 , 241-248. Harley, RA; Marr, LC; Lehner, JK; Giddings,Environ. , 40 , 4137-4149. Marr, LC; Black, DR; Harley,only 10% less on Sundays [Marr et al. , 2002]. Therefore, we

  1. Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

    2008-01-01

    85, 241-248. Harley, RA; Marr, LC; Lehner, JK; Giddings,Environ. , 40, 4137-4149. Marr, LC; Black, DR; Harley, RA. (only 10% less on Sundays [Marr et al. , 2002]. Therefore, we

  2. Thermogravimetry-Mass Spectrometry for Carbon Nanotube Detection in Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Desiree Louise

    In spite of the growth of the carbon nanotube (CNT) industry, there are no established analytical methods with which to detect or quantify CNTs in environmental matrices. Given that CNTs have relatively high thermal ...

  3. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ?} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ?} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ?} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ?} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ? 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ?} ? 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  4. Final spin and radiated energy in numerical simulations of binary black holes with equal masses and equal, aligned or anti-aligned spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Hemberger; Geoffrey Lovelace; Thomas J. Loredo; Lawrence E. Kidder; Mark A. Scheel; Béla Szilágyi; Nicholas W. Taylor; Saul A. Teukolsky

    2013-09-23

    The behavior of merging black holes (including the emitted gravitational waves and the properties of the remnant) can currently be computed only by numerical simulations. This paper introduces ten numerical relativity simulations of binary black holes with equal masses and equal spins aligned or anti-aligned with the orbital angular momentum. The initial spin magnitudes have $|\\chi_i| \\lesssim 0.95$ and are more concentrated in the aligned direction because of the greater astrophysical interest of this case. We combine this data with five previously reported simulations of the same configuration, but with different spin magnitudes, including the highest spin simulated to date, $\\chi_i \\approx 0.97$. This data set is sufficiently accurate to enable us to offer improved analytic fitting formulae for the final spin and for the energy radiated by gravitational waves as a function of initial spin. The improved fitting formulae can help to improve our understanding of the properties of binary black hole merger remnants and can be used to enhance future approximate waveforms for gravitational wave searches, such as Effective-One-Body waveforms.

  5. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, A.R.; Thornton, D.C.; Driedger, A.R. III [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF DARK MATTER HALOS ON DYNAMICAL ESTIMATES OF BLACK HOLE MASS: 10 NEW MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-{sigma} EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusli, S. P.; Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Fabricius, M.; Erwin, P.; Bender, R.; Nowak, N.; Lee, C. H.; Riffeser, A.; Sharp, R.

    2013-09-15

    Adaptive optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of 10 early-type galaxies are presented. Based primarily on the SINFONI kinematics, 10 black hole (BH) masses occupying the high-mass regime of the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation are derived using three-integral Schwarzschild models. The effect of dark matter (DM) inclusion on the BH mass is explored. The omission of a DM halo in the model results in a higher stellar mass-to-light ratio, especially when extensive kinematic data are used in the model. However, when the diameter of the sphere of influence-computed using the BH mass derived without a dark halo-is at least 10 times the point-spread function FWHM during the observations, it is safe to exclude a DM component in the dynamical modeling, i.e., the change in BH mass is negligible. When the spatial resolution is marginal, restricting the mass-to-light ratio to the right value returns the correct M{sub BH} although a dark halo is not present in the model. Compared to the M{sub BH}-{sigma} and M{sub BH}-L relations of McConnell et al., the 10 BHs are all more massive than expected from the luminosities and 7 BH masses are higher than expected from the stellar velocity dispersions of the host bulges. Using new fitted relations, which include the 10 galaxies, we find that the space density of the most massive BHs (M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) estimated from the M{sub BH}-L relation is higher than the estimate based on the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation and the latter is higher than model predictions based on quasar counts, each by about an order of magnitude.

  7. Quantification of black carbon in marine systems using the benzene polycarboxylic acid method: a mechanistic and yield study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziolkowski, Lori A; Chamberlin, A.R.; Greaves, John; Druffel, Ellen R.M.

    2011-01-01

    and carbon nanotubes using the benzene polycarboxylic acidmarine systems using the benzene polycarboxylic acid method:as sediment or soil. The benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA)

  8. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genet, Helene [Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB), University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB), University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Barrett, K. [USGS Alaska Science Center] [USGS Alaska Science Center; Breen, Amy [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Johnstone, J. F. [University of Saskatchewan] [University of Saskatchewan; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park] [University of Maryland, College Park; Melvin, A. M. [University of Florida, Gainesville] [University of Florida, Gainesville; Bennett, A. [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Mack, M. C. [University of Florida, Gainesville] [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rupp, Scott T. [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Schuur, Edward [University of Florida] [University of Florida; Turetsky, M. R. [University of Guelph, Canada] [University of Guelph, Canada; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layercaused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness of 1.1 m on average by 2100. The combination of warming and fire led to a simulated cumulative loss of 9.6 kgC m 2 on average by 2100. Our analysis suggests that ecosystem carbon storage in boreal forests in interior Alaska is particularly vulnerable, primarily due to the combustion of organic layer thickness in fire and the related increase in active layer thickness that exposes previously protected permafrost soil carbon to decomposition.

  9. THE AKARI 2.5-5.0 ?m SPECTRAL ATLAS OF TYPE-1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATOR, LINE RATIO, AND HOT DUST TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Lee, Seong-Kook; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki; Ohyama, Youichi E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 ?m spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 ?m spectral region contains emission lines such as Br? (2.63 ?m), Br? (4.05 ?m), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 ?m), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ?1100 K and ?220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  10. Magnetized static black Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoytcho S. Yazadjiev

    2008-02-06

    We construct a new static solution to the 5D Einstein-Maxwell equations describing a static black hole surrounded by a non-rotating dipole black ring. The configuration is kept in equilibrium by an external magnetic field interacting with the dipole charge of the black ring. The properties of the black Saturn-like configuration are studied and the basic physical quantities are calculated. The solution demonstrates 2-fold continuous non-uniqueness of the 5D magnetized static neutral black objects for fixed total mass and Melvin background.

  11. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  12. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass.more »It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.« less

  13. Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

    1985-04-29

    Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

  14. Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

    1987-11-17

    Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

  15. Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, Powell (New Bern, NC); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Prach, Thomas F. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1987-01-01

    Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

  16. Critique of the carbonate mass loss model for paint damage functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.A.

    1987-06-01

    One of the key questions concerning the assessment of acid deposition damage is its effect on painted surfaces. In order to determine this it is necessary to have a paint damage function that expresses the quantity of physical damage associated with a given level of acid deposition. This problem is now a major focus of EPA's current research; however, results are not yet available. Consequently, the NAPAP paint damage function was derived from data collected in several studies that substantially predated the acid rain research program. Although this damage function may appear plausible at first glance, it has been criticized, in part because paint damage constitutes such an important part of the total, but mainly because it is based largely on a conceptual model involving erosion due to dissolution loss of carbonate extenders in the paint formulation.

  17. Optical Thermonuclear Transients From Tidal Compression of White Dwarfs as Tracers of the Low End of the Massive Black Hole Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Kasen, Daniel; Rosswog, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we model the observable signatures of tidal disruptions of white dwarf (WD) stars by massive black holes (MBHs) of moderate mass, $\\approx 10^3 - 10^5 M_\\odot$. When the WD passes deep enough within the MBH's tidal field, these signatures include thermonuclear transients from burning during maximum compression. We combine a hydrodynamic simulation that includes nuclear burning of the disruption of a $0.6 M_\\odot$ C/O WD with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculation to synthesize the properties of a representative transient. The transient's emission emerges in the optical, with lightcurves and spectra reminiscent of type I SNe. The properties are strongly viewing-angle dependent, and key spectral signatures are $\\approx 10,000$ km s$^{-1}$ Doppler shifts due to the orbital motion of the unbound ejecta. Disruptions of He WDs likely produce large quantities of intermediate-mass elements, offering a possible production mechanism for Ca-rich transients. Accompanying multiwavelength transients ar...

  18. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-08-01

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  19. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-01

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  20. New Limits on an Intermediate Mass Black Hole in Omega Centauri: I. Hubble Space Telescope Photometry and Proper Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jay

    2009-01-01

    We analyze data from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys of the globular cluster Omega Cen. We construct a photometric and proper-motion catalog using the GO-9442, GO-10252, and GO-10775 data sets. The 2.5- to 4-year baseline between observations yields a catalog of some $10^5$ proper motions, with 53,382 high-quality measurements in a central field. We determine the cluster center to ~1-arcecond accuracy using two different star-count methods. We also determine the kinematical center of the proper motions, which agrees with the star-count center to within its ~4.6-arcsecond uncertainty. The proper-motion dispersion of the cluster increases gradually inwards, but there is no variation in kinematics with position within the central ~15 arcsec: there is no dispersion cusp and no stars with unusually high velocities. We measure for the first time in any globular cluster the variation in proper-motion dispersion with mass along the main sequence, and find the cluster not yet to be in equipart...

  1. Mass Spectroscopy of Chemical Reaction of 3d Metal Clusters Involved in Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    -labeled experiments. KEYWORDS: cluster, iron, cobalt, nickel, FT-ICR, single-walled carbon nanotubes *Present address Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Shuhei Inoue* and Shigeo Maruyama Department of Mechanical Engineering importance. For example, these reactions are involved in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

  2. Late devonian carbon isotope stratigraphy and sea level fluctuations, Canning Basin, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01

    stratigraphy in shallow-water carbonates: implications for Cretaceous black-shale deposition. Sedimentology

  3. Effects of volatile coatings on the morphology and optical detection of combustion-generated black carbon particles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambha, Ray P.; Dansson, Mark Alex; Schrader, Paul E.; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2013-09-01

    We have measured time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) from combustion-generated mature soot extracted from a burner and (1) coated with oleic acid or (2) coated with oleic acid and then thermally denuded using a thermodenuder. The soot samples were size selected using a differential mobility analyser and characterized with a scanning mobility particle sizer, centrifugal particle mass analyser, and transmission electron microscope. The results demonstrate a strong influence of coatings particle morphology and on the magnitude and temporal evolution of the LII signal. For coated particles higher laser fluences are required to reach LII signal levels comparable to those of uncoated particles. This effect is predominantly attributable to the additional energy needed to vaporize the coating while heating the particle. LII signals are higher and signal decay rates are significantly slower for thermally denuded particles relative to coated or uncoated particles, particularly at low and intermediate laser fluences.

  4. Search for Quantum Black Hole Production in High-Invariant-Mass Lepton + Jet Final States Using pp Collisions at ?s = 8 TeV and the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents a search for quantum black-hole production using 20.3??fb[superscript ?1] of data collected with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at the LHC at ?s = 8??TeV. The quantum black holes are assumed to ...

  5. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in2007), Comparison of carbon dioxide fluxes over three borealharvest influence carbon dioxide fluxes of black spruce

  6. Effects of aggregate morphology and size on laser-induced incandescence and scattering from black carbon (mature soot)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bambha, Ray P.; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2015-07-03

    We have used a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to measure time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) and laser scatter from combustion-generated mature soot with a fractal dimension of 1.88 extracted from a burner. We have also made measurements on restructured mature-soot particles with a fractal dimension of 2.3–2.4. We reproduced the LII and laser-scatter temporal profiles with an energy- and mass-balance model, which accounted for heating of particles passed through a CW-laser beam over laser–particle interaction times of ~10 ?s. Furthermore, the results demonstrate a strong influence of aggregate size and morphology on LII and scattering signals. Conductive cooling competes with absorptivemore »heating on these time scales; the effects are reduced with increasing aggregate size and fractal dimension. These effects can lead to a significant delay in the onset of the LII signal and may explain an apparent low bias in the SP2 measurements for small particle sizes, particularly for fresh, mature soot. The results also reveal significant perturbations to the measured scattering signal from LII interference and suggest rapid expansion of the aggregates during sublimation.« less

  7. The Role of Circulation Features on Black Carbon Transport into the Arctic in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Easter, Richard C.; Tilmes, S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Liu, Xiaohong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2013-05-28

    Current climate models generally under-predict the surface concentration of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic due to the uncertainties associated with emissions, transport, and removal. This bias is also present in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5.1 (CAM5). In this study, we investigate the uncertainty of Arctic BC due to transport processes simulated by CAM5 by configuring the model to run in an “offline mode” in which the large-scale circulations are prescribed. We compare the simulated BC transport when the offline model is driven by the meteorology predicted by the standard free-running CAM5 with simulations where the meteorology is constrained to agree with reanalysis products. Some circulation biases are apparent: the free-running CAM5 produces about 50% less transient eddy transport of BC than the reanalysis-driven simulations, which may be attributed to the coarse model resolution insufficient to represent eddies. Our analysis shows that the free-running CAM5 reasonably captures the essence of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), but some discernable differences in the spatial pattern of the AO between the free-running CAM5 and the reanalysis-driven simulations result in significantly different AO modulation of BC transport over Northeast Asia and Eastern Europe. Nevertheless, we find that the overall climatological circulation patterns simulated by the free-running CAM5 generally resembles those from the reanalysis products, and BC transport is very similar in both simulation sets. Therefore, the simulated circulation features regulating the long-range BC transport is unlikely the most important cause of the large under-prediction of surface BC concentration in the Arctic.

  8. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-05-04

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA andmore »West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  9. Quantifying sources of black carbon in western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source–receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over northwestern USA and westernmore »Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  10. Relationship of Black Holes to Bulges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Laura Ferrarese

    2001-07-08

    Supermassive black holes appear to be uniquely associated with galactic bulges. The mean ratio of black hole mass to bulge mass was until recently very uncertain, with ground based, stellar kinematical data giving a value roughly an order of magnitude larger than other techniques. The discrepancy was resolved with the discovery of the M-sigma relation, which simultaneously established a tight corrrelation between black hole mass and bulge velocity dispersion, and confirmed that the stellar kinematical mass estimates were systematically too large due to failure to resolve the black hole's sphere of influence. There is now excellent agreement between the various techniques for estimating the mean black hole mass, including dynamical mass estimation in quiescent galaxies; reverberation mapping in active galaxies and quasars; and computation of the mean density of compact objects based on integrated quasar light. Implications of the M-sigma relation for the formation of black holes are discussed.

  11. A Link To The Future: A Pilot Study Look at How Historically Black Colleges and Universities With Journalism and Mass Communications Units Use The Internet in Recruiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford II, Jerry L.

    2012-04-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have had the ability to recruit African-American students since the 1860s by stressing a sense of inclusion and family through their mission statements and community ...

  12. Reprocessing of used tires into activated carbon and other products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng, H.; Serio, M.A.; Wojtowicz, M.A.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-09-01

    Landfilling used tires which are generated each year in the US is increasingly becoming an unacceptable solution. A better approach, from an environmental and economic standpoint, is to thermally reprocess the tires into valuable products such as activated carbon, other solid carbon forms (carbon black, graphite, and carbon fibers), and liquid fuels. In this study, high surface area activated carbons (> 800 m{sup 2}/g solid product) were produced in relatively high yields by pyrolysis of tires at up to 900 C, followed by activation in CO{sub 2} at the same temperature. The surface areas of these materials are comparable with those of commercial activated carbons. The efficiency of the activation process (gain in specific surface area/loss in mass) was greatest (up to 138 m{sup 2}/g original tire) when large pieces of tire material were used ({approximately} 170 mg). Oxygen pretreatment of tires was found to enhance both the yield and the surface area of the carbon product. High-pressure treatment of tires at low temperatures (< 400 C) is an alternative approach if the recovery of carbon black or fuel oils is the primary objective.

  13. Using an Explicit Emission Tagging Method in Global Modeling of Source-Receptor Relationships for Black Carbon in the Arctic: Variations, Sources and Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Rudong; Ma, Po-Lun; Qian, Yun; Ghan, Steven J.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2014-11-27

    We introduce an explicit emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model to quantify source-region-resolved characteristics of black carbon (BC), focusing on the Arctic. Explicit tagging of BC source regions without perturbing the emissions makes it straightforward to establish source-receptor relationships and transport pathways, providing a physically consistent and computationally efficient approach to produce a detailed characterization of the destiny of regional BC emissions and the potential for mitigation actions. Our analysis shows that the contributions of major source regions to the global BC burden are not proportional to the respective emissions due to strong region-dependent removal rates and lifetimes, while the contributions to BC direct radiative forcing show a near-linear dependence on their respective contributions to the burden. Distant sources contribute to BC in remote regions mostly in the mid- and upper troposphere, having much less impact on lower-level concentrations (and deposition) than on burden. Arctic BC concentrations, deposition and source contributions all have strong seasonal variations. Eastern Asia contributes the most to the wintertime Arctic burden. Northern Europe emissions are more important to both surface concentration and deposition in winter than in summer. The largest contribution to Arctic BC in the summer is from Northern Asia. Although local emissions contribute less than 10% to the annual mean BC burden and deposition within the Arctic, the per-emission efficiency is much higher than for major non-Arctic sources. The interannual variability (1996-2005) due to meteorology is small in annual mean BC burden and radiative forcing but is significant in yearly seasonal means over the Arctic. When a slow aging treatment of BC is introduced, the increase of BC lifetime and burden is source-dependent. Global BC forcing-per-burden efficiency also increases primarily due to changes in BC vertical distributions. The relative contribution from major non-Arctic sources to the Arctic BC burden increases only slightly, although the contribution of Arctic local sources is reduced by a factor of 2 due to the slow aging treatment.

  14. A long-term record of carbon exchange in a boreal black spruce forest: means, responses to interannual variability, and decadal trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, AL; Barford, CC; Wofsy, SC; Goulden, ML; Daube, BC

    2007-01-01

    the growing season (OGS and EGS, respectively) as the firstthe influence of OGS, EGS, and LGS on the annual carbon

  15. ARM - Measurement - Black carbon concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticle size distribution

  16. Black hole horizons Eric Gourgoulhon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    on a black hole: up to 42% of the mass-energy mc2 of accreted matter ! NB: thermonuclear reactions release: a very deep gravitational potential well Release of potential gravitational energy by accretion

  17. Identification of a Class of Low-Mass Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Struggling to Become Carbon Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Martha L; Srinivasan, Sundar; Zijlstra, Albert; van Loon, Jacco Th; Olsen, Knut A G; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a new class of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC/LMC) using optical to infrared photometry, light curves, and optical spectroscopy. The strong dust production and long-period pulsations of these stars indicate that they are at the very end of their AGB evolution. Period-mass-radius relations for the fundamental-mode pulsators give median current stellar masses of 1.14 M_sun in the LMC and 0.94 M_sun in the SMC (with dispersions of 0.21 and 0.18 M_sun, respectively), and models suggest initial masses of chemistries, placing the limit where dredge-up allows carbon star production below these masses. A high fraction of the brightest among them should show S star characteristics indicative of atmospheric C/O ~ 1, and many will form O-rich dust prior to their C-rich phase. These stars can be separated from their less-evolved counterparts by their...

  18. Will black holes eventually engulf the universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prado Martin-Moruno; Jose A. Jimenez Madrid; Pedro F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    2006-03-28

    The Babichev-Dokuchaev-Eroshenko model for the accretion of dark energy onto black holes has been extended to deal with black holes with non-static metrics. The possibility that for an asymptotic observer a black hole with large mass will rapidly increase and eventually engulf the Universe at a finite time in the future has been studied by using reasonable values for astronomical parameters. It is concluded that such a phenomenon is forbidden for all black holes in quintessential cosmological models.

  19. Energy of 4-Dimensional Black Hole, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2011-07-18

    In this letter I suggest possible redefinition of mass density, not depending on speed of the mass element, which leads to a more simple stress-energy for an object. I calculate energy of black hole.

  20. UV-Vis, infrared, and mass spectroscopy of electron irradiated frozen oxygen and carbon dioxide mixtures with water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Ozone has been detected on the surface of Ganymede via observation of the Hartley band through the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and is largely agreed upon to be formed by radiolytic processing via interaction of magnetospheric energetic ions and/or electrons with oxygen-bearing ices on Ganymede's surface. Interestingly, a clearly distinct band near 300 nm within the shoulder of the UV-Vis spectrum of Ganymede was also observed, but currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. Consequently, the primary motivation behind this work was the collection of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of ozone formation by energetic electron bombardment of a variety of oxygen-bearing ices (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water) relevant to this moon as well as other solar system. Ozone was indeed synthesized in pure ices of molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide and a mixture of water and oxygen, in agreement with previous studies. The Hartley band of the ozone synthesized in these ice mixtures was observed in the UV-Vis spectra and compared with the spectrum of Ganymede. In addition, a solid state ozone absorption cross section of 6.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup –17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup –1} was obtained from the UV-Vis spectral data. Ozone was not produced in the irradiated carbon dioxide-water mixtures; however, a spectrally 'red' UV continuum is observed and appears to reproduce well what is observed in a large number of icy moons such as Europa.

  1. A time-domain fourth-order-convergent numerical algorithm to integrate black hole perturbations in the extreme-mass-ratio limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos O. Lousto

    2006-05-26

    We obtain a fourth order accurate numerical algorithm to integrate the Zerilli and Regge-Wheeler wave equations, describing perturbations of nonrotating black holes, with source terms due to an orbiting particle. Those source terms contain the Dirac's delta and its first derivative. We also re-derive the source of the Zerilli and Regge-Wheeler equations for more convenient definitions of the waveforms, that allow direct metric reconstruction (in the Regge-Wheeler gauge).

  2. 3-D Nano-Structured Carbon/Tin Composite Anodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    uniform dispersion of Sn in the carbon matrix 20 10 * Carbon matrix displays 10-15 nm graphene 0 1 2 3 4 >4 domains and regions typical of carbon blacks P article S ize (nm )...

  3. Location and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the chondritic uniform reservoir (CHUR; black line) and the depleted mantle (purple line). The parameters of CHUR by calcite. Fig. 5. Pyritized fracture Fig. 6. Massive black shale Fig. 7. Graptolite in black shale Fig. 8 shale, - Measure the concentrations of major, minor and trace elements including organic carbon

  4. Can Superconducting Cosmic Strings Piercing Seed Black Holes Generate Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes at redshifts $z> 6$, when the Universe was only nine hundred million years old, has raised the fundamental question of how such massive compact objects could form in a (cosmologically) short time interval. Each of the proposed standard scenarios for black hole formation, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes, or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short time formation of supermassive objects. In the present Letter, we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings, piercing small seed black holes, is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. The increase in mass of a primordial seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings is estimated and it is shown that this increases linearly in time. Due to the high energy transfer rate from the cosmic strings, we find that supermassi...

  5. Energy density bounds for black strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Tomizawa

    2005-06-07

    The conserved charge called Y-ADM mass density associated with asymptotically translational Killing-Yano tensor gives us an appropriate physical meaning about the energy density of $p$ brane spacetimes or black strings. We investigated the positivity of energy density in black string spacetimes, using the spinorial technique introduced by Witten. Recently, the positivity of Y-ADM mass density in p brane spacetimes was discussed. In this paper, we will extend this discussion to the transversely asymptotically flat black string spacetimes containing an apparent horizon. We will give the sufficient conditions for the Y-ADM mass density to become positive in such spacetimes.

  6. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  7. Primordial black holes and asteroid danger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Shatskiy

    2008-02-21

    Probability for a primordial black hole to invade the Kuiper belt was calculated. We showed that primordial black holes of certain masses can significantly change asteroids' orbits. These events may result in disasters, local for our solar system and global for the Earth (like the Tunguska meteorite). We also estimated how often such events occur.

  8. Canonical structure of 2D black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro-Salas, J; Talavera, C F

    1994-01-01

    We determine the canonical structure of two-dimensional black-hole solutions arising in $2D$ dilaton gravity. By choosing the Cauchy surface appropriately we find that the canonically conjugate variable to the black hole mass is given by the difference of local (Schwarzschild) time translations at right and left spatial infinities. This can be regarded as a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem.

  9. Black Holes and Galaxy Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1999-06-02

    The consequences of nuclear black holes for the structure and dynamics of stellar spheroids are reviewed. Slow growth of a black hole in a pre-existing core produces a steep power-law density profile similar to the cusps seen in faint elliptical galaxies. The weaker cusps in bright ellipticals may result from ejection of stars by a coalescing black-hole binary; there is marginal kinematical evidence for such a process having occurred in M87. Stellar orbits in a triaxial nucleus are mostly regular at radii where the gravitational force is dominated by the black hole; however the orbital shapes are not conducive to reinforcing the triaxial figure, hence nuclei are likely to be approximately axisymmetric. In triaxial potentials, a ``zone of chaos'' extends outward to a radius where the enclosed stellar mass is roughly 100 times the mass of the black hole; in this chaotic zone, no regular, box-like orbits exist. At larger radii, the phase space in triaxial potentials is complex, consisting of stochastic orbits as well as regular orbits associated with stable resonances. Figure rotation tends to increase the degree of stochasticity. Both test-particle integrations and N-body simulations suggest that a triaxial galaxy responds globally to the presence of a central mass concentration by evolving toward more axisymmetric shapes; the evolution occurs rapidly when the mass of the central object exceeds roughly 2% of the mass in stars. The lack of significant triaxiality in most early-type galaxies may be a consequence of orbital evolution induced by nuclear black holes.

  10. Carbon-14 and the San Francisco Skeletons A radioactive substance is a substance that spontaneously decays, meaning that its mass sponta-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    . Carbon-14 is a radioactive isotope commonly used to date fossils, which makes sense because life forms it convenient for dating. Use the half-life of carbon-14 to write down an exponential decay model A = Pe on this planet are primarily carbon based. Its half-life is around = 5, 715 years; this long half life makes

  11. Carbon K-Edge XANES Spectromicroscopy of Natural Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes,J.; Cody, G.; Rumble, D.; Haberstroh, P.; Wirick, S.; Gelinas, Y.; Morais-Cabral, J.

    2008-01-01

    The black carbon continuum is composed of a series of carbon-rich components derived from combustion or metamorphism and characterized by contrasting environmental behavior and susceptibility to oxidation. In this work, we present a micro-scale density fractionation method that allows isolating the small quantities of soot-like and graphitic material usually found in natural samples. Organic carbon and {delta}{sup 13}C mass balance calculations were used to quantify the relative contributions of the two fractions to thermally-stable organic matter from a series of aquatic sediments. Varying proportions of soot-like and graphitic material were found in these samples, with large variations in {delta}{sup 13}C signatures suggesting important differences in their origin and/or dynamics in the environment.

  12. Thermodynamic fluctuation in black string flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng Sun; Yong-Chang Huna

    2015-06-14

    It has long been noticed that Laudau-Lifshitz theory can be used to study the fluctuation of a system that contains a black hole. Since the black string can be constructed by extending n-dimensional black hole into one extra dimension. We study the fluctuation of black string flow with a Schwarzschlid-like metric in D=n+1 dimensional spacetime and a charged solution in D=5 dimensional spacetime and get the second moments of the fluctuation of the mass flux and charge flux.

  13. Thermodynamic fluctuation in black string flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng Sun; Yong-Chang Huang

    2015-05-11

    It has long been noticed that Laudau-Lifshitz theory can be used to study the fluctuation of a system that contains a black hole. Since the black string can be constructed by extending n-dimensional black hole into one extra dimension. We study the fluctuation of black string flow with a Schwarzschlid-like metric in D=n+1 dimensional spacetime and a charged solution in D=5 dimensional spacetime and get the second moments of the fluctuation of the mass flux and charge flux.

  14. Black Hole Thermodynamics and Electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2005-07-15

    We show a strong parallel between the Hawking, Beckenstein black hole Thermodynamics and electromagnetism: When the gravitational coupling constant transform into the electromagnetic coupling constant, the Schwarzchild radius, the Beckenstein temperature, the Beckenstein decay time and the Planck mass transform to respectively the Compton wavelength, the Hagedorn temperature, the Compton time and a typical elementary particle mass. The reasons underlying this parallalism are then discussed in detail.

  15. Quantization of black holes by analogy with hydrogen atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Liu; Yan-Gang Miao; Yu-Mei Wu; Yu-Hao Zhang

    2015-11-16

    We suggest a proposal of quantization for black holes that is based on an analogy between a black hole and a hydrogen atom. A self-regular Schwarzschild-AdS black hole is investigated, where the mass density of the extreme black hole is given by the probability density of the ground state of hydrogen atoms and the mass densities of non-extreme black holes are chosen to be the probability densities of excited states with no angular momenta. Consequently, it is logical to accept quantization of mean radii of hydrogen atoms as that of black hole horizons. In this way, quantization of total black hole masses is deduced. Furthermore, the quantum hoop conjecture and the Correspondence Principle are discussed.

  16. Quantization of black holes by analogy with hydrogen atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chang; Wu, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Hao

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a proposal of quantization for black holes that is based on an analogy between a black hole and a hydrogen atom. A self-regular Schwarzschild-AdS black hole is investigated, where the mass density of the extreme black hole is given by the probability density of the ground state of hydrogen atoms and the mass densities of non-extreme black holes are chosen to be the probability densities of excited states with no angular momenta. Consequently, it is logical to accept quantization of mean radii of hydrogen atoms as that of black hole horizons. In this way, quantization of total black hole masses is deduced. Furthermore, the quantum hoop conjecture and the Correspondence Principle are discussed.

  17. Quantization of black holes by analogy with hydrogen atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Liu; Yan-Gang Miao; Yu-Mei Wu; Yu-Hao Zhang

    2015-11-23

    We suggest a proposal of quantization for black holes that is based on an analogy between a black hole and a hydrogen atom. A self-regular Schwarzschild-AdS black hole is investigated, where the mass density of the extreme black hole is given by the probability density of the ground state of hydrogen atoms and the mass densities of non-extreme black holes are chosen to be the probability densities of excited states with no angular momenta. Consequently, it is logical to accept quantization of mean radii of hydrogen atoms as that of black hole horizons. In this way, quantization of total black hole masses is deduced. Furthermore, the quantum hoop conjecture and the Correspondence Principle are discussed.

  18. Testing a Mechanistic Model of Forest-Canopy Mass and Energy Exchange Using Eddy Correlation: Carbon Dioxide and Ozone Uptake by a Mixed Oak-Maple Stand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amthor, JS; Goulden, ML; Munger, JW; Wofsy, SC

    1994-01-01

    exchange of mass and energy between a forest canopy and thewater, energy, and momentum exchange between a forest andmeasurements of forest mass and energy exchange are

  19. Host Galaxy Properties and Black Hole Mass of Swift J164449.3+573451 from Multi-Wavelength Long-Term Monitoring and HST Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Yongmin; Jeon, Yiseul; Lee, Seong-Kook; Choi, Philip; Gehrels, Neil; Pak, Soojong; Sakamoto, Takanori; Urata, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    We study the host galaxy properties of the tidal disruption object, Swift J164449.3+573451 using long-term optical to near-infrared (NIR) data. First, we decompose the galaxy surface brightness distribution and analyze the morphology of the host galaxy using high resolution \\emph{HST} WFC3 images. We conclude that the host galaxy is a bulge-dominant galaxy that is well described by a single S\\'{e}rsic model with S\\'{e}rsic index $n=3.43\\pm0.05$. Adding a disk component, the bulge to total host galaxy flux ratio (B/T) is $0.83\\pm0.03$, which still indicates a bulge-dominant galaxy. Second, we estimate multi-band fluxes of the host galaxy through long-term light curves. Our long-term NIR light curves reveal the pure host galaxy fluxes $\\sim500$ days after the burst. We fit spectral energy distribution (SED) models to the multi-band fluxes from the optical to NIR of the host galaxy and determine its properties. The stellar mass, the star formation rate, and the age of stellar population are $\\log(M_{\\star}/M_{\\o...

  20. The neutron star mass distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiziltan, B; Kottas, A; De Yoreo, M; Thorsett, SE

    2013-01-01

    Science Library, Vol. 326, Neutron Stars 1 : Equation ofBlack holes, white dwarfs, and neutron stars: The physics ofPhys. Rev. , 55, 364 The Neutron Star Mass Distribution van

  1. Rotating black hole thermodynamics with a particle probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwak, Bogeun; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2011-10-15

    The thermodynamics of Myers-Perry black holes in general dimensions are studied using a particle probe. When undergoing particle absorption, the changes of the entropy and irreducible mass are shown to be dependent on the particle radial momentum. The black hole thermodynamic behaviors are dependent on dimensionality for specific rotations. For a 4-dimensional Kerr black hole, its black hole properties are maintained for any particle absorption. 5-dimensional black holes can avoid a naked ring singularity by absorbing a particle in specific momenta ranges. Black holes over 6 dimensions become ultraspinning black holes through a specific form of particle absorption. The microscopical changes are interpreted in limited cases of Myers-Perry black holes using Kerr/CFT correspondence. We systematically describe the black hole properties changed by particle absorption in all dimensions.

  2. Minimal Length Effects on Tunnelling from Spherically Symmetric Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benrong Mu; Peng Wang; Haitang Yang

    2015-01-24

    In this paper, we investigate effects of the minimal length on quantum tunnelling from spherically symmetric black holes using the Hamilton-Jacobi method incorporating the minimal length. We first derive the deformed Hamilton-Jacobi equations for scalars and fermions, both of which have the same expressions. The minimal length correction to the Hawking temperature is found to depend on the black hole's mass and the mass and angular momentum of emitted particles. Finally, we calculate a Schwarzschild black hole's luminosity and find the black hole evaporates to zero mass in infinite time.

  3. Minimal Length Effects on Tunnelling from Spherically Symmetric Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, Benrong; Yang, Haitang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate effects of the minimal length on quantum tunnelling from spherically symmetric black holes using the Hamilton-Jacobi method incorporating the minimal length. We first derive the deformed Hamilton-Jacobi equations for scalars and fermions, both of which have the same expressions. The minimal length correction to the Hawking temperature is found to depend on the black hole's mass and the mass and angular momentum of emitted particles. Finally, we calculate a Schwarzschild black hole's luminosity and find the black hole evaporates to zero mass in infinite time.

  4. Pulsed combustion process for black liquor gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durai-Swamy, K.; Mansour, M.N.; Warren, D.W.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this project is to test an energy efficient, innovative black liquor recovery system on an industrial scale. In the MTCI recovery process, black liquor is sprayed directly onto a bed of sodium carbonate solids which is fluidized by steam. Direct contact of the black liquor with hot bed solids promotes high rates of heating and pyrolysis. Residual carbon, which forms as a deposit on the particle surface, is then gasified by reaction with steam. Heat is supplied from pulse combustor resonance tubes which are immersed within the fluid bed. A portion of the gasifier product gas is returned to the pulse combustors to provide the energy requirements of the reactor. Oxidized sulfur species are partially reduced by reaction with the gasifier products, principally carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The reduced sulfur decomposed to solid sodium carbonate and gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). Sodium values are recovered by discharging a dry sodium carbonate product from the gasifier. MTCI's indirectly heated gasification technology for black liquor recovery also relies on the scrubbing of H{sub 2}S for product gases to regenerate green liquor for reuse in the mill circuit. Due to concerns relative to the efficiency of sulfur recovery in the MTCI integrated process, an experimental investigation was undertaken to establish performance and design data for this portion of the system.

  5. Thermal BEC black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Casadio; Andrea Giugno; Octavian Micu; Alessio Orlandi

    2015-11-04

    We review some features of BEC models of black holes obtained by means of the HWF formalism. We consider the KG equation for a toy graviton field coupled to a static matter current in spherical symmetry. The classical field reproduces the Newtonian potential generated by the matter source, while the corresponding quantum state is given by a coherent superposition of scalar modes with continuous occupation number. An attractive self-interaction is needed for bound states to form, so that (approximately) one mode is allowed, and the system of N bosons can be self-confined in a volume of the size of the Schwarzschild radius. The HWF is then used to show that the radius of such a system corresponds to a proper horizon. The uncertainty in the size of the horizon is related to the typical energy of Hawking modes: it decreases with the increasing of the black hole mass (larger number of gravitons), in agreement with semiclassical calculations and different from a single very massive particle. The spectrum contains a discrete ground state of energy $m$ (the bosons forming the black hole), and a continuous spectrum with energy $\\omega > m$ (representing the Hawking radiation and modelled with a Planckian distribution at the expected Hawking temperature). The $N$-particle state can be collectively described by a single-particle wave-function given by a superposition of a total ground state with energy $M = N m$ and a Planckian distribution for $E > M$ at the same Hawking temperature. The partition function is then found to yield the usual area law for the entropy, with a logarithmic correction related with the Hawking component. The backreaction of modes with $\\omega > m$ is also shown to reduce the Hawking flux and the evaporation properly stops for vanishing mass.

  6. Thermodynamic Relations for Kiselev and Dilaton Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushra Majeed; Mubasher Jamil; Parthapratim Pradhan

    2015-08-24

    We investigate the thermodynamics and phase transition for Kiselev black hole and dilaton black hole. Speci?cally we consider Reissner Nordstrom black hole surrounded by radiation and dust, and Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by quintessence, as special cases of Kiselev solution. We have calculated the products relating the surface gravities, surface temperatures, Komar energies, areas, entropies, horizon radii and the irreducible masses at the Cauchy and the event horizons. It is observed that the product of surface gravities, surface temperature product and product of Komar energies at the horizons are not universal quantities for the Kiselev solutions while products of areas and entropies at both the horizons are independent of mass of the above mentioned black holes (except for Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by quintessence). For charged dilaton black hole, all the products vanish. First law of thermodynamics is also veri?ed for Kiselev solutions. Heat capacities are calculated and phase transitions are observed, under certain conditions.

  7. Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences laminated, Cenoma- nian­Santonian black shale sequences contain between 2% and 15% organic carbon about the depositional conditions leading to the black shale accumulations. The low d13 Corg values

  8. No Supermassive Black Hole in M33?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Laura Ferrarese; Charles L. Joseph

    2001-07-20

    We analyze optical long-slit spectroscopy of the nucleus of M33 obtained from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Rather than the steep rise expected within the radius of influence of a supermassive black hole, the velocity dispersion drops significantly within the inner parsec. Dynamical modelling yields an estimated upper limit of 3000 solar masses for the mass of a central compact object. This upper limit is however consistent within the uncertainties with the mass predicted by the M-sigma relation, which is between 2000 and 20,000 solar masses. We therefore can not conclude that the presence of a massive black hole in the nucleus of M33 would require a different formation mechanism from that of the black holes detected in galaxies with more luminous bulges.

  9. Del Black

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design ofDefects LeadDel Black Del

  10. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-06

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive $\\geq30\\Msun$, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos in the mass range $10^{6}-10^{10}\\Ms$. Such early black holes, at redshifts z$\\gtsim10$, could be the seed black holes for the many supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If they exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime signal for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation of black holes in the center of high redshift dark matter halos and explore implications of initial natal kick velocities conjectured by some formation models. The central concentration of early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they are born even with moderate kicks of tens of km/s. The modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the lower mass black holes as compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N--body simulations we quantify the role of natal kicks of black holes formed from massive metal free stars on their merger rates with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies. Our results also apply to black holes ejected by the gravitational slingshot mechanism.

  11. Black Hole Demographics from the M(BH)-sigma Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Laura Ferrarese

    2001-03-03

    We analyze a sample of 32 galaxies for which a dynamical estimate of the mass of the hot stellar component, M_bulge, is available. For each of these galaxies, we calculate the mass of the central black hole, M_BH, using the tight empirical correlation between M_BH and the bulge stellar velocity dispersion. The frequency function N(log M_BH/M_bulge) is reasonably well described as a Gaussian with ~ -2.90 and standard deviation 0.45; the implied mean ratio of black hole to bulge mass is a factor 5 smaller than generally quoted in the literature. We present marginal evidence for a lower, average black-hole mass fraction in more massive galaxies. The total mass density in black holes in the local Universe is estimated to be 5 x 10^5 solar masses per cubic megaparsec, consistent with that inferred from high redshift (z ~ 2) AGNs.

  12. Nonthermal correction to black hole spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Yu Wen

    2014-11-14

    Area spectrum of black holes have been obtained via various methods such as quasinormal modes, adiabatic invariance and angular momentum. Among those methods, calculations were done by assuming black holes in thermal equilibrium. Nevertheless, black holes in the asymptotically flat space usually have negative specific heat and therefore tend to stay away from thermal equilibrium. Even for those black holes with positive specific heat, temperature may still not be well defined in the process of radiation, due to the back reaction of decreasing mass. Respect to these facts, it is very likely that Hawking radiation is nonthermal and the area spectrum is no longer equidistant. In this note, we would like to illustrate how the area spectrum of black holes is corrected by this nonthermal effect.

  13. Evidence for the Black Hole Event Horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh Narayan

    2003-10-23

    Astronomers have discovered many candidate black holes in X-ray binaries and in the nuclei of galaxies. The candidate objects are too massive to be neutron stars, and for this reason they are considered to be black holes. While the evidence based on mass is certainly strong, there is no proof yet that any of the objects possesses the defining characteristic of a black hole, namely an event horizon. Type I X-ray bursts, which are the result of thermonuclear explosions when gas accretes onto the surface of a compact star, may provide important evidence in this regard. Type I bursts are commonly observed in accreting neutron stars, which have surfaces, but have never been seen in accreting black hole candidates. It is argued that the lack of bursts in black hole candidates is compelling evidence that these objects do not have surfaces. The objects must therefore possess event horizons.

  14. How fast can a black hole rotate?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2015-01-01

    Kerr black holes have their angular momentum, $J$, bounded by their mass, $M$: $Jc\\leqslant GM^2$. There are, however, known black hole solutions violating this Kerr bound. We propose a very simple universal bound on the rotation, rather than on the angular momentum, of four-dimensional, stationary and axisymmetric, asymptotically flat black holes, given in terms of an appropriately defined horizon linear velocity, $v_H$. The $v_H$ bound is simply that $v_H$ cannot exceed the velocity of light. We verify the $v_H$ bound for known black hole solutions, including some that violate the Kerr bound, and conjecture that only extremal Kerr black holes saturate the $v_H$ bound.

  15. Free fall onto evaporating black holes at the quantum limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice H. P. M. van Putten

    2015-11-11

    Black hole space times evaporate in discrete steps due to remarkably slow Hawking radiation. We here identify evaporation with essentially extremal states at the limit of quantum computation, performing $2.7\\times 10^{79}$ bit calculations per photon emission in a one solar mass black hole. During evaporation, particles in free fall co-evolve satisfying $EM=$constant, where $E$ and $M$ denote the total mass energy-at-infinity of the particle and, respectively, black hole. Particles are hereby increasingly entangled with the black hole space-time over the course of its evaporation.

  16. Abstract: Coalescing stellar mass compact objects (binary neutron stars and black holes) are promising sources for the direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and Virgo in the next few years. Maximizing the scientific return from such a d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Michael W.

    ) are promising sources for the direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and Virgo in the next few of a centrifugally supported torus onto the central black hole. Neutron star mergers are also accompanied

  17. Thermodynamics of Three-dimensional Black Holes via Charged Particle Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwak, Bogeun

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that changes occur in a (2+1)-dimensional charged black hole by adding a charged probe. The particle increases the entropy of the black hole and guarantees the second law of thermodynamics. The first law of thermodynamics is derived from the change in the black hole mass. Using the particle absorption, we test the extremal black hole and find out that the mass of the extremal black hole increases more than the electric charge. Therefore, the outer horizon of the black hole still exists. However, the extremal condition becomes non-extremal.

  18. Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2011-02-04

    Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

  19. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-15

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive >30 Msun, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos. We expect primordial stars to form in halos in the mass range 10^6-10^10 Msun. Some of these early black holes, formed at redshifts z>10, could be the seed black hole for a significant fraction of the supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If the black hole descendants of the primordial stars exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime candidate for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation and evolution of dark matter halos in LambdaCDM universe. We seed high-redshift dark matter halos with early black holes, and explore the merger history of the host halos and the implications of black hole's kick velocities arising from their coalescence. The central concentration of low mass early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they experience even moderate kicks of tens of km/s. Even such modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the low mass black holes that were ejected, compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates with central supermassive black holes in the largest halos may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N-body simulations, we quantify the role of kicks on the merger rates of black holes formed from massive metal free stars with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies.

  20. Improving snow albedo processes in WRF/SSiB regional climate model to assess impact of dust and black carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over western U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Basin: 1. A 6 year record of energy balance, radiation, andorganic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850–carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over

  1. Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hui-Hsien [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ? To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ? ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ? PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ? The findings suggest that ELF has a protective role against PM. ? The synthetic ELF system could reduce the use of animals in PM-driven ROS testing.

  2. Extraordinary vacuum black string solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2008-01-15

    In addition to the boosted static solution there are two other classes of stationary stringlike solutions of the vacuum Einstein equation in (4+1) dimensions. Each class is characterized by three parameters of mass, tension, and momentum flow along the fifth coordinate. We analyze the metric properties of one of the two classes, which was previously assumed to be naked singular, and show that the solution spectrum contains black string and wormhole in addition to the known naked singularity as the momentum flow to mass ratio increases. Interestingly, there does not exist new zero momentum solution in these cases.

  3. Galaxy bulges and their massive black holes: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alister W. Graham

    2015-02-17

    With references to both key and oft-forgotten pioneering works, this article starts by presenting a review into how we came to believe in the existence of massive black holes at the centres of galaxies. It then presents the historical development of the near-linear (black hole)-(host spheroid) mass relation, before explaining why this has recently been dramatically revised. Past disagreement over the slope of the (black hole)-(velocity dispersion) relation is also explained, and the discovery of sub-structure within the (black hole)-(velocity dispersion) diagram is discussed. As the search for the fundamental connection between massive black holes and their host galaxies continues, the competing array of additional black hole mass scaling relations for samples of predominantly inactive galaxies are presented.

  4. The structure of the carbon black flame 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, W. Kermi

    1945-01-01

    nvd1yS w.w, w. U w . ' jomvR ?Wdp jomvR ?Wdp jomvR ?Wdp w.'F w.U3F w.U*w w.U*O w.U*C w.U8O w.UCw w.Fw w..U3F w.U38 w.U8U w.U8* w.0wO w.'w ' w.*F w.U8w w.U8F w.'w ' w.'wO w.0w* w.'Uw U.ww w.U8C w.UCF w.'w0 w.'w0 w.'w8 w.'U3 U.'F w.UCw w.UCw w.0w0... w.'w0 w.'Uw w.'UO U.Fw w.UCw w.UCF w.'w0 w.'wF w.'U0 w.'w8 U.*F w.UC3 w.UC8 w.'wO w.'wF w.'UO w.0U8 ' .ww w.UC3 w.UC3 w.'w ' w .'w8 w.'UF w.0U8 '.'F w .UC8 w.UC3 w.'w ' w.'wO w.'U8 w.0U8 ' .Fw w.'wO w.'w3 w.'w8 w.0w3 w.'UC w.' 'U EO *w w.'w8 w...

  5. Controls on black carbon storage in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Masiello, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    matter upon sorp- tion to goethite and kaolinite, Chem.organic matter fractions to goethite (alpha-FeOOH): Effectreactive with minerals like goethite [Kaiser, 2003; Kaiser

  6. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sedlacek, Arthur; S, Satheesh; Springston, Stephen

    This measurement characterizes the types of BC emissions that result in near­surface BC­ containing particles in a region that is dominated by biomass and open pit/stove cooking. Specifically, examine three primary BC emission sources: (i) urban setting (e.g., fossil fuel emissions); and (ii) biomass burning. Source (i) are captured at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Biomass emissions (ii) contains a series of 1­2 day measurement excursions to the rural area surrounding Bangalore.

  7. Global atmospheric black carbon inferred from AERONET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * , Andrew Lacis* , Reto Ruedy*§ , Oleg Dubovik¶ , Brent Holben¶ , Mian Chin¶ , and Tica Novakov *National

  8. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sedlacek, Arthur; S, Satheesh; Springston, Stephen

    2013-11-06

    This measurement characterizes the types of BC emissions that result in near­surface BC­ containing particles in a region that is dominated by biomass and open pit/stove cooking. Specifically, examine three primary BC emission sources: (i) urban setting (e.g., fossil fuel emissions); and (ii) biomass burning. Source (i) are captured at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Biomass emissions (ii) contains a series of 1­2 day measurement excursions to the rural area surrounding Bangalore.

  9. Formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO) in interstellar analogous methane (CH{sub 4})-carbon monoxide (CO) ices: A combined FTIR and reflectron time-of-flight mass spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jones, Brant M.

    2014-07-01

    The formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO) in methane-carbon monoxide (CH{sub 4}-CO) ices was investigated upon its exposure to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons at 5.5 K. The radiation-induced nonthermal equilibrium processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via infrared spectroscopy complimented with post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption studies exploiting highly sensitive reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ReTOF) coupled with single photon fragment-free photo ionization (PI) at 10.49 eV. The detection of ketene in irradiated (isotopically labeled) methane-carbon monoxide ices was confirmed via the ?{sub 2} infrared absorption band and substantiated during the warm-up phase based on sublimation profiles obtained from the ReTOF-PI spectra of the corresponding isotopic masses. The experiments conducted with the mixed isotopic ices of {sup 12}CD{sub 4}-{sup 13}CO provide clear evidence of the formation of at least two ketene isotopomers (D{sub 2} {sup 12}C{sup 13}CO and D{sub 2} {sup 13}C{sup 13}CO), allowing for the derivation of two competing formation pathways. We have also proposed underlying reaction mechanisms to the formation of ketene based on kinetic fitting of the temporal evolution of the ketene isotopomers.

  10. A Quantum Material Model of Static Schwarzschild Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -T. Sung

    1997-03-16

    A quantum-mechanical prescription of static Einstein field equation is proposed in order to construct the matter-metric eigen-states in the interior of a static Schwarzschild black hole where the signature of space-time is chosen as (--++). The spectrum of the quantum states is identified to be the integral multiples of the surface gravity. A statistical explanation of black hole entropy is given and a quantisation rule for the masses of Schwarzschild black holes is proposed.

  11. Classical and Quantum Properties of Liouville Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1994-04-25

    Black hole spacetimes can arise when a Liouville field is coupled to two- dimensional gravity. Exact solutions are obtained both classically and when quantum corrections due to back reaction effects are included. The black hole temperature depends upon the mass and the thermodynamic limit breaks down before evaporation of the black hole is complete, indicating that higher-loop effects must be included for a full description of the process.

  12. A Variational Principle for Asymptotically Randall-Sundrum Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Fraser; Douglas M. Eardley

    2015-07-28

    We prove the following variational principle for asymptotically Randall-Sundrum (RS) black holes, based on the first law of black hole mechanics: Instantaneously static initial data that extremizes the mass yields a static black hole, for variations at fixed apparent horizon area, AdS curvature length, cosmological constant, brane tensions, and RS brane warp factors. This variational principle is valid with either two branes (RS1) or one brane (RS2), and is applicable to variational trial solutions.

  13. Energy Extraction from Spinning Black Holes via Relativistic Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh Narayan; Jeffrey E. McClintock; Alexander Tchekhovskoy

    2013-03-12

    It has for long been an article of faith among astrophysicists that black hole spin energy is responsible for powering the relativistic jets seen in accreting black holes. Two recent advances have strengthened the case. First, numerical general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of accreting spinning black holes show that relativistic jets form spontaneously. In at least some cases, there is unambiguous evidence that much of the jet energy comes from the black hole, not the disk. Second, spin parameters of a number of accreting stellar-mass black holes have been measured. For ballistic jets from these systems, it is found that the radio luminosity of the jet correlates with the spin of the black hole. This suggests a causal relationship between black hole spin and jet power, presumably due to a generalized Penrose process.

  14. Pair Production of Topological anti de Sitter Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1996-07-28

    The pair creation of black holes with event horizons of non-trivial topology is described. The spacetimes are all limiting cases of the cosmological $C$ metric. They are generalizations of the $(2+1)$ dimensional black hole and have asymptotically anti de Sitter behaviour. Domain walls instantons can mediate their pair creation for a wide range of mass and charge.

  15. Aged black carbon identified in marine dissolved organic carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziolkowski, Lori A; Druffel, Ellen R.M.

    2010-01-01

    pool in the northeast Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Part I,?445‰ in the deep NE Pacific Ocean (Table S1). The Suwanneein the northeast Pacific Ocean. If the BC in the Amazon

  16. arXiv:0712.1036v1[astro-ph]6Dec2007 The lowest-mass stellar black holes: catastrophic death of neutron stars in gamma-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    of neutron stars in gamma-ray bursts K. Belczynski1 , R. O'Shaughnessy2 , V. Kalogera3 , F. Rasio3 , R. Taam3 progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient a gamma-ray burst [3]. Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary

  17. The Environmental Impact of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham Loeb

    2004-08-10

    The supermassive black holes observed at the centers of almost all present-day galaxies, had a profound impact on their environment. I highlight the principle of self-regulation, by which supermassive black holes grow until they release sufficient energy to unbind the gas that feeds them from their host galaxy. This principle explains several observed facts, including the correlation between the mass of a central black hole and the depth of the gravitational potential well of its host galaxy, and the abundance and clustering properties of bright quasars in the redshift interval of z~2-6. At lower redshifts, quasars might have limited the maximum mass of galaxies through the suppression of cooling flows in X-ray clusters. The seeds of supermassive black holes were likely planted in dwarf galaxies at redshifts z>10, through the collapse of massive or supermassive stars. The minimum seed mass can be identified observationally through the detection of gravitational waves from black hole binaries by Advanced LIGO or LISA. Aside from shaping their host galaxies, quasar outflows filled the intergalactic medium with magnetic fields and heavy elements. Beyond the reach of these outflows, the brightest quasars at z>6 have ionized exceedingly large volumes of gas (tens of comoving Mpc) prior to global reionization, and must have suppressed the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in these volumes before the same occurred through the rest of the universe.

  18. Investigating Dark Energy with Black Hole Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Adam Kelleher

    2009-06-08

    The accelerated expansion of the universe is ascribed to the existence of dark energy. Black holes accretion of dark energy induces a mass change proportional to the energy density and pressure of the background dark energy fluid. The time scale during which the mass of black holes changes considerably is too long relative to the age of the universe, thus beyond detection possibilities. We propose to take advantage of the modified black hole masses for exploring the equation of state $w[z]$ of dark energy, by investigating the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries on a dark energy background. Deriving the signatures of dark energy accretion on the evolution of binaries, we find that dark energy imprints on the emitted gravitational radiation and on the changes in the orbital radius of the binary can be within detection limits for certain supermassive black hole binaries. In this talk I describe how binaries can provide a useful tool in obtaining complementary information on the nature of dark energy, based on the work done with A.Kelleher.

  19. Combustion of biomass as a global carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Rowena

    2008-01-01

    This note is intended to highlight the important role of black carbon produced from biomass burning in the global carbon cycle, and encourage further research in this area. Consideration of the fundamental physical chemistry of cellulose thermal decomposition suggests that suppression of biomass burning or biasing burning practices to produce soot-free flames must inevitably transfer more carbon to the atmosphere. A simple order-of-magnitude quantitative analysis indicates that black carbon may be a significant carbon reservoir that persists over geological time scales.

  20. Black hole physics: recent developments and observational perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    on a black hole: up to 42% of the mass-energy mc2 of accreted matter ! NB: thermonuclear reactions release: a very deep gravitational potential well Release of potential gravitational energy by accretion

  1. Black holes and tests of gravitation Eric Gourgoulhon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    potential well Release of potential gravitational energy by accretion on a black hole: up to 42% of the mass-energy mc2 of accreted matter ! NB: thermonuclear reactions release less than 1% mc2 Matter falling

  2. Spectral Properties of Galactic and Extragalactic Black Hole Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    1996-11-10

    We review current theoretical understanding of the spectral properties (low and high states, transition of states, quasi-periodic oscillations etc.) of the low mass as well as supermassive black hole candidates.

  3. Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Ferrarese; David Merritt

    2002-06-13

    After a brief historical introduction, we summarize current efforts and accomplishments in the study of supermassive black holes.

  4. Carbon Fillers for Actuation of Electroactive Thermoset Shape Memory Polyurethane Composites by Resistive Heating 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ya-Jen

    2014-05-01

    , focusing on stimuli-responsive SMPs enables researchers to develop more versatile devices with SMP composites. The electroactive SMP composites incorporated with conductive fillers such as carbon black and carbon nanotubes allow shape recovery actuation...

  5. Black Pine Engineering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Black Pine Engineering is commercializing a disruptive technology in the turbomachinery industry. Using a patented woven composite construction, Black Pine Engineering can make turbomachines (turbines, compressors) that are cheaper and lighter than competing technologies. Using this technology, Black Pine Engineering will sell turbo-compressors which solve the problem of wasted steam in geothermal power plants.

  6. Lovelock black hole thermodynamics in a string cloud model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tae-Hun; Maharaj, Sunil D; Baboolal, Dharmanand

    2015-01-01

    The Lovelock theory is an extension of general relativity to higher dimensions. We study the Lovelock black hole for a string cloud model in arbitrary dimensional spacetime, and in turn also analyze its thermodynamical properties. Indeed, we compute the mass, temperature and entropy of the black hole and also perform a thermodynamical stability analysis. The phase structure suggests that the Hawking-Page phase transition is achievable. It turns out that the presence of the Lovelock terms and/or background string cloud completely changes the black hole thermodynamics. Interestingly, the entropy of a black hole is unaffected due to a background string cloud, but has a correction term due to Lovelock gravity.

  7. Area products for black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Area products for multi-horizon black holes often have intriguing properties, and are often independent of the mass of the black hole (depending only on various charges, angular momenta, and moduli). Such products are often formulated in terms of the areas of inner (Cauchy) horizons and event horizons, and often include the effects of unphysical "virtual'" horizons. For the Schwarzschild-de Sitter [Kottler] black hole in (3+1) dimensions it is shown by explicit exact calculation that the product of event horizon area and cosmological horizon area is not mass independent. (Including the effect of the third "virtual" horizon does not improve the situation.) Similarly, in the Reissner-Nordstrom-anti-de Sitter black hole in (3+1) dimensions the product of inner (Cauchy) horizon area and event horizon area is calculated (perturbatively), and is shown to be not mass independent. That is, the mass-independence of the product of physical horizon areas is not generic. In the generic situation, whenever the quasi-local...

  8. Thermodynamic Product Formula for Taub-NUT Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2015-08-20

    We derive various important thermodynamic relations of the inner and outer horizon in the background of Taub-NUT(Newman-Unti-Tamburino) black hole in four dimensional \\emph{Lorentzian geometry}. We compare these properties with the properties of Reissner Nordstr{\\o}m black hole. We compute \\emph{area product, area sum, area minus and area division} of black hole horizons. We show that they all are not universal quantities. Based on these relations, we compute the area bound of all horizons. From area bound, we derive entropy bound and irreducible mass bound for both the horizons. We further study the stability of such black hole by computing the specific heat for both the horizons. It is shown that due to negative specific heat the black hole is thermodynamically unstable. All these calculations might be helpful to understanding the nature of black hole entropy both \\emph{interior} and exterior at the microscopic level.

  9. Thermodynamic Product Formula for Taub-NUT Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-01-01

    We derive various important thermodynamic relations of the inner and outer horizon in the background of Taub-NUT(Newman-Unti-Tamburino) black hole in four dimensional \\emph{Lorentzian geometry}. We compare these properties with the properties of Reissner Nordstr{\\o}m black hole. We compute \\emph{area product, area sum, area minus and area division} of black hole horizons. We show that they all are not universal quantities. Based on these relations, we compute the area bound of all horizons. From area bound, we derive entropy bound and irreducible mass bound for both the horizons. We further study the stability of such black hole by computing the specific heat for both the horizons. It is shown that due to negative specific heat the black hole is thermodynamically unstable. All these calculations might be helpful to understanding the nature of black hole entropy both \\emph{interior} and exterior at the microscopic level.

  10. Thermodynamic Product Formula for Ho?ava Lifshitz Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2015-06-10

    We examine the thermodynamic properties of inner and outer horizons in the background of Ho\\v{r}ava Lifshitz black hole. We compute the \\emph{horizon radii product, the surface area product, the entropy product, the surface temperature product, the Komar energy product and the specific heat product} for both the horizons of said black hole. We show that surface area product, entropy product and irreducible mass product are \\emph{universal} quantities, whereas the surface temperature product, Komar energy product and specific heat product are \\emph{not universal} quantities because they all are depends on mass parameter. We also observe that the \\emph{First law} of black hole thermodynamics and \\emph {Smarr-Gibbs-Duhem } relations do not hold for this black hole. The underlying reason behind this failure due to the scale invariance of the coupling constant. We further derive the \\emph{Smarr mass formula} and \\emph{Christodolou-Ruffini mass formula} for such black hole spacetime. Moreover we study the stability of such black hole by computing the specific heat for both the horizons. It has been observed that under certain condition the black hole possesses second order phase transition.

  11. Imprint of Accretion Disk-Induced Migration on Gravitational Waves from Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunes, Nicolas

    We study the effects of a thin gaseous accretion disk on the inspiral of a stellar-mass black hole into a supermassive black hole. We construct a phenomenological angular momentum transport equation that reproduces known ...

  12. Carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon sequestration is the process of capture and long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2).[1] Carbon sequestration describes long-term storage of carbon dioxide or other forms of carbon to either mitigate or defer global warming and avoid ...

  13. Circumnuclear Media and Accretion Rates of Quiescent Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generozov, Aleksey; Metzger, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    We calculate steady-state, one-dimensional hydrodynamic profiles of hot gas in slowly accreting ("quiescent") galactic nuclei for a range of central black hole masses, parameterized gas heating rates, and observationally-motivated stellar density profiles. Mass is supplied to the circumnuclear medium by stellar winds, while energy is injected primarily by stellar winds, supernovae, and black hole feedback. Analytic estimates are derived for the stagnation radius (where the radial velocity of the gas passes through zero) and the black hole accretion rate, as a function of the black hole mass and the gas heating efficiency, the latter being related to the star-formation history. We assess the conditions under which radiative instabilities develop in the hydrostatic region near the stagnation radius, both in the case of a single burst of star formation and for the average star formation history predicted by cosmological simulations. By combining a sample of measured nuclear X-ray luminosities from nearby quiesce...

  14. Bright vigorous winds as signposts of supermassive black hole birth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiacconi, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The formation of supermassive black holes is still an outstanding question. In the quasi-star scenario, black hole seeds experience an initial super-Eddington growth, that in less than a million years may leave a $10^4-10^5$ M$_{\\odot}$ black hole at the centre of a protogalaxy at $z \\sim 20-10$. Super-Eddington accretion, however, may be accompanied by vigorous mass loss that can limit the amount of mass that reaches the black hole. In this paper, we critically assess the impact of radiative driven winds, launched from the surface of the massive envelopes from which the black hole accretes. Solving the full wind equations coupled with the hydrostatic structure of the envelope, we find mass outflows with rates between a few tens and $10^4$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$, mainly powered by advection luminosity within the outflow. We therefore confirm the claim by Dotan, Rossi & Shaviv (2011) that mass losses can severely affect the black hole seed early growth within a quasi-star. In particular, seeds with mass $>1...

  15. Correlated chemostratigraphy of Mn-carbonate microbialites (rkt, Hungary) Mrta Polgri a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    ) microbialites at the Úrkút black shale-hosted manganese carbonate ore body (central Hungary) is described microbialites mostly behaved as an open system during deposition of black shale under early diagenetic reduction under an oxic water column; more equant types occur at the contact zone of black shale and Mn

  16. Ion mass spectrometry investigations of the discharge during reactive high power pulsed and direct current magnetron sputtering of carbon in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, S.; Greczynski, G.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Czigany, Zs.

    2012-07-01

    Ion mass spectrometry was used to investigate discharges formed during high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a graphite target in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2} ambient. Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) were recorded in time-averaged and time-resolved mode for Ar{sup +}, C{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, N{sup +}, and C{sub x}N{sub y}{sup +} ions. An increase of N{sub 2} in the sputter gas (keeping the deposition pressure, pulse width, pulse frequency, and pulse energy constant) results for the HiPIMS discharge in a significant increase in C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and CN{sup +} ion energies. Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and C{sub 2}N{sup +} ion energies, in turn, did not considerably vary with the changes in working gas composition. The HiPIMS process showed higher ion energies and fluxes, particularly for C{sup +} ions, compared to DCMS. The time evolution of the plasma species was analyzed for HiPIMS and revealed the sequential arrival of working gas ions, ions ejected from the target, and later during the pulse-on time molecular ions, in particular CN{sup +} and C{sub 2}N{sup +}. The formation of fullerene-like structured CN{sub x} thin films for both modes of magnetron sputtering is explained by ion mass-spectrometry results and demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy as well as diffraction.

  17. Thermal stability of radiant black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathi Majumdar

    2006-04-06

    Beginning with a brief sketch of the derivation of Hawking's theorem of horizon area increase, based on the Raychaudhuri equation, we go on to discuss the issue as to whether generic black holes, undergoing Hawking radiation, can ever remain in stable thermal equilibrium with that radiation. We derive a universal criterion for such a stability, which relates the black hole mass and microcanonical entropy, both of which are well-defined within the context of the Isolated Horizon, and in principle calculable within Loop Quantum Gravity. The criterion is argued to hold even when thermal fluctuations of electric charge are considered, within a {\\it grand} canonical ensemble.

  18. Bicycling Black Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriette Elvang; Maria J. Rodriguez

    2008-01-25

    We present detailed physics analyses of two different 4+1-dimensional asymptotically flat vacuum black hole solutions with spin in two independent planes: the doubly spinning black ring and the bicycling black ring system ("bi-rings"). The latter is a new solution describing two concentric orthogonal rotating black rings which we construct using the inverse scattering technique. We focus particularly on extremal zero-temperature limits of the solutions. We construct the phase diagram of currently known zero-temperature vacuum black hole solutions with a single event horizon, and discuss the non-uniqueness introduced by more exotic black hole configurations such as bi-rings and multi-ring saturns.

  19. Bicycling Black Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elvang, Henriette

    2008-01-01

    We present detailed physics analyses of two different 4+1-dimensional asymptotically flat vacuum black hole solutions with spin in two independent planes: the doubly spinning black ring and the bicycling black ring system ("bi-rings"). The latter is a new solution describing two concentric orthogonal rotating black rings which we construct using the inverse scattering technique. We focus particularly on extremal zero-temperature limits of the solutions. Such limits exist for both types of solutions; for the bi-rings it is obtained when the two rings drag each other to extremality through the effect of gravitational frame-dragging. We construct the phase diagram of currently known zero-temperature vacuum black hole solutions with a single event horizon, and discuss the non-uniqueness introduced by more exotic black hole configurations such as bi-rings and multi-ring saturns.

  20. BLACK HISTORY MONTH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Black History Month is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of “Negro History Week,” created by historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Other countries around the world, including Canada and the United Kingdom, also devote a month to celebrating black history.

  1. Hybrid method for understanding black-hole mergers: Inspiralling case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Nichols; Yanbei Chen

    2012-02-21

    We adapt a method of matching post-Newtonian and black-hole-perturbation theories on a timelike surface (which proved useful for understanding head-on black-hole-binary collisions) to treat equal-mass, inspiralling black-hole binaries. We first introduce a radiation-reaction potential into this method, and we show that it leads to a self-consistent set of equations that describe the simultaneous evolution of the waveform and of the timelike matching surface. This allows us to produce a full inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform of the l=2, m=2,-2 modes of the gravitational waveform of an equal-mass black-hole-binary inspiral. These modes match those of numerical-relativity simulations well in phase, though less well in amplitude for the inspiral. As a second application of this method, we study a merger of black holes with spins antialigned in the orbital plane (the "superkick" configuration). During the ringdown of the superkick, the phases of the mass- and current-quadrupole radiation become locked together, because they evolve at the same quasinormal mode frequencies. We argue that this locking begins during merger, and we show that if the spins of the black holes evolve via geodetic precession in the perturbed black-hole spacetime of our model, then the spins precess at the orbital frequency during merger. In turn, this gives rise to the correct behavior of the radiation, and produces a kick similar to that observed in numerical simulations.

  2. Accreting Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begelman, Mitchell C

    2014-01-01

    I outline the theory of accretion onto black holes, and its application to observed phenomena such as X-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, tidal disruption events, and gamma-ray bursts. The dynamics as well as radiative signatures of black hole accretion depend on interactions between the relatively simple black-hole spacetime and complex radiation, plasma and magnetohydrodynamical processes in the surrounding gas. I will show how transient accretion processes could provide clues to these interactions. Larger global magnetohydrodynamic simulations as well as simulations incorporating plasma microphysics and full radiation hydrodynamics will be needed to unravel some of the current mysteries of black hole accretion.

  3. Hadrons As Kerr-Newman Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Oldershaw

    2010-03-15

    The scale invariance of the source-free Einstein field equations suggests that one might be able to model hadrons as "strong gravity" black holes, if one uses an appropriate rescaling of units or a revised gravitational coupling factor. The inner consistency of this hypothesis is tested by retrodicting a close approximation to the mass of the proton from an equation that relates the angular momentum and mass of a Kerr black hole. More accurate mass and radius values for the proton are then retrodicted using the geometrodynamics form of the full Kerr-Newman solution of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. The radius of an alpha particle is calculated as an additional retrodictive test. In a third retrodictive test of the "strong gravity" hypothesis, the subatomic particle mass spectrum in the 100 MeV to 7,000 MeV range is retrodicted to a first approximation using the Kerr solution of General Relativity. The particle masses appear to form a restricted set of quantized values of the Kerr solution: n^1/2 M, where values of n are a set of discrete integers and M is the revised Planck mass. The accuracy of the 27 retrodicted masses averages 98.4%. Finally, the new atomic scale gravitational coupling constant suggests a radical revision of the assumptions governing the Planck scale, and leads to a natural explanation for the fine structure constant.

  4. Self-regular quantum black hole by analogue of hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Liu; Yan-Gang Miao; Yu-Mei Wu; Yu-Hao Zhang

    2015-12-14

    We suggest a quantum black hole model that is based on the analogy with hydrogen atoms. A self-regular Schwarzschild-AdS black hole is investigated, where the mass density of the extreme black hole is given by the probability density of the ground state of hydrogen atoms and the mass densities of non-extreme black holes are chosen to be the probability densities of excited states with no angular momenta. Consequently, it is logical to accept quantization of mean radii of hydrogen atoms as that of black hole horizons. In this way, quantization of total black hole masses is deduced. Furthermore, the quantum hoop conjecture and the Correspondence Principle are discussed.

  5. Spin alignment and differential accretion in merging black hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Gerosa; Benedetta Veronesi; Giuseppe Lodato; Giovanni Rosotti

    2015-07-01

    Interactions between a supermassive black hole binary and the surrounding accretion disc can both assist the binary inspiral and align the black hole spins to the disc angular momentum. While binary migration is due to angular-momentum transfer within the circumbinary disc, the spin-alignment process is driven by the mass accreting on to each black hole. Mass transfer between different disc components thus couples the inspiral and the alignment process together. Mass is expected to leak through the cavity cleared by the binary, and preferentially accretes on to the lighter (secondary) black hole which orbits closer to the disc edge. Low accretion rate on to the heavier (primary) black hole slows the alignment process down. We revisit the problem and develop a semi-analytical model to describe the coupling between gas-driven inspiral and spin alignment, finding that binaries with mass ratio qprimaries from aligning. Binary black holes with misaligned primaries are ideal candidates for precession effects in the strong-gravity regime and may suffer from moderately large (~1500 km/s) recoil velocities.

  6. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

    1997-06-10

    Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

  7. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

  8. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  9. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  10. Rotating Hairy Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

    2000-12-20

    We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

  11. Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

  12. "Hybrid" Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeri P. Frolov; Andrei V. Frolov

    2014-12-30

    We discuss a solution of the Einstein equations, obtained by gluing the external Kerr metric and the internal Weyl metric, describing an axisymmetric static vacuum distorted black hole. These metrics are glued at the null surfaces representing their horizons. For this purpose we use the formalism of massive thin null shells. The corresponding solution is called a "hybrid" black hole. The massive null shell has an angular momentum which is the origin of the rotation of the external Kerr spacetime. At the same time, the shell distorts the geometry inside the horizon. The inner geometry of the "hybrid" black hole coincides with the geometry of the interior of a non-rotating Weyl-distorted black hole. Properties of the "hybrid" black holes are briefly discussed.

  13. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Haijie; Liu, Enhui; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  14. Thermodynamics and Luminosities of Rainbow Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benrong Mu; Peng Wang; Haitang Yang

    2015-07-14

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As a result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is \\textquotedblleft Gravity's rainbow", where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the \\textquotedblleft Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation" which is $E^{2}=m^{2}+p^{2}\\left[ 1-\\eta\\left( E/m_{p}\\right) ^{n}\\right] $ with $n>0$, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of $\\eta$ and $n$ in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with $\\eta<0$ and $n\\geq2$. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of $\\eta$ and $n$.

  15. Black Hole Spin in AGN and GBHCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher S. Reynolds; Laura W. Brenneman; David Garofalo

    2004-10-05

    We discuss constraints on black hole spin and spin-related astrophysics as derived from X-ray spectroscopy. After a brief discussion about the robustness with which X-ray spectroscopy can be used to probe strong gravity, we summarize how these techniques can constrain black hole spin. In particular, we highlight XMM-Newton studies of the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 and the stellar-mass black hole GX339-4. The broad X-ray iron line profile, together with reasonable and general astrophysical assumptions, allow a non-rotating black hole to be rejected in both of these sources. If we make the stronger assertion of no emission from within the innermost stable circular orbit, the MCG-6-30-15 data constrain the dimensionless spin parameter to be a>0.93. Furthermore, these XMM-Newton data are already providing evidence for exotic spin-related astrophysics in the central regions of this object. We conclude with a discussion of the impact that Constellation-X will have on the study of strong gravity and black hole spin.

  16. Weighing Black Holes in high-z SCUBA Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, D M

    2006-01-01

    Deep SCUBA surveys have uncovered a population of dust-enshrouded star-forming galaxies at z~2. Using the ultra-deep 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North survey we recently showed that a large fraction of these systems are also undergoing intense black-hole growth. Here we provide further constraints on the properties of the black holes in SCUBA galaxies using the virial black-hole mass estimator. We show that typical SCUBA galaxies are likely to host black holes with M_BH~10^7-10^8 M_solar which are accreting at, or close to, the Eddington limit. These results provide qualitative support for our earlier conclusion that the growth of the black hole lags that of the host galaxy in these massive ultraluminous galaxies.

  17. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC CONSTRAINTS ON THE MASS OF THE HEAVIEST SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Justin M.; Woosley, S. E., E-mail: jumbrown@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We explore the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis in massive stars to the truncation of supernova explosions above a certain mass. It is assumed that stars of all masses contribute to nucleosynthesis by their pre-explosive winds, but above a certain limiting main sequence mass, M{sub BH}, the presupernova star becomes a black hole and ejects nothing more. The solar abundances from oxygen to atomic mass 90 are fit quite well assuming no cutoff at all, i.e., by assuming all stars up to 120 M{sub Sun} make successful supernovae. Little degradation in the fit occurs if M{sub BH} is reduced to 25 M{sub Sun }. If this limit is reduced further however, the nucleosynthesis of the s-process declines precipitously and the production of species made in the winds, e.g., carbon, becomes unacceptably large compared with elements made in the explosion, e.g., silicon and oxygen. By varying uncertain physics, especially the mass loss rate for massive stars and the rate for the {sup 22}Ne({alpha}, n){sup 25}Mg reaction rate, acceptable nucleosynthesis might still be achieved with a cutoff as low as 18 M{sub Sun }. This would require, however, a supernova frequency three times greater than the fiducial value obtained when all stars explode in order to produce the required {sup 16}O. The effects of varying M{sub BH} on the nucleosynthesis of {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al, the production of helium as measured by {Delta}Y/{Delta}Z, and the average masses of compact remnants are also examined.

  18. 7, 605639, 2007 Mass, chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , and V. Gianelle 7 1 Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, T.P. 290, Ispra (VA) 21020, Italy 2 British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK particles", which accounts for >80% of fine par- ticles). Organic matter (OM) and black-carbon (BC

  19. Spin alignment and differential accretion in merging black-hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerosa, Davide; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rosotti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between a supermassive black-hole binary and the surrounding accretion disc can both assist the binary inspiral and align the black-hole spins to the disc angular momentum. While binary migration is due to angular-momentum transfer within the circumbinary disc, the spin-alignment process is driven by the mass accreting onto each black hole. Mass transfer between different disc components thus couples the inspiral and the alignment process together. Mass is expected to leak through the cavity cleared by the binary, and preferentially accretes onto the lighter (secondary) black-hole which orbits closer to the disc edge. Low accretion rate onto the heavier (primary) black hole slows the alignment process down. We revisit the problem and develop a semi-analytical model to describe the coupling between gas-driven inspiral and spin alignment, finding that binaries with mass ratio qprimaries ...

  20. Improvements to the construction of binary black hole initial data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serguei Ossokine; Francois Foucart; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Michael Boyle; Béla Szilágyi

    2015-06-04

    Construction of binary black hole initial data is a prerequisite for numerical evolutions of binary black holes. This paper reports improvements to the binary black hole initial data solver in the Spectral Einstein Code, to allow robust construction of initial data for mass-ratio above 10:1, and for dimensionless black hole spins above 0.9, while improving efficiency for lower mass-ratios and spins. We implement a more flexible domain decomposition, adaptive mesh refinement and an updated method for choosing free parameters. We also introduce a new method to control and eliminate residual linear momentum in initial data for precessing systems, and demonstrate that it eliminates gravitational mode mixing during the evolution. Finally, the new code is applied to construct initial data for hyperbolic scattering and for binaries with very small separation.

  1. Bekenstein-Spectrum, Hawking-Temperature and Specific Heat of Schwarzschild Black Holes from Microscopic Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Krause

    2005-10-28

    We study the thermodynamic consequences of a recently proposed description for a Schwarzschild black hole based on Euclidean (D3,D3)+(\\bar{D3},\\bar{D3}) brane pairs described in terms of chain-like excitations. A discrete mass-spectrum of Bekenstein-type is inferred and upon identification of the black hole mass with the chain's energy the leading corrections to both Hawking-temperature and specific heat of the black hole are obtained. The results indicate that for small black holes the evaporation process will be considerably altered.

  2. Facies and Reservoir Characterization of the Permian White Rim Sandstone, Black Box Dolomite, and Black Dragon Member of the Triassic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of Geological Sciences, BYU Master of Science Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2, and Black Dragon Member of the Triassic Moenkopi Formation for CO2 Storage and Sequestration at Woodside Formation, for CO2 Sequestration at Woodside Field, East-central Utah Walter Harston Department

  3. Bounding the greybody factors for Schwarzschild black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarpa

    2008-01-01

    Greybody factors in black hole physics modify the naive Planckian spectrum that is predicted for Hawking radiation when working in the limit of geometrical optics. We consider the Schwarzschild geometry in (3+1) dimensions, and analyze the Regge-Wheeler equation for arbitrary particle spin S and wave-mode angular momentum L, deriving rigourous bounds on the greybody factors as a function of S, L, wave frequency (omega), and the black hole mass, m.

  4. Higgs Boson Production from Black Holes at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak; J. Smith

    2006-06-09

    If the fundamental Planck scale is near a TeV, then TeV scale black holes should be produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC where \\sqrt{s} = 14 TeV. As the temperature of the black holes can be ~ 1 TeV we also expect production of Higgs bosons from them via Hawking radiation. This is a different production mode for the Higgs boson, which would normally be produced via direct pQCD parton fusion processes. In this paper we compare total cross sections and transverse momentum distributions d\\sigma/dp_T for Higgs production from black holes at the LHC with those from direct parton fusion processes at next-to-next-to-leading order and next-to-leading order respectively. We find that the Higgs production from black holes can be larger or smaller than the direct pQCD production depending upon the Planck mass and black hole mass. We also find that d\\sigma/dp_T of Higgs production from black holes increases as a function of p_T which is in sharp contrast with the pQCD predictions where d\\sigma/dp_T decreases so we suggest that the measurement of an increase in d\\sigma/dp_T as p_T increases for Higgs (or any other heavy particle) production can be a useful signature for black holes at the LHC.

  5. Back reaction on a Reissner-Nordstro''m black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bobo; Huang, Chao-guang

    2001-06-15

    The perturbed (''dressed'') metric of the conformally invariant scalar field in a Reissner-Nordstroem (RN) black hole is given by solving the semiclassical Einstein and Maxwell equations according to York's back-reaction approach. Some properties of the ''dressed'' black hole are obtained, such as its ''dressed'' mass, the location of the event horizon, and its surface gravity. It will also be found that the hypersurfaces of r{sub +} and r{sub {minus}} which are the event and Cauchy horizons in the ''naked'' RN black hole, become spacelike in the perturbed geometry.

  6. Mexico city aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 2: Analysis of the biomass burning contribution and the non-fossil carbon fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiken, A.C.; Wang, J.; de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Wehrli, M. N.; Szidat, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Noda, J.; Wacker, L.; Volkamer, R.; Fortner, E.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Querol, X.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-16

    Submicron aerosol was analyzed during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City with a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and complementary instrumentation. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) of high resolution AMS spectra identified a biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) component, which includes several large plumes that appear to be from forest fires within the region. Here, we show that the AMS BBOA concentration at T0 correlates with fire counts in the vicinity of Mexico City and that most of the BBOA variability is captured when the FLEXPART model is used for the dispersion of fire emissions as estimated from satellite fire counts. The resulting FLEXPART fire impact factor (FIF) correlates well with the observed BBOA, acetonitrile (CH3CN), levoglucosan, and potassium, indicating that wildfires in the region surrounding Mexico City are the dominant source of BBOA at T0 during MILAGRO. The impact of distant BB sources such as the Yucatan is small during this period. All fire tracers are correlated, with BBOA and levoglucosan showing little background, acetonitrile having a well-known tropospheric background of {approx}100-150 pptv, and PM2.5 potassium having a background of {approx}160 ng m3 (two-thirds of its average concentration), which does not appear to be related to BB sources. We define two high fire periods based on satellite fire counts and FLEXPART-predicted FIFs. We then compare these periods with a low fire period when the impact of regional fires is about a factor of 5 smaller. Fire tracers are very elevated in the high fire periods whereas tracers of urban pollution do not change between these periods. Dust is also elevated during the high BB period but this appears to be coincidental due to the drier conditions and not driven by direct dust emission from the fires. The AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) factor (OOA, mostly secondary OA or SOA) does not show an increase during the fire periods or a correlation with fire counts, FLEXPART-predicted FIFs or fire tracers, indicating that it is dominated by urban and/or regional sources and not by the fires near the MCMA. A new 14C aerosol dataset is presented. Both this new and a previously published dataset of 14C analysis suggest a similar BBOA contribution as the AMS and chemical mass balance (CMB), resulting in 13% higher non-fossil carbon during the high vs. low regional fire periods. The new dataset has {approx}15% more fossil carbon on average than the previously published one, and possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. During the low regional fire period, 38% of organic carbon (OC) and 28% total carbon (TC) are from non-fossil sources, suggesting the importance of urban and regional non-fossil carbon sources other than the fires, such as food cooking and regional biogenic SOA. The ambient BBOA/CH3CN ratio is much higher in the afternoon when the wildfires are most intense than during the rest of the day. Also, there are large differences in the contributions of the different OA components to the surface concentrations vs. the integrated column amounts. Both facts may explain some apparent disagreements between BB impacts estimated from afternoon aircraft flights vs. those from 24-h ground measurements. We show that by properly accounting for the non-BB sources of K, all of the BB PM estimates from MILAGRO can be reconciled. Overall, the fires from the region near the MCMA are estimated to contribute 15-23% of the OA and 7-9% of the fine PM at T0 during MILAGRO, and 2-3% of the fine PM as an annual average. The 2006 MCMA emissions inventory contains a substantially lower impact of the forest fire emissions, although a fraction of these emissions occur just outside of the MCMA inventory area.

  7. PURDUE UNIVERSITY BLACK CULTURAL CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    traveled to Detroit, Michigan to study our fall research theme, " Black Detroit: The History, Movement

  8. Black Holes and Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1999-10-29

    Supermassive binary black holes and their influence on the structure and evolution of galaxies is reviewed.

  9. Moduli Vacuum Bubbles Produced by Evaporating Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2007-08-14

    We consider a model with a toroidally compactified extra dimension giving rise to a temperature-dependent 4d effective potential with one-loop contributions due to the Casimir effect, along with a 5d cosmological constant. The forms of the effective potential at low and high temperatures indicates a possibility for the formation of a domain wall bubble, formed by the modulus scalar field, surrounding an evaporating black hole. This is viewed as an example of a recently proposed black hole vacuum bubble arising from matter-sourced moduli fields in the vicinity of an evaporating black hole [D. Green, E. Silverstein, and D. Starr, Phys. Rev. D74, 024004 (2006), arXiv:hep-th/0605047]. The black hole bubble can be highly opaque to lower energy particles and photons, and thereby entrap them within. For high temperature black holes, there may also be a symmetry-breaking black hole bubble of false vacuum of the type previously conjectured by Moss [I.G. Moss, Phys. Rev. D32,1333 (1985)], tending to reflect low energy particles from its wall. A double bubble composed of these two different types of bubble may form around the black hole, altering the hole's emission spectrum that reaches outside observers. Smaller mass black holes that have already evaporated away could have left vacuum bubbles behind that contribute to the dark matter.

  10. Analysis of spherically symmetric black holes in Braneworld models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Pavan

    2010-05-25

    Research on black holes and their physical proprieties has been active on last 90 years. With the appearance of the String Theory and the Braneworld models as alternative descriptions of our Universe, the interest on black holes, in these context, increased. In this work we studied black holes in Braneworld models. A class of spherically symmetric black holes is investigaded as well its stability under general perturbations. Thermodynamic proprieties and quasi-normal modes are discussed. The black holes studied are the SM (zero mass) and CFM solutions, obtained by Casadio {\\it et al.} and Bronnikov {\\it et al.}. The geometry of bulk is unknown. However the Campbell-Magaard Theorem guarantees the existence of a 5-dimensional solution in the bulk whose projection on the brane is the class of black holes considered. They are stable under scalar perturbations. Quasi-normal modes were observed in both models. The tail behavior of the perturbations is the same. The entropy upper bound of a body absorved by the black holes studied was calculated. This limit turned out to be independent of the black hole parameters.

  11. Gravitational wave production by rotating primordial black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Ruifeng; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze in detail a rarely discussed question of gravity waves production from evaporating black holes. Evaporating black holes emit gravitons which are at classical level registered as gravity waves. We use the latest constraints on the primordial black hole abundance, and calculate the power emitted in gravitons at the time of their evaporation. We then solve the coupled system of equations that gives us the evolution of the frequency and amplitude of gravity waves during the expansion of the universe. The spectrum of gravitational waves that can be detected today depends on multiple factors: fraction of the total energy density which was occupied by black holes, the epoch in which the black holes are formed, and quantities like mass and angular momentum of evaporating black holes. We conclude that very small primordial black holes which evaporate before the nucleosynthesis emit gravitons whose spectral energy fraction today can be as large as $10^{-5}$. On the other hand, primordial black ...

  12. Composite catalysts supported on modified carbon substrates and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N. (Columbia, SC); Subramanian, Nalini (Kennesaw, GA); Colon-Mercado, Hector R. (Columbia, SC)

    2009-11-17

    A method of producing a composite carbon catalyst is generally disclosed. The method includes oxidizing a carbon precursor (e.g., carbon black). Optionally, nitrogen functional groups can be added to the oxidized carbon precursor. Then, the oxidized carbon precursor is refluxed with a non-platinum transitional metal precursor in a solution. Finally, the solution is pyrolyzed at a temperature of at least about 500.degree. C.

  13. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-12-28

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+} = \\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}: E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb} = \\left(\\frac{3+\\sqrt{5}}{2}\\right)\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}:E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO} = 4\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}} = \\infty: 3.23 : 2.6$. Which is exactly \\emph{similar} to the spherically symmetric extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole.}

  14. On the Neutron Star-Black Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-driven Hypernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryer, C L; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-01-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) following the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm have been introduced to explain the concomitance of energetic long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with type Ic supernovae. The progenitor system is a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta of the exploding CO core triggers a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS, which in a few seconds reach the NS critical mass, and gravitationally collapses to a black hole (BH) emitting a GRB. These tight binary systems evolve through the supernova explosion very differently than compact binary progenitors studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion timescale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection can not be assumed to be instantaneous. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the supern...

  15. Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng-Sen Ma; Ren Zhao

    2014-11-04

    We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

  16. Primordial Black Holes: Observational Characteristics of The Final Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ukwatta, T N; Linnemann, J T; MacGibbon, J H; Marinelli, S S; Yapici, T; Tollefson, K

    2015-01-01

    Many early universe theories predict the creation of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs). PBHs could have masses ranging from the Planck mass to $10^5$ solar masses or higher depending on the size of the universe at formation. A Black Hole (BH) has a Hawking temperature which is inversely proportional to its mass. Hence a sufficiently small BH will quasi-thermally radiate particles at an ever-increasing rate as emission lowers its mass and raises its temperature. The final moments of this evaporation phase should be explosive and its description dependent on the particle physics model. In this work we investigate the final few seconds of BH evaporation using the Standard Model of particle physics incorporating the most recent LHC results and calculate energy dependent PBH burst light curves in the GeV/TeV energy range. Moreover, we explore PBH burst search methods and potential observational PBH burst signatures relevant to very high energy gamma-ray observatories.

  17. Phnomnes de pizoconductivit dans les composites polymre-noir de carbone. Application aux capteurs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    régulation du trafic routier est envisagé. Abstract. - The electrical conductivity of some carbon black-polymer347 Phénomènes de piézoconductivité dans les composites polymère-noir de carbone. Application aux) Résumé. - Certains composites polymère-noir de carbone ont une conductivité qui varie beaucoup avec les

  18. Preparation of highly loaded Pt/carbon xerogel catalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells by the Strong Electrostatic Adsorption method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regalbuto, John R.

    and composition, such as carbon xerogels and aerogels, constitute an interesting alternative to carbon blacks [4, the samples were filtered, dried and reduced. In order to increase the Pt weight percentage, up to three

  19. Laser-induced light emission from carbon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osswald, S.; Behler, K.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2008-10-01

    Strong absorption of light in a broad wavelength range and poor thermal conductance between particles of carbon nanomaterials, such as nanotubes, onions, nanodiamond, and carbon black, lead to strong thermal emission (blackbody radiation) upon laser excitation, even at a very low (milliwatts) power. The lasers commonly used during Raman spectroscopy characterization of carbon can cause sample heating to very high temperatures. While conventional thermometry is difficult in the case of nanomaterials, Raman spectral features, such as the G band of graphitic carbon and thermal emission spectra were used to estimate the temperature during light emission that led to extensive graphitization and evaporation of carbon nanomaterials, indicating local temperatures exceeding 3500 deg. C.

  20. Scalar Hairy Black Holes in General Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing-Hui Feng; H. Lu; Qiang Wen

    2014-01-13

    We obtain a class of asymptotic flat or (A)dS hairy black holes in D-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar with certain scalar potential. For a given mass, the theory admits both the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini and the hairy black holes with different temperature and entropy, but satisfying the same first law of thermodynamics. For some appropriate choice of parameters, the scalar potential can be expressed in terms of a super-potential and it can arise in gauged supergravities. In this case, the solutions develop a naked curvature singularity and become the spherical domain walls. Uplifting the solutions to D=11 or 10, we obtain solutions that can be viewed as spherical M-branes or D3-branes. We also add electric charges to these hairy black holes. All these solutions contain no scalar charges in that the first law of thermodynamics are unmodified. We also try to construct new AdS black holes carrying scalar charges, with some moderate success in that the charges are pre-fixed in the theory instead of being some continuous integration constants.

  1. Scalar Hairy Black Holes in General Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Xing-Hui; Wen, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    We obtain a class of asymptotic flat or (A)dS hairy black holes in D-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar with certain scalar potential. For a given mass, the theory admits both the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini and the hairy black holes with different temperature and entropy, but satisfying the same first law of thermodynamics. For some appropriate choice of parameters, the scalar potential can be expressed in terms of a super-potential and it can arise in gauged supergravities. In this case, the solutions develop a naked curvature singularity and become the spherical domain walls. Uplifting the solutions to D=11 or 10, we obtain solutions that can be viewed as spherical M-branes or D3-branes. We also add electric charges to these hairy black holes. All these solutions contain no scalar charges in that the first law of thermodynamics are unmodified. We also try to construct new AdS black holes carrying scalar charges, with some moderate success in that the charges are pre-fixed in the theory instead ...

  2. Failed supernovae explain the compact remnant mass function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USAAND (United States); Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    One explanation for the absence of higher mass red supergiants (16.5 M {sub ?} ? M ? 25 M {sub ?}) as the progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) is that they die in failed SNe creating black holes. Simulations show that such failed SNe still eject their hydrogen envelopes in a weak transient, leaving a black hole with the mass of the star's helium core (5-8 M {sub ?}). Here we show that this naturally explains the typical masses of observed black holes and the gap between neutron star and black hole masses without any fine-tuning of stellar mass loss, binary mass transfer, or the SN mechanism, beyond having it fail in a mass range where many progenitor models have density structures that make the explosions more likely to fail. There is no difficulty including this ?20% population of failed SNe in any accounting of SN types over the progenitor mass function. And, other than patience, there is no observational barrier to either detecting these black hole formation events or limiting their rates to be well below this prediction.

  3. Probing Dark Energy with Black Hole Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Adam Kelleher

    2008-08-25

    The equation of state (EoS) of dark energy $w$ remains elusive despite enormous experimental efforts to pin down its value and its time variation. Yet it is the single most important handle we have in our understanding of one of the most mysterious puzzle in nature, dark energy. This letter proposes a new method for measuring the EoS of dark energy by using the gravitational waves (GW) of black hole binaries. The method described here offers an alternative to the standard way of large scale surveys. It is well known that the mass of a black hole changes due to the accretion of dark energy but at an extremely slow rate. However, a binary of supermassive black holes (SBH) radiates gravitational waves with a power proportional to the masses of these accreting stars and thereby carries information on dark energy. These waves can propagate through the vastness of structure in the universe unimpeded. The orbital changes of the binary, induced by the energy loss from gravitational radiation, receive a large contribution from dark energy accretion. This contribution is directly proportional to $(1+w)$ and is dominant for SBH binaries with separation $R \\ge 1000$ parsec, thereby accelerating the merging process for $w > -1$ or ripping the stars apart for phantom dark energy with $w < -1$. Such orbital changes, therefore $w$, can be detected with LIGO and LISA near merging time, or with X-ray and radio measurements of Chandra and VLBA experiments.

  4. Giant black hole ringings induced by massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves Decanini; Antoine Folacci; Mohamed Ould El Hadj

    2014-01-01

    A distorted black hole radiates gravitational waves in order to settle down in one of the geometries permitted by the no-hair theorem. During that relaxation phase, a characteristic damped ringing is generated. It can be theoretically constructed from the black hole quasinormal frequencies (which govern its oscillating behavior and its decay) and from the associated excitation factors (which determine intrinsically its amplitude) by carefully taking into account the source of the distortion. Here, by considering the Schwarzschild black hole in the framework of massive gravity, we show that the excitation factors have an unexpected strong resonant behavior leading to giant ringings which are, moreover, slowly decaying. Such extraordinary black hole ringings could be observed by the next generations of gravitational wave detectors and allow us to test the various massive gravity theories or their absence could be used to impose strong constraints on the graviton mass.

  5. An Energy Extremum Principle for Charged Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, Scott

    2015-01-01

    For a set of asymptotically flat black holes with arbitrary charges and masses, all initially at rest and well-separated, we prove the following extremum principle: the extremal charge configuration ($|q_i|=m_i$ for each black hole) can be derived by extremizing the total energy, for variations of the black hole apparent horizon areas, at fixed charges and fixed Euclidean separations. If all charges have the same sign, this result is a variational principle that reinterprets the static equilibrium of the Majumdar-Papapetrou-Hartle-Hawking solution as an extremum of total energy, rather than as a balance of forces; this result augments a list of related variational principles for static black holes, and is consistent with the independently known BPS energy minimum.

  6. An Energy Extremum Principle for Charged Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Fraser; Shaker Von Price Funkhouser

    2015-09-13

    For a set of asymptotically flat black holes with arbitrary charges and masses, all initially at rest and well-separated, we prove the following extremum principle: the extremal charge configuration ($|q_i|=m_i$ for each black hole) can be derived by extremizing the total energy, for variations of the black hole apparent horizon areas, at fixed charges and fixed Euclidean separations. If all charges have the same sign, this result is a variational principle that reinterprets the static equilibrium of the Majumdar-Papapetrou-Hartle-Hawking solution as an extremum of total energy, rather than as a balance of forces; this result augments a list of related variational principles for static black holes, and is consistent with the independently known BPS energy minimum.

  7. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-01-01

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{c...

  8. Black Holes In Astronomy Black Holes In Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    Black Hole horizon static limit ergosphere radiation magnetic fields jet jet #12;Black-hole accretion with a central bulge. #12;Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level Jets and lobes of Cygnus A Carilli et al. Supermassive black holes are the most powerful engines in the Universe

  9. The renaissance of black phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Xi

    One hundred years after its first successful synthesis in the bulk form in 1914, black phosphorus (black P) was recently rediscovered from the perspective of a 2D layered material, attracting tremendous interest from ...

  10. Black Hole Portal into Hidden Valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Dubovsky; Victor Gorbenko

    2010-12-13

    Superradiant instability turns rotating astrophysical black holes into unique probes of light axions. We consider what happens when a light axion is coupled to a strongly coupled hidden gauge sector. In this case superradiance results in an adiabatic increase of a hidden sector CP-violating $\\theta$-parameter in a near horizon region. This may trigger a first order phase transition in the gauge sector. As a result a significant fraction of a black hole mass is released as a cloud of hidden mesons and can be later converted into electromagnetic radiation. This results in a violent electromagnetic burst. The characteristic frequency of such bursts may range approximately from 100 eV to 100 MeV.

  11. Hybrid black-hole binary initial data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno C. Mundim; Bernard J. Kelly; Yosef Zlochower; Hiroyuki Nakano; Manuela Campanelli

    2010-12-04

    Traditional black-hole binary puncture initial data is conformally flat. This unphysical assumption is coupled with a lack of radiation signature from the binary's past life. As a result, waveforms extracted from evolutions of this data display an abrupt jump. In Kelly et al. [Class.Quant.Grav.27:114005,2010], a new binary black-hole initial data with radiation contents derived in the post-Newtonian (PN) calculation was adapted to puncture evolutions in numerical relativity. This data satisfies the constraint equations to the 2.5PN order, and contains a transverse-traceless "wavy" metric contribution, violating the standard assumption of conformal flatness. Although the evolution contained less spurious radiation, there were undesired features; the unphysical horizon mass loss and the large initial orbital eccentricity. Introducing a hybrid approach to the initial data evaluation, we significantly reduce these undesired features.

  12. Black Holes And Their Entropy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mei, Jianwei

    2010-10-12

    . . . . . . . . . 21 1. Solutions in Four Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2. Solutions in Higher Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 C. Black Hole Solutions in Supergravity Theories . . . . . . . 30 D. Plebanski-Demianski Type Solutions in d = 5... is to discuss the construction of new black hole solutions and the calculation of the black hole entropy. In Chapter II, we shall re- port some new black hole solutions that we have found during the past few years [21, 22, 23] and we will discuss some...

  13. How do black holes move, as quantum objects or as classical objects?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2007-09-12

    Results of a recent study of the transition between quantum and classical behavior are applied to black holes. The study led to a criterion separating quantum from classical behavior on the basis of mass or size, dependent on local effects of cosmic expansion. Application of this criterion to black holes indicates that the motion of smaller black holes will be characteristically quantum mechanical, while the motion of larger black holes must be classical, with a threshold distinguishing these behaviors at a Schwartzschild radius of roughly the size of a nucleon.

  14. Five-dimensional black strings in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2005-04-15

    We consider black-string-type solutions in five-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Numerically constructed solutions under static, axially symmetric and translationally invariant metric ansatz are presented. The solutions are specified by two asymptotic charges: mass of a black string and a scalar charge associated with the radion part of the metric. Regular black string solutions are found if and only if the two charges satisfy a fine-tuned relation, and otherwise the spacetime develops a singular event horizon or a naked singularity. We can also generate bubble solutions from the black strings by using a double Wick rotation.

  15. Black Holes at Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Webber

    2006-04-06

    In theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity, black holes are copiously produced in particle collisions at energies well above the Planck scale. I briefly review some recent work on the phenomenology of this process, with emphasis on theoretical uncertainties and possible strategies for measuring the number of extra dimensions.

  16. Quantum black hole inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Altaie

    2001-05-07

    In this paper we follow a new approach for particle creation by a localized strong gravitational field. The approach is based on a definition of the physical vacuum drawn from Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Using the fact that the gravitational field red-shifts the frequency modes of the vacuum, a condition on the minimum stregth of the gravitational field required to achieve real particle creation is derived. Application of this requirement on a Schwartzchid black hole resulted in deducing an upper limit on the region, outside the event horizon, where real particles can be created. Using this regional upper limit, and considering particle creation by black holes as a consequence of the Casimir effect, with the assumption that the created quanta are to be added to the initial energy, we deduce a natural power law for the development of the event horizon, and consequently a logarithmic law for the area spectrum of an inflating black hole. Application of the results on a cosmological model shows that if we start with a Planck-dimensional black hole, then through the process of particle creation we end up with a universe having the presently estimated critical density. Such a universe will be in a state of eternal inflation.

  17. Gasification of black liquor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA)

    1987-07-28

    A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediatley above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone.

  18. Gasification of black liquor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohl, A.L.

    1987-07-28

    A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediately above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone. 2 figs.

  19. Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

    2008-06-02

    Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

  20. Black Hole Spin via Continuum Fitting and the Role of Spin in Powering Transient Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey E. McClintock; Ramesh Narayan; James F. Steiner

    2013-06-28

    The spins of ten stellar black holes have been measured using the continuum-fitting method. These black holes are located in two distinct classes of X-ray binary systems, one that is persistently X-ray bright and another that is transient. Both the persistent and transient black holes remain for long periods in a state where their spectra are dominated by a thermal accretion disk component. The spin of a black hole of known mass and distance can be measured by fitting this thermal continuum spectrum to the thin-disk model of Novikov and Thorne; the key fit parameter is the radius of the inner edge of the black hole's accretion disk. Strong observational and theoretical evidence links the inner-disk radius to the radius of the innermost stable circular orbit, which is trivially related to the dimensionless spin parameter a_* of the black hole (|a_*| 0.95. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by the dozens or hundreds of independent and consistent measurements of spin that have been obtained for several black holes, and through careful consideration of many sources of systematic error. Among the results discussed is a dichotomy between the transient and persistent black holes; the latter have higher spins and larger masses. Also discussed is recently discovered evidence in the transient sources for a correlation between the power of ballistic jets and black hole spin.

  1. Towards an understanding of the carbon isotopic changes across the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Alison Margaret

    2005-01-01

    A combination of bulk carbon, biomarker and compound specific isotopic analyses were used in order to investigate the changes which accompanied the deposition of black shales during the upper tenuicostatum and lower ...

  2. Recovery Boiler Modeling: An Improved Char Burning Model Including Sulfate Reduction and Carbon Removal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grace, T. M.; Wag, K. J.; Horton, R. R.; Frederick, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an improved model of char burning during black liquor combustion that is capable of predicting net rates of sulfate reduction to sulfide as well as carbon burnup rates. Enhancements include a proper ...

  3. Statistical Mechanics of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Harms; Y. Leblanc

    1992-05-11

    We analyze the statistical mechanics of a gas of neutral and charged black holes. The microcanonical ensemble is the only possible approach to this system, and the equilibrium configuration is the one for which most of the energy is carried by a single black hole. Schwarzschild black holes are found to obey the statistical bootstrap condition. In all cases, the microcanonical temperature is identical to the Hawking temperature of the most massive black hole in the gas. U(1) charges in general break the bootstrap property. The problems of black hole decay and of quantum coherence are also addressed.

  4. Dark Matter Hawking Radiation? Dark Spinors Tunnelling in String Theory Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti, R T

    2015-01-01

    The Hawking radiation spectrum of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is derived, in the context of dark spinors tunnelling across the horizon. Since a black hole has a well defined temperature, it should radiate in principle all the standard model particles, similar to a black body at that temperature. We investigate the tunnelling of mass dimension one spin-1/2 dark fermions, that are beyond the standard model and are prime candidates to the dark matter. Their interactions with the standard model matter and gauge fields are suppressed by at least one power of unification scale, being restricted just to the Higgs field and to the graviton likewise. The tunnelling method for the emission and absorption of mass dimension one particles across the event horizon of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is shown here to provide further evidence for the universality of black hole radiation, further encompassing particles beyond the standard model.

  5. Dark Matter Hawking Radiation? Dark Spinors Tunnelling in String Theory Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. T. Cavalcanti; Roldao da Rocha

    2015-07-14

    The Hawking radiation spectrum of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is derived, in the context of dark spinors tunnelling across the horizon. Since a black hole has a well defined temperature, it should radiate in principle all the standard model particles, similar to a black body at that temperature. We investigate the tunnelling of mass dimension one spin-1/2 dark fermions, that are beyond the standard model and are prime candidates to the dark matter. Their interactions with the standard model matter and gauge fields are suppressed by at least one power of unification scale, being restricted just to the Higgs field and to the graviton likewise. The tunnelling method for the emission and absorption of mass dimension one particles across the event horizon of Kerr-Sen axion-dilaton black holes is shown here to provide further evidence for the universality of black hole radiation, further encompassing particles beyond the standard model.

  6. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

    2008-03-11

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  7. The impacts of population change on carbon emissions in China during 1978-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Qin, E-mail: zhuqin@fudan.edu.cn; Peng Xizhe, E-mail: xzpeng@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-09-15

    This study examines the impacts of population size, population structure, and consumption level on carbon emissions in China from 1978 to 2008. To this end, we expanded the stochastic impacts by regression on population, affluence, and technology model and used the ridge regression method, which overcomes the negative influences of multicollinearity among independent variables under acceptable bias. Results reveal that changes in consumption level and population structure were the major impact factors, not changes in population size. Consumption level and carbon emissions were highly correlated. In terms of population structure, urbanization, population age, and household size had distinct effects on carbon emissions. Urbanization increased carbon emissions, while the effect of age acted primarily through the expansion of the labor force and consequent overall economic growth. Shrinking household size increased residential consumption, resulting in higher carbon emissions. Households, rather than individuals, are a more reasonable explanation for the demographic impact on carbon emissions. Potential social policies for low carbon development are also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the impacts of population change on carbon emissions in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We expand the STIRPAT model by containing population structure factors in the model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The population structure includes age structure, urbanization level, and household size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ridge regression method is used to estimate the model with multicollinearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The population structure plays a more important role compared with the population size.

  8. Supermassive Black Hole Growth and Merger Rates from Cosmological N-body Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Kelly Holley-Bockelmann; Steinn Sigurdsson; Tom Abel

    2007-03-20

    Understanding how seed black holes grow into intermediate and supermassive black holes (IMBHs and SMBHs, respectively) has important implications for the duty-cycle of active galactic nuclei (AGN), galaxy evolution, and gravitational wave astronomy. Most studies of the cosmological growth and merger history of black holes have used semianalytic models and have concentrated on SMBH growth in luminous galaxies. Using high resolution cosmological N-body simulations, we track the assembly of black holes over a large range of final masses -- from seed black holes to SMBHs -- over widely varying dynamical histories. We used the dynamics of dark matter halos to track the evolution of seed black holes in three different gas accretion scenarios. We have found that growth of Sagittarius A* - size SMBH reaches its maximum mass M_{SMBH}~10^6Msun at z~6 through early gaseous accretion episodes, after which it stays at near constant mass. At the same redshift, the duty-cycle of the host AGN ends, hence redshift z=6 marks the transition from an AGN to a starburst galaxy which eventually becomes the Milky Way. By tracking black hole growth as a function of time and mass, we estimate that the IMBH merger rate reaches a maximum of R_{max}=55 yr^-1 at z=11. From IMBH merger rates we calculate N_{ULX}=7 per Milky Way type galaxy per redshift in redshift range 2

  9. Identification of Astrophysical Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    1998-03-19

    Black holes are by definition black, and therefore cannot be directly observed by using electromagnetic radiations. Convincing identification of black holes must necessarily depend on the identification of a very specially behaving matter and radiation which surround them. A major problem in this subject of black hole astrophysics is to quantify the behaviour of matter and radiation close to the horizon. In this review, the subject of black hole accretion and outflow is systematically developed. It is shown that both the stationary as well as the non-stationary properties of the observed spectra could be generally understood by these solutions. It is suggested that the solutions of radiative hydrodynamic equations may produce clear spectral signatures of black holes. Other circumstantial evidences of black holes, both in the galactic centers as well as in binary systems, are also presented.

  10. Relating Follicly-Challenged Compact Stars to Bald Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Nicolas Yunes

    2015-07-08

    Compact stars satisfy certain no-hair relations through which their multipole moments are given by their mass, spin and quadrupole moment. These relations are approximately independent of their equation of state, relating pressure to density. Such relations are similar to the black hole no-hair theorems, but these possess event horizons inside which information that led to their formation can hide. Compact stars do not possess horizons, so whether their no-hair relations are related to the black hole ones is unclear. We investigate how the two relations are related by studying relations among multipole moments for compact stars with anisotropic pressure as a toy model, which allows such stars to be more compact than those with isotropic pressure. We here show numerically that the compact star no-hair relations approach the black hole ones as the compactness approaches that of a black hole. We also prove analytically that the current dipole moment exactly reaches the black hole limit quadratically in compactness as strongly-anisotropic stars approach the black hole limit. We moreover show that compact stars become progressively oblate in this limit, even if prolate at low compactness due to strong anisotropies.

  11. Thermodynamics of Black Hole Horizons and Kerr/CFT Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Shen-xiu Liu; Jia-ju Zhang

    2012-11-02

    In this paper we investigate the thermodynamics of the inner horizon and its implication on the holographic description of the black hole. We focus on the black holes with two physical horizons. Under reasonable assumption, we prove that the first law of thermodynamics of the outer horizon always indicates that of the inner horizon. As a result, the fact that the area product being mass-independent is equivalent to the relation $T_+S_+=T_-S_-$, with $T_\\pm$ and $S_\\pm$ being the Hawking temperatures and the entropies of the outer and inner horizon respectively. We find that the mass-independence of area product breaks down in general Myers-Perry black holes with spacetime dimension $d\\geq6$ and Kerr-AdS black holes with $d\\geq4$. Moreover we discuss the implication of the first laws of the outer and inner horizons on the thermodynamics of the right- and left-moving sectors of dual CFT in Kerr/CFT correspondence. We show that once the relation $T_+S_+=T_-S_-$ is satisfied, the central charges of two sectors must be same. Furthermore from the thermodynamics relations, we read the dimensionless temperatures of microscopic CFT, which are in exact agreement with the ones obtained from hidden conformal symmetry in the low frequency scattering off the black holes, and then determine the central charges. This method works well in well-known cases in Kerr/CFT correspondence, and reproduce successfully the holographic pictures for 4D Kerr-Newman and 5D Kerr black holes. We go on to predict the central charges and temperatures of a possible holographic CFT description dual to 5D doubly rotating black ring.

  12. Flip-flopping binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos O. Lousto; James Healy

    2015-03-14

    We study binary spinning black holes to display the long term individual spin dynamics. We perform a full numerical simulation starting at an initial proper separation of $d\\approx25M$ between equal mass holes and evolve them down to merger for nearly 48 orbits, 3 precession cycles, and half of a flip-flop cycle. The simulation lasts for $t=20000M$ and displays a total change in the orientation of the spin of one of the black holes from initially aligned with the orbital angular momentum to a complete anti-alignment after half of a flip-flop cycle. We compare this evolution with an integration of the 3.5 Post-Newtonian equations of motion and spin evolution to show that this process continuously flip-flops the spin during the lifetime of the binary until merger. We also provide lower order analytic expressions for the maximum flip-flop angle and frequency. We discuss the effects this dynamics may have on spin growth in accreting binaries and on the observational consequences for galactic and supermassive binary black holes.

  13. Thermodynamics and Luminosities of Rainbow Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, Benrong; Yang, Haitang

    2015-01-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As a result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is \\textquotedblleft Gravity's rainbow", where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the \\textquotedblleft Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation" which is $E^{2}=m^{2}+p^{2}\\left[ 1-\\eta\\left( E/m_{p}\\right) ^{n}\\right] $ with $n>0$, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of $\\eta$ and $n$ in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with $\\eta<0$ and $n\\geq2$. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute lum...

  14. Adaptive Finite Elements and Colliding Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas N. Arnold; Arup Mukherjee; Luc Pouly

    1997-09-15

    According to the theory of general relativity, the relative acceleration of masses generates gravitational radiation. Although gravitational radiation has not yet been detected, it is believed that extremely violent cosmic events, such as the collision of black holes, should generate gravity waves of sufficient amplitude to detect on earth. The massive Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, is now being constructed to detect gravity waves. Consequently there is great interest in the computer simulation of black hole collisions and similar events, based on the numerical solution of the Einstein field equations. In this note we introduce the scientific, mathematical, and computational problems and discuss the development of a computer code to solve the initial data problem for colliding black holes, a nonlinear elliptic boundary value problem posed in an unbounded three dimensional domain which is a key step in solving the full field equations. The code is based on finite elements, adaptive meshes, and a multigrid solution process. Here we will particularly emphasize the mathematical and algorithmic issues arising in the generation of adaptive tetrahedral meshes.

  15. Black Hole Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Crisostomo; Ricardo Troncoso; Jorge Zanelli

    2000-09-22

    Gravitation theories selected by requiring that they have a unique anti-de Sitter vacuum with a fixed cosmological constant are studied. For a given dimension d, the Lagrangians under consideration are labeled by an integer k=1,2,...,[(d-1)/2]. Black holes for each d and k are found and are used to rank these theories. A minimum possible size for a localized electrically charged source is predicted in the whole set of theories, except General Relativity. It is found that the thermodynamic behavior falls into two classes: If d-2k=1, these solutions resemble the three dimensional black hole, otherwise, their behavior is similar to the Schwarzschild-AdS_4 geometry.

  16. Black holes at accelerators.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Bryan R

    be presented and the effects of some of the uncertainties can be investigated. 3.1. Hawking Spectrum With the above assumptions, the spectrum of particles emitted during black hole decay takes the form dN dE ? ?E2 (eE/TH ? 1) T n+6H (8) where as usual... the trapped surface area [6, 7]. T030 02 4 6 8 10 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 n=0 n=1 n=2 n=6 E rS ?ˆ (0 ) ab s/ pi r2 S Figure 4: Grey-body factors for scalar emission on the brane from a (4 + n)D black hole. 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 n=0 n=1 n=2 n=6 E...

  17. Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-04-17

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  18. Carbon Fiber

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-07-23

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  19. Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-06

    Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

  20. Black Pine Circle Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-03-31

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  1. Black Pine Circle Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-09-15

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  2. Black Hole Demographics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Ferrarese

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this contribution is to review the current status of black hole demographics in light of recent advances in the study of high redshift QSOs (section 2), local AGNs (section 3) and local quiescent galaxies (section 4). I will then outline the prospects for future progress (section 5), and discuss what I believe will be the challenges for the years to come [ABRIDGED].

  3. Entropy Product Formula for spinning BTZ Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of inner and outer horizons in the background of spinning BTZ(Ba\\~{n}ados,Teitelboim and Zanelli) black hole. We compute the \\emph{horizon radii product, the entropy product, the surface temperature product, the Komar energy product and the specific heat product} for both the horizons. We observe that the entropy product is \\emph{universal}(mass-independent), whereas the surface temperature product, Komar energy product and specific heat product are \\emph{not universal} because they all depends on mass parameter. We also show that the \\emph{First law} of black hole thermodynamics and \\emph {Smarr-Gibbs-Duhem } relations hold for inner horizon as well as outer horizon. The Christodoulou-Ruffini mass formula is derived for both the horizons. We further study the \\emph{stability} of such black hole by computing the specific heat for both the horizons. It has been observed that under certain condition the black hole possesses \\emph{second order phase transition}.

  4. Entropy Product Formula for spinning BTZ Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2015-09-02

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of inner and outer horizons in the background of spinning BTZ(Ba\\~{n}ados,Teitelboim and Zanelli) black hole. We compute the \\emph{horizon radii product, the entropy product, the surface temperature product, the Komar energy product and the specific heat product} for both the horizons. We observe that the entropy product is \\emph{universal}(mass-independent), whereas the surface temperature product, Komar energy product and specific heat product are \\emph{not universal} because they all depends on mass parameter. We also show that the \\emph{First law} of black hole thermodynamics and \\emph {Smarr-Gibbs-Duhem } relations hold for inner horizon as well as outer horizon. The Christodoulou-Ruffini mass formula is derived for both the horizons. We further study the \\emph{stability} of such black hole by computing the specific heat for both the horizons. It has been observed that under certain condition the black hole possesses \\emph{second order phase transition}.

  5. Relativistic Viscous Fluid Description of Microscopic Black Hole Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Kapusta

    2001-05-25

    Microscopic black holes explode with their temperature varying inversely as their mass. Such explosions would lead to the highest temperatures in the present universe, all the way to the Planck energy. Whether or not a quasi-stationary shell of matter undergoing radial hydrodynamic expansion surrounds such black holes is been controversial. In this paper relativistic viscous fluid equations are applied to the problem. It is shown that a self-consistent picture emerges of a fluid just marginally kept in local thermal equilibrium; viscosity is a crucial element of the dynamics.

  6. Schwarzschild black hole levitating in the hyperextreme Kerr field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. S. Manko; E. Ruiz

    2015-11-05

    The equilibrium configurations between a Schwarzschild black hole and a hyperextreme Kerr object are shown to be described by a three-parameter subfamily of the extended double-Kerr solution. For this subfamily, its Ernst potential and corresponding metric functions, we provide a physical representation which employs as arbitrary parameters the individual Komar masses and relative coordinate distance between the sources. The calculation of horizon's local angular velocity induced in the Schwarzschild black hole by the Kerr constituent yields a simple expression inversely proportional to the square of the distance parameter.

  7. Accretions of Dark Matter and Dark Energy onto ($n+2$)-dimensional Schwarzschild Black Hole and Morris-Thorne Wormhole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ujjal Debnath

    2015-03-06

    We have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass not sensitively depends on the dimension.

  8. Black holes in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2009-01-01

    What is going on (as of August 2008) at the interface between theoretical general relativity, string-inspired models, and observational astrophysics? Quite a lot. In this mini-survey I will make a personal choice and focus on four specific questions: Do black holes "exist"? (For selected values of the word "exist".) Is black hole formation and evaporation unitary? Can one mimic a black hole to arbitrary accuracy? Can one detect the presence of a horizon using local physics?

  9. Black Hole Masses in Nearby Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Nicholas James

    2012-01-01

    Photometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2.2 Photometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .with high-resolution photometry from HST (Laine et al. 2003)

  10. Quantum Mechanics and Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose N. Pecina-Cruz

    2005-11-27

    This paper discusses the existence of black holes from the foundations of quantum mechanics. It is found that quantum mechanics rule out a possible gravitational collapse.

  11. Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasser, Juerg

    2005-10-26

    In my talk, I reviewed some basic aspects of quark masses: what do they mean, how can they be determined, what is our present knowledge on them. The talk was addressed to non specialists in the field, and so is this write up.

  12. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  13. Why Blue-Collar Blacks Help Less

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Sandra Susan; Young, Kara Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Exclude Black Men from Blue-Collar Jobs. Berkeley, CA:How Black and Latino Blue Collar Workers Make Decisionsof Sample Respondents Blue-Collar Latinos Blue-Collar Black

  14. Dermoscopy of black-spot poison ivy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rader, Ryan K; Mu, Ruipu; Shi, Honglan; Stoecker, William V; Hinton, Kristen A

    2012-01-01

    CT, Bean AS. Black-spot poison ivy: A rare phenomenon. J AmJG, Lucky AW. Black spot poison ivy: A report of 5 cases andis unique for black-spot poison ivy. The UFLC-MS/MS urushiol

  15. Green, Black, Lean Six Sigma and Master Black Belt Certifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Green, Black, Lean Six Sigma and Master Black Belt Certifications Green BeLt CertifiCation Candidates may choose from three Green Belts offered: 1) Lean (one week of coursework) 2) Lean Six Sigma (two weeks of coursework) 3) Six Sigma (two weeks of coursework) Green Belt certification is a two

  16. Distorted black holes from a vacuum 5-d spherical solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capistrano, Abraão J S; Ulhoa, Sergio C; Amorim, Ronni G G

    2015-01-01

    We study the deformation caused by the influence of extrinsic curvature on a vacuum spherically symmetric metric embedded in a 5-d bulk. In this sense, we investigate the produced stationary black-holes and derive general properties such as its mass and horizons. As an application, a test moving particle near such black-holes is also shown as well the distortion caused by extrinsic curvature on its movement. Accordingly, using asymptotically conformal flat condition on the extrinsic curvature and an analytical expansion of a set of \\emph{n}-scalar fields, we show that the resulting black holes must be large and constrained in the range $-1/2 \\leq n \\leq 1.8$ that are locally thermodynamically stable, but not globally preferred.

  17. Exploring Higher Dimensional Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Harris; M. J. Palmer; M. A. Parker; P. Richardson; A. Sabetfakhri; B. R. Webber

    2004-11-01

    In some extra dimension theories with a TeV fundamental Planck scale, black holes could be produced in future collider experiments. Although cross sections can be large, measuring the model parameters is difficult due to the many theoretical uncertainties. Here we discuss those uncertainties and then we study the experimental characteristics of black hole production and decay at a typical detector using the ATLAS detector as a guide. We present a new technique for measuring the temperature of black holes that applies to many models. We apply this technique to a test case with four extra dimensions and, using an estimate of the parton-level production cross section error of 20%, determine the Planck mass to 15% and the number of extra dimensions to +-0.75.

  18. Holographic Superconductors with Ho?ava-Lifshitz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Gen Cai; Hai-Qing Zhang

    2009-12-03

    We discuss the phase transition of planar black holes in Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity by introducing a Maxwell field and a complex scalar field. We calculate the condensates of the charged operators in the dual CFTs when the mass square of the complex scalar filed is $m^2=-2/L^2$ and $m^2=0$, respectively. We compute the electrical conductivity of the \\hl superconductor in the probe approximation. In particular, it is found that there exists a spike in the conductivity for the case of the operator with scaling dimension one. These results are quite similar to those in the case of Schwarzschild-AdS black holes, which demonstrates that the holographic superconductivity is a robust phenomenon associated with asymptotic AdS black holes.

  19. Carbon particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  20. Carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, F.M.

    1993-11-01

    Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

  1. SPIN-PRECESSION: BREAKING THE BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR DEGENERACY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Cornish, Neil; Klein, Antoine; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Mergers of compact stellar remnants are prime targets for the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave detectors. The gravitational wave signals from these merger events can be used to study the mass and spin distribution of stellar remnants, and provide information about black hole horizons and the material properties of neutron stars. However, it has been suggested that degeneracies in the way that the star's mass and spin are imprinted in the waveforms may make it impossible to distinguish between black holes and neutron stars. Here we show that the precession of the orbital plane due to spin-orbit coupling breaks the mass-spin degeneracy, and allows us to distinguish between standard neutron stars and alternative possibilities, such as black holes or exotic neutron stars with large masses and spins.

  2. Holographic Black Hole Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Karch; Brandon Robinson

    2015-11-02

    Thermodynamic quantities associated with black holes in Anti-de Sitter space obey an interesting identity when the cosmological constant is included as one of the dynamical variables, the generalized Smarr relation. We show that this relation can easily be understood from the point of view of the dual holographic field theory. It amounts to the simple statement that the extensive thermodynamic quantities of a large $N$ gauge theory only depend on the number of colors, $N$, via an overall factor of $N^2$.

  3. You Cannot Press Out the Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Ida; Takahiro Okamoto

    2012-01-03

    It is shown that a ball-shaped black hole region homeomorphic with D**n cannot be pressed out, along whichever axis penetrating the black hole region, into a black ring with a doughnut-shaped black hole region homeomorphic with S**1 x D**(n-1). A more general prohibition law for the change of the topology of black holes, including a version of no-bifurcation theorems for black holes, is given.

  4. Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2007-06-08

    Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

  5. New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Matthew Todd

    2007-01-01

    1-2% of the oil mass, however the calcium ion peak at m/z 40and elemental carbon (EC) peaks. The HDDV oil mass spectraoil mass spectra were characterized by an intense Ca + ion peak and

  6. The Maximum Mass of a Neutron Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliki Kalogera; Gordon Baym

    1996-08-11

    Observational identification of black holes as members of binary systems requires the knowledge of the upper limit on the gravitational mass of a neutron star. We use modern equations of state for neutron star matter, fitted to experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and the properties of light nuclei, to calculate, within the framework of Rhoades & Ruffini (1974), the minimum upper limit on a neutron star mass. Regarding the equation of state as valid up to twice nuclear matter saturation density, rho_{nm}, we obtain a secure upper bound on the neutron star mass equal to 2.9 solar masses. We also find that in order to reach the lowest possible upper bound of 2.2 solar masses, we need understand the physical properties of neutron matter up to a density of about 4 times rho_{nm}.

  7. Topological black holes in Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M. H.; Alinejadi, N.; Hendi, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    In this paper, we present topological black holes of third order Lovelock gravity in the presence of cosmological constant and nonlinear electromagnetic Born-Infeld field. Depending on the metric parameters, these solutions may be interpreted as black hole solutions with inner and outer event horizons, an extreme black hole or naked singularity. We investigate the thermodynamics of asymptotically flat solutions and show that the thermodynamic and conserved quantities of these black holes satisfy the first law of thermodynamic. We also endow the Ricci flat solutions with a global rotation and calculate the finite action and conserved quantities of these class of solutions by using the counterterm method. We compute the entropy through the use of the Gibbs-Duhem relation and find that the entropy obeys the area law. We obtain a Smarr-type formula for the mass as a function of the entropy, the angular momenta, and the charge, and compute temperature, angular velocities, and electric potential and show that these thermodynamic quantities coincide with their values which are computed through the use of geometry. Finally, we perform a stability analysis for this class of solutions in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensemble and show that the presence of a nonlinear electromagnetic field and higher curvature terms has no effect on the stability of the black branes, and they are stable in the whole phase space.

  8. Back-Reaction of Classical Fields on Black Hole Area Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2015-08-13

    We study the back-reaction of classical Maxwell field and massive scalar field on the BTZ black hole entropy. The exact values of the modification which correct the black hole area law are found. We discuss the similar properties between the scalar and Maxwell field which is investigated in both of Coulomb gauge and Lorentz gauge. The dependences of mass and mode number on the black hole entropy are illustrated. We also study the back-reaction by D branes, which is described by DBI action, and explicitly check that the classical solution which gives the black hole entropy precisely corrects the black hole area law. Our results extend the calculations of the generalized gravitational entropy proposed in recent by Lewkowycz and Maldacena [1].

  9. A connection between plasma conditions near black hole event horizons and outflow properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koljonen, K I I; Ontiveros, J A Fernández; Markoff, S; Russell, T D; Miller-Jones, J C A; van der Horst, A J; Bernardini, F; Casella, P; Curran, P A; Gandhi, P; Soria, R

    2015-01-01

    Accreting black holes are responsible for producing the fastest, most powerful outflows of matter in the Universe. The formation process of powerful jets close to black holes is poorly understood, and the conditions leading to jet formation are currently hotly debated. In this paper, we report an unambiguous empirical correlation between the properties of the plasma close to the black hole and the particle acceleration properties within jets launched from the central regions of accreting stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. In these sources the emission of the plasma near the black hole is characterized by a power law at X-ray energies during times when the jets are produced. We find that the photon index of this power law, which gives information on the underlying particle distribution, correlates with the characteristic break frequency in the jet spectrum, which is dependent on magnetohydrodynamical processes in the outflow. The observed range in break frequencies varies by five orders of magnitude, i...

  10. Back-Reaction of Classical Fields on Black Hole Area Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    We study the back-reaction of classical Maxwell field and massive scalar field on the BTZ black hole entropy. The exact values of the modification which correct the black hole area law are found. We discuss the similar properties between the scalar and Maxwell field which is investigated in both of Coulomb gauge and Lorentz gauge. The dependences of mass and mode number on the black hole entropy are illustrated. We also study the back-reaction by D branes, which is described by DBI action, and explicitly check that the classical solution which gives the black hole entropy precisely corrects the black hole area law. Our results extend the calculations of the generalized gravitational entropy proposed in recent by Lewkowycz and Maldacena [1].

  11. Back-Reaction of Classical Fields on Black Hole Area Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2015-08-17

    We study the back-reaction of classical Maxwell field and massive scalar field on the BTZ black hole entropy. The exact values of the modification which correct the black hole area law are found. We discuss the similar properties between the scalar and Maxwell field which is investigated in both of Coulomb gauge and Lorentz gauge. The dependences of mass and mode number on the black hole entropy are illustrated. We also study the back-reaction by D branes, which are described by DBI action, and explicitly check that the classical solution which gives the black hole entropy precisely corrects the black hole area law. Our results extend the calculations of the generalized gravitational entropy proposed in recent by Lewkowycz and Maldacena [1].

  12. The Black Hole Particle Accelerator as a Machine to make Baby Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, A J S

    2013-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the inner horizon of an astronomically realistic rotating black hole is subject to the mass inflation instability. The inflationary instability acts like a gravity-powered particle accelerator of extraordinary power, accelerating accreted streams of particles along the principal outgoing and ingoing null directions at the inner horizon to collision energies that would, if nothing intervened, typically exceed exponentially the Planck energy. The inflationary instability is fueled by ongoing accretion, and is occurring inevitably in essentially every black hole in our Universe. This extravagant machine, the Black Hole Particle Accelerator, has the hallmarks of a device to make baby universes. Since collisions are most numerous inside supermassive black holes, reproductive efficiency requires our Universe to make supermassive black holes efficiently, as is observed.

  13. The Black Hole Particle Accelerator as a Machine to make Baby Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. S. Hamilton

    2013-05-20

    General relativity predicts that the inner horizon of an astronomically realistic rotating black hole is subject to the mass inflation instability. The inflationary instability acts like a gravity-powered particle accelerator of extraordinary power, accelerating accreted streams of particles along the principal outgoing and ingoing null directions at the inner horizon to collision energies that would, if nothing intervened, typically exceed exponentially the Planck energy. The inflationary instability is fueled by ongoing accretion, and is occurring inevitably in essentially every black hole in our Universe. This extravagant machine, the Black Hole Particle Accelerator, has the hallmarks of a device to make baby universes. Since collisions are most numerous inside supermassive black holes, reproductive efficiency requires our Universe to make supermassive black holes efficiently, as is observed.

  14. Elemental and Molecular Evidence of Soot-and Char-Derived Black

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louchouarn, Patrick

    fossil fuel use and incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) was common practice in NYC. DecreasesElemental and Molecular Evidence of Soot- and Char-Derived Black Carbon Inputs to New York City. In contrast, GBC concentrations were highest in the mid 1900s, a period when oil combustion dominated local

  15. Horizon of quantum black holes in various dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Mureika, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    We adapt the horizon wave-function formalism to describe massive static spherically symmetric sources in a general $(1+D)$-dimensional space-time, for $D>3$ and including the $D=1$ case. We find that the probability $P_{\\rm BH} $ that such objects are (quantum) black holes behaves similarly to the probability in the $(3+1)$ framework for $D> 3$. In fact, for $D\\ge 3$, the probability increases towards unity as the mass grows above the relevant $D$-dimensional Planck scale $m_D$, the faster the larger $D$. In contrast, for $D=1$, we find the probability is comparably larger for smaller masses, but $P_{\\rm BH} < 0.5$, suggesting that such lower dimensional black holes are purely quantum and not classical objects. This result is consistent with recent observations that sub-Planckian black holes are governed by an effective two-dimensional gravitation theory. Lastly, we derive Generalised Uncertainty Principle relations for the black holes under consideration, and for all cases find a minimum length scale $L_D...

  16. Sensitivity of HAWC to Primordial Black Hole Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, D Stump J H; Marinelli, S S; Yapici, T; Tollefson, K

    2015-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are black holes that may have been created in the early Universe and could be as large as supermassive black holes or as small as the Planck scale. It is believed that a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will thermally emit all species of fundamental particles. PBHs with initial masses of 5.0 x 10^14 g should be expiring today with bursts of high-energy gamma radiation in the GeV/TeV energy range. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is sensitive to the high end of the PBH gamma-ray burst spectrum. Due to its large field of view, duty cycle above 90% and sensitivity up to 100 TeV, the HAWC observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. We report that if the PBH explodes within 0.25 light years from Earth and within 26 degrees of zenith, HAWC will have a 95% probability of detecting the PBH burst at the 5 sigma level. Conversely, a null detection from a 2 year or longer HAWC search will set PBH upper limits which ar...

  17. Thermodynamics of asymptotically flat charged black holes in third order Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M.H.; Shamirzaie, M.

    2005-12-15

    We present a new class of asymptotically flat charge static solutions in third order Lovelock gravity. These solutions present black hole solutions with two inner and outer event horizons, extreme black holes, or naked singularities provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitable. We find that the uncharged asymptotically flat solutions can present black holes with two inner and outer horizons. This kind of solution does not exist in Einstein or Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and it is a special effect in third order Lovelock gravity. We compute temperature, entropy, charge, electric potential, and mass of the black hole solutions, and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also perform a stability analysis by computing the determinant of the Hessian matrix of the mass with respect to its thermodynamic variables in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensembles, and show that there exists only an intermediate stable phase.

  18. Thermodynamics and Gauge Gravity Correspondence for a Generalized Charged Rotating Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majeed, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole on the inner and outer horizons. Products of surface gravities, surface temperatures, Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials, angular velocities, areas, entropies, horizon radii and the irreducible masses at the Cauchy and the Event horizons are calculated. It is observed that the product of surface gravities, surface temperature product and product of Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials and angular velocities at the horizons are not universal quantities for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole. Products of areas and entropies at both the horizons are independent of mass of the black hole. Heat capacity is calculated and phase transition is observed, under certain conditions on r. Using the thermodynamics method with quantized charges (known as re?ned thermodynamics), the central charges and the holographic pictures (J-picture, Q-picture, and P-picture) of the dual CFT for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole are determined.

  19. Thermodynamics and Gauge Gravity Correspondence for a Generalized Charged Rotating Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushra Majeed; Mubasher Jamil

    2015-07-06

    We investigate the thermodynamics of Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole on the inner and outer horizons. Products of surface gravities, surface temperatures, Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials, angular velocities, areas, entropies, horizon radii and the irreducible masses at the Cauchy and the Event horizons are calculated. It is observed that the product of surface gravities, surface temperature product and product of Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials and angular velocities at the horizons are not universal quantities for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole. Products of areas and entropies at both the horizons are independent of mass of the black hole. Heat capacity is calculated and phase transition is observed, under certain conditions on r. Using the thermodynamics method with quantized charges (known as re?ned thermodynamics), the central charges and the holographic pictures (J-picture, Q-picture, and P-picture) of the dual CFT for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole are determined.

  20. Engineering We have explored the use of carbon black and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) to form emulsions for oil spill remediation, anodes for lithium ion batteries and electrically conducting, graphene- based/polymer composite materials, novel Si-based anodes fro Li ion batteries, advanced

  1. Black carbon refractive index and morphology: a Laboratory study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    radiative properties derived from Mie theory and therefore limited to the assumption of spherical aerosol cake 2.6 Heavy fuel oil 1.5 Figure 2: Global sources by fuel types [7]. A wide range of fuel types

  2. BLACK CARBON: Climate Impact of Bushfire in Australia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    Fire is a ubiquitous feature of the Australian landscape – characteristics of natural flora suggest that fire has been commonplace since well before the arrival of man some 40,000 years ago. Emissions from bushfire at a ...

  3. Radiocarbon measurements of black carbon in aerosols and ocean sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masiello, CA; Druffel, ERM; Currie, LA

    2002-01-01

    0.0154, because before demineralization, this sediment wassulfuric acid, allowing demineralization and oxidation insoak. During the demineralization step and following oxida-

  4. The Role of Circulation Features on Black Carbon Transport into...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    significantly different AO modulation of BC transport over Northeast Asia and Eastern Europe. Nevertheless, we find that the overall climatological circulation patterns simulated...

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22,Microphysical Properties of Clouds(CARES)(CARES):

  6. Estimating body mass of pumas (Puma concolor) Brian D. JansenA,B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the relationships between body measurements and body mass for 58 pumas in the Black Hills. We then applied our top equation to eight pumas that we captured in areas outside the Black Hills study population. Key results. We, Weckerly et al. 1987), East African ungulates (Talbot and McCulloch 1965), elk (Cervus elaphus, Millspaugh

  7. Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Grohse, E.W.

    1995-06-27

    A process is described for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol. 3 figs.

  8. Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1995-01-01

    A process for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol.

  9. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksi?, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinovi?, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzi?, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Kadler, M; Schulz, R; Ros, E; Bach, U; Krauß, F; Wilms, J

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry, but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here, we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC telescopes revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20\\% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet.

  10. Three-dimensional black holes, gravitational solitons, kinks and wormholes for BHT massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julio Oliva; David Tempo; Ricardo Troncoso

    2009-07-03

    The theory of massive gravity in three dimensions recently proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm and Townsend (BHT) is considered. At the special case when the theory admits a unique maximally symmetric solution, a conformally flat space that contains black holes and gravitational solitons for any value of the cosmological constant is found. For negative cosmological constant, the black hole is characterized in terms of the mass and the "gravitational hair" parameter, providing a lower bound for the mass. For negative mass parameter, the black hole acquires an inner horizon, and the entropy vanishes at the extremal case. Gravitational solitons and kinks, being regular everywhere, are obtained from a double Wick rotation of the black hole. A wormhole solution in vacuum that interpolates between two static universes of negative spatial curvature is obtained as a limiting case of the gravitational soliton with a suitable identification. The black hole and the gravitational soliton fit within a set of relaxed asymptotically AdS conditions as compared with the ones of Brown and Henneaux. In the case of positive cosmological constant the black hole possesses an event and a cosmological horizon, whose mass is bounded from above. Remarkably, the temperatures of the event and the cosmological horizons coincide, and at the extremal case one obtains the analogue of the Nariai solution, $dS_{2}\\times S^{1}$. A gravitational soliton is also obtained through a double Wick rotation of the black hole. The Euclidean continuation of these solutions describes instantons with vanishing Euclidean action. For vanishing cosmological constant the black hole and the gravitational soliton are asymptotically locally flat spacetimes. The rotating solutions can be obtained by boosting the previous ones in the $t-\\phi$ plane.

  11. Thermal Action and Specific Heat of the Five-Dimensional Non-Extremal Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shijong Ryang

    1997-01-28

    We construct the Euclidean on-shell action for the five-dimensional non-extremal black hole with multiple electric charges. We show that this thermal action agrees with one half of the entropy. This agreement is argued to be related to the generalized Smarr formula of the five-dimensional black hole mass. Through the calculation of the specific heat far off extremality we observe that a phase transition occurs.

  12. Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes: Theoretical and Experimental Challenges

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    A network of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/...) is currently taking data near its planned sensitivity. Coalescing black hole binaries are among the most promising, and most exciting, gravitational wave sources for these detectors. The talk will review the theoretical and experimental challenges that must be met in order to successfully detect gravitational waves from coalescing black hole binaries, and to be able to reliably measure the physical parameters of the source (masses, spins, ...).

  13. Short-carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy as a piezoresistive strain sensor This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    sense reversible strain and (ii) in the form of a polymer- matrix composite with an electrically include polymer-matrix composites containing contin- uous carbon fibers [l], carbon black [2-4], metal particles [3] and short carbon fibers [4], and ceramic-matrix com- positescontaining silicon carbide

  14. Energy extraction from boosted black holes: Penrose process, jets, and the membrane at infinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert F. Penna

    2015-04-15

    Numerical simulations indicate that black holes carrying linear momentum and/or orbital momentum can power jets. The jets extract the kinetic energy stored in the black hole's motion. This could provide an important electromagnetic counterpart to gravitational wave searches. We develop the theory underlying these jets. In particular, we derive the analogues of the Penrose process and the Blandford-Znajek jet power prediction for boosted black holes. The jet power we find is $(v/2M)^2 \\Phi^2/(4\\pi)$, where $v$ is the hole's velocity, $M$ is its mass, and $\\Phi$ is the magnetic flux. We show that energy extraction from boosted black holes is conceptually similar to energy extraction from spinning black holes. However, we highlight two key technical differences: in the boosted case, jet power is no longer defined with respect to a Killing vector, and the relevant notion of black hole mass is observer dependent. We derive a new version of the membrane paradigm in which the membrane lives at infinity rather than the horizon and we show that this is useful for interpreting jets from boosted black holes. Our jet power prediction and the assumptions behind it can be tested with future numerical simulations.

  15. General Nonextremal Rotating Black Holes in Minimal Five-Dimensional Gauged Supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chong, Z.-W.; Lue, H.; Pope, C.N.; Cvetic, M.

    2005-10-14

    We construct the general solution for nonextremal charged rotating black holes in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity. They are characterized by four nontrivial parameters: namely, the mass, the charge, and the two independent rotation parameters. The metrics in general describe regular rotating black holes, providing the parameters lie in appropriate ranges so that naked singularities and closed timelike curves (CTCs) are avoided. We calculate the conserved energy, angular momenta, and charge for the solutions, and show how supersymmetric solutions arise in a Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield limit. These have naked CTCs in general, but for special choices of the parameters we obtain new regular supersymmetric black holes or smooth topological solitons.

  16. Using radio emission to detect isolated and quiescent accreting black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2005-03-05

    We discuss the implications of new relations between black holes' masses, X-ray luminosities and radio luminosities, as well as the properties of the next generation of radio telescopes, for the goal of finding isolated accreting black holes. Because accreting black holes have radio-to-X-ray flux ratios that increase with decreasing luminosity in Eddington units, and because deep surveys over large fields of view should be possible with planned instrumentation such as LOFAR, radio surveys should be significantly more efficient than X-ray surveys for finding these objects.

  17. Thermodynamics of a charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; H. Farahani

    2013-08-07

    In this paper we study thermodynamics, statistics and spectroscopic aspects of a charged black hole with a scalar hair coupled to the gravity in (2+1) dimensions. We obtained effects of the black hole charge and scalar field on the thermodynamical and statistical quantities. We find that scalar charge may increase entropy, temperature and probability, while may decrease black hole mass, free and internal energy. Also electric charge increases probability and decreases temperature and internal energy. Also we investigate stability of the system and find that the thermodynamical stability exists.

  18. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-75 Sediment Trap Study in the Green Bay Mass Balance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Mass and Organic Carbon Fluxes, Resuspension, and Particle Settling Velocities Brian J. Eadie Gerald L ................................................................................................. 23 4.5 Flux Profiles and Estimates of Sediment Resuspension

  19. Positive specific heat of the quantum corrected dilaton black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Grumiller; W. Kummer; D. V. Vassilevich

    2003-06-20

    Path integral quantization of dilaton gravity in two dimensions is applied to the CGHS model to the first nontrivial order in matter loops. Our approach is background independent as geometry is integrated out exactly. The result is an effective shift of the Killing norm: the apparent horizon becomes smaller. The Hawking temperature which is constant to leading order receives a quantum correction. As a consequence, the specific heat becomes positive and proportional to the square of the black hole mass.

  20. Detectability of Gravitational Radiation from Prompt and Delayed Star Collapse to a Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano Palomba

    2001-01-31

    We consider the emission of gravitational waves in the two proposed models for the collapse of a massive star to a black hole: the prompt collapse, in which nearly all the star collapses to a black hole in a dynamical time scale, and the delayed collapse, in which a light black hole, or a neutron star, which subsequently accretes matter, forms due to the fall-back achieving, in the neutron star case, the critical mass for black hole formation. Recent simulations strongly support this last scenario. We show that, due to the slowness of fall-back, in the delayed collapse the main burst of gravitational radiation is emitted depending on the parameters, mass and angular momentum, of the initial, light, black hole. We estimate, under different assumptions, the detectability of the emitted gravitational waves showing that such kind of collapse is not particularly suited for detection by forthcoming interferometric detectors. Detectors with high sensitivity at frequencies greater than ~4-5 kHz would be well suited for this kind of sources. We calculate also the final mass distribution function of single black holes.

  1. The Efficiency of Gravitational Bremsstrahlung Production in the Collision of Two Schwarzschild Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Aranha; H. P. de Oliveira; I. Damião Soares; E. V. Tonini

    2008-04-22

    We examine the efficiency of gravitational bremsstrahlung production in the process of head-on collision of two boosted Schwarzschild black holes. We constructed initial data for the characteristic initial value problem in Robinson-Trautman spacetimes, that represent two instantaneously stationary Schwarzschild black holes in motion towards each other with the same velocity. The Robinson-Trautman equation was integrated for these initial data using a numerical code based on the Galerkin method. The final resulting configuration is a boosted black hole with Bondi mass greater than the sum of the individual mass of each initial black hole. Two relevant aspects of the process are presented. The first relates the efficiency $\\Delta$ of the energy extraction by gravitational wave emission to the mass of the final black hole. This relation is fitted by a distribution function of non-extensive thermostatistics with entropic parameter $q \\simeq 1/2$; the result extends and validates analysis based on the linearized theory of gravitational wave emission. The second is a typical bremsstrahlung angular pattern in the early period of emission at the wave zone, a consequence of the deceleration of the black holes as they coalesce; this pattern evolves to a quadrupole form for later times.

  2. Carbon investment funds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-01-15

    The report is a study of the development of funds to invest in the purchase of carbon credits. It takes a look at the growing market for carbon credits, the rise of carbon investment funds, and the current state of carbon investing. Topics covered in the report include: Overview of climate change, greenhouse gases, and the Kyoto Protocols. Analysis of the alternatives for reducing carbon emissions including nitrous oxide reduction, coal mine methane capture and carbon capture and storage; Discussion of the different types of carbon credits; Discussion of the basics of carbon trading; Evaluation of the current status of carbon investing; and Profiles of 37 major carbon investment funds worldwide.

  3. Strings, higher curvature corrections, and black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mohaupt

    2005-12-05

    We review old and recent results on subleading contributions to black hole entropy in string theory.

  4. Physics: the big black box Mirror conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalieri, Renzo

    Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture A look into the mirror (I) an overview of Mirror Symmetry #12;Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture Outline 1 Physics: the big black box 2 Math Symmetry #12;Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture A slogan Mirror Symmetry is a correspondence

  5. AdS and Lifshitz Black Holes in Conformal and Einstein-Weyl Gravities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Lu; Y. Pang; C. N. Pope; J. Vazquez-Poritz

    2012-04-14

    We study black hole solutions in extended gravities with higher-order curvature terms, including conformal and Einstein-Weyl gravities. In addition to the usual AdS vacuum, the theories admit Lifshitz and Schr\\"odinger vacua. The AdS black hole in conformal gravity contains an additional parameter over and above the mass, which may be interpreted as a massive spin-2 hair. By considering the first law of thermodynamics, we find that it is necessary to introduce an associated additional intensive/extensive pair of thermodynamic quantities. We also obtain new Liftshitz black holes in conformal gravity and study their thermodynamics. We use a numerical approach to demonstrate that AdS black holes beyond the Schwarzschild-AdS solution exist in Einstein-Weyl gravity. We also demonstrate the existence of asymptotically Lifshitz black holes in Einstein-Weyl gravity. The Lifshitz black holes arise at the boundary of the parameter ranges for the AdS black holes. Outside the range, the solutions develop naked singularities. The asymptotically AdS and Lifshitz black holes provide an interesting phase transition, in the corresponding boundary field theory, from a relativistic Lorentzian system to a non-relativistic Lifshitz system.

  6. Mass and Angular Momentum of Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2004-10-13

    For very fast spinning black holes with a>0.9953 the orbital velocity of a test particle unexpectly shows a positive radial gradient for low orbits, an effect of GR which has been overlooked so far. For a=0.99616 the maximum radial change of the orbital velocity equals the radial epicyclic frequency, which in turn is in a 1:3 resonance with the vertical epicyclic frequency. Application to Sgr A* using the quasi-periodic oscillations recently measured suggest that the mass of Sgr A* is 3.28 +/- 0.13 million solar masses.

  7. A Fundamental Relation Between Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Ferrarese; David Merritt

    2000-08-09

    The masses of supermassive black holes correlate almost perfectly with the velocity dispersions of their host bulges, M(BH) ~ sigma^alpha, where alpha =4.8 +/- 0.5$. The relation is much tighter than the relation between M(BH) and bulge luminosity, with a scatter no larger than expected on the basis of measurement error alone. Black hole masses estimated by Magorrian et al. (1998) lie systematically above the M(BH)-sigma relation defined by more accurate mass estimates, some by as much as two orders of magnitude. The tightness of the M(BH)-sigma relation implies a strong link between black hole formation and the properties of the stellar bulge.

  8. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01

    Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

  9. Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

  10. Thermodynamics of regular black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2008-09-21

    We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

  11. Black Holes and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2006-02-17

    Supermassive black holes inhabit galactic nuclei, and their presence influences in crucial ways the evolution of the stellar distribution. The low-density cores observed in bright galaxies are probably a result of black hole infall, while steep density cusps like those at the Galactic center are a result of energy exchange between stars moving in the gravitational field of the single black hole. Loss-cone dynamics are substantially more complex in galactic nuclei than in collisionally-relaxed systems like globular clusters due to the wider variety of possible geometries and orbital populations. The rate of star-black hole interactions has begun to be constrained through observations of energetic events associated with stellar tidal disruptions.

  12. Thermodynamic Product Formula for Ho\\v{r}ava Lifshitz Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-01-01

    We examine the thermodynamic properties of inner and outer horizons in the background of Ho\\v{r}ava Lifshitz black hole. We compute the \\emph{horizon radii product, the surface area product, the entropy product, the surface temperature product, the Komar energy product and the specific heat product} for both the horizons of said black hole. We show that surface area product, entropy product and irreducible mass product are \\emph{universal} quantities, whereas the surface temperature product, Komar energy product and specific heat product are \\emph{not universal} quantities because they all are depends on mass parameter. We also observe that the \\emph{First law} of black hole thermodynamics and \\emph {Smarr-Gibbs-Duhem } relations do not hold for this black hole. The underlying reason behind this failure due to the scale invariance of the coupling constant. We further derive the \\emph{Smarr mass formula} and \\emph{Christodolou-Ruffini mass formula} for such black hole spacetime. Moreover we study the stability...

  13. Transition from adiabatic inspiral to plunge into a spinning black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesden, Michael

    2011-05-15

    A test particle of mass {mu} on a bound geodesic of a Kerr black hole of mass M>>{mu} will slowly inspiral as gravitational radiation extracts energy and angular momentum from its orbit. This inspiral can be considered adiabatic when the orbital period is much shorter than the time scale on which energy is radiated, and quasicircular when the radial velocity is much less than the azimuthal velocity. Although the inspiral always remains adiabatic provided {mu}<black hole's spin changes following a test-particle merger, and can be extrapolated to help predict the mass and spin of the final black hole produced in finite-mass-ratio black-hole mergers. Our new contribution is particularly important for nearly maximally spinning black holes, as it can affect whether a merger produces a naked singularity.

  14. The Hawking cascade from a black hole is extremely sparse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finnian Gray; Sebastian Schuster; Alexander Van-Brunt; Matt Visser

    2015-06-12

    The Hawking flux from a black hole, (at least as seen from large distances), is extremely sparse and thin, with the average time between emission of successive Hawking quanta being hundreds of times larger than the natural timescale set by the energies of the emitted quanta. Some aspects of this result have been known for over 30 years, but have been largely forgotten, possibly because authors focussed mainly on the late-time high-temperature regime. We shall instead focus on the early-stage low-temperature regime, and shall both quantify and significantly extend these observations in a number of different ways. First we shall identify several natural dimensionless figures of merit, and thereby compare the mean time between emission of successive Hawking quanta to several quite natural timescales that can be associated with the emitted quanta, demonstrating that ratios of 300 or more are typical for emission of photons or gravitons from a Schwarzschild black hole. Furthermore these ratios are independent of the mass of the black hole as it slowly evolves. The situation for fermion emission (massless neutrinos) is actually worse. Second, we shall then show that the situation for Reissner-Nordstrom, Kerr, Kerr-Newman and "dirty" black holes is even worse. Third, we consider the effects of particle rest mass. Overall, the Hawking quanta are seen to be dribbling out of the black hole one at a time, in an extremely slow cascade of 3-body decays. This implies that the Hawking flux is subject to "shot noise". Observationally, the Planck spectrum of the Hawking flux can only be determined by collecting and integrating data over a very long time. We conclude by connecting these points back to various kinematic aspects of the Hawking evaporation process.

  15. The History of Nuclidic Masses and of their Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Audi

    2006-02-08

    This paper is centered on some historical aspects of nuclear masses, and their relations to major discoveries. Besides nuclear reactions and decays, the heart of mass measurements lies in mass spectrometry, the early history of which will be reviewed first. I shall then give a short history of the mass unit which has not always been defined as one twelfth of the carbon-12 mass. When combining inertial masses from mass spectrometry with energy differences obtained in reactions and decays, the conversion factor between the two is essential. The history of the evaluation of the nuclear masses (actually atomic masses) is only slightly younger than that of the mass measurements themselves. In their modern form, mass evaluations can be traced back to 1955. Prior to 1955, several tables were established, the oldest one in 1935.

  16. Black Boundary Lines: Race, Class and Gender among Black Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales, Erica

    2012-01-01

    C. 1994. Behind the Mule: Race and Class in African AmericanHarlemworld: Doing Race and Class in Contemporary BlackBlue-Chip Black: Race, Class and Status in the New Black

  17. Ordered nanoporous carbon for increasing CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Hye-Min; Lee, Seul-Yi [Korea CCS R and D Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeongro, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Korea CCS R and D Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeongro, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Ordered nanoporous carbons (ONCs) were prepared using a soft-templating method. The prepared ONCs materials were subjected to a controlled carbonization temperature over the temperature range, 700-1000 Degree-Sign C, to increase the specific surface area and total pore volume of ordered nanoporous carbon followed by carbonization of the phenolic resin. ONCs materials synthesized at various carbonization temperatures were used as adsorbents to improve the CO{sub 2} adsorption efficiency. The surface properties of the ONCs materials were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The structural properties of the ONCs materials were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The textural properties of the ONCs materials were examined using the N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms according to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity was measured by CO{sub 2} isothermal adsorption at 298 K/30 bar and 298 K/1 bar. The carbonization temperature was found to have a major effect on the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity, resulting from the specific surface area and total pore volumes of the ONCs materials. - Graphical abstract: This schematic diagram described synthesis of ONCs. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ONCs materials can be prepared readily using the direct-triblock-copolymer-templating method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distributions show that prominent development can be observed around the micro-pore region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The soft-templating method provides opportunities for controlling the pore structure of ONCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From thermal power plants for CO2 capture by adsorption technology, is a new direction.

  18. Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Fiber Consortium SHARE Carbon Fiber Consortium Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium The Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium was established in 2011 to...

  19. Observational Characteristics of the Final Stages of Evaporating Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, J H; Linnemann, J T; Marinelli, S S; Yapici, T; Tollefson, K

    2015-01-01

    Many early universe theories predict the creation of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs). The PBHs could have masses ranging from the Planck mass to 10^5 solar masses or higher depending on the formation scenario. Hawking showed that any Black Hole (BH) has a temperature which is inversely proportional to its mass. Hence a sufficiently small BH will thermodynamically radiate particles at an ever-increasing rate, continually decreasing its mass and raising its temperature. The final moments of this evaporation phase should be explosive. In this work, we investigate the final few seconds of the BH burst using the Standard Model of particle physics and calculate the energy dependent burst time profiles in the GeV/TeV range. We use the HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory as a case study and calculate PBH burst light curves which would be observed by HAWC.

  20. Sensitivity Comparison of Searches for Binary Black Hole Coalescences with Ground-based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satya Mohapatra; Laura Cadonati; Sarah Caudill; James Clark; Chad Hanna; Sergey Klimenko; Chris Pankow; Ruslan Vaulin; Gabriele Vedovato; Salvatore Vitale

    2014-05-26

    Searches for gravitational-wave transients from binary black hole coalescences typically rely on one of two approaches: matched filtering with templates and morphology-independent excess power searches. Multiple algorithmic implementations in the analysis of data from the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave interferometers have used different strategies for the suppression of non-Gaussian noise transients, and targeted different regions of the binary black hole parameter space. In this paper we compare the sensitivity of three such algorithms: matched filtering with full coalescence templates, matched filtering with ringdown templates and a morphology-independent excess power search. The comparison is performed at a fixed false alarm rate and relies on Monte-carlo simulations of binary black hole coalescences for spinning, non-precessing systems with total mass 25-350 solar mass, which covers the parameter space of stellar mass and intermediate mass black hole binaries. We find that in the mass range of 25 -100 solar mass the sensitive distance of the search, marginalized over source parameters, is best with matched filtering to full waveform templates, to within 10 percent at a false alarm rate of 3 events per year. In the mass range of 100-350 solar mass, the same comparison favors the morphology-independent excess power search to within 20 percent. The dependence on mass and spin is also explored.

  1. Microscopic quantum structure of black hole and vacuum versus quantum statistical origin of gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shun-Jin Wang

    2014-10-28

    The Planckon densely piled model of vacuum is proposed. Based on this model, the microscopic quantum structure of Schwarzschild black hole and quantum statistical origin of its gravity are studied. The cutoff of black hole horizon leads to Casimir effect inside the horizon. This effect makes the inside vacuum has less zero quantum fluctuation energy than that of outside vacuum and the spin 1/2 radiation hole excitations are resulted inside the horizon. The mean energy of the radiation hole excitations is related to the temperature decrease of the Hawking-Unruh type by the period law of the Fermion temperature greens function and a temperature difference as well as gravity are created on the horizon. A dual relation of the gravity potentials between inside and outside regions of the black hole is found. An attractor behaviour of the horizon surface is unveiled. The gravity potential inside the black hole is linear in radial coordinate and no singularity exists at the origin of the black hole, in contrast to the conventional conjecture. All the particles absorbed by the black hole have fallen down to the horizon and converted into spin 1/2 radiation quanta with the mean energy related to the Hawking-Unruh temperature, the thermodynamic equilibrium and the mechanical balance make the radiation quanta be tightly bound in the horizon. The gravitation mass $2M$ and physical mass $M$ of the black hole are calculated. The calculated entropy of the black hole is well consistent with Hawking. Outside the horizon, there exist thermodynamic non-equilibrium and mechanical non-balance which lead to an outward centrifugal energy flow and an inward gravitation energy flow. The lost vacuum energy in the negative gravitation potential region has been removed to the black hole surface to form a spherical Planckon shell with the thickness of Planckon diameter so that energy conservation is guaranteed.

  2. Fishing in Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Brotas

    2006-09-01

    The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

  3. INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE INDUCED QUENCHING OF MASS SEGREGATION IN STAR CLUSTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    -light relaxation time P1 Gyr, which is required to guarantee efficient energy equipartition due to two- body). If this is indeed the case, there are significant consequences for ultra- luminous X-ray sources, gravitational wave Marel [2004] and Miller & Colbert [2004] for an overview). Definitive evidence for IMBHs has, however

  4. Black hole free energy during charged collapse: a numerical study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugues Beauchesne; Ariel Edery

    2012-05-19

    We perform a numerical investigation of the thermodynamics during the collapse of a charged (complex) scalar field to a Reissner-Nordstr\\"om (RN) black hole in isotropic coordinates. Numerical work on gravitational collapse in isotropic coordinates has recently shown that the negative of the total Lagrangian approaches the Helmholtz free energy F= E-TS of a Schwarzschild black hole at late times of the collapse (where E is the black hole mass, T the temperature and S the entropy). The relevant thermodynamic potential for the RN black hole is the Gibbs free energy G=E-TS-$\\Phi_H$ Q where Q is the charge and $\\Phi_H$ the electrostatic potential at the outer horizon. In charged collapse, there is a large outgoing matter wave which prevents the exterior from settling quickly to a static state. However, the interior region is not affected significantly by the wave. We find numerically that the interior contribution to the Gibbs free energy is entirely gravitational and accumulates in a thin shell just inside the horizon. The entropy is gravitational in origin and one observes dynamically that it resides on the horizon. We also compare the numerical value of the interior Lagrangian to the expected analytical value of the interior Gibbs free energy for different initial states and we find that they agree to within 10-13%. The two values are approaching each other so that their difference decreases with more evolution time.

  5. Bulk emission of scalars by a rotating black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Casals; S. R. Dolan; P. Kanti; E. Winstanley

    2008-07-17

    We study in detail the scalar-field Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by a higher-dimensional, rotating black hole. We numerically compute the angular eigenvalues, and solve the radial equation of motion in order to find transmission factors. The latter are found to be enhanced by the angular momentum of the black hole, and to exhibit the well-known effect of superradiance. The corresponding power spectra for scalar fields show an enhancement with the number of dimensions, as in the non-rotating case. We compute the total mass loss rate of the black hole for a variety of black-hole angular momenta and bulk dimensions, and find that, in all cases, the bulk emission remains significantly smaller than the brane emission. The angular-momentum loss rate is also computed and found to have a smaller value in the bulk than on the brane. We present accurate bulk-to-brane emission ratios for a range of scenarios.

  6. Quantum Jump from Singularity to Outside of Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dündar, Furkan Semih

    2015-01-01

    Considering the role of black hole singularity in quantum evolution, a resolution to the firewall paradox is presented. It is emphasized that if an observer has the singularity as a part of his spacetime, then the semi-classical evolution would be non-unitary as viewed by him. Specifically, a free-falling observer inside the black hole would have a Hilbert space with non-unitary evolution; a quantum jump for particles encountering the singularity to outside of the horizon as part of late radiations in black hole evaporation. Accordingly, we elaborate the first postulate of black hole complementarity: freely falling observers who pass through the event horizon would have non-unitarity evolutions. The non-unitary evolution is such that it does not have physically measurable effects for them. Besides, no information would be lost in singularity. Taking the modified picture into account, the firewall paradox {can be} resolved, respecting No Drama. A by-product of our modification is that roughly half of the mass ...

  7. Photophysics of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsonidze, Georgii G

    2007-01-01

    This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

  8. The Effect of Local Atmospheric Circulations on Daytime Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over a Pinus elliottii Canopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    The Effect of Local Atmospheric Circulations on Daytime Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over canopy, have been used to provide estimates of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) (Black et" transported from the below-canopy environment associated with cold-air drainage. Since then, advection has

  9. Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    #12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

  10. TOC Total organic carbon MBC Microbial biomass carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    C Carbon TOC Total organic carbon MBC Microbial biomass carbon Active C Pool Indicated by Light, the relationship between carbon dynamics including total organic carbon (TOC) storage, microbial biomass carbon and microbial biomass carbon in subsoil 4 years after rehabilitation · Microbial biomass carbon had a positive

  11. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

    1993-01-01

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  12. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smit, Berend

    2011-06-08

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  13. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to be less difficult than one could think of it.

  14. International black tea market integration and price discovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharmasena, Kalu Arachchillage Senarath Dhananjaya Bandara

    2004-09-30

    In this thesis we study three basic issues related to international black tea markets: Are black tea markets integrated? Where is the price of black tea discovered? Are there leaders and followers in black tea markets? We ...

  15. The role of stellar relaxation in the formation and evolution of the first massive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yajima, Hidenobu

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations on the formation of massive black holes with 10^5 Msun at z > 6 that can be the seeds of supermassive black holes at z > 6. Under the assumption of compact star cluster formation in merging galaxies, star clusters in haloes of 10^8 ~ 10^9 Msun undergo rapid core-collapse leading to the formation of very massive stars (VMSs) with ~1000 Msun which directly collapse into black holes with similar masses. Star clusters in halos of > 10^9 Msun experience type-II supernovae before the formation of VMSs due to long core-collapse time scales. We also model the subsequent growth of black holes via accretion of residual stars in clusters. 2-body relaxation efficiently re-fills the loss cones of stellar orbits at larger radii and resonant relaxation at small radii is the main driver for accretion of stars onto black holes. As a result, more than ninety percent of stars in the initial cluster are swallowed by the central black holes before z=6. Using dark matter merger trees we derive black hole ma...

  16. Constraining Alternate Models of Black Holes: Type I X-ray Bursts on Accreting Fermion-Fermion and Boson-Fermion Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye-Fei Yuan; Ramesh Narayan; Martin J. Rees

    2004-01-26

    The existence of black holes remains open to doubt until other conceivable options are excluded. With this motivation, we consider a model of a compact star in which most of the mass consists of dark particles of some kind, and a small fraction of the mass is in the form of ordinary nucleonic gas. The gas does not interact with the dark matter other than via gravity, but collects at the center as a separate fermionic fluid component. Depending on whether the dark mass is made of fermions or bosons, the objects may be called fermion-fermion stars or boson-fermion stars, respectively. For appropriate choices of the mass of the dark matter particles, these objects are viable models of black hole candidates in X-ray binaries. We consider models with a dark mass of 10 solar masses and a range of gas mass from 10^{-6} to nearly one solar mass, and analyse the bursting properties of the models when they accrete gas. We show that all the models would experience thermonuclear Type I X-ray bursts at appropriate mass accretion rates. Since no Type I bursts have been reported from black hole candidates, the models are ruled out. The case for identifying black hole candidates in X-ray binaries as true black holes is thus strengthened.

  17. The vacuum bubbles in de Sitter background and black hole pair creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Wonwoo Lee

    2009-10-07

    We study the possible types of the nucleation of vacuum bubbles. We classify vacuum bubbles in de Sitter background and present some numerical solutions. The thin-wall approximation is employed to obtain the nucleation rate and the radius of vacuum bubbles. With careful analysis we confirm that Parke's formula is also applicable to the large true vacuum bubbles. The nucleation of the false vacuum bubble in de Sitter background is also evaluated. The tunneling process in the potential with degenerate vacua is analyzed as the limiting cases of the large true vacuum bubble and false vacuum bubble. Next, we consider the pair creation of black holes in the background of bubble solutions. We obtain static bubble wall solutions of junction equation with black hole pair. The masses of created black holes are uniquely determined by the cosmological constant and surface tension on the wall. Finally, we obtain the rate of pair creation of black holes.

  18. Rotating black holes in a draining bathtub: superradiant scattering of gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauricio Richartz; Angus Prain; Stefano Liberati; Silke Weinfurtner

    2015-06-05

    In a draining rotating fluid flow background, surface perturbations behave as a scalar field on a rotating effective black hole spacetime. We propose a new model for the background flow which takes into account the varying depth of the water. Numerical integration of the associated Klein-Gordon equation using accessible experimental parameters shows that gravity waves in an appropriate frequency range are amplified through the mechanism of superradiance. Our numerical results suggest that the observation of this phenomenon in a common fluid mechanical system is within experimental reach. Unlike the case of wave scattering around Kerr black holes, which depends only on one dimensionless background parameter (the ratio $a/M$ between the specific angular momentum and the mass of the black hole), our system depends on two dimensionless background parameters, namely the normalized angular velocity and surface gravity at the effective black hole horizon.

  19. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  20. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  1. Energy on black hole spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi

    2012-07-18

    We consider the issue of defining energy for test particles on a background black hole spacetime. We revisit the different notions of energy as defined by different observers. The existence of a time-like isometry allows for the notion of a total conserved energy to be well defined, and subsequently the notion of a gravitational potential energy is also meaningful. We then consider the situation in which the test particle is adsorbed by the black hole, and analyze the energetics in detail. In particular, we show that the notion of horizon energy es defined by the isolated horizons formalism provides a satisfactory notion of energy compatible with the particle's conserved energy. As another example, we comment a recent proposal to define energy of the black hole as seen by an observer at rest. This account is intended to be pedagogical and is aimed at the level of and as a complement to the standard textbooks on the subject.

  2. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; Kh. Jafarzade

    2015-06-23

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  3. Charged rotating dilaton black strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M.H.; Farhangkhah, N.

    2005-02-15

    In this paper we, first, present a class of charged rotating solutions in four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity with zero and Liouville-type potentials. We find that these solutions can present a black hole/string with two regular horizons, an extreme black hole or a naked singularity provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitable. We also compute the conserved and thermodynamic quantities, and show that they satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Second, we obtain the (n+1)-dimensional rotating solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity with Liouville-type potential. We find that these solutions can present black branes, naked singularities or spacetimes with cosmological horizon if one chooses the parameters of the solutions correctly. Again, we find that the thermodynamic quantities of these solutions satisfy the first law of thermodynamics.

  4. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sachdev, Subir [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  5. Radiation transport around Kerr black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnittman, Jeremy David

    2005-01-01

    This Thesis describes the basic framework of a relativistic ray-tracing code for analyzing accretion processes around Kerr black holes. We begin in Chapter 1 with a brief historical summary of the major advances in black ...

  6. Does phantom energy produce black hole?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rahaman; A. Ghosh; M. Kalam

    2006-12-23

    We have found an exact solution of spherically symmetrical Einstein equations describing a black hole with a special type phantom energy source. It is surprising to note that our solution is analogous to Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole.

  7. Estimating parameters of binary black holes from gravitational-wave observations of their inspiral, merger and ringdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archisman Ghosh; Walter Del Pozzo; Parameswaran Ajith

    2015-05-21

    We characterize the expected statistical errors with which the parameters of black-hole binaries can be measured from gravitational-wave (GW) observations of their inspiral, merger and ringdown by a network of second-generation ground-based GW observatories. We simulate a population of black-hole binaries with uniform distribution of component masses in the interval $(3,80)~M_\\odot$, distributed uniformly in comoving volume, with isotropic orientations. From signals producing signal-to-noise ratio $\\geq 5$ in at least two detectors, we estimate the posterior distributions of the binary parameters using the Bayesian parameter estimation code LALInference. The GW signals will be redshifted due to the cosmological expansion and we measure only the "redshifted" masses. By assuming a cosmology, it is possible to estimate the gravitational masses by inferring the redshift from the measured posterior of the luminosity distance. We find that the measurement of the gravitational masses will be in general dominated by the error in measuring the luminosity distance. In spite of this, the component masses of more than $50\\%$ of the population can be measured with accuracy better than $\\sim 25\\%$ using the Advanced LIGO-Virgo network. Additionally, the mass of the final black hole can be measured with median accuracy $\\sim 18\\%$. Spin of the final black hole can be measured with median accuracy $\\sim 5\\% ~(17\\%)$ for binaries with non-spinning (aligned-spin) black holes. Additional detectors in Japan and India significantly improve the accuracy of sky localization, and moderately improve the estimation of luminosity distance, and hence, that of all mass parameters. We discuss the implication of these results on the observational evidence of intermediate-mass black holes and the estimation of cosmological parameters using GW observations.

  8. Introduction to Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henry Lambert

    2014-01-16

    These lecture notes are an elementary and pedagogical introduction to the black hole evaporation, based on a lecture given by the author at the Ninth Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics and are intended for PhD students. First, quantum field theory in curved spacetime is studied and tools needed for the remaining of the course are introduced. Then, quantum field theory in Rindler spacetime in 1+1 dimensions and in the spacetime of a spherically collapsing star are considered, leading to Unruh and Hawking effects, respectively. Finally, some consequences such as thermodynamics of black holes and information loss paradox are discussed.

  9. Black hole energy extraction via stationary scalar clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson-Gerow, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    We study scalar field configurations around Kerr black holes with a time-independent energy-momentum tensor. These stationary `scalar clouds', confined near the black hole (BH) by their own mass or a mirror at fixed radius, exist at the threshold for energy extraction via superradiance. Motivated by the electromagnetic Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism, we explore whether scalar clouds could serve as a proxy for the force-free magnetosphere in the BZ process. We find that a stationary energy-extracting scalar cloud solution exists when the reflecting mirror is replaced by a semi-permeable surface which allows the cloud to radiate some energy to infinity while maintaining self-sustained superradiance. The radial energy flux displays the same behaviour for rapidly rotating holes as magnetohydrodynamic simulations predict for the BZ mechanism.

  10. Black hole energy extraction via stationary scalar clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan Wilson-Gerow; Adam Ritz

    2015-09-22

    We study scalar field configurations around Kerr black holes with a time-independent energy-momentum tensor. These stationary `scalar clouds', confined near the black hole (BH) by their own mass or a mirror at fixed radius, exist at the threshold for energy extraction via superradiance. Motivated by the electromagnetic Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism, we explore whether scalar clouds could serve as a proxy for the force-free magnetosphere in the BZ process. We find that a stationary energy-extracting scalar cloud solution exists when the reflecting mirror is replaced by a semi-permeable surface which allows the cloud to radiate some energy to infinity while maintaining self-sustained superradiance. The radial energy flux displays the same behaviour for rapidly rotating holes as magnetohydrodynamic simulations predict for the BZ mechanism.

  11. 4d neutral dilatonic black holes and (4+p) dimensional nondilatonic black p-branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2000-01-11

    It is shown that, in contrast to the case of extreme 4d dilatonic black holes, 4d neutral dilatonic black holes with horizon singularities can not be interpreted as nonsingular nondilatonic black p-branes in (4+p) dimensions, regardless of the number of extra dimensions p. That is, extra dimensions do not remove naked singularities of 4d neutral dilatonic black holes.

  12. Thermal cycling effect on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a carbonate eutectic with alumina nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Sandhya

    2011-08-08

    The objective of this research was to measure the effect of thermal cycling on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a nanocomposite material consisting of a eutectic of lithium carbonate and potassium carbonate and 1% by mass alumina...

  13. Classical and thermodynamic stability of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Monteiro

    2010-06-28

    We consider the stability of black holes within both classical general relativity and the semiclassical thermodynamic description. In particular, we study linearised perturbations and their contribution to the gravitational partition function, addressing technical issues for charged (Reissner-Nordstrom) and rotating (Kerr-AdS) black holes. Exploring the connection between classical and thermodynamic stability, we find classical instabilities of Myers-Perry black holes and bifurcations to new black hole families.

  14. Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don N. Page

    2006-12-18

    A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

  15. The M(BH)-Sigma Relation for Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Laura Ferrarese

    2000-08-20

    We investigate the differences in the M(BH)-sigma relation derived recently by Ferrarese & Merritt (2000) and Gebhardt et al. (2000). The shallower slope found by the latter authors (3.75 vs. 4.8) is due partly to the use of a regression algorithm that ignores measurement errors, and partly to the value of the velocity dispersion adopted for a single galaxy, the Milky Way. A steeper relation is shown to provide a better fit to black hole masses derived from reverberation mapping studies. Combining the stellar dynamical, gas dynamical, and reverberation mapping mass estimates, we derive a best-fit relation M(BH) = 1.30 (+/- 0.36) X 10^8 (sigma_c/200)^{4.72(+/- 0.36)}, where M(BH) is in solar masses, and sigma in km/s.

  16. Black Holes in Galaxy Mergers: Evolution of Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip F. Hopkins; Lars Hernquist; Thomas J. Cox; Tiziana Di Matteo; Paul Martini; Brant Robertson; Volker Springel

    2005-06-13

    Based on numerical simulations of gas-rich galaxy mergers, we discuss a model in which quasar activity is tied to the self-regulated growth of supermassive black holes in galaxies. Nuclear inflow of gas attending a galaxy collision triggers a starburst and feeds black hole growth, but for most of the duration of the starburst, the black hole is heavily obscured by surrounding gas and dust which limits the visibility of the quasar, especially at optical and UV wavelengths. Eventually, feedback energy from accretion heats the gas and expels it in a powerful wind, leaving a 'dead quasar'. Between buried and dead phases there is a window during which the galaxy would be seen as a luminous quasar. Because the black hole mass, radiative output, and distribution of obscuring gas and dust all evolve strongly with time, the duration of this phase of observable quasar activity depends on both the waveband and imposed luminosity threshold. We determine the observed and intrinsic lifetimes as a function of luminosity and frequency, and calculate observable lifetimes ~10 Myr for bright quasars in the optical B-band, in good agreement with empirical estimates and much smaller than the black hole growth timescales ~100 Myr, naturally producing a substantial population of 'buried' quasars. However, observed and intrinsic energy outputs converge in the IR and hard X-ray bands as attenuation becomes weaker and chances of observation greatly increase. We obtain the distribution of column densities along sightlines in which the quasar is seen above a given luminosity, and find that our result agrees remarkably well with observed estimates of the column density distribution from the SDSS for appropriate luminosity thresholds. (Abridged)

  17. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    properties due to differences in origin (vegetation fires or coalproperties and partial oxidation of the surface of soil BC particles for vegetation fire and coal

  18. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    products that form primary volatiles [34-37]: biomass (solid) ? P YROLYSIS ? biochar ? liquid or oil (

  19. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    residue of experimental forest fires against the CO/CO 2as charcoal BC after forest fires. The soot BC yielded

  20. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    International, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open-high-elevation soils in Switzerland. Geophys. Res. Absrt.Zü t rich: Zurich, Switzerland, 2005. 88. Glaser, B. ;

  1. Enhanced Activated Carbon Cathode Performance for Microbial Fuel Cell by Blending Carbon Black

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    support and functions as a current collector. Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) is normally used cathodes can be made with a PTFE binder by batch18,20 or continuous (rolling) cold-pressing of the AC onto

  2. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    Ocean: biomass burning or fossil fuels? Geophys. Res. Lett.112. Jacobson, M.Z. Control of fossil-fuel particulate blackcombustion of biomass and fossil fuel in the absence of

  3. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    overview of BC extraction and measurement methods and BC useand thermal oxidation methods of BC extraction assume thatexisting BC extraction and analyses methods, followed by

  4. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01

    combustion of pine, oak and Eucalyptus wood was respectivelymass (FPM) for both oak and Eucalyptus and 1.4% FPM for pine44% of FPM for pine, oak and Eucalyptus wood. Figure 2. Size

  5. Scattering by regular black holes: Planar massless scalar waves impinging upon a Bardeen black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macedo, Caio F B; Crispino, Luís C B

    2015-01-01

    Singularities are common features of general relativity black holes. However, within general relativity, one can construct black holes that present no singularities. These regular black hole solutions can be achieved by, for instance, relaxing one of the energy conditions on the stress energy tensor sourcing the black hole. Some regular black hole solutions were found in the context of non-linear electrodynamics, the Bardeen black hole being the first one proposed. In this paper, we consider a planar massless scalar wave scattered by a Bardeen black hole. We compare the scattering cross section computed using a partial-wave description with the classical geodesic scattering of a stream of null geodesics, as well as with the semi-classical glory approximation. We obtain that, for some values of the corresponding black hole charge, the scattering cross section of a Bardeen black hole has a similar interference pattern of a Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole.

  6. Scattering by regular black holes: Planar massless scalar waves impinging upon a Bardeen black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caio F. B. Macedo; Ednilton S. de Oliveira; Luís C. B. Crispino

    2015-06-26

    Singularities are common features of general relativity black holes. However, within general relativity, one can construct black holes that present no singularities. These regular black hole solutions can be achieved by, for instance, relaxing one of the energy conditions on the stress energy tensor sourcing the black hole. Some regular black hole solutions were found in the context of non-linear electrodynamics, the Bardeen black hole being the first one proposed. In this paper, we consider a planar massless scalar wave scattered by a Bardeen black hole. We compare the scattering cross section computed using a partial-wave description with the classical geodesic scattering of a stream of null geodesics, as well as with the semi-classical glory approximation. We obtain that, for some values of the corresponding black hole charge, the scattering cross section of a Bardeen black hole has a similar interference pattern of a Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole.

  7. New approaches to black holes Eric Gourgoulhon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    References Eric Gourgoulhon (LUTH) New approaches to black holes Okinawa Nat. Col. Tech., 17 Aug 2008 2 / 36 Gourgoulhon (LUTH) New approaches to black holes Okinawa Nat. Col. Tech., 17 Aug 2008 3 / 36 #12;Local (2006)] Eric Gourgoulhon (LUTH) New approaches to black holes Okinawa Nat. Col. Tech., 17 Aug 2008 4

  8. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

    1998-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  9. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

    1999-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Based Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Mian; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-11-01

    This review article provides a comprehensive review on sensors and biosensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  11. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  12. Carbon Monoxide Environmental Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Workgroup on Carbon Monoxide Surveillance Formed in April 2005 Membership: EPHT grantees Academic

  13. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Charles David; Das, Sujit; Jeon, Dr. Saeil

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  14. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  15. Thermodynamics of a higher dimensional noncommutative anti-de Sitter-Einstein-Born-infeld black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angélica González; Román Linares; Marco Maceda; Oscar Sánchez-Santos

    2015-08-21

    We analyze noncommutative deformations of a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter-Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole. Two models based on noncommutative inspired distributions of mass and charge are discussed and their thermodynamical properties are calculated. In the (3+1)-dimensional case, the equation of state and the Gibbs energy function of each model are found.

  16. Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests Jeffrey Q. Chambers,1 * Jeremy I carbon sink is an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity (4), which transfers bio- mass from and lower biomass stocks (5). Here, we quantify hurricane Katrina's carbon impact on Gulf Coast forests

  17. Carbon nanofiber supercapacitors with large areal capacitances James R. McDonough,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    nickel foam. The 3D porous substrates facilitate a mass loading of active electrodes and per an annealing-free CNF growth process that minimizes undesirable nickel carbide formation. Superior per the performance of carbon-based SCs, carbon nanofibers CNFs and carbon nanotubes CNTs have been studied immensely

  18. Uncertainties and novel prospects in the study of the soil carbon dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4100, USA b Wetland Ecology Program, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee the component fluxes of the global carbon cycle and for studying the soil carbon cycle. Most significant development in the soil carbon cycle study is the application of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS

  19. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  20. From Pinholes to Black Holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2014-10-06

    Pinhole photography has made major contributions to astrophysics through the use of “coded apertures”. Coded apertures were instrumental in locating gamma-ray bursts and proving that they originate in faraway galaxies, some from the birth of black holes from the first stars that formed just after the big bang.