Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Exploiting simultaneous observational constraints on mass and absorption to estimate the global direct radiative forcing of black carbon and brown carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a leading climate warming agent, yet uncertainties on the global direct radiative forcing (DRF) remain large. Here we expand a global model simulation (GEOS-Chem) of BC to include the ...

Schwarz, J. P.

2

Black carbon snow albedo reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black carbon snow albedo reduction Black carbon snow albedo reduction Title Black carbon snow albedo reduction Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hadley, Odelle L., and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Nature Climate Change Volume 2 Pagination 437-440 Abstract Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black-carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and near-worldwide melting of ice1, 2. In this study, we generated and characterized pure and black-carbon-laden snow in the laboratory and verified that black-carbon contamination appreciably reduces snow albedo at levels that have been found in natural settings1, 3, 4. Increasing the size of snow grains in our experiments decreased snow albedo and amplified the radiative perturbation of black carbon, which justifies the aging-related positive feedbacks that are included in climate models. Moreover, our data provide an extensive verification of the Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation model1, which will be included in the next assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change5.

3

6, 34193463, 2006 Black carbon or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous;ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

4

Primordial black hole minimum mass  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we revisit thermodynamic constraints on primordial black hole (PBH) formation in the early universe. Under the assumption that PBH mass is equal to the cosmological horizon mass, one can use the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics to put a lower limit on the PBH mass. In models of PBH formation, however, PBHs are created at some fraction of the horizon mass. We show that this thermodynamic constraint still holds for subhorizon PBH formation.

Chisholm, James R. [Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8440 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalinventory of black carbon emissions. Atmos. Environ. 1993,commonly studied form of carbon emissions. Black carbon (BC)

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Abstract: Black carbon (BC) may play an important role in the global C...

7

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOAA/ESRL. Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide Annual Mean Data.H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalanalysis of black carbon in soils. Global Biogeochem. Cycle.

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The structure of the carbon black flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE STRUCTURE OF THE CARBON BLACK FLAME A Dissertation By W1 111 ami Kermit Anderson THEHSR UCOF Approval as to style and content recommended Head of tiie Department of Chemistry A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Agricultural... and Mechanical College of. Texas in Parti ail Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy THE STRUCTURE OF THE CARBON BLACK FLAME Major Subject: Chemistry AB William Hermit Anderson:\\ t * August 1945 THE STRUCTURE OF THE. CARBON...

Anderson, W. Kermi

1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Extraneous Carbon Assessments in Radiocarbon Measurements of Black Carbon in Environmental Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rived (black/elemental) carbon in soils and sediments usingbon measurements of black carbon in aerosols and oceanMWI, Noack AG. 2000. Black carbon in soils and sediments:

Coppola, Alysha; Ziolkowski, L. A.; Druffel, E. R. M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The AGN Black Hole Mass Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AGN Black Hole Mass Database is a compilation of all published spectroscopic reverberation-mapping studies of active galaxies. We have created a public web interface, where users may get the most up-to-date black hole masses from reverberation mapping for any particular active galactic nucleus (AGN), as well as obtain the individual measurements upon which the masses are based and the appropriate references. While the database currently focuses on the measurements necessary for black hole mass determinations, we also plan to expand it in the future to include additional useful information, such as host-galaxy characteristics. New reverberation mapping results will also be incorporated into the database as they are published in peer-refereed journals.

Bentz, Misty C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Trend in Global Black Carbon Emissions from 1960 to 2007  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) warms the Earth system by absorbing sunlight and emitting infrared radiation, and by decreasing the ice/snow albedo. ... (2, 3) Therefore, any efforts to reduce BC emission can lead to the dual benefit of slowing down global warming and of protecting human health. ... This work measured PM (EFPM) and EC (EFEC) EF for 9 crop residues and 5 coals in actual rural cooking and coal stoves using the C mass balance method. ...

Rong Wang; Shu Tao; Huizhong Shen; Ye Huang; Han Chen; Yves Balkanski; Olivier Boucher; Philippe Ciais; Guofeng Shen; Wei Li; Yanyan Zhang; Yuanchen Chen; Nan Lin; Shu Su; Bengang Li; Junfeng Liu; Wenxin Liu

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

Black Carbon and the Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduces net CO 2 release by permanent deforestation...constitute a substantial fraction of the missing carbon...estimate of oxygen release assuming 10% of...constitute a substantial fraction of sedimentary organic...formation by vegetation fires may be important...from soils becoming airborne by wind erosion...

Thomas A. J. Kuhlbusch

1998-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

A Comparison of Intermediate Mass Black Hole Candidate ULXs and Stellar-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool thermal emission components have recently been revealed in the X-ray spectra of a small number of ultra-luminous X-ray (ULX) sources with L_X > 1 E+40 erg/s in nearby galaxies. These components can be well fitted with accretion disk models, with temperatures approximately 5-10 times lower than disk temperatures measured in stellar-mass Galactic black holes when observed in their brightest states. Because disk temperature is expected to fall with increasing black hole mass, and because the X-ray luminosity of these sources exceeds the Eddington limit for 10 Msun black holes (L_Edd = 1.3 E+39 erg/s), these sources are extremely promising intermediate-mass black hole candidates (IMBHCs). In this Letter, we directly compare the inferred disk temperatures and luminosities of these ULXs, with the disk temperatures and luminosities of a number of Galactic black holes. The sample of stellar-mass black holes was selected to include different orbital periods, companion types, inclinations, and column densities. These ULXs and stellar-mass black holes occupy distinct regions of a L_X -- kT diagram, suggesting these ULXs may harbor IMBHs. We briefly discuss the important strengths and weaknesses of this interpretation.

J. M. Miller; A. C. Fabian; M. C. Miller

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Speaker(s): Odelle Hadley Date: August 13, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 This presentation examines the changing cryosphere and specifically the role of black carbon on the reflectivity of snow. Small amounts of black carbon in snow purportedly contribute to a reduction in snow albedo, contributing to regional climate change and early onset of melting. Our current research focuses on the connection between black carbon and albedo reduction. This presentation will describe our laboratory experiments wherein we make and characterize pure and contaminated snow and assess the black carbon snow albedo reduction as a function of black carbon mixing ratio and snow grain size. Experimental results are compared to verify or

15

ARM - Field Campaign - Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCharacterization of Black Carbon Mixing State govCampaignsCharacterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Related Campaigns Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State - II 2014.02.15, Sedlacek, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State 2012.11.01 - 2013.06.14 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below. Description The objective of the proposed experiments was to characterize the mixing state of black carbon produced in biomass burning using the single particle soot photometer (SP2). The large uncertainty associated with black carbon (BC) direct forcing is due, in part, to the dependence of light absorption of BC-containing particles on the position of the BC aggregate within the particle. It is

16

Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions Liquid Hydrogen. Note: Black carbon does not deplete ozone. What happens is the black carbon emissions from the rocket. Other black carbon emissions: The number one contributor to black carbon is burning biomass. Also

Toohey, Darin W.

17

Search for gravitational waves from intermediate mass binary black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of nonspinning intermediate mass black holes in the total mass range 100450??M? and with the component mass ratios between 1?1 ...

Barsotti, Lisa

18

Intermediate-Mass Black Holes as LISA Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), with masses of hundreds to thousands of solar masses, will be unique sources of gravitational waves for LISA. Here we discuss their context as well as specific characteristics of IMBH-IMBH and IMBH-supermassive black hole mergers and how these would allow sensitive tests of the predictions of general relativity in strong gravity.

M. Coleman Miller

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Title Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6062E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Chelsea Preble, Odelle L. Hadley, and Ashok J. Gadgil Keywords aethalometer, Berkeley Darfur Stove, black carbon, carbon monoxide, climate change, DustTrak, global warming, improved cookstoves, indoor air quality, LBNL Stove Testing Facility, particulate matter, photoacoustic absorption spectrometer, pollutant emission factor, three-stone fire Abstract Traditional methods of cooking in developing regions of the world emit pollutants that

20

Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks An X-ray Rainbow An Insulating Breakthrough Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles JANUARY 11, 2007 Bookmark and Share Fig. 1. Diagram showing CB segregation to triple junctions during press sintering. Inset: USAXS image acquired from a press-sintered CB/PMMA sample with 1% CB mass fraction. Self-assembly is likely to play a decisive role in producing nanoscale elements for three dimensional (3D) electronic and nanoscale electro-mechanical systems. Until now, however, the difficult problem of fabricating a complex, interconnected 3D system of conductive nanoscale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analysis of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions and photochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and known emission factors for black carbon (BC) from South Asia yields 0.7 Tg yr?1 (upper limit of about 1 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); KEYWORDS: Soot, black carbon, CO, emissions, India Citation of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions

Dickerson, Russell R.

22

The cosmological evolution of quasar black hole masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......distribution of the central engine (e.g. Laor 1998, 2000...some other physical limit on fuel supply which prevents accretion...physical limit on black hole fuel supply might be imposed by...expected to limit the mass consumption rate of a supermassive black......

Ross J. McLure; James S. Dunlop

2004-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Supermassive black hole mass related to total mass of host galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although a supermassive black hole resides at the center of almost all galaxies, fundamental questions concerning the relation between central black hole mass and host galaxy mass remain unanswered. Marleau et al [arXiv:1212.0980 and arXiv:1411.3844] studied about 6,000 galaxies and found central black hole mass correlates better with total stellar mass of the host galaxy than with bulge mass, disk mass, or stellar velocity dispersion. They summarized their findings in a linear correlation equation linking central black hole mass and host galaxy stellar mass. The model outlined in this paper, based on the holographic principle and involving no arbitrary parameters, relates central black hole mass to total mass (including dark matter) of the host galaxy and accounts for the Marleau et al 6,000 galaxy survey data better than their linear correlation equation. The fact that a simple model with no arbitrary parameters accounts for observational data on central black holes in terms of host galaxy total mass reinforces the conclusion that central black holes are an essential element of most galaxies.

T. R. Mongan

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel (FF) combustion and biomass burning (BB), respectively. The enhancements of BC and LSP in BBEmission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over. (2012), Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

25

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Title Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Melissa M. Lunden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Abstract Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel-fueled trucks driving through a 1 km-long California highway tunnel in August 2006. Emission factors were based on concurrent increases in BC, PN, and COB2B concentrations (measured at 1 Hz) that corresponded to the passage of individual HD trucks. The distributions of BC and PN emission factors from individual HD trucks are skewed, meaning that a large fraction of pollution comes from a small fraction of the in-use vehicle fleet. The highest-emitting 10% of trucks were

26

Infrared spectra of carbon monoxide adsorbed on palladium black  

SciTech Connect

The authors investigate the heterogeneous adsorption of carbon monoxide and the concurrent catalytic and sorptive properties of palladium black from the standpoint of a comprehensive analysis of the infrared spectra of the reaction pathways and their various products as well as the pressure dependence of the line behavior at various wavelengths.

Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Levintova, T.D.; Sokol'skii, D.V.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NSF GA-32589X I CHARACTERISTICS OF CARBON BLACK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for years. The amount of solar energy which can be absorbed by carbon black and transmitted to the air and the reduced solar radiation available inside the cloud. Such problems are to be expected when attempting particles in aerosol form spread artificially in the atmosphere to absorb solar radiation and hence

Gray, William

28

Black Carbon in the Soil Carbon Cycle: Is it an Oxidation Resistant End-Product?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for different materials and combustion temperatures. It is less than 1% for thermally altered biomass at combusBlack Carbon in the Soil Carbon Cycle: Is it an Oxidation Resistant End-Product? Simone resistant product of incomplete combustion, and consists out of a range of combustion products such as char

Fischlin, Andreas

29

Enhanced Activated Carbon Cathode Performance for Microbial Fuel Cell by Blending Carbon Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced Activated Carbon Cathode Performance for Microbial Fuel Cell by Blending Carbon Black-based materials that have good catalytic activity, but the electrical conductivity of the AC is poor compared as a binder, as opposed to Nafion with Pt, which greatly reduces the cost of the cathode materials. AC

30

CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS  

SciTech Connect

We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fracture properties of natural rubber filled with hybrid carbon black/nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid carbon black (CB) and nanoclay (NC) in a rubber matrix have provided superior mechanical performances over conventional composites. Yet the fracture and fatigue properties have...

Yuanbo Liu; Li Li; Qi Wang; Xin Zhang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil  

SciTech Connect

Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m{sup -2}, or about 7-10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182-541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene poly carboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

Hammes, K.; Torn, M.S.; Lapenas, A.G.; Schmidt, M.W.I.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Can Reducing Black Carbon Emissions Counteract Global Warming?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Can Reducing Black Carbon Emissions Counteract Global Warming? ... It has been known for over 30 years that aerosols affect the Earth's radiative balance:? reflective particles (such as sulfates) have a cooling effect, and light-absorbing particles (such as BC) warm the system (3). ... Although Figure 3 shows many of the high-emitting devices that contribute most to global BC concentrations, much of the world's fuel is burned in low-emitting technologies such as pulverized coal burners and gasoline vehicles with current technology. ...

Tami C. Bond; Haolin Sun

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric black carbon Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 32 (1997) 401--407 Carbon blackhigh density polyethylene Summary: . The carbon black was then heated to 900 C in a nitrogen atmosphere and...

35

Multi-Proxy Approach on Black Carbon Characterization and Combustion Products Source Discrimination in Environmental Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental applications of pyrogenic carbon, aka black carbon (BC), have been hampered due to the poor characterization and quantification of environmental BC. This dissertation was dedicated to the better characterization of environmental char...

Kuo, Li-Jung

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

Black carbon refractive index and morphology: a Laboratory study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.9 Coal 6.9 Cooking processes 4.9 Agricultural waste 4.8 Crop residues 4 Extra-tropical forest 2.9 Dung carbon (see Table). We intend to include some bulk samples of bio- mass burning. Due to the wide range of burning conditions; these cannot be simulated accurately in the laboratory. We thus intend to concentrate

Oxford, University of

37

Mass without radiation: heavily obscured AGN, the X-ray Background and the Black Hole Mass Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent revision of black hole scaling relations (Kormendy & Ho 2013), indicates that the local mass density in black holes should be increased by up to a factor of five with respect to previously determined values. The local black hole mass density is connected to the mean radiative efficiency of accretion through the time integral of the AGN volume density and a significant increase of the local black holes mass density would have interesting consequences on AGN accretion properties and demography. One possibility to explain a large black hole mass density is that most of the Black Hole growth is via radiatively inefficient channels such as super Eddington accretion, however, given the intrinsic degeneracies in the Soltan argument, this solution is not unique. Here we show how it is possible to accommodate a larger fraction of heavily buried, Compton thick AGN, without violating the limit imposed by the hard X-ray and mid-infrared backgrounds spectral energy density.

Comastri, A; Marconi, A; Risaliti, G; Salvati, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Tidal Capture of Stars by Intermediate-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent X-ray observations and theoretical modelling have made it plausible that some ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) are powered by intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). N-body simulations have also shown that runaway merging of stars in dense star clusters is a way to form IMBHs. In the present paper we have performed N-body simulations of young clusters such as MGG-11 of M82 in which IMBHs form through runaway merging. We took into account the effect of tidal heating of stars by the IMBH to study the tidal capture and disruption of stars by IMBHs. Our results show that the IMBHs have a high chance of capturing stars through tidal heating within a few core relaxation times and we find that 1/3 of all runs contain a ULX within the age limits of MGG-11, a result consistent with the fact that a ULX is found in this galaxy. Our results strengthen the case for some ULX being powered by intermediate-mass black holes.

H. Baumgardt; C. Hopman; S. Portegies Zwart; J. Makino

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Black carbon in the Gulf of Maine : new insights into inputs and cycling of combustion-derived organic carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of black carbon (BC), the soot and char formed during incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, have increased over the last century and are estimated to be between 8 and 270 Tg BC/yr. BC may affect ...

Flores Cervantes, Dborah Xanat, 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Short Review of Relativistic Iron Lines from Stellar-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, I briefly review recent progress in detecting and measuring the properties of relativistic iron lines observed in stellar-mass black hole systems, and the aspects of these lines that are most relevant to studies of similar lines in Seyfert-1 AGN. In particular, the lines observed in stellar-mass black holes are not complicated by complex low-energy absorption or partial-covering of the central engine, and strong lines are largely independent of the model used to fit the underlying broad-band continuum flux. Indeed, relativistic iron lines are the most robust diagnostic of black hole spin that is presently available to observers, with specific advantages over the systematics-plagued disk continuum. If accretion onto stellar-mass black holes simply scales with mass, then the widespread nature of lines in stellar-mass black holes may indicate that lines should be common in Seyfert-1 AGN, though perhaps harder to detect.

J. M. Miller

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » September 2012 Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Atmospheric black carbon may not cause as much warming of the climate as we thought. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe

42

Temporal and angular analysis of nonlinear scattering in carbon-black suspensions in water and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical origin of the nonlinear scattering of light induced by the focusing of intense laser pulses onto carbon-black suspensions (CBSs) is discussed through the...

Durand, Olivier; Grolier-Mazza, Valrie; Frey, Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Picosecond-resolution study of nonlinear scattering in carbon black suspensions in water and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical origin of the nonlinear scattering of light induced by focusing of intense laser pulses onto carbon black suspensions (CBSs) is discussed through the interpretation of...

Durand, O; Grolier-Mazza, V; Frey, R

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols T. Novakov,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hansen,3 T. W. Kirchstetter,1 M. Sato,3 J. E. Sinton,1 and J. A. Sathaye1 Received 26 September 2002, M. Sato, J. E. Sinton, and J. A. Sathaye, Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon

45

Size and shape of crystallites and internal stresses in carbon blacks T. Ungara,*, J. Gubiczab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is generally used as a filler in rubber production to modify the mechanical properties of the tire. Although sites present on the surface determine reinfor- cing properties of carbon black in rubber [7]. Energy

Gubicza, Jenõ

46

Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosolssplit Fossil fuel sources Bio fuel sources Open burningemissions from fossil-plus-bio-fuel and from open biomass

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ORIGINAL PAPER Long-term black carbon dynamics in cultivated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the term BC is used to describe the residual product from incomplete combustion of biomass either by land XPS Introduction Black carbon (BC) is a C-rich organic material derived from incomplete combustion

Lehmann, Johannes

48

Responsibility of electric resistance of polyethyleneimine-grafted carbon black against alcohol vapor and humidity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystalline polyethyleneimine (PEI(C)) was successfully grafted onto carbon black surface by direct condensation of imino groups of PEI with carboxyl groups on the surface using N,N?-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as a...

Norio Tsubokawa; Sachio Yoshikawa; Kiyotaka Maruyama; Tomoaki Ogasawara

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

50

A mass of less than 15 solar masses for the black hole in an ultraluminous X-ray source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) display a typical set of properties not seen in Galactic stellar-mass black holes (BHs): higher luminosity Lx > 3 10^39 erg/s, unusually soft X-ray components (kT solar masses. Our results demonstrate that in P13, soft thermal emission and spectral curvature are indeed signatures of supercritical accretion. ...

Motch, C; Soria, R; Gris, F; Pietrzy?ski, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $\\textnormal W^{-1} \\textnormal m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $\\textnormal PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

Mahajan, Salil [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

THE M {sub BH}-L {sub SPHEROID} RELATION AT HIGH AND LOW MASSES, THE QUADRATIC GROWTH OF BLACK HOLES, AND INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES  

SciTech Connect

From a sample of 72 galaxies with reliable supermassive black hole masses M {sub bh}, we derive the M {sub bh}-(host spheroid luminosity, L) relation for (1) the subsample of 24 core-Sersic galaxies with partially depleted cores, and (2) the remaining subsample of 48 Sersic galaxies. Using K{sub s} -band Two Micron All Sky Survey data, we find the near-linear relation M {sub bh}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.10{+-}0.20} {sub K{sub s}} for the core-Sersic spheroids thought to be built in additive dry merger events, while we find the relation M {sub bh}{proportional_to}L {sup 2.73{+-}0.55}{sub K{sub s}} for the Sersic spheroids built from gas-rich processes. After converting literature B-band disk galaxy magnitudes into inclination- and dust-corrected bulge magnitudes, via a useful new equation presented herein, we obtain a similar result. Unlike with the M {sub bh}-(velocity dispersion) diagram, which is also updated here using the same galaxy sample, it remains unknown whether barred and non-barred Sersic galaxies are offset from each other in the M {sub bh}-L diagram. While black hole feedback has typically been invoked to explain what was previously thought to be a nearly constant M {sub bh}/M {sub Spheroid} mass ratio of {approx}0.2%, we advocate that the near-linear M {sub bh}-L and M {sub bh}-M {sub Spheroid} relations observed at high masses may have instead arisen largely from the additive dry merging of galaxies. We argue that feedback results in a dramatically different scaling relation, such that black hole mass scales roughly quadratically with the spheroid mass in Sersic galaxies. We therefore introduce a revised cold-gas 'quasar' mode feeding equation for semi-analytical models to reflect what we dub the quadratic growth of black holes in Sersic galaxies built amidst gas-rich processes. Finally, we use our new Sersic M {sub bh}-L equations to predict the masses of candidate intermediate mass black holes in almost 50 low-luminosity spheroids containing active galactic nuclei, finding many masses between that of stellar mass black holes and supermassive black holes.

Graham, Alister W.; Scott, Nicholas, E-mail: AGraham@swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)] [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mass and First Law for Static Asymptotically Randall-Sundrum Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a new, intrinsic, mass definition for spacetimes asymptotic to the Randall-Sundrum braneworld models, RS1 and RS2. For this mass, we prove a first law for static black holes, including variations of the bulk cosmological constant, brane tensions, and RS1 interbrane distance. Our first law defines a thermodynamic volume and a gravitational tension that are braneworld analogs of the corresponding quantities in asymptotically AdS black hole spacetimes and asymptotically flat compactifications, respectively. This paper is the first in a series on asymptotically RS black holes.

Scott Fraser; Douglas M. Eardley

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earths climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second most important individual climate-forcing agent in the industrial era, following carbon dioxide. Sources that emit black carbon also emit other short- lived species that may either cool or warm climate. Climate forcings from co-emitted species are estimated and used in the framework described herein. When the principal effects of co- emissions, including cooling agents such as sulfur dioxide, are included in net forcing, energy-related sources (fossil-fuel and biofuel) have a net climate forcing of +0.004 (-0.62 to +0.57) W m-2 during the first year after emission. For a few of these sources, such as diesel engines and possibly residential biofuels, warming is strong enough that eliminating all emissions from these sources would reduce net climate forcing (i.e., produce cooling). When open burning emissions, which emit high levels of organic matter, are included in the total, the best estimate of net industrial-era climate forcing by all black- carbon-rich sources becomes slightly negative (-0.08 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of -1.23 to +0.81 W m-2). The uncertainties in net climate forcing from black-carbon-rich sources are substantial, largely due to lack of knowledge about cloud interactions with both black carbon and co-emitted organic carbon. In prioritizing potential black-carbon mitigation actions, non-science factors, such as technical feasibility, costs, policy design, and implementation feasibility play important roles. The major sources of black carbon are presently in different stages with regard to the feasibility for near-term mitigation. This assessment, by evaluating the large number and complexity of the associated physical and radiative processes in black-carbon climate forcing, sets a baseline from which to improve future climate forcing estimates.

Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Responsiveness of electric resistance of polymer-grafted carbon black/alumina gel composite against solvent vapor and solute in solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbon black/alumina gel composites were prepared by sol-gel reaction of aluminum isopropoxide in the presence of polymer-grafted carbon black. The electric resistance of the alumina gel composite from polyme...

Norio Tsubokawa; Junya Inaba; Katsunori Arai; Kazuhiro Fujiki

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Natural Oxidation of Black Carbon in Soils: Changes in Molecular...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon in Soils: Changes in Molecular Form and Surface Charge along a Climosequence. Abstract: The aim of this work was to investigate changes in molecular form and surface...

57

Fluorinated carbon blacks : influence of the morphology of the starting material on the fluorination mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, n° 2, p. 217-220. Abstract : The effect of fluorination, using CF4 r.f. plasmas, has been studied, we used CF4 r.f. plasma for the fluorination of carbon blacks and investigated, by X in r.f. plasma conditions was carried out in a SE-80 barrel reactor (Plasma Tech. System). CF4 gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

58

Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

profile, cloud temperature and amount, the seasonal cycle, and the tropopause level and accelerating polar ice melting. We use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model to investigate is generally assumed. Citation: Koch, D., and J. Hansen (2005), Distant origins of Arctic black carbon

59

Sensitivity of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon to aerosol size and altitude of injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively. Engineered particles, such as resonant scatterers or self-levitating particles, have been proposed

60

Head-on collisions of unequal mass black holes in D=5 dimensions  

SciTech Connect

We study head-on collisions of unequal mass black hole binaries in D=5 spacetime dimensions, with mass ratios between 1:1 and 1:4. Information about gravitational radiation is extracted by using the Kodama-Ishibashi gauge-invariant formalism and details of the apparent horizon of the final black hole. We present waveforms, total integrated energy and momentum for this process. Our results show surprisingly good agreement, within 5% or less, with those extrapolated from linearized, point-particle calculations. Our results also show that consistency with the area theorem bound requires that the same process in a large number of spacetime dimensions must display new features.

Witek, Helvi [CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa (UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Cardoso, Vitor [CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa (UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677 (United States); Gualtieri, Leonardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, 'Sapienza' Universita di Roma e Sezione INFN Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy); Herdeiro, Carlos [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-183 Aveiro (Portugal); Centro de Fisica do Porto (CFP), Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto (FCUP), Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Sperhake, Ulrich [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677 (United States); Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Zilhao, Miguel [Centro de Fisica do Porto (CFP), Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto (FCUP), Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(incineration) or as a filler for asphalt. Incineration has been employed in an attempt to harness the high calorific value of scrap tires. However, disposal via incineration may not maximize the potential economic recovery of energy and chemical materials... into liquid fuels and forms of solid carbon such as carbon black and activated carbon. Previous work in this area utilizes pyrolysis. ' There are several commercial, pilot, and bench-scale tire 2-4, 6-8 pyrolysis systems in use today. Many of these employ...

Woodrow, Philip Travis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Inferring Black Carbon Concentrations in Particulate Organic Matter by Observing Pyrene Fluorescence Losses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inferring Black Carbon Concentrations in Particulate Organic Matter by Observing Pyrene Fluorescence Losses ... For example, most atmospheric scientists are interested in the blackness of aerosols and the resultant effect on the radiative heat balance (3, 7), while oceanographers and soil scientists are interested in the refractory properties of BC in soils and sediments influencing its role in carbon cycling (5). ... Studies since the late 1970s and early 1980s have suggested that absorption into biogenic and diagenetic organic matter is a key process controlling the fate and effects of hydrophobic organic pollutants (8, 9), and this process has been described using a linear sorption model where Kd is the solid?water distribution coefficient (L/kgsolid), and this parameter is estimated using the product of the total organic carbon (TOC) fraction (fTOC, kgTOC/kgsediment) and the TOC-normalized distribution coefficient (KTOC, L/kgTOC). ...

D. Xanat Flores-Cervantes; Christopher M. Reddy; Philip M. Gschwend

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

63

THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASS-SPHEROID STELLAR MASS RELATION FOR SERSIC AND CORE-SERSIC GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We have examined the relationship between supermassive black hole mass (M{sub BH}) and the stellar mass of the host spheroid (M{sub sph,*}) for a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. To derive the spheroid stellar masses we used improved Two Micron All Sky Survey K{sub s}-band photometry from the ARCHANGEL photometry pipeline. Dividing our sample into core-Sersic and Sersic galaxies, we find that they are described by very different M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relations. For core-Sersic galaxies-which are typically massive and luminous, with M{sub BH} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to} M{sub sph,*}{sup 0.97{+-}0.14}, consistent with other literature relations. However, for the Sersic galaxies-with typically lower masses, M{sub sph,*} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to}M{sub sph,*}{sup 2.22{+-}0.58}, a dramatically steeper slope that differs by more than 2 standard deviations. This relation confirms that, for Sersic galaxies, M{sub BH} is not a constant fraction of M{sub sph,*}. Sersic galaxies can grow via the accretion of gas which fuels both star formation and the central black hole, as well as through merging. Their black hole grows significantly more rapidly than their host spheroid, prior to growth by dry merging events that produce core-Sersic galaxies, where the black hole and spheroid grow in lockstep. We have additionally compared our Sersic M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relation with the corresponding relation for nuclear star clusters, confirming that the two classes of central massive object follow significantly different scaling relations.

Scott, Nicholas; Graham, Alister W [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Vic 3122 (Australia); Schombert, James [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Are Outflows Biasing Single-Epoch CIV Black Hole Mass Estimates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a combination of reverberation mapping data and single-epoch spectra of the CIV emission line in a sample of both low and high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to investigate sources of the discrepancies between CIV- and Hbeta-based single-epoch black hole mass estimates. We find that for all reverberation mapped sources, there is a component of the line profile that does not reverberate, and the velocity characteristics of this component vary from object-to-object. The differing strength and properties of this non-variable component are responsible for much of the scatter in CIV-based black hole masses compared to Hbeta masses. The CIV mass bias introduced by this non-variable component is correlated with the shape of the CIV line, allowing us to make an empirical correction to the black hole mass estimates. Using this correction and accounting for other sources of scatter such as poor data quality and data inhomogeneity reduces the scatter between the CIV and Hbeta masses in our sample by a fac...

Denney, Kelly D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SIMPLE FIT OF DATA RELATING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASS TO GALAXY PITCH ANGLE  

SciTech Connect

Seigar et al. have recently demonstrated a new, tight correlation between galactic central supermassive black hole (BH) mass and the pitch angle of the spiral arm in disk galaxies which they attribute to other indirect correlations. They fit a double power law, governed by five parameters, to the BH mass as a function of pitch. Noting the features of their fitted curve, we show that a simple linear proportion of the BH mass to the cotangent of the pitch angle can obtain the same fit, within error. Such a direct, elegant fit may help shed light on the nature of the correlation.

Ringermacher, Harry I. [General Electric Global Research Center, Schenectady, NY 12309 (United States); Mead, Lawrence R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Mass of the Oppenheimer-Snyder Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The only instance when the General Relativistic (GTR) collapse equations have been solved (almost) exactly to explicitly find the metric coefficients is the case of a homogeneous spherical dust (Oppenheimer and Snyder in 1939 in Phy. Rev. 56, 455). The equation (37) of their paper showed the formation of an event horizon for a collapsing homogeneous dust ball of mass M in that the circumference radius the outermost surface, r_b = r_0= 2M in a proper time proportional to r_0^{-1/2} in the limit of large Schrarzschild time t= infinity. But Eq.(37) was approximated from the Eq. (36) whose essential character is t = log (y+1/y-1), where, at the boundary of the star y=r_b/ r_0 = r_b /2 M. And since the argument of a logarithmic function can not be negative, one must have y >= 1 or 2M/r_b 0, actually becomes null. And this independently showed that BHs have unique mass, M=0.

Abhas Mitra

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Effect of composite microstructure on electrical and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl acetate) composites with carbon black and clay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electrical and mechanical behavior of carbon black filled poly(vinyl acetate) latex-based and solution-based polymer composites was examined. A set of experiments were performed to distinguish composites with a segregated network (emulsion...

Miriyala, Sethu M.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Structure and Oxidation Activity Correlations for Carbon Blacks and Diesel Soot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work focuses on a comprehensive investigation of structureactivity relationships for a diesel engine soot sample (Corning) and 10 commercially available carbon black samples. ... Su and colleagues used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the relation between the microstructure and oxidation behavior of soot from exhausts of different heavy-duty diesel engines and discovered the microstructure-controlled oxidation behavior of diesel soot. ... FE-SEM images (see Figure S1 of the Supporting Information) of some carbon blacks (Monarch 1400, Monarch 280, and Printex-U) and diesel soot-1 show the agglomerates, which are composed of their fundamental units called primary particles. ...

Lakshitha Pahalagedara; Hom Sharma; Chung-Hao Kuo; Saminda Dharmarathna; Ameya Joshi; Steven L. Suib; Ashish B. Mhadeshwar

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Carbon balance of sorghum from anthesis to black layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measured Changes in Y and m The Integrated Carbon Balance Parameters dS, dW, and dSm as Functions of Biomass Page 87 96 Effects of Tissue Composi tion on Y g V CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES VI TA 101 117 122 125 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 2. 1 2... dSm and dR plotted as functions of biomass, W. 4. 7 Plot of organ biomass, by organ, over time. 97 98 109 4. 8 Plot of the total biomass of a simulated plant, over time, in the model of Y 9 4. 9 Plot of the change in Y due to a simulated...

Stahl, Randal Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Dielectric study of Poly(styrene-co-butadiene) Composites with Carbon Black, Silica, and Nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dielectric study of Poly(styrene-co-butadiene) Composites with Carbon Black, Silica, and Nanoclay ... Given the possible nanoscale dimensions and high surface to volume ratio of the added particles, the glassy interphase can comprise a large fraction of the composite and can strongly influence the mechanical properties of the composite. ... The potential of nanoclays to serve as matrix sensitive structure-directing agents in tailor-made materials is demonstrated. ...

Loan T. Vo; Spiros H. Anastasiadis; Emmanuel P. Giannelis

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

71

Small mass plunging into a Kerr black hole: Anatomy of the inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically solve the Teukolsky equation in the time domain to obtain the gravitational-wave emission of a small mass inspiraling and plunging into the equatorial plane of a Kerr black hole. We account for the dissipation of orbital energy using the Teukolsky frequency-domain gravitational-wave fluxes for circular, equatorial orbits, down to the light-ring. We consider Kerr spins $-0.99 \\leq q \\leq 0.99$, and compute the inspiral-merger-ringdown (2,2), (2,1), (3,3), (3,2), (4,4), and (5,5) modes. We study the large-spin regime, and find a great simplicity in the merger waveforms, thanks to the extremely circular character of the plunging orbits. We also quantitatively examine the mixing of quasinormal modes during the ringdown, which induces complicated amplitude and frequency modulations in the waveforms. Finally, we explain how the study of small mass-ratio black-hole binaries helps extending effective-one-body models for comparable-mass, spinning black-hole binaries to any mass ratio and spin magnitude.

Andrea Taracchini; Alessandra Buonanno; Gaurav Khanna; Scott A. Hughes

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of Immobilized Enzyme in a High-Surface-Area Biofuel Cell Electrode Made of Redox-Polymer-Grafted Carbon Black  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, nanocarbon materials like carbon black, carbon nanotubes, and carbon aerogel particles have been used by several groups to form three-dimensional electrodes. ... The TEM micrograph of the GOD-coated electrode was shown in Figure 2A. Figure 2B shows magnified image of the dotted frame in Figure 2A. The location of GOD and carbon black in Figure 2B was indicated in Figure 2C. A few tens of stained GOD, which were small black spots with a diameter of about 5 nm, were dispersed on each carbon black particle, which was a gray spot with a diameter of about 30 nm. ...

Takanori Tamaki; Atsushi Hiraide; Faizly B. Asmat; Hidenori Ohashi; Taichi Ito; Takeo Yamaguchi

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gasification behavior of carbon residue in bed solids of black liquor gasifier  

SciTech Connect

Steam gasification of carbon residue in bed solids of a low-temperature black liquor gasifier was studied using a thermogravimetric system at 3 bar. Complete gasification of the carbon residue, which remained unreactive at 600 C, was achieved in about 10 min as the temperature increased to 800 C. The rate of gasification and its temperature dependence were evaluated from the non-isothermal experiment results. Effects of particle size and adding H{sub 2} and CO to the gasification agent were also studied. The rate of steam gasification could be taken as zero order in carbon until 80% of carbon was gasified, and for the rest of the gasification process the rate appeared to be first order in carbon. The maximum rate of carbon conversion was around 0.003/s and the activation energy was estimated to be in the range of 230-300 kJ/mol. The particle size did not show significant effect on the rate of gasification. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide appeared to retard the onset of the gasification process. (author)

Preto, Fernando; Zhang, Xiaojie (Frank); Wang, Jinsheng [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Relationship Between Nuclear Black Hole Mass and Galaxy Velocity Dispersion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a correlation between the mass M_BH of a galaxy's central black hole and the luminosity-weighted line-of-sight velocity dispersion sigma_e within the half-light radius. The result is based on a sample of 26 galaxies, including 13 galaxies with new determinations of black hole masses from Hubble Space Telescope measurements of stellar kinematics. The best-fit correlation is M_BH = 1.2 (+-0.2) x 10^8 M_sun (sigma_e/200 km/s)^(3.75 (+-0.3))over almost three orders of magnitude in M_BH; the scatter in M_BH at fixed sigma_e is only 0.30 dex and most of this is due to observational errors. The M_BH-sigma_e relation is of interest not only for its strong predictive power but also because it implies that central black hole mass is constrained by and closely related to properties of the host galaxy's bulge.

Karl Gebhardt; Ralf Bender; Gary Bower; Alan Dressler; S. M. Faber; Alexei V. Filippenko; Richard Green; Carl Grillmair; Luis C. Ho; John Kormendy; Tod R. Lauer; John Magorrian; Jason Pinkney; Douglas Richstone; Scott Tremaine

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Penrose inequalities and a positive mass theorem for charged black holes in higher dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the inverse mean curvature flow to establish Penrose-type inequalities for time-symmetric Einstein-Maxwell initial data sets which can be suitably embedded as a hypersurface in Euclidean space $\\mathbb R^{n+1}$, $n\\geq 3$. In particular, we prove a positive mass theorem for this class of charged black holes. As an application we show that the conjectured upper bound for the area in terms of the mass and the charge, which in dimension $n=3$ is relevant in connection with the Cosmic Censorship Conjecture, always holds under the natural assumption that the horizon is stable as a minimal hypersurface.

Levi Lopes de Lima; Frederico Giro; Weslley Lozrio; Juscelino Silva

2014-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Constraining the Lifetime of QSOs with Present-day Mass Function of Supermassive Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the theoretical models of the QSO formation, we can reproduce optical QSO luminosity functions (LFs) at high redshifts (z > 2.2). Two different models can reproduce LFs successfully, though the lifetime of QSOs, t_Q, and the relation between the black hole mass and the host halo mass are different each other; t_Q = 10^6yr, in one model, t_Q > 10^7yr, in other models. Here, we propose a method to break this degeneracy. We calculate the mass function of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at z=2.5, and compare the result with the current mass function obtained by Salucci et al.(1999). In the shorter lifetime model, the mass function at z=2.5 exceeds that of z=0.0 by one order of magnitude, then it should be ruled out. We conclude that the lifetime is at least t_Q > 10^7yr. Next, we examine the difference of the formation epoch of SMBHs existing at z=3.0 for each model under the model assumptions. We simply discuss the difference of formation epoch as another possible model-discriminator.

T. Hosokawa

2002-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 20052010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

78

Manufacture of Carbon Materials of Aerogel Type from Carbon Blacks of Various Origins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence exerted by the structure and origin of samples of technical grade carbon, conditions of their thermal treatment (temperature, nature of a gas medium) and preliminary impregnation with activating ...

S. S. Stavitskaya; V. E. Goba; A. N. Tomashevskaya

79

Prospects for intermediate mass black hole binary searches with advanced gravitational-wave detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimated the sensitivity of the upcoming advanced, ground-based gravitational-wave observatories (the upgraded LIGO and Virgo and the KAGRA interferometers) to coalescing intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). We added waveforms modeling the gravitational radiation emitted by IMBHBs to detectors' simulated data and searched for the injected signals with the coherent WaveBurst algorithm. The tested binary's parameter space covers non-spinning IMBHBs with source-frame total masses between 50 and 1050 $\\text{M}_{\\odot}$ and mass ratios between $1/6$ and 1$\\,$. We found that advanced detectors could be sensitive to these systems up to a range of a few Gpc. A theoretical model was adopted to estimate the expected observation rates, yielding up to a few tens of events per year. Thus, our results indicate that advanced detectors will have a reasonable chance to collect the first direct evidence for intermediate mass black holes and open a new, intriguing channel for probing the Universe over cosmological scales.

G. Mazzolo; F. Salemi; M. Drago; V. Necula; C. Pankow; G. A. Prodi; V. Re; V. Tiwari; G. Vedovato; I. Yakushin; S. Klimenko

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Accretion disks around binary black holes of unequal mass: GRMHD simulations near decoupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on simulations in general relativity of magnetized disks onto black hole binaries. We vary the binary mass ratio from 1:1 to 1:10 and evolve the systems when they orbit near the binary-disk decoupling radius. We compare (surface) density profiles, accretion rates (relative to a single, non-spinning black hole), variability, effective $\\alpha$-stress levels and luminosities as functions of the mass ratio. We treat the disks in two limiting regimes: rapid radiative cooling and no radiative cooling. The magnetic field lines clearly reveal jets emerging from both black hole horizons and merging into one common jet at large distances. The magnetic fields give rise to much stronger shock heating than the pure hydrodynamic flows, completely alter the disk structure, and boost accretion rates and luminosities. Accretion streams near the horizons are among the densest structures; in fact, the 1:10 no-cooling evolution results in a refilling of the cavity. The typical effective temperature in the bulk of the disk is $\\sim 10^5 (M/10^8 M_\\odot)^{-1/4} (L/L_{\\rm edd})^{1/4} {\\rm K}$ yielding characteristic thermal frequencies $\\sim 10^{15} (M/10^8 M_\\odot)^{-1/4} (L/L_{\\rm edd})^{1/4}(1+z)^{-1}{\\rm Hz} $. These systems are thus promising targets for many extragalactic optical surveys, such as LSST, WFIRST, and PanSTARRS.

Roman Gold; Vasileios Paschalidis; Zachariah B. Etienne; Stuart L. Shapiro; Harald P. Pfeiffer

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Uptake of Reactive Black 5 by pumice and walnut activated carbon: Chemistry and adsorption mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The potential of using pumice and walnut wood activated carbon as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) from aqueous solutions was investigated. The Langmuir isotherm fit to the data specified the presence of two different natures of adsorption sites with different binding energies on the AC-W surface. Kinetic modelling showed that the adsorption behaviour and mechanism of RB5 for both adsorbents is believed to happen via surface adsorption followed by diffusion into the pores of the AC-W and pumice. The main adsorption mechanisms are hydrogen bonding, electrostatic bonding and n? interactions.

Behzad Heibati; Susana Rodriguez-Couto; Abdeltif Amrane; Mohd. Rafatullah; Alaa Hawari; Mohammad A. Al-Ghouti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

83

The Black-Hole Mass in M87 from Gemini/NIFS Adaptive Optics Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the stellar kinematics in the central 2" of the luminous elliptical galaxy M87 (NGC 4486), using laser adaptive optics to feed the Gemini telescope integral-field spectrograph, NIFS. The velocity dispersion rises to 480 km/s at 0.2". We combine these data with extensive stellar kinematics out to large radii to derive a black-hole mass equal to (6.6+-0.4)x10^9 Msun, using orbit-based axisymmetric models and including only the NIFS data in the central region. Including previously-reported ground-based data in the central region drops the uncertainty to 0.25x10^9 Msun with no change in the best-fit mass; however, we rely on the values derived from the NIFS-only data in the central region in order to limit systematic differences. The best-fit model shows a significant increase in the tangential velocity anisotropy of stars orbiting in the central region with decreasing radius; similar to that seen in the centers of other core galaxies. The black-hole mass is insensitive to the inclusion of a dark halo ...

Gebhardt, Karl; Richstone, Douglas; Lauer, Tod R; Faber, S M; Gultekin, Kayhan; Murphy, Jeremy; Tremaine, Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The ecology of star clusters and intermediate mass black holes in the Galactic bulge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We simulate the inner 100pc of the Milky-Way Galaxy to study the formation and evolution of the population of star clusters and intermediate mass black holes. For this study we perform extensive direct N-body simulations of the star clusters which reside in the bulge, and of the inner few tenth of parsecs of the super massive black hole in the Galactic center. In our N-body simulations the dynamical friction of the star cluster in the tidal field of the bulge are taken into account via (semi)analytic soluations. The N-body calculations are used to calibrate a (semi)analytic model of the formation and evolution of the bulge. We find that about 10% of the clusters born within 100pc of the Galactic center undergo core collapse during their inward migration and form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) via runaway stellar merging. After the clusters dissolve, these IMBHs continue their inward drift, carrying a few of the most massive stars with them. We predict that region within about 10 parsec of the SMBH is populated by about 50IMBHs of some 1000Msun. Several of these are expected to be accompanied still by some of the most massive stars from the star cluster. We also find that within a few milliparsec of the SMBH there is a steady population of several IMBHs. This population drives the merger rate between IMBHs and the SMBH at a rate of about one per 10Myr, sufficient to build the accumulate majority of mass of the SMBH. Mergers of IMBHs with SMBHs throughout the universe are detectable by LISA, at a rate of about two per week.

Simon Portegies Zwart; Holger Baumgardt; Stephen L. W. McMillan; Junichiro Makino; Piet Hut; Toshi Ebisuzaki

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Comparative Study on AC Conductivity and Dielectric Behavior of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Polyaniline Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Filled High Density Polyethylene-Carbon Black Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an experimental investigation on AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of carbon black reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE-CB) and HDPE-CB filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-CB-HDPE) and Polyaniline (PAni) coated MWNTs-CB-HDPE nanocomposites. The electrical properties such as dielectric constant ({epsilon}'), dissipation factor (tan {delta}) and AC conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) of nanocomposites have been measured with reference to the weight fraction (0.5 and 1 wt% MWNTs), frequency (75 KHz-30 MHz), temperature (25-90 deg. C) and sea water ageing. The experimental results showed that the increased AC conductivity and dielectric constant of the nanocomposites were influenced by PAni coated MWNTs in HDPE-CB nanocomposites. The value of dielectric constant and tan {delta} decreased with increasing frequency. Further more, above 5 MHz the AC conductivity increases drastically whereas significant effect on tan {delta} was observed in less than 1 MHz.

Dinesh, P. [Department of Electronics and Communication, Nagarjuna College of Engineering and Technology, Bangalore-562 110 Karnataka (India); Department of Electronics and Communication, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, Mysore-570 006, Karnataka (India); Renukappa, N. M. [Department of Electronics and Communication, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, Mysore-570 006, Karnataka (India); Siddaramaiah [Department of Polymer Science and Technology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, Mysore-570 006, Karnataka (India); Lee, J. H. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonbuk 561 756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeevananda, T. [R and D Centre, Department of Chemistry, R.N.S. Institute of Technology, Bangalore-560 061, Karnataka (India)

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

On the black-hole mass -- radio luminosity relation for flat-spectrum radio-loud quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new analysis of the connection between black-hole mass and radio luminosity in radio-selected flat-spectrum quasars (FSQ) is presented. In contrast to recent claims in the literature, we find no evidence that the black-hole masses of radio-selected FSQ are systematically lower that those of luminous optically-selected radio-loud quasars. The black-hole masses of the FSQ are estimated via the virial black-hole mass estimator which utilizes the line-width of the H$\\beta$ emission line as a tracer of the central gravitational potential. By correcting for the inevitable effects of inclination, incurred due to the FSQ being viewed close to the line of sight, we find that the black-hole masses of the FSQ with intrinsically powerful radio jets are confined, virtually exclusively, to M_bh > 10^8 M_solar. This is in good agreement with previous studies of optically selected FSQ and steep-spectrum radio-loud quasars. Finally, following the application of a realistic Doppler boosting correction, we find that the FSQ occupy a wide range in intrinsic radio luminosity, and that many sources would be more accurately classified as radio-intermediate or radio-quiet quasars. This range in radio luminosity suggests that the FSQ are fully consistent with an upper boundary on radio power of the form L_5GHz \\propto M_bh^2.5.

Matt J. Jarvis; Ross J. McLure

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

Difficulties with Recovering the Masses of Supermassive Black Holes from Stellar Kinematical Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the ability of three-integral, axisymmetric, orbit-based modeling algorithms to recover the parameters defining the gravitational potential (mass-to-light ratio and black hole mass M) in spheroidal stellar systems using stellar kinematical data. We show that the potential estimation problem is generically underdetermined when applied to long-slit kinematical data of the kind used for most black hole mass determinations to date. A range of parameters (, M) can provide equally good fits to the data, making it impossible to assign best-fit values. The indeterminacy arises from the large variety of orbital solutions that are consistent with a given mass model. We demonstrate the indeterminacy using a variety of data sets derived from realistic models, as well as published observations of the galaxy M32. The indeterminacy becomes apparent only when a sufficiently large number of distinct orbits are supplied to the modeling algorithm; if too few orbits are used, spurious minima appear in the ?2(,M) contours, and these minima do not necessarily coincide with the parameters defining the gravitational potential. We show that the range of degeneracy in M depends on the degree to which the data resolve the radius of influence rh of the black hole. For FWHM/2rh 0.5, where FWHM refers to the instrumental resolution, we find that only very weak constraints can be placed on M. In the case of M32, our reanalysis demonstrates that when a large orbit library is used, data published prior to 2000 (FWHM/2rh ? 0.25) are equally consistent with black hole masses in the range 1.5 ? 106 M? M 6 M?, with no preferred value in that range. Exactly the same data can reproduce previous published results with smaller orbit libraries. While the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) data for this galaxy (FWHM/2rh ? 0.06) may overcome the degeneracy in M, HST data for most galaxies do not resolve the black hole's sphere of influence and in these galaxies the degree of degeneracy allowed by the data may be greater than previously believed. We investigate the effect of regularization, or smoothness constraints, on the degree of degeneracy of the solutions. Enforcing smoothness reduces the range of acceptable models, but we find no indication that the true potential can be recovered simply by enforcing smoothing. For a given smoothing level, all solutions in the minimum ?2 valley exhibit similar levels of noise; as the smoothing is increased, there is a systematic shift in the midpoint of the ?2 valley, until at a high level of smoothing the solution is biased with respect to the true solution. These experiments suggest both that the indeterminacy is real (i.e., that it is not an artifact associated with nonsmooth solutions) and that there is no known empirical way to choose the smoothing parameter to ensure that the correct solution is selected.

Monica Valluri; David Merritt; Eric Emsellem

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The old nuclear star cluster in the Milky Way: dynamics, mass, statistical parallax, and black hole mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive new constraints on the mass, rotation, orbit structure and statistical parallax of the Galactic old nuclear star cluster and the mass of the supermassive black hole. We combine star counts and kinematic data from Fritz et al (2014), including 2'500 line-of-sight velocities and 10'000 proper motions. We show that the difference between the proper motion dispersions sigma_l and sigma_b cannot be explained by rotation, but is a consequence of the flattening of the nuclear cluster. We fit the surface density distribution of stars in the central 1000'' by a spheroidal cluster with scale ~100'' and a much larger nuclear disk component. We compute the two-integral distribution function f(E,L_z) for this density model, and add rotation self-consistently. We find that: (i) The orbit structure of the f(E,L_z) gives an excellent match to the observed velocity dispersion profiles as well as the proper motion and line-of-sight velocity histograms, including the double-peak in the v_l-histograms. (ii) This requir...

Chatzopoulos, Sotirios; Gerhard, Ortwin; Gillessen, Stefan; Wegg, Chris; Genzel, Reinhard; Pfuhl, Oliver

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Rates of Stellar Tidal Disruption as Probes of the Supermassive Black Hole Mass Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rates of stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) due to two-body relaxation are calculated using a large galaxy sample (N ~ 200) in order to explore the sensitivity of the TDE rates to observational uncertainties, such as the parametrization of galaxy light profiles and the stellar mass function. The largest uncertainty arises due to the poorly constrained occupation fraction of SMBHs in low-mass galaxies, which otherwise dominate the total TDE rate. The detection rate of TDE flares by optical surveys is calculated as a function of SMBH mass and other observables for several physically-motivated models of TDE emission. We also quantify the fraction of galaxies that produce deeply penetrating disruption events. If the majority of the detected events are characterized by super-Eddington luminosities (such as disk winds, or synchrotron radiation from an off-axis relativistic jet), then the measured SMBH mass distribution will tightly constrain the low-end SMBH occupation fracti...

Stone, Nicholas C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

SciTech Connect

Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration ('biochar'). Here we present a molecular-level assessment of the physical organization and chemical complexity of biomass-derived chars and, specifically, that of aromatic carbon in char structures. BET-N{sub 2} surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy are used to show how two plant materials (wood and grass) undergo analogous, but quantitatively different physical-chemical transitions as charring temperature increases from 100 to 700 C. These changes suggest the existence of four distinct categories of char consisting of a unique mixture of chemical phases and physical states: (i) in transition chars the crystalline character of the precursor materials is preserved, (ii) in amorphous chars the heat-altered molecules and incipient aromatic polycondensates are randomly mixed, (iii) composite chars consist of poorly ordered graphene stacks embedded in amorphous phases, and (iv) turbostratic chars are dominated by disordered graphitic crystallites. The molecular variations among the different char categories translate into differences in their ability to persist in the environment and function as environmental sorbents.

Keiluweit, M.; Nico, P.S.; Johnson, M.G.; Kleber, M.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Decadal growth of black carbon emissions in India - article no. L02807  

SciTech Connect

A Geographical Information System (GIS) based methodology has been used to construct the black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Indian geographical region. The distribution of emissions from a broader level to a spatial resolution of 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid has been carried out by considering micro level details and activity data of fossil fuels and bio-fuels. Our calculated total BC emissions were 1343.78 Gg and 835.50 Gg for the base years 2001 and 1991 respectively with a decadal growth of around 61%, which is highly significant. The district level analysis shows a diverse spatial distribution with the top 10% emitting districts contributing nearly 50% of total BC emission. Coal contributes more than 50% of total BC emission. All the metropolitan cities show high BC emissions due to high population density giving rise to high vehicular emissions and more demand of energy.

Sahu, S.K.; Beig, G.; Sharma, C. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Black carbon emissions in the United Kingdom during the past four decades: An empirical analysis  

SciTech Connect

We use data from a unique 40-year record of 150 urban and rural stations in the ''Black Smoke and SO2 Network'' in Great Britain to infer information about sources of atmospheric black carbon (BC). The data show a rapid decline of ambient atmospheric BC between 1962 and the early 1990s that exceeds the decline in official estimates of BC emissions based only on amount of fuel use and mostly fixed emission factors. This provides empirical confirmation of the existence and large impact of a time-dependent ''technology factor'' that must multiply the rate of fossil fuel use. Current ambient BC amounts in Great Britain comparable to those in western and central Europe, with diesel engines being the principal present source. From comparison of BC and SO2 data we infer that current BC emission inventories understate true emissions in the U.K. by about a factor of two. The results imply that there is the potential for improved technology to achieve large reduction of global ambient BC. There is a need for comparable monitoring of BC in other countries.

Novakov, T.; Hansen, J.E.

2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

X-ray reflection in accreting stellar-mass black hole systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The X-ray spectra of accreting stellar-mass black hole systems exhibit spectral features due to reflection, especially broad iron K alpha emission lines. We investigate the reflection by the accretion disc that can be expected in the high/soft state of such a system. First, we perform a self-consistent calculation of the reflection that results from illumination of a hot, inner portion of the disc with its atmosphere in hydrostatic equilibrium. Then we present reflection spectra for a range of illumination strengths and disc temperatures under the assumption of a constant-density atmosphere. Reflection by a hot accretion disc differs in important ways from that of a much cooler disc, such as that expected in an active galactic nucleus.

R. R. Ross; A. C. Fabian

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

Mass Spectroscopy and Reaction Studies of Laser-Vaporized Clusters from Metal-Doped Carbon Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C50 + LaC60 + (40) 30 40 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) (a) Positive La Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) C43 ­ C44 ­ Mass (amu) LaC32 ­ (a) (b) Fig. 2 Even distribution. 440 460 480 500 36 38 40 42 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b

Maruyama, Shigeo

95

Immobilization of Hydroquinone through a Spacer to Polymer Grafted on Carbon Black for a High-Surface-Area Biofuel Cell Electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluation of three different spacer arms tethering hydroquinone to linear polymers revealed that only the hydrophilic and flexible di(ethylene oxide) spacer made it possible for immobilized hydroquinone to transfer electrons from glucose oxidase (GOD) to an electrode; direct immobilization and an alkyl spacer did not. ... The carbon black used was Ketjen black (Ketjen Black International Co. Ltd, Japan) with a particle diameter of about 30 nm. ... FDH adsorbs strongly and stably on Ketjen black (KB) particles that were modified on carbon papers (CP) and produces the catalytic current with the max. ...

Takanori Tamaki; Taichi Ito; Takeo Yamaguchi

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

96

Non-stationary hyperaccretion of stellar-mass black holes in three dimensions: Torus evolution and neutrino emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of selfgravitating, thick accretion discs around hyperaccreting stellar-mass black holes. The black hole-torus systems are considered to be remnants of compact object mergers, in which case the disc is not fed by an external mass reservoir and the accretion is non-stationary. Our models take into account viscous dissipation, described by an alpha-law, a detailed equation of state for the disc gas, and an approximate treatment of general relativistic effects on the disc structure by using a pseudo-Newtonian potential for the black hole including its possible rotation and spin-up during accretion. Magnetic fields are ignored. The neutrino emission of the hot disc is treated by a neutrino-trapping scheme, and the neutrino-antineutrino annihilation near the disc is evaluated in a post-processing step. Our simulations show that the neutrino emission and energy deposition by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation increase sensitively with the disc mass, with the black hole spin in case of a disc in corotation, and in particular with the alpha-viscosity. We find that for sufficiently large alpha-viscosity neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can be a viable energy source for gamma-ray bursts.

S. Setiawan; M. Ruffert; H. -Th. Janka

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hydrotreatment of petroleum vaccum residue with NiMo supported on carbon black of hollow nano-particles  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenation with NiMo catalyst on the carbon black of hollow sphere was very active to decrease asphaltene(hexane insoluble:HI) from 10% to 1% in the VR under the conditions of 340{degrees}C, 4h, and 10 MPa of H2. Non-protonated-aromatic carbons of remaining HI were converted to protonated carbons with increase of naphthenic carbons observed by {sup 13}C-NMR. Metallic compounds principally contained in HI were also converted to be hexane soluble(HS). It revealed that some of the metal containing compounds trapped in the asphaltene micelle are liberated from the micelle through the catalytic hydrogenation under mild conditions. The present catalyst was found much more active for the hydrogenative conversion of asphaltene and metallic compounds as well as the demetallation than the conventional demetallation catalysts, suggesting that NiMo/KB catalyst is highly dispersed to interact more intimately with asphaltene molecules.

Yamashita, N.; Sakanishi, K.; Mochida, I. [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effects of subchronic inhalation exposure to carbon black nanoparticles in the nasal airways of laboratory rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nose can be an efficient filter for inhaled gases, vapours and particles that may be harmful to the lung. Nasal airways may also be targets for injury caused by inhaled toxicants. To investigate the nasal toxicity of carbon black nanoparticles (CB), rats were exposed to 0, 1, 7 or 50 mg/m³ of high surface area CB (HSCB; primary particle size 17 nm; particle surface area 300 m²/g) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 13 week. Additional rats were exposed to 50 mg/m³ of low surface area CB (LSCB; primary particle size 70 nm; particle surface area 37 m²/g). Rats were sacrificed 1 day, 13 week, or 11 months postexposure (PE). Rats exposed to mid- or high-dose HSCB had nasal inflammatory and epithelial lesions at one day PE. HSCB-induced nasal inflammation resolved by 13 week PE, but some nasal epithelial lesions were still present in rats at 11 months after high-dose HSCB exposure. Low-dose HSCB or high-dose LSCB induced only minimal epithelial lesions that were resolved by 13 week PE. Results indicate that incidence, severity, and persistence of CB-induced nasal toxicity in rats is dependent on exposure concentration, particle surface area, and time PE. Effects of inhaled CB on human nasal airways are yet to be determined.

Priya Santhanam; James G. Wagner; Alison Elder; Robert Gelein; Janet M. Carter; Kevin E. Driscoll; Gunter Oberdorster; Jack R. Harkema

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701  

SciTech Connect

It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D. [Hadley Center for Climate Predictions & Research, Exeter (United Kingdom)

2005-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

The lowest-mass stellar black holes: catastrophic death of neutron stars in gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mergers of double neutron stars are considered the most likely progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient accreting torus of nuclear matter (Lee & Ramirez-Ruiz 2007, Oechslin & Janka 2006), and the conversion of a fraction of the torus mass-energy to radiation can power a gamma-ray burst (Nakar 2006). Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary calculations of double neutron star formation, we demonstrate that the fraction of mergers that can form a black hole -- torus system depends very sensitively on the (largely unknown) maximum neutron star mass. We show that the available observations and models put a very stringent constraint on this maximum mass under the assumption that a black hole formation is required to produce a short gamma-ray burst in a double neutron star merger. Specifically, we find that the maximum neutron star mass must be within 2 - 2.5 Msun. Moreover, a single unambiguous measurement of a neutron star mass above 2.5 Msun would exclude a black hole -- torus central engine model of short gamma-ray bursts in double neutron star mergers. Such an observation would also indicate that if in fact short gamma-ray bursts are connected to neutron star mergers, the gamma-ray burst engine is best explained by the lesser known model invoking a highly magnetized massive neutron star (e.g., Usov 1992; Kluzniak & Ruderman 1998; Dai et al. 2006; Metzger, Quataert & Thompson 2007).

K. Belczynski; R. O'Shaughnessy; V. Kalogera; F. Rasio; R. Taam; T. Bulik

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

X-ray Properties of Intermediate-mass Black Holes in Active Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a pilot study of the X-ray properties of intermediate-mass (~10^5-10^6 M_sun) black holes in active galaxies using the Chandra X-ray telescope. Eight of the 10 active galaxies are detected with a significance of at least 3 sigma, with X-ray luminosities in the range L_(0.5-2 keV) ~ 10^41-10^43 ergs/s. The optical-to-X-ray flux ratios are consistent with expectations, given the known correlations between alpha_ox and ultraviolet luminosity, while a couple of objects appear to be anomalously X-ray weak. The range of 0.5--2 keV photon indices we measure, 1 X-ray spectral index. On the other hand, we do find evidence for a correlation between X-ray power-law slope and both X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio, which may suggest that X-ray emission mechanisms weaken at high Eddington ratio. Such a weakening may explain the X-ray weakness of one of our most optically luminous objects.

Jenny E. Greene; Luis C. Ho

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

The antikick strikes back: recoil velocities for nearly-extremal binary black hole mergers in the test-mass limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves emitted from a generic binary black-hole merger carry away linear momentum anisotropically, resulting in a gravitational recoil, or "kick", of the center of mass. For certain merger configurations the time evolution of the magnitude of the kick velocity has a local maximum followed by a sudden drop. Perturbative studies of this "antikick" in a limited range of black hole spins have found that the antikick decreases for retrograde orbits as a function of negative spin. We analyze this problem using a recently developed code to evolve gravitational perturbations from a point-particle in Kerr spacetime driven by an effective-one-body resummed radiation reaction force at linear order in the mass ratio $\

Alessandro Nagar; Enno Harms; Sebastiano Bernuzzi; An?l Zengino?lu

2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Center of Mass Energy of the Collision for two Neutral Particles in the Background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the center of mass energy of the collision for two neutral particles with different rest masses falling freely from rest at infinity in the background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole. Further, we discuss the center of mass energy near the horizon(s) of an extremal and non-extremal Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole and show that an arbitrarily high center of mass energy is achievable under some restrictions. We will study the special case of the center of mass energy when the specific energy, specific angular momentum and Carter constant of both the particles are same.

Zakria, Ayesha

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Center of Mass Energy of the Collision for two Neutral Particles in the Background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the center of mass energy of the collision for two neutral particles with different rest masses falling freely from rest at infinity in the background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole. Further, we discuss the center of mass energy near the horizon(s) of an extremal and non-extremal Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole and show that an arbitrarily high center of mass energy is achievable under some restrictions. We will study the special case of the center of mass energy when the specific energy, specific angular momentum and Carter constant of both the particles are same.

Ayesha Zakria; Mubasher Jamil

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

Black Hole Formation in Core-Collapse Supernovae and Time-of-Flight Measurements of the Neutrino Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early black hole formation in core-collapse supernovae may be triggered by mass accretion or a change in the high-density equation of state. We consider the possibility that black hole formation happens when the flux of neutrinos is still measurably high. If this occurs, then the neutrino signal from the supernova will be terminated abruptly (the transition takes $\\lesssim 0.5$ ms). The properties and duration of the signal before the cutoff are important measures of both the physics and astrophysics of the cooling proto-neutron star. For the event rates expected in present and proposed detectors, the cutoff will generally appear sharp, thus allowing model-independent time-of-flight mass tests for the neutrinos after the cutoff. If black hole formation occurs relatively early, within a few ($\\sim 1$) seconds after core collapse, then the expected luminosities are of order $L_{BH} = 10^{52}$ erg/s per flavor. In this case, the neutrino mass sensitivity can be extraordinary. For a supernova at a distance $D = 10$ kpc, SuperKamiokande can detect a $\\bar{\

J. F. Beacom; R. N. Boyd; A. Mezzacappa

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

111

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the atmosphere from biomass burning, Climatic Change, 2,Chemistry and Physics Biomass burning contribution to black2011 Y. H. Mao et al. : Biomass burning contribution to

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Search for gravitational radiation from intermediate mass black hole binaries in data from the second LIGO-Virgo joint science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on an unmodeled, all-sky search for gravitational waves from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). The search was performed on data from the second joint science run of the LIGO and Virgo ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

114

Mass production of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by metal dusting process with high yield  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over Fe-Ni nanoparticles supported alloy 304L. {yields} Production of carbon nanotubes with high yield (700-1000%) and low cost catalyst. {yields} Optimum growth condition is CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C under long term repetitive thermal cycling. {yields} Possibility of the mass production by metal dusting process with low cost. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube materials were synthesized over Fe-Ni nanoparticles generated during disintegration of the surface of alloy 304L under metal dusting environment. The metal dusting condition was simulated and optimized through exposing stainless steel samples during long term repetitive thermal cycling in CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, total gas flow rate 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C for 300 h. After reaction, surface morphology of the samples and also carbonaceous deposition which had grown on sample surfaces were examined by stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes could be formed over nanocatalyst generated on the alloy surface by exploiting metal dusting process. By optimization of reaction parameters the yields of carbon nanotube materials obtained were 700-1000%. Also it has been shown herein that the amount of carbon nanotube materials remarkably increases when the reaction time is extended up to 300 h, indicating a possibility of the mass production by this easy method.

Ghorbani, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, A.M., E-mail: Rashidiam@ripi.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegari, S.; Mirdamadi, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alaei, M. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...water-assisted CVD SuperGrowth...26). All optical components, the...solar absorber coatings for high-efficiency...nanotube black coating in the infrared...graphite black-coating for cryogenic...nickel-phosphorus alloy optical absorber . IEEE...thermometric applications at low temperatures...2007 ) Optical thin-film materials with low...

Kohei Mizuno; Juntaro Ishii; Hideo Kishida; Yuhei Hayamizu; Satoshi Yasuda; Don N. Futaba; Motoo Yumura; Kenji Hata

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2002 ) Deposition of PVD solar absorber coatings for high-efficiency thermal collectors...depositon of black nickel solar absorber coatings on stainless steel AISI316L for thermal...Solar selective black nickel-cobalt coatings on aluminum alloys . Sol Energy Mater Sol...

Kohei Mizuno; Juntaro Ishii; Hideo Kishida; Yuhei Hayamizu; Satoshi Yasuda; Don N. Futaba; Motoo Yumura; Kenji Hata

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The powerful jet of an off-nuclear intermediate-mass black hole in the spiral galaxy NGC 2276  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jet ejection by accreting black holes is a mass invariant mechanism unifying stellar and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that should also apply for intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), which are thought to be the seeds from which SMBHs form. We present the detection of an off-nuclear IMBH of $\\sim$5 $\\times$ 10$^{4}$ M$_\\odot$ located in an unusual spiral arm of the galaxy NGC 2276 based on quasi-simultaneous \\textit{Chandra} X-ray observations and European VLBI Network (EVN) radio observations. The IMBH, NGC2276-3c, possesses a 1.8 pc radio jet that is oriented in the same direction as large-scale ($\\sim$650 pc) radio lobes and whose emission is consistent with flat to optically thin synchrotron emission between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. Its jet kinetic power ($4 \\times 10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$) is comparable to its radiative output and its jet efficiency ($\\geq$ 46\\%) is as large as that of SMBHs. A region of $\\sim$300 pc along the jet devoid of young stars could provide observational evidence of jet feedback from...

Mezcua, M; Lobanov, A P; Sutton, A D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Is radio jet power linearly proportional to the product of central black hole mass and Eddington ratio in AGN?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the relation between radio jet power and the product of central black hole (BH) mass and Eddington ratio of AGN is proposed, and the model is examined with data from the literature. We find that radio jet power positively correlates but not linearly with the product of BH mass ($m$ in solar mass) and Eddington ratio ($\\lambda$), and the power law indices ($\\mu$) are significantly less than unity for relatively low accretion ($\\lambdapower assuming that the spin induced jet is gradually suppressed as the accretion rate increases. Whereas, for the high-z quasars which often show the slope $\\mu\\geq1$, a positive correlation between the radio loudness and disc luminosity is pr...

Liu, Xiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Black Carbon and Kerosene Lighting: An Opportunity for Rapid Action on Climate Change and Clean Energy for Development  

SciTech Connect

Replacing inefficient kerosene lighting with electric lighting or other clean alternatives can rapidly achieve development and energy access goals, save money and reduce climate warming. Many of the 250 million households that lack reliable access to electricity rely on inefficient and dangerous simple wick lamps and other kerosene-fueled light sources, using 4 to 25 billion liters of kerosene annually to meet basic lighting needs. Kerosene costs can be a significant household expense and subsidies are expensive. New information on kerosene lamp emissions reveals that their climate impacts are substantial. Eliminating current annual black carbon emissions would provide a climate benefit equivalent to 5 gigatons of carbon dioxide reductions over the next 20 years. Robust and low-cost technologies for supplanting simple wick and other kerosene-fueled lamps exist and are easily distributed and scalable. Improving household lighting offers a low-cost opportunity to improve development, cool the climate and reduce costs.

Jacobson, Arne [Humboldt State Univ., MN (United States). Schatz Energy Research Center; Bond, Tami C. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lam, Nicholoas L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences; Hultman, Nathan [The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A 400 solar mass black hole in the Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1 accreting close to its Eddington limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M82 X-1, the brightest X-ray source in the galaxy M82, has been thought to be an intermediate-mass black hole (100 to 10,000 solar masses) because of its extremely high luminosity and variability characteristics, although some models suggest that its mass may be only about 20 solar masses. The previous mass estimates were based on scaling relations that use low-frequency characteristic timescales which have large intrinsic uncertainties. For stellar-mass black holes, we know that the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (100-450 hertz) in the X-ray emission that occur in a 3:2 frequency ratio are stable and scale in frequency inversely with black hole mass with a reasonably small dispersion. The discovery of such stable oscillations thus potentially offers an alternative and less ambiguous means of mass determination for intermediate-mass black holes, but has hitherto not been realized. Here we report stable, twin-peak (3:2 frequency ratio) X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations from M82 X-1 at frequencies o...

Pasham, Dheeraj R; Mushotzky, Richard F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, $\\ell=m=2$, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M . G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brckner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Caldern Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Delglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; V. Dolique; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; L. Gondan; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Grf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jimnez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; K. Haris; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kflian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

A transition mass for black holes to show broad emission lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for black holes to show broad emission lines Susmita Chakravorty 1 2 Martin Elvis 2...properties in common, the broad emission lines (BELs) are exclusively signatures of...AGN). Based on the detection of these lines from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS......

Susmita Chakravorty; Martin Elvis; Gary Ferland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Black Carbon-Inclusive Modeling Approaches for Estimating the Aquatic Fate of Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three versions of the model were developed in which sediment-water partitioning was described using (i) an amorphous organic carbon (AOC) partitioning sorption model without BC sorption, (ii) a combined AOC and BC sorption model based on the Freundlich isotherm, and (iii) a combined BC-AOC model based on the Langmuir isotherm. ... However, for estimation of KTOC or dissolved water concentrations, both versions of the combined AOC and BC sorption models provided greatly improved estimates compared to the AOC-only model. ... Multimedia fate models typically assume that amorphous organic carbon (AOC) is entirely responsible for the sorbing capacity of solids for hydrophobic compounds and that the solid-water distribution coefficient Kd (LW/kgdw) can be readily estimated from the mass fraction of organic carbon in the solid and the organic carbon normalized solid-water partition coefficient (KAOC) (1), where fAOC is the mass fraction of AOC in dried soil or sediment and KAOC (LW/kgAOC) is the organic carbon normalized solidwater partition coefficient. ...

James M. Armitage; Ian T. Cousins; N. Johan Persson; rjan Gustafsson; Gerard Cornelissen; Tuomo Saloranta; Dag Broman; Kristoffer Ns

2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Probing the mass loss history of carbon stars using CO line and dust continuum emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive modelling of CO line emission from the circumstellar envelopes around a number of carbon stars is performed. By combining radio observations and infrared observations obtained by ISO the circumstellar envelope characteristics are probed over a large radial range. In the radiative transfer analysis the observational data are consistently reproduced assuming a spherically symmetric and smooth wind expanding at a constant velocity. The combined data set gives better determined envelope parameters, and puts constraints on the mass loss history of these carbon stars. The importance of dust in the excitation of CO is addressed using a radiative transfer analysis of the observed continuum emission, and it is found to have only minor effects on the derived line intensities. The analysis of the dust emission also puts further constraints on the mass loss rate history. The stars presented here are not likely to have experienced any drastic long-term mass loss rate modulations, at least less than a factor of about 5, over the past thousands of years. Only three, out of nine, carbon stars were observed long enough by ISO to allow a detection of CO far-infrared rotational lines.

F. L. Schoeier; N. Ryde; H. Olofsson

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

Black carbon pollution of speleothems by fine urban aerosols in tourist caves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Previous work on airborne carbon particles...chemically defined organic fraction of the carbon particles...soot from natural fires and torch, bat guano...suggested that the As release was not the result...area electron dif-fraction (SAED) pattern...

Gi Young Jeong; Soo Jin Kim; Sae Jung Chang

127

CHARACTERIZATION OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-TYPE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. HOST BULGE PROPERTIES AND BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES  

SciTech Connect

We present a study of the host bulge properties and their relations with the black hole mass for a sample of 10 intermediate-type active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our sample consists mainly of early-type spirals, four of them hosting a bar. For 70{sup +10} {sub -17}% of the galaxies, we have been able to determine the type of the bulge, and find that these objects probably harbor a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge, suggesting that pseudobulges might be frequent in intermediate-type AGNs. In our sample, 50% {+-} 14% of the objects show double-peaked emission lines. Therefore, narrow double-peaked emission lines seem to be frequent in galaxies harboring a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge. Depending on the bulge type, we estimated the black hole mass using the corresponding M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation and found them within a range of 5.69 {+-} 0.21 < log M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} < 8.09 {+-} 0.24. Comparing these M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} values with masses derived from the FWHM of H{beta} and the continuum luminosity at 5100 A from their SDSS-DR7 spectra (M {sub BH}), we find that 8 out of 10 (80{sup +7} {sub -17}%) galaxies have black hole masses that are compatible within a factor of 3. This result would support that M {sub BH} and M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} are the same for intermediate-type AGNs, as has been found for type 1 AGNs. However, when the type of the bulge is taken into account, only three out of the seven (43{sup +18} {sub -15}%) objects of the sample have their M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} and M {sub BH} compatible within 3{sigma} errors. We also find that estimations based on the M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation for pseudobulges are not compatible in 50% {+-} 20% of the objects.

Benitez, Erika; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Martinez, Benoni; Jimenez-Bailon, Elena [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)] [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Lopez-Martin, Luis [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)] [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM-IPN), U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)] [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM-IPN), U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Chavushyan, Vahram [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51-216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)] [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51-216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Leon-Tavares, Jonathan, E-mail: erika@astro.unam.mx [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, 02540 Kylmaelae (Finland)] [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, 02540 Kylmaelae (Finland)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Template banks to search for low-mass binary black holes in advanced gravitational-wave detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coalescing binary black holes (BBHs) are among the most likely sources for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and its international partners Virgo and KAGRA. Optimal searches for BBHs require accurate waveforms for the signal model and effectual template banks that cover the mass space of interest. We investigate the ability of the second-order post-Newtonian TaylorF2 hexagonal template placement metric to construct an effectual template bank, if the template waveforms used are effective one body waveforms tuned to numerical relativity (EOBNRv2). We find that by combining the existing TaylorF2 placement metric with EOBNRv2 waveforms, we can construct an effectual search for BBHs with component masses in the range 3 Msolar searches. We find that for systems with (m_1/m_2)= 2.68 radians, there is no significant loss in the total possible signal-to-noise ratio due to neglecting modes other than l = m = 2 in the template waveforms. For a source population uniformly distributed in spacial volume, over the entire sampled region of the component-mass space, the loss in detection rate (averaged over a uniform distribution of inclination angle and sky-location/polarization angles), remains below ~11%. For binaries with high mass-ratios \\textit{and} 0.31 Advanced LIGO. Our results can be used to construct matched-filter searches in Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo.

Duncan A. Brown; Prayush Kumar; Alexander H. Nitz

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Dark matter and dark energy accretion on to intermediate-mass black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dark matter and dark energy accretion on to intermediate-mass...1428 Buenos Aires, Argentina 2 Consejo Nacional de...AAJ, Buenos Aires, Argentina 3 Instituto Argentino...de Buenos Aires, Argentina In this work we investigate...the so-called dark energy on to an intermediate-mass......

C. Pepe; L. J. Pellizza; G. E. Romero

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

130

A near-infrared relationship for estimating black hole masses in active galactic nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......a continuum spectral energy distribution (SED...nearby (in position and air mass) A0-V star with...circles). Therefore, improving the number statistics...and where M BH is in solar masses, FWHM and sigmaline...reverberation-mapped AGN with high-quality near-IR spectroscopy......

Hermine Landt; Martin J. Ward; Bradley M. Peterson; Misty C. Bentz; Martin Elvis; Kirk T. Korista; Margarita Karovska

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Catalytic Conversion of Tars, Carbon Black and Methane from Pyrolysis/Gasification of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of catalysts in biomass gasification has been suggested for a long time.1 Fung and Graham found that potassium carbonate and calcium oxide have catalytic influences on the gasification rate and the produc...

Clas Ekstrm; Nils Lindman; Rune Pettersson

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES: ASSESSING THE NON-STELLAR INFRARED COMPONENT  

SciTech Connect

We have combined ground-based optical and near-infrared data with Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data for five black hole (BH) soft X-ray transients (SXTs) in order to determine the levels of near- and mid-infrared emission from sources other than the secondary star. Mid-infrared emission from an accretion disk, circumbinary dust, and/or a jet could act as sources of near-infrared contamination, thereby diluting ellipsoidal variations of the secondary star and affecting determined BH mass estimates. Based on optical to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution modeling of the five SXTs along with the prototype, V616 Mon, we detected mid-infrared excesses in half of the systems, and suggest that the excesses detected from these systems arise from non-thermal synchrotron jets rather than circumbinary dust disks.

Gelino, Dawn M. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gelino, Christopher R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Harrison, Thomas E., E-mail: dawn@ipac.caltech.ed [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluation of Preindustrial to Present-day Black Carbon and its Albedo Forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against the observations including 12 ice core records, a long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using the NCAR Community Land and Sea-Ice model 4 with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000, which includes the SNICAR BC-snow model. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations to using recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to the differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology among models; 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However,models agree well on 2.5~3 times increase in the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day, which matches with the 2.5 times increase in BC emissions. We find a large model diversity at both NH and SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfrauch and Ispra. However, the models fail to capture the Arctic BC seasonality due tosevere underestimations during winter and spring. Compared to recent snowpack measurements, the simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of observations except for Greenland and Arctic Ocean. However, model and observation differ widely due to missing interannual variations in emissions and possibly due to the choice of the prescribed meteorology period (i.e., 1996-2000).

Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, Drew; Berntsen, T.; Bisiauxs, M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; McConnell, J.R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Black carbon pollution of speleothems by fine urban aerosols in tourist caves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...washing with distilled water three times. A drop of a suspension of the residues from acid dissolution was loaded on a micro-grid of lacey formvar-carbon using a micro-pipette. Particle shapes and element compositions were analyzed using a Carl...

Gi Young Jeong; Soo Jin Kim; Sae Jung Chang

139

Fluorine-Doped Carbon Blacks: Highly Efficient Metal-Free Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a result of the energy crisis in the world, fuel cells are attractive as clean and sustainable energy conversion devices because they can help address the ever increasing global energy demand. ... (2, 3) To date, Pt-based materials are the most widely used electrocatalysts for ORR;(4-6) however, Pt-based catalysts suffer from problems, such as sluggish oxygen reduction at any pH, durability, very limited reserves, high cost, and inactivation by carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. ...

Xiujuan Sun; Yuwei Zhang; Ping Song; Jing Pan; Lin Zhuang; Weilin Xu; Wei Xing

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

Using electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectrometry to study competitive binding of inhibitors to carbonic anhydrase  

SciTech Connect

We report a method based on mass spectrometry for the characterization of noncovalent complexes of proteins with mixtures of ligands; this method is relevant to the study of drug leads and may be useful in screening libraries for tight-binding compounds. This study describes the competitive binding of inhibitors derived from para-substituted benzenesulfonamides to bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCAII, EC 4.2.1.1) using this technique. Relative binding constants and structural information for a mixture of inhibitors can be obtained in a single experiment using ESI-FTICR-MS. The work demonstrates that ESI-MS has significant potential for measuring relative binding affinities and characterizing the structures of ligands associated noncovalently to proteins. We have detected noncovalent complexes in the gas phase for ligands having values of K{sub b} as low as 1.7 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} in solution. The technique also allowed identification of tightbinding ligands from small libraries. The structures of inhibitors having similar masses can be identified by the high-resolution and multistep dissociation mass spectrometry of which FTICR is uniquely capable. This range of capabilities for ESI-FTICR-MS should be widely useful in medicinal chemistry. 22 refs., 2 figs.

Cheng, X.; Chen, R.; Bruce, J.E.; Schwartz, B.L.; Anderson, G.A.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Gale, D.C.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gao, J.; Sigal, G.B.; Mammen, M.; Whitesides, G.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Insulating and sheathing materials of electric and optical cables: common test methods part 4-1: methods specific to polyethylene and polypropylene compounds resistance to environmental stress cracking measurement of the melt flow index carbon black and/or mineral filler content measurement in polyethylene by direct combustion measurement of carbon black content by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) assessment of carbon black dispersion in polyethylene using a microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specifies the test methods to be used for testing polymeric insulating and sheathing materials of electric cables for power distribution and telecommunications including cables used on ships. Gives the methods for measurements of the resistance to environmental stress cracking, for wrapping test after thermal ageing in air, for measurement of melt flow index and for measurement of carbon black and/or mineral filler content, which apply to PE and PP coumpounds, including cellular compounds and foam skin for insulation.

International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

SDSS J013127.34-032100.1: a candidate blazar with a 11 billion solar mass black hole at $z$=5.18  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radio-loud quasar SDSS J013127.34-032100.1 at a redshift z=5.18 is one of the most distant radio-loud objects. The radio to optical flux ratio (i.e. the radio-loudness) of the source is large, making it a promising blazar candidate. Its overall spectral energy distribution, completed by the X-ray flux and slope derived through Target of Opportunity Swift/XRT observations, is interpreted by a jet non-thermal plus an accretion disc and molecular torus model. We estimate that its black hole mass is (1.1+-0.2)e10 Msun, the largest found at these redshifts. We derive a viewing angle between 3 and 5 degrees. This implies that there must be other (hundreds) sources with the same black hole mass of SDSS J013127.34-032100.1, but whose jets are pointing away from Earth. We discuss the problems posed by the existence of such large black hole masses at such redshifts, especially in jetted quasars. In fact, if they are associated to rapidly spinning black holes, the accretion efficiency is high, implying a slower pace...

Ghisellini, G; Sbarrato, T; Gehrels, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

EVOLUTION OF BLACK CARBON MIXING-STATE IN AN URBAN-BIOGENIC ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 (DOE G-1) and the incandescent signal peak from the BC core (BC; mass equivalent diameter = 60 - 650 nm). For nascent soot that must first "boil" off before the BC core can incandesce. It is this time ­ to vaporize the coating

144

A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China  

SciTech Connect

Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

145

Measuring the luminosity and virial black hole mass dependence of quasar-galaxy clustering at z ~ 0.8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dependence of quasar clustering on quasar luminosity and black hole mass by measuring the angular overdensity of photometrically selected galaxies imaged by WISE about z $\\sim$ 0.8 quasars from SDSS. By measuring the quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function and using photometrically selected galaxies, we achieve a higher density of tracer objects and a more sensitive detection of clustering than measurements of the quasar autocorrelation function. We test models of quasar formation and evolution by measuring the luminosity dependence of clustering amplitude. We find a significant overdensity of WISE galaxies about z $\\sim$ 0.8 quasars at 0.2--6.4 h$^{-1}$ Mpc in projected comoving separation. We find no appreciable increase in clustering amplitude with quasar luminosity across a decade in luminosity, and a power-law fit between luminosity and clustering amplitude gives an exponent of $-$0.01 $\\pm$ 0.06 (1 $\\sigma$ errorbar). We also fail to find a significant relationship between clustering ampli...

Krolewski, Alex G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluation of Sludge Characteristics and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plants in China by Mass and Energy Balances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy balances were used to evaluate the characteristics of sludge and to calculate the carbon dioxide emissions in the WWTPs in this study. To avoid the errors, mass balances by TP have been used to calibrate the relating data before making energy ... Keywords: Sludge, CEP, mass balance, energy balance, carbon dioxide

Gan Wang; Yongzhen Peng; Shuying Wang; Gan Wang; Hongxun Hou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Search for narrow resonances and quantum black holes in inclusive and b-tagged dijet mass spectra from pp collisions at s?=7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J H E P01(2013)013 Published for SISSA by Springer Received: October 8, 2012 Accepted: December 6, 2012 Published: January 2, 2013 Search for narrow resonances and quantum black holes in inclusive and b-tagged dijet mass spectra from pp collisions... Access, Copyright CERN, for the benefit of the CMS collaboration doi:10.1007/JHEP01(2013)013 J H E P01(2013)013 Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 The CMS detector and data sample 3 3 Event reconstruction and selection 4 4 Measurement of the dijet mass spectrum...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Bio-mass derived mesoporous carbon as super electrode in all vanadium redox flow battery with multicouple reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We first report the multi-couple reaction in all vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB) while using bio-mass (coconut shell) derived mesoporous carbon as electrode. The presence of V3+/V4+ redox couple certainly supplies the additional electrons for the electrochemical reaction and subsequently provides improved electrochemical performance of VRFB system. The efficient electro-catalytic activity of such coconut shell derived high surface area mesoporous carbon is believed for the improved cell performance. Extensive power and electrochemical studies are performed for VRFB application point of view and described in detail.

Mani Ulaganathan; Akshay Jain; Vanchiappan Aravindan; Sundaramurthy Jayaraman; Wong Chui Ling; Tuti Mariana Lim; M.P. Srinivasan; Qingyu Yan; Srinivasan Madhavi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Black Hole Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mass of a black hole has traditionally been identified with its energy. We describe a new perspective on black hole thermodynamics, one that identifies the mass of a black hole with chemical enthalpy, and the cosmological constant as thermodynamic pressure. This leads to an understanding of black holes from the viewpoint of chemistry, in terms of concepts such as Van der Waals fluids, reentrant phase transitions, and triple points. Both charged and rotating black holes exhibit novel chemical-type phase behaviour, hitherto unseen.

David Kubiznak; Robert B. Mann

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Search for gravitational radiation from intermediate mass black hole binaries in data from the second LIGO-Virgo joint science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on an unmodeled, all-sky search for gravitational waves from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). The search was performed on data from the second joint science run of the LIGO and Virgo detectors (July 2009 - October 2010) and was sensitive to IMBHBs with a range up to $\\sim 200$ Mpc, averaged over the possible sky positions and inclinations of the binaries with respect to the line of sight. No significant candidate was found. Upper limits on the coalescence-rate density of nonspinning IMBHBs with total masses between 100 and $450 \\ \\mbox{M}_{\\odot}$ and mass ratios between $0.25$ and $1\\,$ were placed by combining this analysis with an analogous search performed on data from the first LIGO-Virgo joint science run (November 2005 - October 2007). The most stringent limit was set for systems consisting of two $88 \\ \\mbox{M}_{\\odot}$ black holes and is equal to $0.12 \\ \\mbox{Mpc}^{-3} \\ \\mbox{Myr}^{-1}$ at the $90\\%$ confidence level. This paper also presents the first estimate, for the case of an unmodeled analysis, of the impact on the search range of IMBHB spin configurations: the visible volume for IMBHBs with nonspinning components is roughly doubled for a population of IMBHBs with spins aligned with the binary's orbital angular momentum and uniformly distributed in the dimensionless spin parameter up to 0.8, whereas an analogous population with antialigned spins decreases the visible volume by $\\sim 20\\%\\,$.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brckner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Caldern Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Delglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Grf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jimnez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; K Haris; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kflian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Modeling Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mass Transfer after Amendment of Contaminated Sediment with Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). We extend our evaluation of ...

David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Massive spin-2 fields on black hole spacetimes: Instability of the Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions and bounds on the graviton mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Massive bosonic fields of arbitrary spin are predicted by general extensions of the standard model. It has been recently shown that there exists a family of bimetric theories of gravityincluding massive gravitywhich are free of Boulware-Deser ghosts at the nonlinear level. This opens up the possibility to describe consistently the dynamics of massive spin-2 particles in a gravitational field. Within this context, we develop the study of massive spin-2 fluctuationsincluding massive gravitonsaround Schwarzschild and slowly rotating Kerr black holes. Our work has two important outcomes. First, we show that the Schwarzschild geometry is linearly unstable for small tensor masses, against a spherically symmetric mode. Second, we provide solid evidence that the Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against long-lived superradiant modes. In the absence of nonlinear effects, the observation of spinning black holes bounds the graviton mass ? to be ??510-23??eV.

Richard Brito; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Temperaturepressure conditions in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin: implications for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorption of gas onto coal is sensitive to pressure and temperature, and carbon dioxide can be a potentially volatile supercritical fluid in coalbed methane reservoirs. More than 5000 wells have been drilled in the coalbed methane fields of the Black Warrior basin in west-central Alabama, and the hydrologic and geothermic information from geophysical well logs provides a robust database that can be used to assess the potential for carbon sequestration in coal-bearing strata. Reservoir temperature within the coalbed methane target zone generally ranges from 80 to 125 F (2752 C), and geothermal gradient ranges from 6.0 to 19.9 F/1000 ft (10.936.2 C/km). Geothermal gradient data have a strong central tendency about a mean of 9.0 F/1000 ft (16.4 C/km). Hydrostatic pressure gradients in the coalbed methane fields range from normal (0.43 psi/ft) to extremely underpressured (wells have pressure gradients greater than 0.30 psi/ft, and 20% have pressure gradients lower than 0.10 psi/ft. Pockets of underpressure are developed around deep longwall coal mines and in areas distal to the main hydrologic recharge zone, which is developed in structurally upturned strata along the southeastern margin of the basin. Geothermal gradients within the coalbed methane fields are high enough that reservoirs never cross the gasliquid condensation line for carbon dioxide. However, reservoirs have potential for supercritical fluid conditions beyond a depth of 2480 ft (756 m) under normally pressured conditions. All target coal beds are subcritically pressured in the northeastern half of the coalbed methane exploration fairway, whereas those same beds were in the supercritical phase window prior to gas production in the southwestern half of the fairway. Although mature reservoirs are dewatered and thus are in the carbon dioxide gas window, supercritical conditions may develop as reservoirs equilibrate toward a normal hydrostatic pressure gradient after abandonment. Coal can hold large quantities of carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, and supercritical isotherms indicate non-Langmiur conditions under which some carbon dioxide may remain mobile in coal or may react with formation fluids or minerals. Hence, carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery show great promise in subcritical reservoirs, and additional research is required to assess the behavior of carbon dioxide in coal under supercritical conditions where additional sequestration capacity may exist.

Jack C Pashin; Marcella R McIntyre

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama Jack C. Pashin (jpashin@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Richard H. Groshong, Jr. (rgroshon@wgs.geo.ua.edu; 205-348-1882) Deparment of Geology University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Richard E. Carroll (rcarroll@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Abstract Sequestration of CO 2 in coal is a market-based environmental solution with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while increasing coalbed methane recovery. Producing coalbed methane through injection of CO 2 is also more efficient than current techniques requiring

157

Thermokinetic/mass-transfer analysis of carbon capture for reuse/sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

Effective capture of atmospheric carbon is a key bottleneck preventing non bio-based, carbon-neutral production of synthetic liquid hydrocarbon fuels using CO{sub 2} as the carbon feedstock. Here we outline the boundary conditions of atmospheric carbon capture for recycle to liquid hydrocarbon fuels production and re-use options and we also identify the technical advances that must be made for such a process to become technically and commercially viable at scale. While conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} into a pure feedstock for hydrocarbon fuels synthesis is presently feasible at the bench-scale - albeit at high cost energetically and economically - the methods and materials needed to concentrate large amounts of CO{sub 2} at low cost and high efficiency remain technically immature. Industrial-scale capture must entail: (1) Processing of large volumes of air through an effective CO{sub 2} capture media and (2) Efficient separation of CO{sub 2} from the processed air flow into a pure stream of CO{sub 2}.

Stechel, Ellen Beth; Brady, Patrick Vane; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Luketa, Anay Josephine

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Furnace Black Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Black Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher 005F 2 Definitions Particle Aggregate = 20nm to 100nm "Diameter" = 200nm to 1,000nm "Length" = Set of Percolated Aggregates Particle (?) Aggregate Agglomerate Constituents Size = Tech/Scientific Challenge 005F 3 Furnace Process High Temperature Refractory Feedstock Oil Air Natural Gas Reaction Zone Quench 005F 4 Specific Surface Area 005F 5 Structure 3-D Morphology Key Characteristic Summary of Crystallographic Studies 005F 7 Methodologies 005F 8 Summary * For all furnace carbon black 12Å < L C < 17Å * Crystallite L a ≈ 25Å * Amorphous Carbon * No micropores * Very few surface groups (hetero atoms) { 005F 9 Effect of Heat Treatment on Amorphous Carbon

159

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

160

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Black holes and thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A black hole of given mass, angular momentum, and charge can have a large number of different unobservable internal configurations which reflect the possible different initial configurations of the matter which collapsed to produce the hole. The logarithm of this number can be regarded as the entropy of the black hole and is a measure of the amount of information about the initial state which was lost in the formation of the black hole. If one makes the hypothesis that the entropy is finite, one can deduce that the black holes must emit thermal radiation at some nonzero temperature. Conversely, the recently derived quantum-mechanical result that black holes do emit thermal radiation at temperature ??2? k c, where ? is the surface gravity, enables one to prove that the entropy is finite and is equal to c3A4 G?, where A is the surface area of the event horizon or boundary of the black hole. Because black holes have negative specific heat, they cannot be in stable thermal equilibrium except when the additional energy available is less than 1/4 the mass of the black hole. This means that the standard statistical-mechanical canonical ensemble cannot be applied when gravitational interactions are important. Black holes behave in a completely random and time-symmetric way and are indistinguishable, for an external observer, from white holes. The irreversibility that appears in the classical limit is merely a statistical effect.

S. W. Hawking

1976-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Uniformly accelerated black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The static and stationary C metric are examined in a generic framework and their interpretations studied in some detail, especially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We find that (i) the spacetime of an accelerated static black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or a lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon, (ii) by using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have a higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature of the accelerated frame, and (iii) the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/27) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated rotating black holes with no significant changes.

Patricio S. Letelier and Samuel R. Oliveira

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modeling polychlorinated biphenyl mass transfer after amendment of contaminated sediment with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). The authors extend their evaluation of a model based on intraparticle diffusion by including a biomimetic semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and a first-order degradation rate for the aqueous phase. The model predictions are compared with the previously reported experimental PCB concentrations in the bulk water phase and in SPMDs. The simulated scenarios comprise a marine and a freshwater sediment, four PCB congeners, two AC grain sizes, four doses of AC, and comparison with laboratory experiments. The modeling approach distinguishes between two different sediment particles types: a light-density fraction representing carbonaceous particles such as charcoal, coal, coke, cenospheres, or wood, and a heavy-density fraction representing the mineral phase with coatings of organic matter. A third particle type in the numerical model is AC. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed shifts in the PCB distribution during repartitioning after AC amendment but overestimates the overall effect of the treatment in reducing aqueous and SPMD concentrations of PCBs by a factor of 2-6. For the AC application in sediment, competitive sorption of the various solutes apparently requires a reduction by a factor of 16 of the literature values for the AC-water partitioning coefficient measured in pure aqueous systems. With this correction, model results and measurements agree within a factor of 3. After AC amendment is homogeneously mixed into the sediment and then left undisturbed, aqueous PCB concentrations tend toward the same reduction after 5 years. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy [University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A 700 year sediment record of black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near the EMEP air monitoring station in Aspvreten, Sweden  

SciTech Connect

In view of poor constraints on historical combustion emissions, past environmental loadings of black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) were reconstructed from dated lake sediment cores collected 70 km south of Stockholm, Sweden. Compared to several dramatic variations over the recent 150 years, the preindustrial loadings were steady within {+-}50% through the entire medieval with BC fluxes of 0.071 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} and PAH fluxes of 6 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. In the wood-burning dominated century leading up to the industrial revolution around 1850, increasing BC fluxes were leading PAH fluxes. BC fluxes reached their millennial-scale maximum around 1920, whereas PAH fluxes increased exponentially to its record maximum around 1960, 50-fold above preindustrial values. For 1920-1950, BC fluxes consistently decreased as PAH fluxes kept increasing. Coal and coke represented >50% of the Swedish energy market in the 1930s. Combined with sharply decreasing (1,7-)/(1,7{+-}2,6-dimethylphenanthrene), indicative of diminishing wood combustion, and decreasing methylphenanthrenes/phenanthrene, indicative of higher-temperature combustion (coal instead of wood), the sediment archive suggests that the relative BC/PAH emission factors thus are lower for coal than for wood combustion. For the first time, both BC and PAH fluxes decreased after 1960. This trend break is a testament to the positive effects of decreasing reliance on petroleum fuels and a number of legislative actions aimed at curbing emissions and by 1990, the loading of BC was back at preindustrial levels, whereas that of PAH were the lowest since the 1910s. However, for the most recent period (1990-2004) the BC and PAH fluxes are no longer decreasing. 55 refs., 3 figs.

Marie Elmquist; Zdenek Zencak; Oerjan Gustafsson [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2N, 76.3E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.670.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (?30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1?1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2?2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.90.2 and 1.80.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions.

Prashant Rajput; M.M. Sarin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Binary Black Hole Accretion Flows From a Misaligned Circumbinary Disk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......mass-accretion-rate variation per binary...because each black hole passes across the circumbinary...mass-accretion-rate variation per binary...holes|black hole physics|Galaxies: nuclei...because each black hole passes across the circumbinary...the mass accretion rates is also independent......

Kimitake Hayasaki; Hideki Saito; Shin Mineshige

2013-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

170

Momentum flow in black-hole binaries. II. Numerical simulations of equal-mass, head-on mergers with antiparallel spins  

SciTech Connect

Research on extracting science from binary-black-hole (BBH) simulations has often adopted a 'scattering matrix' perspective: given the binary's initial parameters, what are the final hole's parameters and the emitted gravitational waveform? In contrast, we are using BBH simulations to explore the nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime. Focusing on the head-on plunge, merger, and ringdown of a BBH with transverse, antiparallel spins, we explore numerically the momentum flow between the holes and the surrounding spacetime. We use the Landau-Lifshitz field-theory-in-flat-spacetime formulation of general relativity to define and compute the density of field energy and field momentum outside horizons and the energy and momentum contained within horizons, and we define the effective velocity of each apparent and event horizon as the ratio of its enclosed momentum to its enclosed mass-energy. We find surprisingly good agreement between the horizons' effective and coordinate velocities. During the plunge, the holes experience a frame-dragging-induced acceleration orthogonal to the plane of their spins and their infall ('downward'), and they reach downward speeds of order 1000 km/s. When the common apparent horizon forms (and when the event horizons merge and their merged neck expands), the horizon swallows upward field momentum that resided between the holes, causing the merged hole to accelerate in the opposite ('upward') direction. As the merged hole and the field energy and momentum settle down, a pulsational burst of gravitational waves is emitted, and the merged hole has a final effective velocity of about 20 km/s upward, which agrees with the recoil velocity obtained by measuring the linear momentum carried to infinity by the emitted gravitational radiation. To investigate the gauge dependence of our results, we compare generalized harmonic and Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura-moving-puncture evolutions of physically similar initial data; although the generalized harmonic and Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura-moving-puncture simulations use different gauge conditions, we find remarkably good agreement for our results in these two cases. We also compare our simulations with the post-Newtonian trajectories and near-field energy-momentum.

Lovelace, Geoffrey [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 14853 (United States); Chen Yanbei; Cohen, Michael; Kaplan, Jeffrey D.; Keppel, Drew; Matthews, Keith D.; Nichols, David A.; Scheel, Mark A.; Sperhake, Ulrich [Theoretical Astrophysics 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Inside a black hole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... interior. These models reveal several significantly different behaviours. The simplest model, of a 'Schwarzschild' black hole, which possesses mass but no charge or angular momentum, has an ... into account, seal off the 'tunnel', and yield an interior similar to the Schwarzschild model, with an all-encompassing crushing singularity. More recently, there have been attempts6- ...

William A. Hiscock

1991-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

172

Black Holes in Active Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent years have seen tremendous progress in the quest to detect supermassive black holes in the centers of nearby galaxies, and gas-dynamical measurements of the central masses of active galaxies have been valuable contributions to the local black hole census. This review summarizes measurement techniques and results from observations of spatially resolved gas disks in active galaxies, and reverberation mapping of the broad-line regions of Seyfert galaxies and quasars. Future prospects for the study of black hole masses in active galaxies, both locally and at high redshift, are discussed.

A. J. Barth

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Energy of 4-Dimensional Black Hole, etc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter I suggest possible redefinition of mass density, not depending on speed of the mass element, which leads to a more simple stress-energy for an object. I calculate energy of black hole.

Dmitriy Palatnik

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Black Mountain Insulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation Insulation Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Mountain Insulation Place United Kingdom Sector Carbon Product UK-based manufacturer of sheeps wool insulation which has a low carbon footprint than traditional glassfiber insulation. Website http://www.blackmountaininsula References Black Mountain Insulation Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Black Mountain Insulation is a company located in United Kingdom. It was formerly known as Ochre Natural Insulation Company. [2] References ↑ "Black Mountain Insulation Website" ↑ http://www.companiesintheuk.co.uk/ltd/black-mountain-insulation Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Black_Mountain_Insulation&oldid=391648

175

Satellite-Based Modeling of the Carbon Fluxes in Mature Black Spruce Forests in Alaska: A Synthesis of the Eddy Covariance Data and Satellite Remote Sensing Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scaling up of observed point data to estimate regional carbon fluxes is an important issue in the context of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. In this study, the authors proposed a new model to scale up the eddy covariance data to estimate ...

Masahito Ueyama; Yoshinobu Harazono; Kazuhito Ichii

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The superwind mass-loss rate of the metal-poor carbon star LI-LMC 1813 in the LMC cluster KMHK 1603  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LI-LMC 1813 is a dust-enshrouded Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star, located in the small open cluster KMHK 1603 near the rim of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Optical and infrared photometry between 0.5 and 60 micron is obtained to constrain the spectral energy distribution of LI-LMC 1813. Near-infrared spectra unambiguously show it to be a carbon star. Modelling with the radiation transfer code Dusty yields accurate values for the bolometric luminosity, L=1.5 x 10^4 Lsun, and mass-loss rate, Mdot=3.7(+/-1.2) x 10^-5 Msun/yr. On the basis of colour-magnitude diagrams, the age of the cluster KMHK 1603 is estimated to be t=0.9-1.0 Gyr, which implies a Zero-Age Main Sequence mass for LI-LMC 1813 of M(ZAMS)=2.2+/-0.1 Msun. This makes LI-LMC 1813 arguably the object with the most accurately and reliably determined (circum)stellar parameters amongst all carbon stars in the superwind phase.

Jacco Th. van Loon; Jonathan R. Marshall; Mikako Matsuura; Albert A. Zijlstra

2003-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

177

Modeling the Mass Transfer of Hydrophobic Organic Pollutants in Briefly and Continuously Mixed Sediment after Amendment with Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sarah E. Hale and David Werner * ... PAHs were quantified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry and details of these methods can be found in SI pages S3 and S7, respectively. ...

Sarah E. Hale; David Werner

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Spinning Black Holes as Particle Accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has recently been pointed out that particles falling freely from rest at infinity outside a Kerr black hole can in principle collide with an arbitrarily high center of mass energy in the limiting case of maximal black hole spin. Here we aim to elucidate the mechanism for this fascinating result, and to point out its practical limitations, which imply that ultraenergetic collisions cannot occur near black holes in nature.

Ted Jacobson and Thomas P. Sotiriou

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Secondary Organic Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in organic aerosols was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were analyzed and corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of organic aerosols was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both (+) and (-) modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive and negative ESI modes with the octanol-water partition constant, and more importantly, with the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOA produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared to online O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS methods is comparable to that of the AMS, with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

Bateman, Adam P.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

180

Primordial Black Hole Evolution in Tensor-Scalar Cosmology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A perturbative analysis shows that black holes do not remember the value of the scalar field ? at the time they formed if ? changes in tensor-scalar cosmology. Moreover, even when the black hole mass in the Einstein frame is approximately unaffected by the changing of ?, in the Jordan-Fierz frame the mass increases. This mass increase requires a reanalysis of the evaporation of primordial black holes in tensor-scalar cosmology. It also implies that there could have been a significant magnification of the (Jordan-Fierz frame) mass of primordial black holes.

Ted Jacobson

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Black Hole Evaporation in an Expanding Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the quantum radiation power of black holes which are asymptotic to the Einstein-de Sitter universe at spatial and null infinities. We consider two limiting mass accretion scenarios, no accretion and significant accretion. We find that the radiation power strongly depends on not only the asymptotic condition but also the mass accretion scenario. For the no accretion case, we consider the Einstein-Straus solution, where a black hole of constant mass resides in the dust Friedmann universe. We find negative cosmological correction besides the expected redshift factor. This is given in terms of the cubic root of ratio in size of the black hole to the cosmological horizon, so that it is currently of order $10^{-5} (M/10^{6}M_{\\odot})^{1/3} (t/14 {Gyr})^{-1/3}$ but could have been significant at the formation epoch of primordial black holes. Due to the cosmological effects, this black hole has not settled down to an equilibrium state. This cosmological correction may be interpreted in an analogy with the radiation from a moving mirror in a flat spacetime. For the significant accretion case, we consider the Sultana-Dyer solution, where a black hole tends to increase its mass in proportion to the cosmological scale factor. In this model, we find that the radiation power is apparently the same as the Hawking radiation from the Schwarzschild black hole of which mass is that of the growing mass at each moment. Hence, the energy loss rate decreases and tends to vanish as time proceeds. Consequently, the energy loss due to evaporation is insignificant compared to huge mass accretion onto the black hole. Based on this model, we propose a definition of quasi-equilibrium temperature for general conformal stationary black holes.

Hiromi Saida; Tomohiro Harada; Hideki Maeda

2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Origin of palladium black by an infrared spectroscopic method  

SciTech Connect

Metal blacks are used as catalysts in a number of organic synthesis processes. Using the method of matrix insulation of blacks obtained from organometallic compounds in the inert atmosphere the IR spectra have been recorded for carbon monoxide adsorbed on actual palladium blacks. The controllable mild conditions for reduction of the initial complex by hydrazine hydrate provide a means of separating the intermediate states of this process. By discontinuing at various stages the reduction of the organometallic complex being investigated the authors have obtained IR spectra of carbon monoxide characterizing the stages of forming the metallic palladium black.

Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Levintova, T.D.; Sokol'skii, D.V.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Thermodynamics of dilaton-axion black holes  

SciTech Connect

Considering a generalized action for the Einstein-Maxwell theory in four dimensions coupled to scalar and pseudoscalar fields, the thermodynamic properties of asymptotically flat black hole solutions in such a background are investigated. Bekenstein-Hawking area-entropy law is verified for these class of black holes. From the property of specific heat, it is shown that such black holes can be stable for a certain choice of the parameters like charge, mass, and the scalar vacuum expectation value. The possibility of a black hole phase transition is discussed in this context.

Ghosh, Tanwi; SenGupta, Soumitra [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Calcutta-700 032 (India)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Black Hole Thermodynamics and Electromagnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show a strong parallel between the Hawking, Beckenstein black hole Thermodynamics and electromagnetism: When the gravitational coupling constant transform into the electromagnetic coupling constant, the Schwarzchild radius, the Beckenstein temperature, the Beckenstein decay time and the Planck mass transform to respectively the Compton wavelength, the Hagedorn temperature, the Compton time and a typical elementary particle mass. The reasons underlying this parallalism are then discussed in detail.

Burra G. Sidharth

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Colorful quantum black holes at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the LHC phenomenology of quantum black holes in models of TeV gravity. By quantum black holes we mean black holes of the smallest masses and entropies, far from the semiclassical regime. These black holes are formed and decay over short distances, and typically carry SU(3) color charges inherited from their parton progenitors. Based on a few minimal assumptions, such as gauge invariance, we identify interesting signatures for quantum black hole decay such as 2 jets, jet + hard photon, jet + missing energy and jet + charged lepton, which should be readily visible above background. The detailed phenomenology depends heavily on whether one requires a Lorentz invariant, low-energy effective field theory description of black hole processes.

Xavier Calmet; Wei Gong; Stephen D. H. Hsu

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

187

Retarded cores, black holes and galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It seems likely that elliptical galaxies contain massive 'black holes'?objects collapsed within their Schwarzschild radii?in their nuclei (see, for example, Wolfe and Burbidge2). The principal ... seems to be required to power the observed phenomena. For such a mass, the Schwarzschild radius (R s) is about 10?4 pc; for a mass of 1011 ...

John Gribbin

1974-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Warming accelerates decomposition of decades-old carbon in forest soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from the canisters on a vacuum line, graphitized for...Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometer...atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons testing ended...Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, University...Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometer facility...

Francesca M. Hopkins; Margaret S. Torn; Susan E. Trumbore

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Black Hole Superradiance in Dynamical Spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the superradiant scattering of gravitational waves by a nearly extremal black hole (dimensionless spin $a=0.99$) by numerically solving the full Einstein field equations, thus including backreaction effects. This allows us to study the dynamics of the black hole as it loses energy and angular momentum during the scattering process. To explore the nonlinear phase of the interaction, we consider gravitational wave packets with initial energies up to $10%$ of the mass of the black hole. We find that as the incident wave energy increases, the amplification of the scattered waves, as well as the energy extraction efficiency from the black hole, is reduced. During the interaction the apparent horizon geometry undergoes sizable nonaxisymmetric oscillations. The largest amplitude excitations occur when the peak frequency of the incident wave packet is above where superradiance occurs, but close to the dominant quasinormal mode frequency of the black hole.

William E. East; Fethi M. Ramazano?lu; Frans Pretorius

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

A rotating black hole in the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations of Sgr A* give strong constraints for possible models of the physical nature of Sgr A* and suggest the presence of a massive black~hole with M0.9) accreting 10^-8.5 - 10^-7 M_sun/yr at a black~hole mass of M=2 10^6 M_sunseen almost edge on. A low mass black hole of M' together with simple scaling laws to provide an easy-to-handle test for the black hole model.

Heino Falcke; Peter L. Biermann; Wolfgang J. Duschl; Peter G. Mezger

1992-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

The first law of thermodynamics in Lifshitz black holes revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain the mass expression of the three- and five-dimensional Lifshitz black holes by em- ploying the recently proposed quasilocal formulation of conserved charges, which is based on the off-shell extension of the ADT formalism. Our result is consistent with the first law of black hole thermodynamics and resolves the reported discrepancy between the ADT formalism and the other conventional methods. The same mass expression of Lifshitz black holes is obtained by using an- other quasilocal method by Padmanabhan. We also discuss the reported discrepancy in the context of the extended first law of black hole thermodynamics by allowing the pressure term.

Yongwan Gim; Wontae Kim; Sang-Heon Yi

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analytic treatment of the black-hole bomb The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250, Israel and The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem 91010, Israel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the mass term effectively works as a mirror, reflecting the scattered wave back towards the black hole Schwarzschild black hole. If a Schwarzschild black hole is perturbed, then the perturba- tion will oscillate surrounds the black hole by a reflecting mirror, the wave will bounce back and forth between the black hole

Hod, Oded

193

Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

R. Y. Chiao

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Initial data for black hole evolutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the initial value problem of general relativity in its recently unified Lagrangian and Hamiltonian pictures and present a multi-domain pseudo-spectral collocation method to solve the resulting coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Using this code, we explore several approaches to construct initial data sets containing one or two black holes: We compute quasi-circular orbits for spinning equal mass black holes and unequal mass (nonspinning) black holes using the effective potential method with Bowen-York extrinsic curvature. We compare initial data sets resulting from different decompositions, and from different choices of the conformal metric with each other. Furthermore, we use the quasi-equilibrium method to construct initial data for single black holes and for binary black holes in quasi-circular orbits. We investigate these binary black hole data sets and examine the limits of large mass-ratio and wide separation. Finally, we propose a new method for constructing spacetimes with superposed gravitational waves of possibly very large amplitude.

Harald P. Pfeiffer

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Super-Eddington Mechanical Power of an Accreting Black Hole in M83  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of plausible shock velocities (fig. S6). We conclude...LEdd (from the BH mass constraints). We...mp is the proton mass and {mu} the mean atomic weight...years. The expansion velocity vs = dR/dt = (3...A. , Black hole winds . Mon. Not. R...accreting stellar mass black holes as ultraluminous...

R. Soria; K. S. Long; W. P. Blair; L. Godfrey; K. D. Kuntz; E. Lenc; C. Stockdale; P. F. Winkler

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles  

SciTech Connect

Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ? To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ? ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ? PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ? The findings suggest that ELF has a protective role against PM. ? The synthetic ELF system could reduce the use of animals in PM-driven ROS testing.

Chuang, Hsiao-Chi [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hui-Hsien [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United Wildland fires can be an important source of greenhouse gases as well as black carbon emissions that have of climate response to fire emissions compared to other emission sources of GHG, aerosols, and black carbon

198

A Quantum Material Model of Static Schwarzschild Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum-mechanical prescription of static Einstein field equation is proposed in order to construct the matter-metric eigen-states in the interior of a static Schwarzschild black hole where the signature of space-time is chosen as (--++). The spectrum of the quantum states is identified to be the integral multiples of the surface gravity. A statistical explanation of black hole entropy is given and a quantisation rule for the masses of Schwarzschild black holes is proposed.

S. -T. Sung

1997-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

4, 34853533, 2004 Black carbon from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-defined BC residence times. Here, the global BC cycle including emissions, transport, and re- moval emissions J. Hendricks 1 , B. K¨archer 1 , A. D¨opelheuer 2, * , J. Feichter 3 , U. Lohmann 4 , and D´osfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico Received: 19 April 2004 ­ Accepted: 25 May 2004

Boyer, Edmond

200

Black Carbon A Review and Policy Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School #12;Front Cover: Aerosol pollution over Northern India and Bangladesh, provided courtesy;Joshua Apte, PhD Candidate, Energy Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley Christo Artusio, Research Division, California Air Resources Board Morgan DeFoort, PhD Candidate, Associate Director

Mauzerall, Denise

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This measurement characterizes the types of BC emissions that result in nearsurface BC containing particles in a region that is dominated by biomass and open pit/stove cooking. Specifically, examine three primary BC emission sources: (i) urban setting (e.g., fossil fuel emissions); and (ii) biomass burning. Source (i) are captured at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Biomass emissions (ii) contains a series of 12 day measurement excursions to the rural area surrounding Bangalore.

Sedlacek, Arthur; S, Satheesh; Springston, Stephen

202

8, 98839929, 2008 Black carbon at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Earth's atmo-25 sphere. It is emitted from incomplete combustion, for example, fossil fuel combustion-friendly Version Interactive Discussion and biomass burning. The roles of BC in the atmosphere have been growing

Boyer, Edmond

203

Black Hole Horizons and Black Hole Thermodynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work investigates how black holes can be described in terms of different definitions of horizons. Global definitions in terms of event horizons and Killing (more)

Nielsen, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Black Hole Evaporation in an Expanding Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the quantum radiation power of black holes which are asymptotic to the Einstein-de Sitter universe at spatial and null infinities. We consider two limiting mass accretion scenarios, no accretion and significant accretion. We find that the radiation power strongly depends on not only the asymptotic condition but also the mass accretion scenario. For the no accretion case, we consider the Einstein-Straus solution, where a black hole of constant mass resides in the dust Friedmann universe. We find negative cosmological correction besides the expected redshift factor. This is given in terms of the cubic root of ratio in size of the black hole to the cosmological horizon, so that it is currently of order $10^{-5} (M/10^{6}M_{\\odot})^{1/3} (t/14 {Gyr})^{-1/3}$ but could have been significant at the formation epoch of primordial black holes. Due to the cosmological effects, this black hole has not settled down to an equilibrium state. This cosmological correction may be interpreted in an analogy with th...

Saida, Hiromi; Maeda, Hideki

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Conserved quantities in a black hole collision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Newman-Penrose constants of the spacetime corresponding to the development of the Brill-Lindquist initial data are calculated by making use of a particular representation of spatial infinity due to H. Friedrich. The Brill-Lindquist initial data set represents the head-on collision of two non-rotating black holes. In this case one non-zero constant is obtained. Its value is given in terms of the product of the individual masses of the black holes and the square of a distance parameter separating the two black holes. This constant retains its value all along null infinity, and therefore it provides information about the late time evolution of the collision process. In particular, it is argued that the magnitude of the constants provides information about the amount of residual radiation contained in the spacetime after the collision of the black holes.

S. Dain; J. A. Valiente-Kroon

2001-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

207

Aged black carbon identified in marine dissolved organic carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pool in the northeast Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Part I,?445 in the deep NE Pacific Ocean (Table S1). The Suwanneein the northeast Pacific Ocean. If the BC in the Amazon

Ziolkowski, Lori A; Druffel, Ellen R.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Aged black carbon identified in marine dissolved organic carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Asia: Biomass or fossil fuel combustion? , Science,of combustion, in Sediment Records of Biomass Burning andduring biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion, the sinks

Ziolkowski, L. A; Druffel, E. R. M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass...

210

The bremsstrahlung spectrum for the electric dipole which nonradially falls into a black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electromagnetic bremsstrahlung spectrum for the dipole which falling by a spiral orbit into the Schwarzschild black hole was found. The characteristic features in this electromagnetic spectrum can be used for determine of the black hole mass by the new way. This new way (if implemented) provides higher accuracy in determining of the black hole mass. Also these features in the spectrum can be used for determine of the certain characteristics in the black hole magnetosphere or in the accretion disk characteristics around the black hole. It is also shown that the asymptotic behavior of this spectrum (at high frequencies) is practically independent from the impact parameter of the falling dipole.

Shatskiy, Alexander; Malinovsky, Alexandr

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

SS433a massive black hole?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... thin ring in a circular orbit at radius R = r GM/c2 around a Schwarzschild black hole of mass M, the two emission peaks will be at wavelengths given ... we would expect the profiles of the emission peaks at any given time to be mirror images of each other (at least on timescales longer than the orbital time). ...

R. J. TERLEVICH; J. E. PRINGLE

1979-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

212

Characterizing asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes with abundant stable gauge field hair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the light of the "no-hair" conjecture, we revisit stable black holes in su(N) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory with a negative cosmological constant. These black holes are endowed with copious amounts of gauge field hair, and we address the question of whether these black holes can be uniquely characterized by their mass and a set of global non-Abelian charges defined far from the black hole. For the su(3) case, we present numerical evidence that stable black hole configurations are fixed by their mass and two non-Abelian charges. For general N, we argue that the mass and N-1 non-Abelian charges are sufficient to characterize large stable black holes, in keeping with the spirit of the "no-hair" conjecture, at least in the limit of very large magnitude cosmological constant and for a subspace containing stable black holes (and possibly some unstable ones as well).

Ben L. Shepherd; Elizabeth Winstanley

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Combustion of biomass as a global carbon sink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note is intended to highlight the important role of black carbon produced from biomass burning in the global carbon cycle, and encourage further research in this area. Consideration of the fundamental physical chemistry of cellulose thermal decomposition suggests that suppression of biomass burning or biasing burning practices to produce soot-free flames must inevitably transfer more carbon to the atmosphere. A simple order-of-magnitude quantitative analysis indicates that black carbon may be a significant carbon reservoir that persists over geological time scales.

Ball, Rowena

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Black hole evaporation within a momentum-dependent metric  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the black hole thermodynamics in a 'deformed' relativity framework where the energy-momentum dispersion law is Lorentz-violating and the Schwarzchild-like metric is momentum-dependent with a Planckian cutoff. We obtain net deviations of the basic thermodynamical quantities from the Hawking-Bekenstein predictions: actually, the black hole evaporation is expected to quit at a nonzero critical mass value (of the order of the Planck mass), leaving a zero temperature remnant, and avoiding a spacetime singularity. Quite surprisingly, the present semiclassical corrections to black hole temperature, entropy, and heat capacity turn out to be identical to the ones obtained within some quantum approaches.

Salesi, G.; Di Grezia, E. [Universita Statale di Bergamo, Facolta di Ingegneria, viale Marconi 5, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

RHIC | Black Holes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in the universe. The gravitational field of a black hole is so strong that Einstein's general relativity tells us that nothing, not even light, can escape from the black hole's interior. However, in 1974 physicist Stephen Hawking demonstrated that black holes must emit radiation once the quantum effects are included. According to quantum mechanics, the physical vacuum is bubbling with short-lived virtual particle-antiparticle pairs. Creation of a particle-antiparticle pair from the vacuum conflicts with energy conservation, but energy need not be conserved at short times in quantum mechanics, according to Heisenberg's

216

A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... We combined the stellar kinematics and imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope with self-consistent Schwarzschild models to constrain the black hole mass and the mass-to-light ratio (M/ ... the object. Dynamical modelling

Anil C. Seth; Remco van den Bosch; Steffen Mieske; Holger Baumgardt; Mark den Brok; Jay Strader; Nadine Neumayer; Igor Chilingarian; Michael Hilker; Richard McDermid; Lee Spitler; Jean Brodie; Matthias J. Frank; Jonelle L. Walsh

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Carbon Fillers for Actuation of Electroactive Thermoset Shape Memory Polyurethane Composites by Resistive Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, focusing on stimuli-responsive SMPs enables researchers to develop more versatile devices with SMP composites. The electroactive SMP composites incorporated with conductive fillers such as carbon black and carbon nanotubes allow shape recovery actuation...

Yu, Ya-Jen

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

4/25/11 12:25 PMRedOrbit NEWS | Scientists Tracking Black Carbon In The Arctic Page 1 of 3http://www.redorbit.com/modules/news/tools.php?tool=print&id=2033713  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation, much like wearing a black shirt on a sunny day. If you want to be cooler, you would wear a light-colored shirt that would reflect the sun's warmth," said Tim Bates, a research chemist at NOAA's Pacific Marine Administration (NOAA), and research chemist at Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL). Heat from other

Rigor, Ignatius G.

219

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted wildland fire greenhouse gas and aerosol (organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) emission inventories

220

Thermodynamics of an Aqueous-Alkaline/Carbonate Carbon Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In view of the fact that aqueous-alkaline hydrogen fuel cells have been used to power an Austin car and a commercial Black Cab in London, these recent results suggest the potential use of aqueous-alkaline carbon fuel cells for vehicular transportation. ... Thus, biocarbons can be a sustainable, environmentally friendly fuel for carbon fuel cell applications, whose production complements the production of bioethanol and biodiesel fuels in a biomass refinery. ... Our interest in the aqueous-alkaline biocarbon fuel cell is stimulated by the fact that aqueous-alkaline hydrogen fuel cells have been used to power an Austin car and a commercial London Black Cab.29-31 Thus, the development of a functional aqueous-alkaline carbon fuel cell could facilitate the replacement of non-renewable, liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels by renewable, solid biocarbons. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Grard C. Nihous

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bicycling Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present detailed physics analyses of two different 4+1-dimensional asymptotically flat vacuum black hole solutions with spin in two independent planes: the doubly spinning black ring and the bicycling black ring system ("bi-rings"). The latter is a new solution describing two concentric orthogonal rotating black rings which we construct using the inverse scattering technique. We focus particularly on extremal zero-temperature limits of the solutions. Such limits exist for both types of solutions; for the bi-rings it is obtained when the two rings drag each other to extremality through the effect of gravitational frame-dragging. We construct the phase diagram of currently known zero-temperature vacuum black hole solutions with a single event horizon, and discuss the non-uniqueness introduced by more exotic black hole configurations such as bi-rings and multi-ring saturns.

Elvang, Henriette

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Bicycling Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present detailed physics analyses of two different 4+1-dimensional asymptotically flat vacuum black hole solutions with spin in two independent planes: the doubly spinning black ring and the bicycling black ring system ("bi-rings"). The latter is a new solution describing two concentric orthogonal rotating black rings which we construct using the inverse scattering technique. We focus particularly on extremal zero-temperature limits of the solutions. We construct the phase diagram of currently known zero-temperature vacuum black hole solutions with a single event horizon, and discuss the non-uniqueness introduced by more exotic black hole configurations such as bi-rings and multi-ring saturns.

Henriette Elvang; Maria J. Rodriguez

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

BLACK HISTORY MONTH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Black History Month is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of Negro History Week, created by historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Other countries around the world, including Canada and the United Kingdom, also devote a month to celebrating black history.

224

Accreting Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I outline the theory of accretion onto black holes, and its application to observed phenomena such as X-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, tidal disruption events, and gamma-ray bursts. The dynamics as well as radiative signatures of black hole accretion depend on interactions between the relatively simple black-hole spacetime and complex radiation, plasma and magnetohydrodynamical processes in the surrounding gas. I will show how transient accretion processes could provide clues to these interactions. Larger global magnetohydrodynamic simulations as well as simulations incorporating plasma microphysics and full radiation hydrodynamics will be needed to unravel some of the current mysteries of black hole accretion.

Begelman, Mitchell C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ARM - Black Forest News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Campaign Images Black Forest News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany January 15, 2008 Microwave Radiometers Put to the Test in Germany September 15, 2007...

226

Environmental biogeochemistry. V. 1: Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

V. 1: Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and selenium cycles. V. 2: Metals transfer and ecological mass balances. Ann Arbor Sci. Publ., Inc., Ann. Arbor, Mich.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Calorific and porosity development in carbonized wood  

SciTech Connect

Wood of four species (red oak, southern yellow pine, black cherry, and hybrid poplar) were carbonized in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere at an average heating rate of 3 degrees Centigrade/minute to selected final temperatures up to 700 degrees Centigrade. The effects of final carbonization temperature on selected properties of the char were obtained using an adiabatic oxygen bomb calorimeter to investigate heat of combustion and a mercury porosimeter to investigate total porosity, real density, apparent density, and pore size distribution. Pore characteristics of carbonized wood developed before 300 degrees Centigrade in southern yellow pine and before 400 degrees Centigrade in red oak, black cherry, and hybrid poplar. Statistical analysis established linear relationships between heat of combustion versus final carbonization temperature in the carbonization temperature ranges investigated. The results of this study will aid in understanding optimum pryrolysis conditions for the development of calorific and porosity values. (Refs. 22).

Baileys, R.T.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Binary Black Hole Accretion Flows in Merged Galactic Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for Theoretical Physics, Oiwake-cho...when the gas can pass across the maximum...mass-capture rates are eventually...holes|black hole physics|galaxies: nuclei...when the gas can pass across the maximum...mass-capture rates exhibit little...for Theoretical Physics (YITP) of Kyoto......

Kimitake Hayasaki; Shin Mineshige; Hiroshi Sudou

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

Probing black holes with constellation-X  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Constellation-X is a premiere X-ray spectroscopy mission due to launch within the next decade. With a factor of 100 increase in sensitivity over current X-ray spectroscopy missions and an excellent energy resolution of 2 eV at 6 keV one of the prime science goals of the mission will be to observe activity near the black hole event horizon by measuring changes in the Fe K? fluorescence emission line profile and time-linked intensity changes between the line and the continuum. Detailed variability studies with Constellation-X will allow us to reconstruct images of the accretion disk probe the effects of strong gravity in the vicinity of black holes and measure black hole mass and spin via deconvolution of the line profile.

Kimberly A. Weaver

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Extremal limits and black hole entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taking the extremal limit of a non-extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole (by externally varying the mass or charge), the region between the inner and outer event horizons experiences an interesting fate -- while this region is absent in the extremal case, it does not disappear in the extremal limit but rather approaches a patch of $AdS_2\\times S^2$. In other words, the approach to extremality is not continuous, as the non-extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"om solution splits into two spacetimes at extremality: an extremal black hole and a disconnected $AdS$ space. We suggest that the unusual nature of this limit may help in understanding the entropy of extremal black holes.

Sean M. Carroll; Matthew C. Johnson; Lisa Randall

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Formation of the radio jet in M87 at 100 Schwarzschild radii from the central black hole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 60 near the centre, with strong collimation of the jet occurring at ?30100 Schwarzschild radii (rS) from the black hole: collimation continues out to ?1,000?rS ... constant, M is the black-hole mass, and c the speed of light; the Schwarzschild radius is the radius of the event horizon, the boundary of a black ...

William Junor; John A. Biretta; Mario Livio

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

"Hybrid" Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a solution of the Einstein equations, obtained by gluing the external Kerr metric and the internal Weyl metric, describing an axisymmetric static vacuum distorted black hole. These metrics are glued at the null surfaces representing their horizons. For this purpose we use the formalism of massive thin null shells. The corresponding solution is called a "hybrid" black hole. The massive null shell has an angular momentum which is the origin of the rotation of the external Kerr spacetime. At the same time, the shell distorts the geometry inside the horizon. The inner geometry of the "hybrid" black hole coincides with the geometry of the interior of a non-rotating Weyl-distorted black hole. Properties of the "hybrid" black holes are briefly discussed.

Valeri P. Frolov; Andrei V. Frolov

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Black Holes and Sub-millimeter Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, a new framework for solving the hierarchy problem was proposed which does not rely on low energy supersymmetry or technicolor. The fundamental Planck mass is at a TeV and the observed weakness of gravity at long distances is due the existence of new sub-millimeter spatial dimensions. In this letter, we study how the properties of black holes are altered in these theories. Small black holes---with Schwarzschild radii smaller than the size of the new spatial dimensions---are quite different. They are bigger, colder, and longer-lived than a usual $(3+1)$-dimensional black hole of the same mass. Furthermore, they primarily decay into harmless bulk graviton modes rather than standard-model degrees of freedom. We discuss the interplay of our scenario with the holographic principle. Our results also have implications for the bounds on the spectrum of primordial black holes (PBHs) derived from the photo-dissociation of primordial nucleosynthesis products, distortion of the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum, overcl...

Argyres, Philip C; March-Russell, John David; Argyres, Philip C.; Dimopoulos, Savas; March-Russell, John

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Primary caustics and critical points behind a Kerr black hole  

SciTech Connect

The primary optical caustic surface behind a Kerr black hole is a four-cusped tube displaced from the line of sight. We derive the caustic surface in the nearly asymptotic region far from the black hole through a Taylor expansion of the lightlike geodesics up to and including fourth-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the spin, and b the impact parameter. The corresponding critical locus in the observer's sky is elliptical and a pointlike source inside the caustics will be imaged as an Einstein cross. With regard to lensing near critical points, a Kerr lens is analogous to a circular lens perturbed by a dipole and a quadrupole potential. The caustic structure of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center could be probed by lensing of low mass x-ray binaries in the galactic inner regions or by hot spots in the accretion disk.

Sereno, Mauro; De Luca, Fabiana [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Primary caustics and critical points behind a Kerr black hole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary optical caustic surface behind a Kerr black hole is a four-cusped tube displaced from the line of sight. We derive the caustic surface in the nearly asymptotic region far from the black hole through a Taylor expansion of the lightlike geodesics up to and including fourth-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the spin, and b the impact parameter. The corresponding critical locus in the observers sky is elliptical and a pointlike source inside the caustics will be imaged as an Einstein cross. With regard to lensing near critical points, a Kerr lens is analogous to a circular lens perturbed by a dipole and a quadrupole potential. The caustic structure of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center could be probed by lensing of low mass x-ray binaries in the galactic inner regions or by hot spots in the accretion disk.

Mauro Sereno and Fabiana De Luca

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

Summerschool Modelling of Mass and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summerschool Modelling of Mass and Energy Transport #12;Black Box Analogy )(teRi dt di L i and Energy Transport Exercise Given a flux vector approaching an oblique oriented surface element (line .constc G S dsndg *)(2 . #12;Mass and Energy Balance Continued V S dsnvudV dt d V S dsnvdV t u

Kornhuber, Ralf

239

Accretion onto a black hole in a string cloud background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the accretion process onto the black hole with a string cloud background, where the horizon of the black hole has an enlarged radius $r_H=2 M/(1-\\alpha)$, due to the string cloud parameter $\\alpha\\; (0 \\leq \\alpha cloud parameter $\\alpha$. We also find the gas compression ratios and temperature profiles below the accretion radius and at the event horizon. It is shown that the mass accretion rate, for both the relativistic and the non-relativistic fluid by a black hole in the string cloud model, increases with increase in $\\alpha$.

Apratim Ganguly; Sushant G. Ghosh; Sunil D. Maharaj

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

240

Three-dimensional Chern-Simons black holes  

SciTech Connect

We construct black hole solutions to three-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with both gravitational and electromagnetic Chern-Simons terms. These intrinsically rotating solutions are geodesically complete, and causally regular within a certain parameter range. Their mass, angular momentum and entropy are found to satisfy the first law of black hole thermodynamics. These Chern-Simons black holes admit a four-parameter local isometry algebra, which generically is sl(2,R)xR, and may be generated from the corresponding vacua by local coordinate transformations.

Moussa, Karim Ait [Laboratoire de Physique Mathematique et Physique Subatomique, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mentouri, Constantine 25000 (Algeria); Clement, Gerard; Leygnac, Cedric [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique LAPTH (CNRS), B.P.110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux cedex (France); Guennoune, Hakim [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique LAPTH (CNRS), B.P.110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux cedex (France); Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif 19000 (Algeria)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fallback and Black Hole Production in Massive Stars  

SciTech Connect

The compact remnants of core collapse supernovae--neutron stars and black holes--have properties that reflect both the structure of their stellar progenitors and the physics of the explosion. In particular, the masses of these remnants are sensitive to the density structure of the presupernova star and to the explosion energy. To a considerable extent, the final mass is determined by the ''fallback'', during the explosion, of matter that initially moves outwards, yet ultimately fails to escape. We consider here the simulated explosion of a large number of massive stars (10 to 100 M{sub {circle_dot}}) of Population I (solar metallicity) and III (zero metallicity), and find systematic differences in the remnant mass distributions. As pointed out by Chevalier (1989), supernovae in more compact progenitor stars have stronger reverse shocks and experience more fallback. For Population III stars above about 25 M{sub {circle_dot}} and explosion energies less than 1.5 x 10{sup 51} erg, black holes are a common outcome, with masses that increase monotonically with increasing main sequence mass up to a maximum hole mass of about 35 M{sub {circle_dot}}. If such stars produce primary nitrogen, however, their black holes are systematically smaller. For modern supernovae with nearly solar metallicity, black hole production is much less frequent and the typical masses, which depend sensitively on explosion energy, are smaller. We explore the neutron star initial mass function for both populations and, for reasonable assumptions about the initial mass cut of the explosion, find good agreement with the average of observed masses of neutron stars in binaries. We also find evidence for a bimodal distribution of neutron star masses with a spike around 1.2 M{sub {circle_dot}} (gravitational mass) and a broader distribution peaked around 1.4 M{sub {circle_dot}}.

Zhang, Wei-Qun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Woosley, S.E.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Heger, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz /Los Alamos

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

RHIC | Black Holes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Before RHIC began operations in 2000, some were concerned that it would produce black holes that would threaten the earth. Here's why those concerns were unfounded. Committee Review of Speculative "Disaster Scenarios" at RHIC In July 1999, Brookhaven Lab Director John Marburger convened a committee of distinguished physicists to write a comprehensive report on the arguments that address the safety of speculative disaster scenarios at RHIC. The scenarios are: Creation of a black hole that would "eat" ordinary matter. Initiation of a transition to a new, more stable universe. Formation of a "strangelet" that would convert ordinary matter to a new form. jaffee "We conclude that there are no credible mechanisms for catastrophic

244

Charged Schrodinger black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct charged and rotating asymptotically Schrdinger black hole solutions of type IIB supergravity. We begin by obtaining a closed-form expression for the null Melvin twist of a broad class of type IIB backgrounds, ...

Adams, Allan

245

The Black Bear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Bear Black Bear Nature Bulletin No. 286-A December 9, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BLACK BEAR The most amusing and human-like of all our American wild animals is the Black Bear. Slow, clumsy and loose-jointed in appearance, with a shambling gait, he can be very swift and nimble. Like any good clown he is also a good acrobat with a fine sense of balance and timing. He is a great climber in spite of his bulk. Shrewd and droll, he is very popular in menageries and as a performer in circuses and side shows because he learns tricks easily. He can stand on his hind legs to wrestle, box, dance, or beg for food and, occasionally, one becomes a graceful artist on roller skates. They love applause.

246

Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Suppression of star formation in early-type galaxies by feedback from supermassive black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed high-resolution observations of the innermost regions of nearby galaxies have revealed the presence of supermassive black holes1. These black holes may interact with their host galaxies by means of 'feedback' in the form of energy and material jets; this feedback affects the evolution of the host and gives rise to observed relations between the black hole and the host. Here we report observations of the ultraviolet emissions of massive early-type galaxies. We derive an empirical relation for a critical black-hole mass (as a function of velocity dispersion) above which the outflows from these black holes suppress star formation in their hosts by heating and expelling all available cold gas. Supermassive black holes are negligible in mass compared to their hosts but nevertheless seem to play a critical role in the star formation history of galaxies.

Kevin Schawinski; Sadegh Khochfar; Sugata Kaviraj; Sukyoung K. Yi; Alessandro Boselli; Tom Barlow; Tim Conrow; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; D. Chris Martin; Patrick Morrissey; Susan Neff; David Schiminovich; Mark Seibert; Todd Small; Ted K. Wyder; Luciana Bianchi; Jose Donas; Tim Heckman; Young-Wook Lee; Barry Madore; Bruno Milliard; R. Michael Rich; Alex Szalay

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

Meng-Sen Ma; Ren Zhao

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

Ma, Meng-Sen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

On Black Hole Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two techniques for computing black hole entropy in generally covariant gravity theories including arbitrary higher derivative interactions are studied. The techniques are Wald's Noether charge approach introduced recently, and a field redefinition method developed in this paper. Wald's results are extended by establishing that his local geometric expression for the black hole entropy gives the same result when evaluated on an arbitrary cross-section of a Killing horizon (rather than just the bifurcation surface). Further, we show that his expression for the entropy is not affected by ambiguities which arise in the Noether construction. Using the Noether charge expression, the entropy is evaluated explicitly for black holes in a wide class of generally covariant theories. Further, it is shown that the Killing horizon and surface gravity of a stationary black hole metric are invariant under field redefinitions of the metric of the form $\\bar{g}_{ab}\\equiv g_{ab} + \\Delta_{ab}$, where $\\Delta_{ab}$ is a tensor field constructed out of stationary fields. Using this result, a technique is developed for evaluating the black hole entropy in a given theory in terms of that of another theory related by field redefinitions. Remarkably, it is established that certain perturbative, first order, results obtained with this method are in fact {\\it exact}. The possible significance of these results for the problem of finding the statistical origin of black hole entropy is discussed.}

Ted Jacobson; Gungwon Kang; Robert C. Myers

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

251

Black rings and the physical process version of the first law of thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of the physical process version of the first law of black ring thermodynamics in n-dimensional Einstein gravity with additional (p+1)-form field strength and dilaton fields. The first order variations of mass, angular momentum and local charge for black ring are derived. From them we prove the physical process version of the first law of thermodynamic for stationary black rings.

Marek Rogatko

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Black rings and the physical process version of the first law of thermodynamics  

SciTech Connect

We consider the problem of the physical process version of the first law of black ring thermodynamics in n-dimensional Einstein gravity with additional (p+1)-form field strength and dilaton fields. The first order variations of mass, angular momentum and local charge for black ring are derived. From them we prove the physical process version of the first law of thermodynamic for stationary black rings.

Rogatko, Marek [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin, pl. Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej 1 (Poland)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Carbon Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Conference ... The Fourth Hienninl Conference on Carbon will be held at the University of Buffalo, June 15 to 19. ... The Pittsburgh Section's coal technology group will meet in the conference room at Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, June ... ...

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Some remarks on black hole temperature and the second law of thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a formulation of the second law of thermodynamics in the presence of black holes which makes use of the efficiency of an ideal machine extracting heat cyclically from a black hole. The Carnot coefficient is found and it is shown to be a simple function of the mass.

M. Scandurra

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

FT-ICR ,,,Carbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60 70 80 720 760 800 Ion Mass [amu] ScC60 + C64 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) ScC60FT-ICR ,?,æ,éCarbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters ·>Í­ì·³"¹1 ·C Masamichi Kohno1 , Tetsuya

Maruyama, Shigeo

256

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Science overview and knowledge needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Science overview and knowledge needs William T: Available online 6 January 2014 Keywords: Wildland fire Climate Forests Carbon cycle Emissions a b s t r a c climate change and the principal emissions component of wildland fires, while black carbon and other

257

Analytical Kerr black hole lensing in the weak deflection limit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present an analytical treatment of gravitational lensing by a Kerr black hole in the weak deflection limit. Lightlike geodesics are expanded as a Taylor series up to and including third-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the angular momentum, and b the impact parameter of the light ray. Positions and magnifications of individual images are computed with a perturbative analysis. At this order, the degeneracy with the translated Schwarzschild lens is broken. The critical curve is still a circle displaced from the black hole position in the equatorial direction and the corresponding caustic is pointlike. The degeneracy between the black hole spin and its inclination relative to the observer is broken through the angular coordinates of the perturbed images.

Mauro Sereno and Fabiana De Luca

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lovelock black holes in a string cloud background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an exact static, spherically symmetric black hole solution to the third order Lovelock gravity with a string cloud background in seven dimensions for the special case when the second and third order Lovelock coefficients are related via $\\tilde{\\alpha}^2_2=3\\tilde{\\alpha}_3\\;(\\equiv\\alpha^2)$. Further, we examine thermodynamic properties of this black hole to obtain exact expressions for mass, temperature, entropy and also perform the thermodynamic stability analysis. We see that a string cloud background makes a profound influence on horizon structure, thermodynamic properties and the stability of black holes. Interestingly, the entropy of the black hole is unaffected due to a string cloud background. However, the critical solution for thermodynamic stability is being affected by a string cloud background.

Tae-Hun Lee; Dharmanand Baboolal; Sushant G. Ghosh

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

Black holes at accelerators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 11 12 8v 3 6 A pr 2 00 6 Black Holes at Accelerators Bryan Webber Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK In theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity, black holes... 2000 3000 Missing ET (GeV) Ar bi tra ry S ca le p p ? QCD SUSY 5 TeV BH (n=6) 5 TeV BH (n=2) (PT > 600 GeV) (SUGRA point 5) Figure 10: Missing transverse energy for various processes at the LHC. 4.2. Event Characteristics Turning from single...

Webber, Bryan R

260

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Transport and reduction of sulfate and immobilization of sulfide in marine black shales  

SciTech Connect

In fine-grained sediments in which the amount of reduced sulfur retained in stable phases substantially exceeds that present initially in pore waters, rates of sulfate reduction may have equaled or exceeded rates of sulfate transport, resulting in enrichment of [sup 34]S in pore waters and reduction products. Abundance and isotopic compositions of reduced sulfur compounds can be used to calculate the extent of sulfide retention and improve reconstructions of carbon-sulfur oxidation-reduction (redox) budgets. The Miocene Monterey Formation and Upper Devonian New Albany Shale represent distinct types of black shales that accumulated under different conditions of sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that the rate of sulfate reduction was controlled largely by mass transport in the Monterey and by the reduction process itself in the New Albany. Sulfide was more efficiently retained in the Monterey; thus each mole of sulfide in the New Albany represents a greater amount of sedimented organic carbon removed during sulfate reduction. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Zaback, D.A.; Pratt, L.M.; Hayes, J.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hybrid black-hole binary initial data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional black-hole binary puncture initial data is conformally flat. This unphysical assumption is coupled with a lack of radiation signature from the binary's past life. As a result, waveforms extracted from evolutions of this data display an abrupt jump. In Kelly et al. [Class.Quant.Grav.27:114005,2010], a new binary black-hole initial data with radiation contents derived in the post-Newtonian (PN) calculation was adapted to puncture evolutions in numerical relativity. This data satisfies the constraint equations to the 2.5PN order, and contains a transverse-traceless "wavy" metric contribution, violating the standard assumption of conformal flatness. Although the evolution contained less spurious radiation, there were undesired features; the unphysical horizon mass loss and the large initial orbital eccentricity. Introducing a hybrid approach to the initial data evaluation, we significantly reduce these undesired features.

Bruno C. Mundim; Bernard J. Kelly; Yosef Zlochower; Hiroyuki Nakano; Manuela Campanelli

2010-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

Massive Black Hole Science with eLISA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evolving Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) will revolutionize our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive black holes along cosmic history by probing massive black hole binaries in the $10^3-10^7$ solar mass range out to redshift $z\\gtrsim 10$. High signal-to-noise ratio detections of $\\sim 10-100$ binary coalescences per year will allow accurate measurements of the parameters of individual binaries (such as their masses, spins and luminosity distance), and a deep understanding of the underlying cosmic massive black hole parent population. This wealth of unprecedented information can lead to breakthroughs in many areas of physics, including astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics. We review the current status of the field, recent progress and future challenges.

Enrico Barausse; Jillian Bellovary; Emanuele Berti; Kelly Holley-Bockelmann; Brian Farris; Bangalore Sathyaprakash; Alberto Sesana

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Extremal black disks in QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that in the high energy QCD a true black disk wave function necessarily contains many quarks. This corresponds to necessity of non-vacuum reggeon loops in formation of a black disk. The result comes from decomposition of the black disk S-matrix in characters on group manifold.

Alexey V. Popov

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Black holes and black strings in plane waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the construction of black holes and black strings in vacuum plane wave spacetimes using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. We find solutions of the linearised equations of motion in the asymptotic region for a general source on a plane wave background. We observe that these solutions do not satisfy our previously defined conditions for being asymptotically plane wave. Hence, the space of asymptotically plane wave solutions is restricted. We consider the solution in the near region, treating the plane wave as a perturbation of a black object, and find that there is a regular black string solution but no regular black hole solution.

Julian Le Witt; Simon F. Ross

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediatley above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone.

Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

268

Black brane steady states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We follow the evolution of an asymptotically AdS black brane with a fixed temperature gradient at spatial infinity until a steady state is formed. The resulting energy density and energy flux of the steady state in the boundary theory are compared to a conjecture on the behavior of steady states in conformal field theories. Very good agreement is found.

Amado, Irene

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE FIRST MASSIVE BLACK HOLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@astron.berkeley.edu Abstract The first massive astrophysical black holes likely formed at high redshifts (z > 10 (Eddington) luminosity, and converts mass to radiation with an efficiency of = Mc2 /LEdd 10%) and using to link the evolution of quasars with that of dark matter halos condensing in a cold dark matter (CDM

Wurtele, Jonathan

270

Conserved Charges and Thermodynamics of the Spinning Goedel Black Hole  

SciTech Connect

We compute the mass, angular momenta, and charge of the Goedel-type rotating black hole solution to five-dimensional minimal supergravity. A generalized Smarr formula is derived, and the first law of thermodynamics is verified. The computation rests on a new approach to conserved charges in gauge theories that allows for their computation at finite radius.

Barnich, Glenn; Compere, Geoffrey [Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, and International Solvay Institutes, Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing carbon Capturing carbon New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

273

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

274

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent of industrial CO2 emissions; 96 percent of the total land mass; and essentially all the geologic sequestration sites in the U.S. potentially available for carbon storage.

275

Nearly extremal apparent horizons in simulations of merging black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spin angular momentum $S$ of an isolated Kerr black hole is bounded by the surface area $A$ of its apparent horizon: $8\\pi S \\le A$, with equality for extremal black holes. In this paper, we explore the extremality of individual and common apparent horizons for merging, rapidly spinning binary black holes. We consider simulations of merging black holes with equal masses $M$ and initial spin angular momenta aligned with the orbital angular momentum, including new simulations with spin magnitudes up to $S/M^2 = 0.994$. We measure the area and (using approximate Killing vectors) the spin on the individual and common apparent horizons, finding that the inequality $8\\pi S extremality by computing the smallest value that Booth and Fairhurst's extremality parameter can take for any scaling. Using this lower bound, we conclude that the common horizons are at least moderately close to extremal just after they appear. Finally, following Lovelace et al. (2008), we construct quasiequilibrium binary-black-hole initial data with "overspun" marginally trapped surfaces with $8\\pi S > A$ and for which our lower bound on their Booth-Fairhurst extremality exceeds unity. These superextremal surfaces are always surrounded by marginally outer trapped surfaces (i.e., by apparent horizons) with $8\\pi Sextremality lower bound on the enclosing apparent horizon is always less than unity but can exceed the value for an extremal Kerr black hole. (Abstract abbreviated.)

Geoffrey Lovelace; Mark A. Scheel; Robert Owen; Matthew Giesler; Reza Katebi; Bela Szilagyi; Tony Chu; Nicholas Demos; Daniel A. Hemberger; Lawrence E. Kidder; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Nousha Afshari

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Discovering the QCD Axion with Black Holes and Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced LIGO will be the first experiment to detect gravitational waves. Through superradiance of stellar black holes, it may also be the first experiment to discover the QCD axion with decay constant above the GUT scale. When an axion's Compton wavelength is comparable to the size of a black hole, the axion binds to the black hole, forming a "gravitational atom." Through the superradiance process, the number of axions occupying the bound levels grows exponentially, extracting energy and angular momentum from the black hole. Axions transitioning between levels of the gravitational atom and axions annihilating to gravitons produce observable gravitational wave signals. The signals are long-lasting, monochromatic, and can be distinguished from ordinary astrophysical sources. We estimate up to O(1) transition events at aLIGO for an axion between 10^-11 and 10^-10 eV and up to 10^4 annihilation events for an axion between 10^-13 and 10^-11 eV. In the event of a null search, aLIGO can constrain the axion mass as a function of the formation rate of rapidly spinning black holes. Axion annihilations are also promising for much lighter masses at future lower-frequency gravitational wave observatories, where we expect as many as $10^5$ events. Our projections for aLIGO are robust against perturbations from the black hole environment and account for our updated exclusion on the QCD axion of 6 * 10^-13 eV < ma < 2 * 10^-11 eV suggested by stellar black hole spin measurements.

Asimina Arvanitaki; Masha Baryakhtar; Xinlu Huang

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Supermassive Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive black holes have generally been recognized as the most destructive force in nature. But in recent years, they have undergone a dramatic shift in paradigm. These objects may have been critical to the formation of structure in the early universe, spawning bursts of star formation and nucleating proto-galactic condensations. Possibly half of all the radiation produced after the Big Bang may be attributed to them, whose number is now known to exceed 300 million. The most accessible among them is situated at the Center of Our Galaxy. In the following pages, we will examine the evidence that has brought us to this point, and we will understand why many expect to actually image the event horizon of the Galaxy's central black hole within this decade.

Fulvio Melia

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

Black hole lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High frequency dispersion does not alter the low frequency spectrum of Hawking radiation from a single black hole horizon, whether the dispersion entails subluminal or superluminal group velocities. We show here that in the presence of an inner horizon as well as an outer horizon the superluminal case differs dramatically however. The negative energy partners of Hawking quanta return to the outer horizon and stimulate more Hawking radiation if the field is bosonic or suppress it if the field is fermionic. This process leads to exponential growth or damping of the radiated flux and correlations among the quanta emitted at different times, unlike in the usual Hawking effect. These phenomena may be observable in condensed matter black hole analogues that exhibit superluminal dispersion.

Steven Corley and Ted Jacobson

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Black Pine Circle Project  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

Mytko, Christine

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Black Pine Circle Project  

SciTech Connect

A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

Mytko, Christine

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gauss-Bonnet black holes with nonconstant curvature horizons  

SciTech Connect

We investigate static and dynamical n({>=}6)-dimensional black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity of which horizons have the isometries of an (n-2)-dimensional Einstein space with a condition on its Weyl tensor originally given by Dotti and Gleiser. Defining a generalized Misner-Sharp quasilocal mass that satisfies the unified first law, we show that most of the properties of the quasilocal mass and the trapping horizon are shared with the case with horizons of constant curvature. It is shown that the Dotti-Gleiser solution is the unique vacuum solution if the warp factor on the (n-2)-dimensional Einstein space is nonconstant. The quasilocal mass becomes constant for the Dotti-Gleiser black hole and satisfies the first law of the black-hole thermodynamics with its Wald entropy. In the non-negative curvature case with positive Gauss-Bonnet constant and zero cosmological constant, it is shown that the Dotti-Gleiser black hole is thermodynamically unstable. Even if it becomes locally stable for the nonzero cosmological constant, it cannot be globally stable for the positive cosmological constant.

Maeda, Hideki [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Algorithm Design Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia #12;Red-Black Tree A red-black tree is a binary search tree, and each node contains one extra field: its color, it can be either black or red of the binary search tree. If a binary search tree satisfies all the following red-black properties, it is a red

Chen, Yangjun

283

Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEAs Di-Jia Liu proprietary or confidential information #12;Objective To develop a novel aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT/mass transport and thermal conductivity through patterned nanotubes with micrometer-dimension flowfield

284

Accretions of Dark Matter and Dark Energy onto ($n+2$)-dimensional Schwarzschild Black Hole and Morris-Thorne Wormhole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass not sensitively depends on the dimension.

Ujjal Debnath

2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nanoscale mass conveyors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

286

The mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mass of the charged Higgs boson at the 1-loop level is investigated, assuming the CP symmetry to be violated explicitly in the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). It is found that there is a parameter region of the MSSM where the presence of explicit CP violation in the Higgs sector yields negative radiative corrections to the charged Higgs boson mass. Thus, the charged Higgs boson in the MSSM may have as low a mass as 60GeV at the 1-loop level, if the CP symmetry is violated. This lower bound may be improved by the Higgs search at LEP2, which imposes experimental constraints on the charged Higgs mass, as well as on the masses of the neutral Higgs bosons. Hence, LEP2 can constrain experimentally the charged Higgs mass to be not smaller than 109GeV under our assumption. In addition, it sets 75GeV as the lower bound on the mass of the lightest neutral Higgs boson, and 84GeV for that of the next-to-lightest neutral Higgs boson.

Seung Woo Ham; Sun Kun Oh; Eun Jong Yoo; Hyun Kyu Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

288

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A broad review of the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes is presented. Particular emphasis is given to ... dimensional density of states predicted for single-wall nanotubes of small diameter. The eviden...

M. S. Dresselhaus; G. Dresselhaus

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

291

Seasonal cycle of carbon dioxide and its isotopic composition in an urban atmosphere: Anthropogenic and biogenic effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and soils on CO2 mixing ratio were quantified with a mass balance calculation using dual carbon and oxygen

Ehleringer, Jim

292

Why Blue-Collar Blacks Help Less  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Hispanics in the Why Blacks Help Less U.S. Economy, eds.71(1):42-71. Why Blacks Help Less Fernandez, Roberto M. andProblems 49 (1): 11- Why Blacks Help Less Heflin, Coleen M.

Smith, Sandra Susan; Young, Kara Alexis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales...photonic structure| Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales...ultrastructure Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales...Controlled absorption of incident solar radiation is the principal...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Black-white asymmetry in visual perception  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tion of black and white in human vision. Investi- gativeneural responses to black and white ments are balanced, weand observers. The black white asymmetry with a 1.28 is

Lu, Z.-L.; Sperling, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Regular Black Hole Metric with Three Constants of Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely characterized by their masses and spins and are described by the Kerr metric. Several parametric spacetimes which deviate from the Kerr metric have been proposed in order to test this theorem with observations of black holes in both the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra. Such metrics often contain naked singularities or closed timelike curves in the vicinity of the compact objects that can limit the applicability of the metrics to compact objects that do not spin rapidly, and generally admit only two constants of motion. The existence of a third constant, however, can facilitate the calculation of observables, because the equations of motion can be written in first-order form. In this paper, I design a Kerr-like black hole metric which is regular everywhere outside of the event horizon, possesses three independent constants of motion, and depends nonlinearly on four free functions that parameterize potential deviations from ...

Johannsen, Tim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

BPS-like bound and thermodynamics of the charged BTZ black hole  

SciTech Connect

The charged Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole is plagued by several pathologies: (a) Divergent boundary terms are present in the action; hence, we have a divergent black-hole mass. (b) Once a finite, renormalized, mass M is defined, black-hole states exist for arbitrarily negative values of M. (c) There is no upper bound on the charge Q. We show that these pathological features are an artifact of the renormalization procedure. They can be completely removed by using an alternative renormalization scheme leading to a different definition M{sub 0} of the black-hole mass, which is the total energy inside the horizon. The new mass satisfies a BPS-like bound M{sub 0}{>=}({pi}/2)Q{sup 2}, and the heat capacity of the hole is positive. We also discuss the black-hole thermodynamics that arises when M{sub 0} is interpreted as the internal energy of the system. We show, using three independent approaches (black-hole thermodynamics, Einstein equations, and Euclidean action formulation), that M{sub 0} satisfies the first law if a term describing the mechanical work done by the electrostatic pressure is introduced.

Cadoni, Mariano; Monni, Cristina [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Cagliari and INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato (Italy)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

Tanmay Vachaspati

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

298

NSA-Old Black Spruce Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-OBS) NSA-OBS) The NSA-OBS site from the air. This aerial shot of the OBS site shows the generator in the lower-right corner, one of the huts in the upper-left corner, and part of the boardwalk leading away from the hut. View an aerial photo-map of the NSA-OBS site. OBS spruce trees and flux tower The road to the OBS site. The road to the OBS site was often a muddy mess, accessable only by ARGO all-terrain vehicles, and even they got stuck often. The OBS flux tower The NSA black spruce carbon model evaluation site and TE canopy access tower. Oblique view of the trail leading into the NSA Old Black Spruce site. Highway 391 is beyond the image at the bottom and the power line is viewable at the top of the image. The NSA-OBS site would be off to the upper left. The NSA-OBS Rohn tower where Amar Bazzaz of Harvard University is climbing the tower for maintenance.

299

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

SciTech Connect

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nanoelectro-mechanical systems based on carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:" , : Nanoelectro-mechanical systems based on carbon nanotubes ,81.90.88,81:39 ( -) 81:99 , ' ", '" #12;"Atomistic simulations of vibration of carbon nanotubes: is it possible to measure the mass of single atom?" Polina Pine Supervisor: Joan Adler, Yuval E. Yaish Carbon nanotubes

Adler, Joan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Black Hole Mass Scaling Relations and their Scatter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;#12;Turn Surface Brightness into 1. Pick an inclination: i. 2. Assume axisymmetry. 3. Invert to get conservation M~ 4. ­ Wind (mechanical): Fabian (1999). ­ Radiation: Fabian, Wilman & Crawford (2002); King

Maryland at College Park, University of

302

Simulations of nanosensors based on single walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations of nanosensors based on single walled carbon nanotubes Polina Pine1, Yuval E. Yaish2. The potential of single-walled carbon nanotubes as mass sensors is examined. The change in mass leads to proportional changes in the nanotube vibrational frequencies, which are monitored during atomistic simulations

Adler, Joan

303

Black Holes And Their Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation covers two di erent but related topics: the construction of new black hole solutions and the study of the microscopic origin of black hole entropy. In the solution part, two di erent sets of new solutions are found. The rst...

Mei, Jianwei

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Black Hole Energy Extraction Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... non-rotating black hole the particle can be lowered to no closer than 1.14 Schwarzschild radii, and the energy extracted can be no more than 63.2 per cent ... gram of matter-and the rope could be lowered no closer than 5 x 1011 Schwarzschild radii. This seems to rule out black holes as practical sources of energy. ...

1972-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optical black holes and solitons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We exhibit a static, cylindrically symmetric, exact solution to the Euler-Heisenberg field equations (EHFE) and prove that its effective geometry contains (optical) black holes. It is conjectured that there are also soliton solutions to the EHFE which contain black hole geometries.

Shawn Westmoreland

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Entropy of Lovelock Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general formula for the entropy of stationary black holes in Lovelock gravity theories is obtained by integrating the first law of black hole mechanics, which is derived by Hamiltonian methods. The entropy is not simply one quarter of the surface area of the horizon, but also includes a sum of intrinsic curvature invariants integrated over a cross section of the horizon.

Ted Jacobson; Robert C. Myers

1993-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009 Experiment Planning COPS Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan (PDF, 12.4M) Outreach COPS Backgrounder (PDF, 306K) Posters AMF Poster, German Vesion Researching Raindrops in the Black Forest News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany Main Site: 48° 32' 24.18" N, 08° 23' 48.72" E Altitude: 511.43 meters In March 2007, the third deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will take place in the Black Forest region of Germany, where scientists will study rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. ARM

308

String-Corrected Black Holes  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect -- the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive! The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

Hubeny, Veronika; Maloney, Alexander; Rangamani, Mukund

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

Stellar black holes and the origin of cosmic acceleration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discovery of cosmic acceleration has presented a unique challenge for cosmologists. As observational cosmology forges ahead, theorists have struggled to make sense of a standard model that requires extreme fine-tuning. This challenge is known as the cosmological constant problem. The theory of gravitational aether is an alternative to general relativity that does not suffer from this fine-tuning problem, as it decouples the quantum field theory vacuum from geometry, while remaining consistent with other tests of gravity. In this paper, we study static black hole solutions in this theory and show that it manifests a UV-IR coupling: Aether couples the space-time metric close to the black hole horizon, to metric at infinity. We then show that using the trans-Planckian ansatz (as a quantum gravity effect) close to the black hole horizon, leads to an accelerating cosmological solution, far from the horizon. Interestingly, this acceleration matches current observations for stellar-mass black holes. Based on our current understanding of the black hole accretion history in the Universe, we then make a prediction for how the effective dark energy density should evolve with redshift, which can be tested with future dark energy probes.

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein; Niayesh Afshordi; Michael L. Balogh

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dynamical evolution of quasi-circular binary black hole data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the fully nonlinear dynamical evolution of binary black hole data, whose orbital parameters are specified via the effective potential method for determining quasi-circular orbits. The cases studied range from the Cook-Baumgarte innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) to significantly beyond that separation. In all cases we find the black holes to coalesce (as determined by the appearance of a common apparent horizon) in less than half an orbital period. The results of the numerical simulations indicate that the initial holes are not actually in quasi-circular orbits, but that they are in fact nearly plunging together. The dynamics of the final horizon are studied to determine physical parameters of the final black hole, such as its spin, mass, and oscillation frequency, revealing information about the inspiral process. We show that considerable resolution is required to extract accurate physical information from the final black hole formed in the merger process, and that the quasi-normal modes of the final hole are strongly excited in the merger process. For the ISCO case, by comparing physical measurements of the final black hole formed to the initial data, we estimate that less than 3% of the total energy is radiated in the merger process.

Miguel Alcubierre; Bernd Bruegmann; Peter Diener; F. Siddhartha Guzman; Ian Hawke; Scott Hawley; Frank Herrmann; Michael Koppitz; Denis Pollney; Edward Seidel; Jonathan Thornburg

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Polarons in Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use ab initio total-energy calculations to predict the existence of polarons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We find that the CNTs' band edge energies vary linearly and the elastic energy increases quadratically with both radial and with axial distortions, leading to the spontaneous formation of polarons. Using a continuum model parametrized by the ab initio calculations, we estimate electron and hole polaron lengths, energies, and effective masses and analyze their complex dependence on CNT geometry. Implications of polaron effects on recently observed electro- and optomechanical behavior of CNTs are discussed.

M. Verissimo-Alves; R. B. Capaz; Belita Koiller; Emilio Artacho; H. Chacham

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Black Hole Particle Accelerator as a Machine to make Baby Universes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General relativity predicts that the inner horizon of an astronomically realistic rotating black hole is subject to the mass inflation instability. The inflationary instability acts like a gravity-powered particle accelerator of extraordinary power, accelerating accreted streams of particles along the principal outgoing and ingoing null directions at the inner horizon to collision energies that would, if nothing intervened, typically exceed exponentially the Planck energy. The inflationary instability is fueled by ongoing accretion, and is occurring inevitably in essentially every black hole in our Universe. This extravagant machine, the Black Hole Particle Accelerator, has the hallmarks of a device to make baby universes. Since collisions are most numerous inside supermassive black holes, reproductive efficiency requires our Universe to make supermassive black holes efficiently, as is observed.

A. J. S. Hamilton

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Primordial black holes from temporally enhanced curvature perturbation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scalar field with generalized kinetic interactions metamorphoses depending on its field value, ranging from cosmological constant to stiff matter. We show that such a scalar field can give rise to temporal enhancement of the curvature perturbation in the primordial Universe, leading to efficient production of primordial black holes while the enhancement persists. If the inflation energy scale is high, those mini-black holes evaporate by the Hawking radiation much before Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the effective reheating of the Universe is achieved by the black hole evaporation. Dominance of PBHs and the reheating by their evaporation modify the expansion history of the primordial Universe. This results in a characteristic feature of the spectrum of primordial tensor modes in the DECIGO frequency band, opening an interesting possibility of testing PBH reheating scenario by measuring the primordial tensor modes. If the inflation energy scale is low, the PBH mass can be much larger than the solar mass. In this case, PBH is an interesting candidate for seeds for supermassive black holes residing in present galaxies.

Teruaki Suyama; Yi-Peng Wu; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

Curing black hole singularities with local scale invariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that Weyl-invariant dilaton gravity provides a description of black holes without classical spacetime singularities. Singularities appear due to ill-behavior of gauge fixing conditions, one example being the gauge in which theory is classically equivalent to standard General Relativity. The main conclusions of our analysis are: (1) singularities signal a phase transition from broken to unbroken phase of Weyl symmetry, (2) instead of a singularity there is a "baby-universe" inside a black hole, (3) there is a critical mass after which reducing mass makes black hole larger as viewed by outside observers, (4) if a black hole could be connected with white hole through the "singularity", this would require breakdown of (classical) geometric description. The singularity of Schwarzschild BH solution is non-generic and so it it dangerous to rely on it in deriving general results. Our results may have important consequences for resolving issues related to information-loss puzzle. The theory we use is basically a completion of General Relativity, containing neither additional physical excitations nor higher-derivative terms, but requires physical scalar field such as Higgs field of Standard Model. Though quantum effects are still crucial and may change the proposed classical picture, a position of building quantum theory around regular classical solutions (without singularities) normally provides a much better starting point.

Predrag Dominis Prester

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

315

Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Elastic scattering of Dirac fermions on Schwarzschild black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximative analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the Schwarzschild geometry are used for building the partial wave analysis of Dirac fermions scattered by black holes. The analytic expressions of the differential cross section and induced polarization degree are derived in terms of scattering angle, mass of the black hole, energy and mass of the fermion. We perform a graphical study of differential cross section analysing the forward/backward scattering (known also as glory scattering) and the polarization degree as functions of scattering angle. The graphical analysis shows the presence of oscillations in scattering intensity around forward/backward directions, phenomena known as spiral scattering. The energy dependence of the differential cross section is also established by using analytical and graphical methods.

Ion I. Cotaescu; Cosmin Crucean; Ciprian A. Sporea

2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

Elastic scattering of Dirac fermions on Schwarzschild black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximative analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the Schwarzschild geometry are used for building the partial wave analysis of the Dirac fermions scattered by black holes. The analytic expressions of the differential cross section and induced polarization degree are derived in terms of scattering angle, mass of the black-hole, energy and mass of the fermion. We perform a graphical study of differential cross section analysing the forward/backward scattering (known also as glory scattering) and the polarization degree as functions of scattering angle. The graphical analysis shows the presence of oscillations in scattering intensity around forward/backward directions, phenomena known as spiral scattering. In addition, we find that the scattering probability increases significantly for fermions with large angular momentum. The energy dependence of the differential cross section is also established by using analytical and graphical methods.

Ion I. Cotaescu; Cosmin Crucean; Ciprian A. Sporea

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

Carbon Capture and Storage: How Green Can Black Be?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...experiments are developing 40-MW burners, intended to be commercially...involves the use of multiple burners and air separation trains...low SO x required on leaving burners, as well as the higher-temperature...gasify coal and chemically shift syngas or methane to hydrogen. Using...

R. Stuart Haszeldine

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon Capture and Storage: How Green Can Black Be?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of solvents from recovery columns need to...consumption of water needs to be reduced...parts per million of water), conventional...avoid dew-point condensation into liquids from...from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) activities...in many fields, water injected to undertake...

R. Stuart Haszeldine

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Antagonistic Interaction of Antiwear Additives and Carbon Black  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This antagonism suggests that removal of the ZDDP film by CB may ... a series of other antiwear and extreme pressure additives that might be considered likely to react...

Yewande Olomolehin; Rita Kapadia; Hugh Spikes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impacts of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. This paper presents the results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4SOM) ...

Salil Mahajan; Katherine J. Evans; James J. Hack; John E. Truesdale

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the zonal steppe soils of Russia. J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci. ,CD-ROM "Land Resources of Russia", International Institute

Hammes, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Carbon Capture and Storage: How Green Can Black Be?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coal, gas, and oil) and sometimes...the highest cost. Historical...progressively larger equipment from pilot...introduction, operation, and establishment...reducing the cost and also...To avoid costs of overcompression...aquifers, oil fields, or gas fields...commercial pipe operation. Fig. 3...

R. Stuart Haszeldine

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

325

MEASUREMENTS OF BLACK CARBON PARTICLES' CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Billerica, MA; 2 Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA; 3 NOAA CIRES, Boulder, CO; 4 UC Davis, Davis, CA; 5 of Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy

326

Aged black carbon in marine sediments and sinking particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining reverse osmosis and electrodialysis for more com-using coupled reverse osmosiselectrodialysis, Geochim.and POC. Reverse osmosis coupled to electrodialysis (RO/ED)

Coppola, Alysha I; Ziolkowski, Lori A; Masiello, Caroline A; Druffel, Ellen R. M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matter, BC from fossil/bio-fuel and biomass sources for thegm ?3 for BC from fossil/bio-fuel over India (4 ? to 40 ? Nemissions for 1990, fossil/bio-fuel BC decreases over Europe

Menon, Surabi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Carbon Capture and Storage: How Green Can Black Be?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduced by 40%. Oxyfuel combustion has not previously been developed...recycled flue gas to cool the combustion. Burners for oxyfuel have been...trains. Attractions of oxyfuel combustion are the much easier separation...coal and chemically shift syngas or methane to hydrogen. Using...

R. Stuart Haszeldine

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

Aged black carbon in marine sediments and sinking particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the incomplete combustion of biomass, coals, and otherwhile cool combustion conditions of biomass burning produceSouth Asia: Biomass or fossil fuel combustion? , Science,

Coppola, Alysha I; Ziolkowski, Lori A; Masiello, Caroline A; Druffel, Ellen R. M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of plant biomass and combustion, and thus are largelyfrom incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has beenincomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning (

Hammes, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Carbon Capture and Storage: How Green Can Black Be?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have been proposed. Norway will form a state...pipelines built to offshore hubs accessing large-scale...Utsira and Snohvhit, Norway and In Salah, Algeria...shown to be viable offshore. Since 2000, several...introduce renewable energies. But this critical...variable output from wind power to 30% or...

R. Stuart Haszeldine

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Carbon Capture and Storage: How Green Can Black Be?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...been proposed. Norway will form a state...pipelines built to offshore hubs accessing large-scale...and Snohvhit, Norway and In Salah...shown to be viable offshore. Since 2000...given to introduce renewable energies. But this critical...

R. Stuart Haszeldine

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

Carbon Capture and Storage: How Green Can Black Be?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plant. The challenge here lies less...continuous integration. In China...operation. National CCS targets...to introduce renewable energies. But this...funds, then national governments have...Electricity Grid The electricity...

R. Stuart Haszeldine

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Physical process version of the first law of thermodynamics for black holes in higher dimensional gravity  

SciTech Connect

The problem of physical process version of the first law of black hole thermodynamics for charged rotating black hole in n-dimensional gravity is elaborated. The formulas for the first order variations of mass, angular momentum and canonical energy in Einstein (n-2)-gauge form field theory are derived. These variations are expressed by means of the perturbed matter energy momentum tensor and charge matter current density.

Rogatko, Marek [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin, pl.Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej 1 (Poland)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes: Theoretical and Experimental Challenges  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A network of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/...) is currently taking data near its planned sensitivity. Coalescing black hole binaries are among the most promising, and most exciting, gravitational wave sources for these detectors. The talk will review the theoretical and experimental challenges that must be met in order to successfully detect gravitational waves from coalescing black hole binaries, and to be able to reliably measure the physical parameters of the source (masses, spins, ...).

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Stimuli-Tailored Dispersion State of Aqueous Carbon Nanotube Suspensions and Solid Polymer Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoparticles (such as, carbon nanotubes, carbon black, clay etc.) have one or more dimensions of the order of 100 nm or less. Owing to very high van der Waals force of attraction, these nanoparticles exist in a highly aggregated state. It is often...

Etika, Krishna

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

U(N)-monopoles on Kerr black hole and its entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe U(N)-monopoles (N > 1) on Kerr black holes by the parameters of the moduli space of holomorphic vector U(N)-bundles over two-sphere with the help of the Grothendieck splitting theorem. For N = 2,3 we obtain this description in an explicit form as well as the estimates for the corresponding monopole masses. This gives a possibility to adduce some reasonings in favour of existence of both a fine structure for Kerr black holes and the statistical ensemble tied with it which might generate the Kerr black hole entropy.

Yu. P. Goncharov

1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

General Nonextremal Rotating Charged Goedel Black Holes in Minimal Five-Dimensional Gauged Supergravity  

SciTech Connect

I present the general exact solutions for nonextremal rotating charged black holes in the Goedel universe of five-dimensional minimal supergravity theory. They are uniquely characterized by four nontrivial parameters: namely, the mass m, the charge q, the Kerr equal rotation parameter a, and the Goedel parameter j. I calculate the conserved energy, angular momenta, and charge for the solutions and show that they completely satisfy the first law of black hole thermodynamics. I also study the symmetry and separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi and the massive Klein-Gordon equations in these Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Goedel black hole backgrounds.

Wu Shuangqing [College of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China)

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Using radio emission to detect isolated and quiescent accreting black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the implications of new relations between black holes' masses, X-ray luminosities and radio luminosities, as well as the properties of the next generation of radio telescopes, for the goal of finding isolated accreting black holes. Because accreting black holes have radio-to-X-ray flux ratios that increase with decreasing luminosity in Eddington units, and because deep surveys over large fields of view should be possible with planned instrumentation such as LOFAR, radio surveys should be significantly more efficient than X-ray surveys for finding these objects.

Thomas J. Maccarone

2005-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

Delayed carbon sequestration and rising carbon prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set out a dynamic model to investigate optimal time paths of emissions, carbon stocks and carbon sequestration by land conversion, allowing for non-instantaneous carbon sequestration. Previous research in a dy...

Alejandro Caparrs

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The structure of black hole magnetospheres I. Schwarzschild black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2000 RAS, MNRAS 315, 89 97 force-free black hole magnetosphere...However, there is nothing fundamental about the paraboloidal shape...in stationary axisymmetric force-free magnetospheres. Therefore...Stegun I. A., 1972, Handbook of Mathematical Functions......

Pranab Ghosh

2000-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermodynamics of Lifshitz black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We apply the recently extended conserved Killing charge definition of Abbott-Deser-Tekin formalism to compute, for the first time, the energies of analytic Lifshitz black holes in higher dimensions. We then calculate the temperature and the entropy of this large family of solutions, and study and discuss the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Along the way we also identify the possible critical points of the relevant quadratic curvature gravity theories. Separately, we also apply the generalized Killing charge definition to compute the energy and the angular momentum of the warped AdS3 black hole solution of the three-dimensional new massive gravity theory.

Deniz Olgu Devecio?lu and zgr Sar?o?lu

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Ecology, Silviculture, and Management of Black Hills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ponderosa pine forests, and watershed management of the Black Hills. Keywords: Black Hills, silviculture of the Black Hills National Forest. The authors are grateful for the insightful and helpful reviews, and members of the Black Hills National Forest. We are thankful for Bob Hamre's editing of the manuscript

Fried, Jeremy S.

344

First law of black Saturn thermodynamics  

SciTech Connect

The physical process version and equilibrium state version of the first law of thermodynamics for a black object consisting of n-dimensional charged stationary axisymmetric black hole surrounded by a black rings, the so-called black Saturn, was derived. The general setting for our derivations is n-dimensional dilaton gravity with p+1 strength form fields.

Rogatko, Marek [Institute of Physics Maria Curie-Sklodowska University 20-031 Lublin, pl. Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej 1 (Poland)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

First law of black Saturn thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical process version and equilibrium state version of the first law of thermodynamics for a black object consisting of n-dimensional charged stationary axisymmetric black hole surrounded by a black rings, the so-called black Saturn, was derived. The general setting for our derivations is n-dimensional dilaton gravity with p+1 strength form fields.

Marek Rogatko

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases | OSTI,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases Information Bridge : Natural materials for carbon capture. ... Realistic costs of carbon capture ... Technology and international climate policy Energy Citations Database : What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions ... Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest ... ScienceCinema : Carbon Smackdown ... Extrapolate the Past or Invent the Future ... Two Billion Cars: What it means for Climate and Energy Policy ... DOE Data Explorer : Big Sky Carbon Atlas... NATCARB Interactive Maps ... Videos of experiments from ORNL's Gas Hydrate Research DOE Green Energy : Thinking Like a Whole Building: A Whole Foods Market New Construction Case

347

Optimization in the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling model of Hawking radiation for Kerr-Newman Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this short report, we investigate the mutual information hidden in the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling model of Hawking radiation for Kerr-Newman black holes. By assuming the radiation as an optimization process, we discuss its effect on time evolution of rotating (charged and uncharged) black holes. For uncharged rotating black holes evaporating under the maximum mutual information optimization, their scale invariant rotation parameter $a_*=a/M$ is almost constant at the early stage but rapidly increase at the very last stage of the evaluation process. The value of rotation parameter at the final state of evaporation depends on the initial condition of the black hole. We also found that the presence of electric charge can cause the black holes lose their angular momentum more rapidly than they lose mass. The charged-rotating black holes asymptotically approach a state which is described by $a_*= 0$ and $Q/M = 1$.

Auttakit Chatrabhuti; Khem Upathambhakul

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

348

Revisit Carbon/Sulfur Composite for Li-S Batteries  

SciTech Connect

To correlate the carbon properties e.g. surface area and porous structure, with the electrochemical behaviors of carbon/sulfur (C/S) composite cathodes for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, four different carbon frameworks including Ketjen Black (KB, high surface area and porous), Graphene (high surface area and nonporous), Acetylene Black (AB, low surface area and nonporous) and Hollow Carbon Nano Sphere (HCNS, low surface area and porous) are employed to immobilize sulfur (80 wt.%). It has been revealed that high surface area of carbon improves the utilization rate of active sulfur and decreases the real current density during the electrochemical reactions. Accordingly, increased reversible capacities and reduced polarization are observed for high surface area carbon hosts such as KB/S and graphene/S composites. The porous structure of KB or HCNS matrix promotes the long-term cycling stability of C/S composites but only at relatively low rate (0.2 C). Once the current density increases, the pore effect completely disappears and all Li-S batteries show similar trend of capacity degradation regardless of the different carbon hosts used in the cathodes. The reason has been assigned to the formation of reduced amount of irreversible Li2S on the cathode as well as shortened time for polysulfides to transport towards lithium anode at elevated current densities. This work provides valuable information for predictive selection on carbon materials to construct C/S composite for practical applications from the electrochemical point of view.

Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin; Li, Xiaohong S.; Zuo, Pengjian; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Self-Regulated Growth of Supermassive Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a series of simulations of the self--regulated growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galaxies via three different fueling mechanisms: major mergers, minor mergers, and disk instabilities. The SMBHs in all three scenarios follow the same black hole fundamental plane (BHFP) and correlation with bulge binding energy seen in simulations of major mergers, and observed locally. Furthermore, provided that the total gas supply is significantly larger than the mass of the SMBH, its limiting mass is not influenced by the amount of gas available or the efficiency of black hole growth. This supports the assertion that SMBHs accrete until they reach a critical mass at which feedback is sufficient to unbind the gas locally, terminating the inflow and stalling further growth. At the same time, while minor and major mergers follow the same projected correlations (e.g., the $M_{BH}-\\sigma$ and Magorrian relations), SMBHs grown via disk instabilities do not, owing to structural differences between the host bulges. This finding is supported by recent observations of SMBHs in pseudobulges and bulges in barred systems, as compared to those hosted by classical bulges. Taken together, this provides support for the BHFP and binding energy correlations as being more "fundamental" than other proposed correlations in that they reflect the physical mechanism driving the co-evolution of SMBHs and spheroids.

Joshua D. Younger; Philip F. Hopkins; T. J. Cox; Lars Hernquist

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization Study, Part 3: Continuous measurements of fine particulate matter mass and composition  

SciTech Connect

Deployment of continuous analyzers in the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization Study (SEARCH) network began in 1998 and continues today as new technologies are developed. Measurement of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass is performed using a dried, 30 {sup o}C tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). TEOM measurements are complemented by observations of light scattering by nephelometry. Measurements of major constituents include: (1) SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} via reduction to SO{sub 2}; (2) NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} via respective catalytic oxidation and reduction to NO, (3) black carbon (BC) by optical absorption,(4) total carbon by combustion to CO{sup 2}, and (5) organic carbon by difference between the latter two measurements. Several illustrative examples of continuous data from the SEARCH network are presented. A distinctive composite annual average diurnal pattern is observed for PM2.5 mass, nitrate, and BC, likely indicating the influence of traffic-related emissions, growth, and break up of the boundary layer and formation of ammonium nitrate. Examination of PM2.5 components indicates the need to better understand the continuous composition of the unmeasured 'other' category, because it contributes a significant fraction to total mass during periods of high PM2.5 loading. Selected episodes are presented to illustrate applications of SEARCH data. An SO{sub 2} conversion rate of 0.2%/hr is derived from an observation of a plume from a coal-fired power plant during early spring, and the importance of local, rural sources of NH{sub 3} to the formation of ammonium nitrate in particulate matter (PM) is demonstrated. 41 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Edgerton, E.S.; Hartsell, B.E.; Saylor, R.D.; Jansen, J.J.; Hansen, D.A.; Hidy, G.M. [Atmospheric Research & Analysis, Inc., Cary, NC (United States)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-2% of the oil mass, however the calcium ion peak at m/z 40and elemental carbon (EC) peaks. The HDDV oil mass spectraoil mass spectra were characterized by an intense Ca + ion peak and

Spencer, Matthew Todd

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chapter 5 - Environmental Impact of Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental impact of black liquor gasification (BLG) is discussed. Biofuels from a BLG process excel in terms of well-to-wheel carbon dioxide emission reduction and energy efficiency. Forest biorefinery utilizing gasification (in a black liquor gasification combined cycle (BLGCC) configuration) rather than a Tomlinson boiler is predicted to produce significantly fewer pollutant emissions due to the intrinsic characteristics of the BLGCC technology. Syngas cleanup conditioning removes a considerable amount of contaminants and gas turbine combustion is more efficient and complete than boiler combustion. Also, there could be reductions in pollutant emissions and hazardous wastes resulting from cleaner production of chemicals and fuels that are now manufactured using fossil energy resources. Production of power, fuels, chemicals, and other products from biomass resources creates a net zero generation of carbon dioxide as plants are renewable carbon sinks. BLG whether conducted at high or low temperatures is still superior to the current recovery boiler combustion technology. Implementation of IGCC power plants will cause net savings in cooling water requirements and net reductions in wastewater discharges. The most significant environmental impact caused by BLG will occur in air emissions. The overall reduction of Total reduced sulphur (TRS) gases using gasification technology will also reduce odor, which will improve public acceptance of pulp and paper mills, particularly in populated areas.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Primordial black holes as biased tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primordial black holes (PBHs) are theoretical black holes which may be formed during the radiation dominant era and, basically, caused by the gravitational collapse of radiational overdensities. It has been well known that in the context of the structure formation in our Universe such collapsed objects, e.g., halos/galaxies, could be considered as bias tracers of underlying matter fluctuations and the halo/galaxy bias has been studied well. Employing a peak-background split picture which is known to be a useful tool to discuss the halo bias, we consider the large scale clustering behavior of the PBH and propose an almost mass-independent constraint to the scenario that dark matters (DMs) consist of PBHs. We consider the case where the statistics of the primordial curvature perturbations is almost Gaussian, but with small local-type non-Gaussianity. If PBHs account for the DM abundance, such a large scale clustering of PBHs behaves as nothing but the matter isocurvature perturbation and constrained strictly by...

Tada, Yuichiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol. 3 figs.

Steinberg, M.; Grohse, E.W.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A Slowly Rotating Black Hole in Horava-Lifshitz Gravity and a 3+1 Dimensional Topological Black Hole: Motion of Particles and BSW Mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The motion of a neutral particle in the vicinity of a slowly rotating black hole in the Horava-Lifshitz theory of gravity and 3+1 dimensional topological Lifshitz black hole is investigated. Geodesics for radial motion of the particles are also plotted. Some different cases of the orbital motion of the particle are discussed where maximum and minimum values of the effective potential are calculated. Further the Ba\\~{n}ados, Silk and West (BSW) mechanism is studied for these black holes. It is shown that the centre-of-mass energy (CME) of two colliding uncharged particles at the horizon of these black holes remains finite. Thus the BSW effect cannot be seen in these cases.

Hussain, Ibrar; Majeed, Bushra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Thermodynamics of regular black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Observational constraints on growth of massive black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the observational constraints on the growth of massive black holes (BHs) in galactic nuclei. We use the velocity dispersions of early-type galaxies obtained by the SDSS and the relation between BH mass and velocity dispersion to estimate the local BH mass density to be 2.5x10^5 Msun/Mpc^3. We also use the QSO luminosity function from the 2dF Redshift Survey to estimate the BH mass density accreted during optically bright QSO phases. The local BH mass density is consistent with the density accreted during optically bright QSO phases if QSOs have an efficiency 0.1. By studying the continuity equation for the BH mass distribution, including the effect of BH mergers, we find relations between the local BH mass function and the QSO luminosity function. If the BH mass is assumed to be conserved during BH mergers, comparison of the predicted relations with the observations suggests that luminous QSOs (L_{bol}>10^{46} erg/s) have a high efficiency (e.g. 0.2), and the growth of high-mass BHs (>10^8 Msun) comes mainly from accretion during optically bright QSO phases, or that luminous QSOs have a super-Eddington luminosity. If luminous QSOs are not accreting with super-Eddington luminosities and the growth of low-mass BHs also occurs mainly during optically bright QSO phases, less luminous QSOs must accrete with a low efficiency 0.1.

Qingjuan Yu; Scott Tremaine

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

360

Of the Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About thirty years ago, Bekenstein and Hawking introduced three basic concepts relating to black hole, namely, the "area entropy", "gravitation temperature" and "thermal radiation". The author analyzes these concepts systematically and concludes that they are mostly inadequate or wrong. He points out that a black hole's taking in thermal radiation from the space is an energy-gathering process. It is special, even extraordinary. It reduces entropy, violating Clausius' second law.

Xinyong Fu

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Galactic Center Black Hole Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The super-massive 4 million solar mass black hole Sagittarius~A* (SgrA*) shows flare emission from the millimeter to the X-ray domain. A detailed analysis of the infrared light curves allows us to address the accretion phenomenon in a statistical way. The analysis shows that the near-infrared flare amplitudes are dominated by a single state power law, with the low states in SgrA* limited by confusion through the unresolved stellar background. There are several dusty objects in the immediate vicinity of SgrA*. The source G2/DSO is one of them. Its nature is unclear. It may be comparable to similar stellar dusty sources in the region or may consist predominantly of gas and dust. In this case a particularly enhanced accretion activity onto SgrA* may be expected in the near future. Here the interpretation of recent data and ongoing observations are discussed.

Eckart, A; Valencia-S., M; Straubmeier, C; Zensus, J A; Karas, V; Kunneriath, D; Alberdi, A; Sabha, N; Schdel, R; Puetzfeld, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

363

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

364

Lattice Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Hawking process on lattices falling into static black holes. The motivation is to understand how the outgoing modes and Hawking radiation can arise in a setting with a strict short distance cutoff in the free-fall frame. We employ two-dimensional free scalar field theory. For a falling lattice with a discrete time-translation symmetry we use analytical methods to establish that, for Killing frequency $\\omega$ and surface gravity $\\kappa$ satisfying $\\kappa\\ll\\omega^{1/3}\\ll 1$ in lattice units, the continuum Hawking spectrum is recovered. The low frequency outgoing modes arise from exotic ingoing modes with large proper wavevectors that "refract" off the horizon. In this model with time translation symmetry the proper lattice spacing goes to zero at spatial infinity. We also consider instead falling lattices whose proper lattice spacing is constant at infinity and therefore grows with time at any finite radius. This violation of time translation symmetry is visible only at wavelengths comparable to the lattice spacing, and it is responsible for transmuting ingoing high Killing frequency modes into low frequency outgoing modes.

Steven Corley; Ted Jacobson

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Red-Black Trees 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red-Black Trees 1© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees 6 3 8 4 v z #12;Red-Black Trees 2© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia From (2,4) to Red-Black Trees A red-black tree is a representation of a (2,4) tree by means of a binary tree whose nodes are colored red or black In comparison with its associated (2,4) tree

Alechina, Natasha

366

Microscopic quantum structure of black hole and vacuum versus quantum statistical origin of gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Planckon densely piled model of vacuum is proposed. Based on this model, the microscopic quantum structure of Schwarzschild black hole and quantum statistical origin of its gravity are studied. The cutoff of black hole horizon leads to Casimir effect inside the horizon. This effect makes the inside vacuum has less zero quantum fluctuation energy than that of outside vacuum and the spin 1/2 radiation hole excitations are resulted inside the horizon. The mean energy of the radiation hole excitations is related to the temperature decrease of the Hawking-Unruh type by the period law of the Fermion temperature greens function and a temperature difference as well as gravity are created on the horizon. A dual relation of the gravity potentials between inside and outside regions of the black hole is found. An attractor behaviour of the horizon surface is unveiled. The gravity potential inside the black hole is linear in radial coordinate and no singularity exists at the origin of the black hole, in contrast to the conventional conjecture. All the particles absorbed by the black hole have fallen down to the horizon and converted into spin 1/2 radiation quanta with the mean energy related to the Hawking-Unruh temperature, the thermodynamic equilibrium and the mechanical balance make the radiation quanta be tightly bound in the horizon. The gravitation mass $2M$ and physical mass $M$ of the black hole are calculated. The calculated entropy of the black hole is well consistent with Hawking. Outside the horizon, there exist thermodynamic non-equilibrium and mechanical non-balance which lead to an outward centrifugal energy flow and an inward gravitation energy flow. The lost vacuum energy in the negative gravitation potential region has been removed to the black hole surface to form a spherical Planckon shell with the thickness of Planckon diameter so that energy conservation is guaranteed.

Shun-Jin Wang

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Bekenstein-Hawking area law for black objects with conical singularities  

SciTech Connect

We argue that, when working with the appropriate set of thermodynamical variables, the Bekenstein-Hawking law still holds for asymptotically flat black objects with conical singularities. The mass energy which enters the first law of thermodynamics does not, however, coincide with the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass; it differs from the latter by the energy associated with the conical singularity, as seen by an asymptotic, static observer. These statements are supported by a number of examples: the Bach-Weyl (double-Schwarzschild) solution, its dihole generalization in Einstein-Maxwell theory and the five-dimensional static black ring.

Herdeiro, Carlos [Centro de Fisica do Porto e Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503 D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

369

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-75 Sediment Trap Study in the Green Bay Mass Balance Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Mass and Organic Carbon Fluxes, Resuspension, and Particle Settling Velocities Brian J. Eadie Gerald L ................................................................................................. 23 4.5 Flux Profiles and Estimates of Sediment Resuspension

370

Characterizing spinning black hole binaries in eccentric orbits with LISA  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is designed to detect gravitational wave signals from astrophysical sources, including those from coalescing binary systems of compact objects such as black holes. Colliding galaxies have central black holes that sink to the center of the merged galaxy and begin to orbit one another and emit gravitational waves. Some galaxy evolution models predict that the binary black hole system will enter the LISA band with significant orbital eccentricity, while other models suggest that the orbits will already have circularized. Using a full 17 parameter waveform model that includes the effects of orbital eccentricity, spin precession, and higher harmonics, we investigate how well the source parameters can be inferred from simulated LISA data. Defining the reference eccentricity as the value one year before merger, we find that for typical LISA sources, it will be possible to measure the eccentricity to an accuracy of parts in a thousand. The accuracy with which the eccentricity can be measured depends only very weakly on the eccentricity, making it possible to distinguish circular orbits from those with very small eccentricities. LISA measurements of the orbital eccentricity can help constraints theories of galaxy mergers in the early universe. Failing to account for the eccentricity in the waveform modeling can lead to a loss of signal power and bias the estimation of parameters such as the black hole masses and spins.

Key, Joey Shapiro; Cornish, Neil J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Bulk emission of scalars by a rotating black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study in detail the scalar-field Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by a higher-dimensional, rotating black hole. We numerically compute the angular eigenvalues, and solve the radial equation of motion in order to find transmission factors. The latter are found to be enhanced by the angular momentum of the black hole, and to exhibit the well-known effect of superradiance. The corresponding power spectra for scalar fields show an enhancement with the number of dimensions, as in the non-rotating case. We compute the total mass loss rate of the black hole for a variety of black-hole angular momenta and bulk dimensions, and find that, in all cases, the bulk emission remains significantly smaller than the brane emission. The angular-momentum loss rate is also computed and found to have a smaller value in the bulk than on the brane. We present accurate bulk-to-brane emission ratios for a range of scenarios.

M. Casals; S. R. Dolan; P. Kanti; E. Winstanley

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Measuring the Black Hole Spin in Sgr A*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polarized mm/sub-mm radiation from Sgr A* is apparently produced by a Keplerian structure whose peak emission occurs within several Schwarzschild radii (r_S=2GM/c^2) of the black hole. The Chandra X-ray counterpart, if confirmed, is presumably the self-Comptonized component from this region. In this paper, we suggest that sub-mm timing observations could yield a signal corresponding to the period P_0 of the marginally stable orbit, and therefore point directly to the black hole's spin a. Sgr A*'s mass is now known to be (2.6\\pm 0.2)\\times 10^6 M_\\odot (an unusually accurate value for supermassive black hole candidates), for which 2.7 minblack hole (a=0) should have P_0 ~ 20 min. The identification of the orbital frequency with the innermost stable circular orbit is made feasible by the transition from optically thick to thin emission at sub-mm wavelengths. With stratification in the emitter, the peak of the sub-mm bump in Sgr A*'s spectrum is thus produced at the smallest radius. We caution, however, that theoretical uncertainties in the structure of the emission region may still produce some ambiguity in the timing signal. Given that Sgr A*'s flux at $\

Fulvio Melia; Benjamin C. Bromley; Siming Liu; Christopher; K. Walker

2001-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Increase of Black Hole Entropy in Higher Curvature Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the Zeroth Law and the Second Law of black hole thermodynamics within the context of effective gravitational actions including higher curvature interactions. We show that entropy can never decrease for quasi-stationary processes in which a black hole accretes positive energy matter, independent of the details of the gravitational action. Within a class of higher curvature theories where the Lagrangian consists of a polynomial in the Ricci scalar, we use a conformally equivalent theory to establish that stationary black hole solutions with a Killing horizon satisfy the Zeroth Law, and that the Second Law holds in general for any dynamical process. We also introduce a new method for establishing the Second Law based on a generalization of the area theorem, which may prove useful for a wider class of Lagrangians. Finally, we show how one can infer the form of the black hole entropy, at least for the Ricci polynomial theories, by integrating the changes of mass and angular momentum in a quasistationary accretion process.

Ted Jacobson; Gungwon Kang; Robert C. Myers

1995-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Vibrating Black Holes in f(R) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider general perturbations of a Schwarzschild black holes in the context of f(R) gravity. A reduced set of frame independent master variables are determined, which obey two closed wave equations - one for the transverse, trace-free (tensor) perturbations and the other for the additional scalar degree of freedom which characterise fourth-order theories of gravity. We show that for the tensor modes, the underlying dynamics in f(R) gravity is governed by a modified Regge-Wheeler tensor which obeys the same Regge-Wheeler equation as in General Relativity. We find that the possible sources of scalar quasinormal modes that follow from scalar perturbations for the lower multipoles result from primordial black holes, while higher mass, stellar black holes are associated with extremely high multipoles, which can only be produced in the first stage of black hole formation. Since scalar quasi-normal modes are short ranged, this scenario makes their detection beyond the range of current experiments.

Anne Marie Nzioki; Rituparno Goswami; Peter K. S. Dunsby

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Inside Story: Quasilocal Tachyons and Black Holes  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the fate of excitations in regions of closed string tachyon condensate, a question crucial for understanding unitarity in a class of black holes in string theory. First we introduce a simple new example of quasilocal tachyon condensation in a globally stable AdS/CFT background, and review tachyons' appearance in black hole physics. Then we calculate forces on particles and fields in a tachyon phase using a field theoretic model with spatially localized exponentially growing time dependent masses. This model reveals two features, both supporting unitary evolution in the bulk of spacetime. First, the growing energy of fields sourced by sets of (real and virtual) particles in the tachyon phase yields outward forces on them, leaving behind only combinations which do not source any fields. Secondly, requiring the consistency of perturbative string theory imposes cancellation of a BRST anomaly, which also yields a restricted set of states. Each of these effects supports the notion of a black hole final state arising from string-theoretic dynamics replacing the black hole singularity.

Horowitz, Gary T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Silverstein, Eva; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

376

Black hole quantum tunnelling and black hole entropy correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parikh-Wilczek tunnelling framework, which treats Hawking radiation as a tunnelling process, is investigated again. As the first order correction, the log-corrected entropy-area relation naturally emerges in the tunnelling picture if we consider the emission of a spherical shell. The second order correction of the emission rate for the Schwarzschild black hole is calculated too. In this level, the result is still in agreement with the unitary theory, however, the entropy of the black hole will contain three parts: the usual Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, the logarithmic term and the inverse area term. In our results the coefficient of the logarithmic term is -1. Apart from a coefficient, Our correction to the black hole entropy is consistent with that of loop quantum gravity.

Jingyi Zhang

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effective potential of a black hole in thermal equilibrium with quantum fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Expectation values of one-loop renormalized thermal equilibrium stress-energy tensors of free conformal scalars, spin-1/2 fermions, and U(1) gauge fields on a Schwarzschild black hole background are used as sources in the semiclassical Einstein equation. The back reaction and new equilibrium metric have been found at O(?) for each spin field in previous work. In this paper, the nature of the modified black hole spacetime is explored through calculations of the effective potential for null and timelike orbits. Significant novel features affecting the motions of both massive and massless test particles show up at lowest order in ?=(MPl/M)2<1, where M is the black hole mass, and MPl is the Planck mass. Specifically, we find an increase in the black hole capture cross sections, and the existence of a region near the black hole with a repulsive contribution, generated by the U(1) back reaction, to the gravitational force. There is no such effect for other spins. Extrapolating our results suggests a tendency towards the formation of stable circular orbits, but the result cannot be established in O(?): the change in the metric becomes large and it changes its signature. We also consider the back reaction arising from multiple fields, which ultimately should be useful for treating a black hole in equilibrium with field ensembles belonging to gauge theories. In certain circumstances, however, reliable results will require calculations beyond O(?).

David Hochberg; Thomas W. Kephart; James W. York; Jr.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Viewing the Shadow of the Black Hole at the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the evidence for the existence of an ultra-compact concentration of dark mass associated with the radio source Sgr A* in the Galactic Center has become very strong. However, an unambiguous proof that this object is indeed a black hole is still lacking. A defining characteristic of a black hole is the event horizon. To a distant observer, the event horizon casts a relatively large ``shadow'' with an apparent diameter of ~10 gravitational radii due to bending of light by the black hole, nearly independent of the black hole spin or orientation. The predicted size (~30 micro-arcseconds) of this shadow for Sgr A* approaches the resolution of current radio-interferometers. If the black hole is maximally spinning and viewed edge-on, then the shadow will be offset by ~8 micro-arcseconds from the center of mass, and will be slightly flattened on one side. Taking into account scatter-broadening of the image in the interstellar medium and the finite achievable telescope resolution, we show that the shadow of Sgr A* may be observable with very long-baseline interferometry at sub-millimeter wavelengths, assuming that the accretion flow is optically thin in this region of the spectrum. Hence, there exists a realistic expectation of imaging the event horizon of a black hole within the next few years.

Heino Falcke; Fulvio Melia; Eric Agol

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effect of quintessence on the energy of the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy content of the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole surrounded by quintessence is investigated using approximate Lie symmetry methods. It is mainly done by assuming mass and charge of the black hole as small quantities ($\\epsilon$), and by retaining its second power in the perturbed geodesic equations for such black hole while neglecting its higher powers. Due to the presence of trivial second-order approximate Lie symmetries of these perturbed geodesic equations, a rescaling of the geodetic parameter gives a rescaling of the energy in this black hole. Interestingly we obtain an explicit relation of the rescaling factor that depends on the square of the charge to mass ratio of the black hole, the normalization factor $\\alpha$, which is related to the state parameter of the quintessence matter, and the coordinate $r$. A comparison of this rescaling factor with that of the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole (Hussain et. al SIGMA, 2007), without quintessence is given. It is observed that the presence of the quint...

Hussain, Ibrar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole in Cygnus X-1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The compact primary in the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 was the first black hole to be established via dynamical observations. We have recently determined accurate values for its mass and distance, and for the orbital inclination angle of the binary. Building on these results, which are based on our favored (asynchronous) dynamical model, we have measured the radius of the inner edge of the black hole's accretion disk by fitting its thermal continuum spectrum to a fully relativistic model of a thin accretion disk. Assuming that the spin axis of the black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum vector, we have determined that Cygnus X-1 contains a near-extreme Kerr black hole with a spin parameter a * > 0.95 (3?). For a less probable (synchronous) dynamical model, we find a * > 0.92 (3?). In our analysis, we include the uncertainties in black hole mass, orbital inclination angle, and distance, and we also include the uncertainty in the calibration of the absolute flux via the Crab. These four sources of uncertainty totally dominate the error budget. The uncertainties introduced by the thin-disk model we employ are particularly small in this case given the extreme spin of the black hole and the disk's low luminosity.

Lijun Gou; Jeffrey E. McClintock; Mark J. Reid; Jerome A. Orosz; James F. Steiner; Ramesh Narayan; Jingen Xiang; Ronald A. Remillard; Keith A. Arnaud; Shane W. Davis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A star in a 15.2-year orbit around the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in April/May 2002 thus probes the mass concentration at around 2,100 times the Schwarzschild radius of a 3 106M black hole. The pericentre distance radius of S2 ... because such a configuration would have a radius only a few times greater than the Schwarzschild radius of a black hole. However, it would be very hard to understand how ...

R. Schdel; T. Ott; R. Genzel; R. Hofmann; M. Lehnert; A. Eckart; N. Mouawad; T. Alexander; M. J. Reid; R. Lenzen; M. Hartung; F. Lacombe; D. Rouan; E. Gendron; G. Rousset; A.-M. Lagrange; W. Brandner; N. Ageorges; C. Lidman; A. F. M. Moorwood; J. Spyromilio; N. Hubin; K. M. Menten

2002-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

Natal kicks of stellar mass black holes by asymmetric mass ejection in fallback supernovae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany...or if they could develop a broken mirror symmetry by rapid differential rotation...one estimates that in the case of a Schwarzschild BH j isco(M BH)- 5- 1016(M BH......

Hans-Thomas Janka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comparative results of the combustion of lignin briquettes and black coal  

SciTech Connect

A new type of biofuel - hydrolytic lignin briquettes - was tested as compared with ordinary SS coal from the Kuznetsk Basin in fuel-bed firing in a Universal-6 boiler. It was found that the (total) efficiency of the boiler with the firing of lignin briquettes was 38% higher than that with the use of black coal. Carbon loss in the combustion of briquettes was 1%, whereas it was 48.2% in the combustion of black coal. The emission of harmful gas pollutants into the environment in the combustion of briquettes was lower than that in the combustion of coal by a factor of 4.5.

V.G. Lurii [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Storage News Carbon Capture and Storage News FE Carbon Capture and Storage News RSS November 7, 2013 Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution 18 Innovative Carbon Capture Projects Will Help Make Fossil Energy Use Cleaner, Safer and More Sustainable as Part of the Obama Administration's Climate Action Plan August 15, 2013 Historically Black Colleges and Universities Receive Funds for Fossil Energy Research Five fossil energy-related projects that will help maintain the nation's energy portfolio while also providing educational and research training opportunities for tomorrow's scientists and engineers have been selected for funding by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). August 14, 2013 DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research

385

A RADIO-SELECTED BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY CANDIDATE IN THE MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTER M62  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of a candidate stellar-mass black hole in the Milky Way globular cluster M62. We detected the black hole candidate, which we call M62-VLA1, in the core of the cluster using deep radio continuum imaging from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. M62-VLA1 is a faint source with a flux density of 18.7 1.9 ?Jy at 6.2 GHz and a flat radio spectrum (? = 0.24 0.42, for S{sub ?} = ?{sup ?}). M62 is the second Milky Way cluster with a candidate stellar-mass black hole; unlike the two candidate black holes previously found in the cluster M22, M62-VLA1 is associated with a Chandra X-ray source, supporting its identification as a black hole X-ray binary. Measurements of its radio and X-ray luminosity, while not simultaneous, place M62-VLA1 squarely on the well-established radio-X-ray correlation for stellar-mass black holes. In archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, M62-VLA1 is coincident with a star near the lower red giant branch. This possible optical counterpart shows a blue excess, H? emission, and optical variability. The radio, X-ray, and optical properties of M62-VLA1 are very similar to those for V404 Cyg, one of the best-studied quiescent stellar-mass black holes. We cannot yet rule out alternative scenarios for the radio source, such as a flaring neutron star or background galaxy; future observations are necessary to determine whether M62-VLA1 is indeed an accreting stellar-mass black hole.

Chomiuk, Laura; Ransom, Scott [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Maccarone, Thomas J. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Miller-Jones, James C. A. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Heinke, Craig [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 4-183 CCIS, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Noyola, Eva [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), A. P. 70-264, 04510 (Mexico); Seth, Anil C., E-mail: chomiuk@pa.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Consortium SHARE Carbon Fiber Consortium Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium The Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium was established in 2011 to...

387

4/25/11 12:32 PMThe Canadian Press: Scientists searching for 'soot-print' in the Arctic; black carbon coating seen as causing melt Page 1 of 2http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5gpZC2HL9mLKe_nwaOPhaSQPdnuUg?docId=6621785  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere by absorbing heat from the sun, explained Quinn, who works in NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental with Quinn, likened the process to wearing a black shirt on a sunny day. "If you want to be cooler, you would wear a light-colored shirt that would reflect t

Rigor, Ignatius G.

388

Energy on black hole spacetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the issue of defining energy for test particles on a background black hole spacetime. We revisit the different notions of energy as defined by different observers. The existence of a time-like isometry allows for the notion of a total conserved energy to be well defined, and subsequently the notion of a gravitational potential energy is also meaningful. We then consider the situation in which the test particle is adsorbed by the black hole, and analyze the energetics in detail. In particular, we show that the notion of horizon energy es defined by the isolated horizons formalism provides a satisfactory notion of energy compatible with the particle's conserved energy. As another example, we comment a recent proposal to define energy of the black hole as seen by an observer at rest. This account is intended to be pedagogical and is aimed at the level of and as a complement to the standard textbooks on the subject.

Alejandro Corichi

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cooling a Hot Disk Around a Supermassive Black Hole by a Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a supermassive black hole resides in the centers of galaxies, there are several effects expected to be observed. It is likely that accretion disks are around the supermassive black hole. Stellar interactions with the accretion flows around the supermassive black hole play a role in that an flying-by star may cool a hot accretion disk as a result of Comptonization. It is shown that the Comptonization of the stellar emission will take place in a hot accretion disk such as the ADAFs around the supermassive black hole and become a relatively important source of the accretion disk cooling when the mass accretion rate is low, and stars are passing outer parts of the hot accretion disk. We suggest that such a stellar cooling can be observed in the radio frequency regime since synchrotron luminosity of the ADAFs depends strongly on the electron temperature and occurs much more frequently than a tidal disruption event.

Chang, H Y

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Cooling a Hot Disk Around a Supermassive Black Hole by a Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a supermassive black hole resides in the centers of galaxies, there are several effects expected to be observed. It is likely that accretion disks are around the supermassive black hole. Stellar interactions with the accretion flows around the supermassive black hole play a role in that an flying-by star may cool a hot accretion disk as a result of Comptonization. It is shown that the Comptonization of the stellar emission will take place in a hot accretion disk such as the ADAFs around the supermassive black hole and become a relatively important source of the accretion disk cooling when the mass accretion rate is low, and stars are passing outer parts of the hot accretion disk. We suggest that such a stellar cooling can be observed in the radio frequency regime since synchrotron luminosity of the ADAFs depends strongly on the electron temperature and occurs much more frequently than a tidal disruption event.

Heon-Young Chang

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

Quasinormal modes for the SdS black hole : an analytical approximation scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasinormal modes for scalar field perturbations of a Schwarzschild-de Sitter (SdS) black hole are investigated. An analytical approximation is proposed for the problem. The quasinormal modes are evaluated for this approximate model in the limit when black hole mass is much smaller than the radius of curvature of the spacetime. The model mirrors some striking features observed in numerical studies of time behaviour of scalar perturbations of the SdS black hole. In particular, it shows the presence of two sets of modes relevant at two different time scales, proportional to the surface gravities of the black hole and cosmological horizons respectively. These quasinormal modes are not complete - another feature observed in numerical studies. Refinements of this model to yield more accurate quantitative agreement with numerical studies are discussed. Further investigations of this model are outlined, which would provide a valuable insight into time behaviour of perturbations in the SdS spacetime.

V. Suneeta

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pressure and volume in the first law of black hole thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mass of a black hole is interpreted, in terms of thermodynamic potentials, as being the enthalpy, with the pressure given by the cosmological constant. The volume is then defined as being the Legendre transform of the pressure, and the resulting relation between volume and pressure is explored in the case of positive pressure. A virial expansion is developed and a van der Waals like critical point determined. The first law of black hole thermodynamics includes a PdV term which modifies the maximal efficiency of a Penrose process. It is shown that, in four-dimensional spacetime with a negative cosmological constant, an extremal charged rotating black hole can have an efficiency of up to 75%, while for an electrically neutral rotating black hole this figure is reduced to 52%, compared to the corresponding values of 50% and 29% respectively when the cosmological constant is zero.

Brian P Dolan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive stars in the early universe gave supermassive black holes a head start March 25, 2013 simulations suggest that star formation conditions back then allowed the first stars to become supermassive themselves In this simulation, a black hole that was just formed by the collapse of a supermassive star is surrounded by a distribution of gas (color indicates density). Because the black hole (located at the center but too small to see) grows by consuming the available gas, simulations like this one help determine how quickly the black hole can grow. The progenitor of this black

394

Black hole binary inspiral and trajectory dominance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral, plunge and merger of a black hole binary carry linear momentum. This results in an astrophysically important recoil to the final merged black hole, a kick that can eject ...

Price, Richard H.

395

Black hole Meissner effect and entanglement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extremal black holes tend to expel magnetic and electric fields. Fields are unable to reach the horizon because the length of the black hole throat blows up in the extremal limit. The length of the throat is related to the ...

Penna, Robert

396

Information loss in black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The question of whether information is lost in black holes is investigated using Euclidean path integrals. The formation and evaporation of black holes is regarded as a scattering problem with all measurements being made at infinity. This seems to be well formulated only in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. The path integral over metrics with trivial topology is unitary and information preserving. On the other hand, the path integral over metrics with nontrivial topologies leads to correlation functions that decay to zero. Thus at late times only the unitary information preserving path integrals over trivial topologies will contribute. Elementary quantum gravity interactions do not lose information or quantum coherence.

S. W. Hawking

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Unparticle-Enhanced Black Holes at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the idea that tensor unparticles can enhance the gravitational interactions between standard model particles, potential black hole formation in high energy collisions is examined. Modifications to the horizon radius $r_H$ are derived, and the corresponding geometric cross-sections of such objects are calculated. It is shown that $r_H$ increases dramatically to the electroweak scale for masses $M_{BH} \\sim 1-10 $TeV, yielding a geometric cross-section $\\sigma_{BH}=\\pi r_H^2$ on the order of $leq 50$ pb. This suggests that unparticle physics provides a mechanism for black hole formation in future accelerators, without the requirement of extra spatial dimensions.

J. R. Mureika

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

Don N. Page

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

399

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

400

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advection-Dominated Accretion and the Black Hole Event Horizon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the luminosity of an accreting black hole drops to a few percent of Eddington, the spectrum switches from the familiar soft state to a hard state that is well-described by a distended and tenuous advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF). An ADAF is a poor radiator, and the ion temperature can approach 10^{12} K near the center, although the electrons are cooler, with their temperature typically capped at ~10^{9-11} K. The foundational papers predicted that the large thermal energy in an ADAF would drive strong winds and jets, as later observed and also confirmed in computer simulations. Of chief interest, however, is the accreting gas that races inward. It carries the bulk of the accretion energy as stored thermal energy, which vanishes without a trace as the gas passes through the hole's event horizon. One thus expects black holes in the ADAF regime to be unusually faint. Indeed, this is confirmed by a comparison of accreting stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars, which reside in very similar transient X-ray binary systems. The black holes are on average observed to be fainter by a factor of ~100-1000. The natural explanation is that a neutron star must radiate the advected thermal energy from its surface, whereas a black hole can hide the energy behind its event horizon. The case for an event horizon in Sagittarius A*, which is immune to caveats on jet outflows and is furthermore independent of the ADAF model, is especially compelling. These two lines of evidence for event horizons are impervious to counterarguments that invoke strong gravity or exotic stars.

Ramesh Narayan; Jeffrey E. McClintock

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Maximal spin and energy conversion efficiency in a symbiotic system of black hole, disk and jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a combined model of black hole - accretion disk - magnetosphere - jet symbiosis, applicable for supermassive black holes. We quantify the mass and spin evolution and we analyze how the limiting value of the spin parameter and the conversion efficiency of accreted mass into radiation depend on the interplay of electromagnetic radiation reaction, magnetosphere characteristics and truncation radius of radiation. The dominant effect comes from the closed magnetic field line region, which reduces the spin limit to values ~0.89 (instead ~0.99 in its absence). Therefore observations on black hole spins could favour or disfavour the existence of the closed magnetic field line region (or its coupling to the disk). We also find that the suppression of radiation from the innermost part of the accretion disk, inferred from observations, and a collimated jet both increase the spin limit and the energy conversion efficiency.

Zoltn Kovcs; Lszl . Gergely; Peter L. Biermann

2010-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

403

Moduli, Scalar Charges, and the First Law of Black Hole Thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that under variation of moduli fields ? the first law of black hole thermodynamics becomes dM=?dA8?+?dJ+?dq+?dp-?d?, where ? are the scalar charges. Also the Arnowitt-Desner-Misner mass is extremized at fixed A, J, (p,q) when the moduli fields take the fixed value ?fix(p,q) which depend only on electric and magnetic charges. Thus the double-extreme black hole minimizes the mass for fixed conserved charges. We can now explain the fact that extreme black holes fix the moduli fields at the horizon ?=?fix(p,q): ?fix is such that the scalar charges vanish: ?(?fix,(p,q))=0.

Gary Gibbons; Renata Kallosh; Barak Kol

1996-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

White holes and eternal black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate isolated white holes surrounded by vacuum, which correspond to the time reversal of eternal black holes that do not evaporate. We show that isolated white holes produce quasi- thermal Hawking radiation. The time reversal of this radiation, incident on a black hole precursor, constitutes a special preparation that will cause the black hole to become eternal.

Stephen D. H. Hsu

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

405

Conservation Assessment for Bloodroot in the Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Assessment for Bloodroot in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota and Wyoming Forest Service Rocky Mountain Region Black Hills National Forest Custer, South Dakota April 2003 #12;Species Assessment of Bloodroot in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota and Wyoming J. Hope

406

Absorption cross section in Lifshitz black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the absorption cross section of a minimally coupled scalar in the Lifshitz black hole obtained from the new massive gravity. The absorption cross section reduces to the horizon area in the low energy and massless limit of s-wave mode propagation, indicating that the Lifshitz black hole also satisfies the universality of low energy absorption cross section for black holes.

Taeyoon Moon; Yun Soo Myung

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

Signatures of black holes at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Signatures of black hole events at CERN's Large Hadron Collider are discussed. Event simulations are carried out with the Fortran Monte Carlo generator CATFISH. Inelasticity effects, exact field emissivities, color and charge conservation, corrections to semiclassical black hole evaporation, gravitational energy loss at formation and possibility of a black hole remnant are included in the analysis.

Marco Cavaglia; Romulus Godang; Lucien M. Cremaldi; Donald J. Summers

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

408

Dynamics of Particles Around a Schwarzschild-like Black Hole in the Presence of Quintessence and Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the dynamics of a neutral and a charged particle around a static and spherically symmetric black hole in the presence of quintessence matter and external magnetic field. We explore the conditions under which the particle moving around the black hole could escape to infinity after colliding with another particle. The innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) for the particles are studied in detail. Mainly the dependence of ISCO on dark energy and on the presence of external magnetic field in the vicinity of black hole is discussed. By using the Lyapunov exponent, we compare the stabilities of the orbits of the particles in the presence and absence of dark energy and magnetic field. The expressions for the center of mass energies of the colliding particles near the horizon of the black hole are derived. The effective force on the particle due to dark energy and magnetic field in the vicinity of black hole is also discussed.

Mubasher Jamil; Saqib Hussain; Bushra Majeed

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Donald Byrne (white) vs. Robert James "Bobby" Fischer (black) 1956 White Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donald Byrne (white) vs. Robert James "Bobby" Fischer (black) 1956 White Black 1. Nf3 Nf6 comments here are called "annotation" 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 black bishop sits on long diagonal 4. d4 0-0 white black threatens the queen 7. Qxc4 c6 8. e4 Nbd7 black's knight on b moves to d7 9. Rd1 Nb6 white's rook

Zirbel, Craig L.

411

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

412

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

413

Report on the first binary black hole inspiral search in LIGO data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration is currently engaged in the first search for binary black hole inspiral signals in real data. We are using the data from the second LIGO science run and we focus on inspiral signals coming from binary systems with component masses between 3 and 20 solar masses. We describe the analysis methods used and report on preliminary estimates for the sensitivities of the LIGO instruments during the second science run.

Eirini Messaritaki; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Smit, Berend

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developing countries are now gaining more attention due to their role in reducing soot BC for climate change

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soot ? aromatics PYROLYSIS biomass lignin ? ? ? ? ? guaiacylVigouroux, R.Z. Pyrolysis of Biomass; Ph.D. Thesis, RoyalPeacoke, G.V.C. Fast pyrolysis for biomass. Renew. Sust.

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PYROLYSIS biomass lignin ? ? ? ? ? guaiacyl units ?soot yield is the cellulose/lignin ratio (Equations 11 andoxidation method to remove lignin and non-BC aromatic

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Holocene Climate and Carbon Sequestration via Black Carbon Burial in Sediments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fire, a global process that depends on climate, volcanic activity, vegetation and human practices is not constant through time and varies at decadal, centennial and (more)

Patel, Nidhi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinatedhydrocarbons (PAHs), dioxins, furans (PCDD/Fs), PCBs, and

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

427. 131. Ball, R. Combustion of biomass as a global carbonfrom incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel in thethe low temperature combustion of biomass at less than 600

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

General relativistic simulations of black-hole-neutron-star mergers: Effects of black-hole spin  

SciTech Connect

Black-hole-neutron-star (BHNS) binary mergers are candidate engines for generating both short-hard gamma-ray bursts and detectable gravitational waves. Using our most recent conformal thin-sandwich BHNS initial data and our fully general relativistic hydrodynamics code, which is now adaptive mesh refinement capable, we are able to efficiently and accurately simulate these binaries from large separations through inspiral, merger, and ringdown. We evolve the metric using the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation with the standard moving puncture gauge conditions, and handle the hydrodynamics with a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. We explore the effects of BH spin (aligned and antialigned with the orbital angular momentum) by evolving three sets of initial data with BH:NS mass ratio q=3: the data sets are nearly identical, except the BH spin is varied between a/M{sub BH}=-0.5 (antialigned), 0.0, and 0.75. The number of orbits before merger increases with a/M{sub BH}, as expected. We also study the nonspinning BH case in more detail, varying q between 1, 3, and 5. We calculate gravitational waveforms for the cases we simulate and compare them to binary black-hole waveforms. Only a small disk (<0.01M{sub {center_dot}}) forms for the antialigned spin case (a/M{sub BH}=-0.5) and for the most extreme-mass-ratio case (q=5). By contrast, a massive (M{sub disk}{approx_equal}0.2M{sub {center_dot}}) hot disk forms in the rapidly spinning (a/M{sub BH}=0.75) aligned BH case. Such a disk could drive a short-hard gamma-ray burst, possibly by, e.g., producing a copious flux of neutrino-antineutrino pairs.

Etienne, Zachariah B.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Baumgarte, Thomas W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine 04011 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Optimization of carbon-supported platinum cathode catalysts for DMFC operation.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we describe performance and optimization of carbon-supported cathode catalysts at low platinum loading. We find that at a loading below 0.6 mg cm-2 carbon-supported platinum outperforms platinum black as a DMFC cathode catalyst. A catalyst with a 1:1 volume ratio of the dry NafionTM to the electronically conducting phase (platinum plus carbon support) provides the best performance in oxygen reduction reaction. Thanks to improved catalyst utilization, carbon-supported catalysts with a platinum content varying from 40 wt% to 80 wt% deliver very good DMFC performance, even at relatively modest precious metal loadings investigated in this work.

Zhu, Y. (Yimin); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Zelenay, P. (Piotr)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method  

SciTech Connect

Carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles with a 5-15 nm diameter size range can be synthesized by hydrogen reduction of platinum(II) acetylacetonate in methanol modified supercritical carbon dioxide. XPS and XRD spectra indicate that the carbon nanotubes contain zero-valent platinum metal and high-resolution TEM images show that the visible lattice fringes of the Pt particles are crystallites. Carbon nanotubes synthesized with 25% by weight of Pt nanoparticles exhibit a higher activity for hydrogenation of benzene compared with a commercial carbon black platinum catalyst. The carbon nanotube-supported Pt nanocatalyst can be reused at least six times for the hydrogenation reaction without losing activity. The carbon nanotube-supported Pt nanoparticles are also highly active for electrochemical oxidation of methanol and for reduction of oxygen suggesting their potential use as a new electrocatalyst for polymer electrode fuel cell applications.

Yen, Clive; Cui, Xiaoli; Pan, H. B.; Wang, S.; Lin, Yuehe; Wai, Chien M.

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

425

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

Lagow, R.J.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

427

Gravitational drag on a point mass in hypersonic motion through a gaseous medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......bend significantly and pass through a shock, can...for both the accretion rate and the gravitational drag. black hole physics|hydrodynamics|stars...only the mass accretion rate, but also the non-linear...velocity 3 THE MASS ACCRETION RATE AND THE DRAG FORCE 3......

J. Cant; A. C. Raga; A. Esquivel; F. J. Snchez-Salcedo

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Non-linear harmonic generation in finite amplitude black hole oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-linear generation of harmonics in gravitational perturbations of black holes is explored using numerical relativity based on an in-going light-cone framework. Localised, finite, perturbations of an isolated black hole are parametrised by amplitude and angular harmonic form. The response of the black hole spacetime is monitored and its harmonic content analysed to identify the strength of the non-linear generation of harmonics as a function of the initial data amplitude. It is found that overwhelmingly the black hole responds at the harmonic mode perturbed, even for spacetimes with 10% of the black hole mass radiated. The relative efficiencies of down and up-scattering in harmonic space are computed for a range of couplings. Down-scattering, leading to smoothing out of angular structure is found to be equally or more efficient than the up-scatterings that would lead to increased rippling. The details of this non-linear balance may form the quantitative mechanism by which black holes avoid fission even for arbitrary strong distortions.

Philippos Papadopoulos

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

430

Wavefront twisting by rotating black holes: orbital angular momentum generation and phase coherent detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study wave propagation and scattering near a rotating black hole. In particular, we assume a coherent emission source near the black hole and investigate the wavefront distortion as seen by a distant observer. Near the observer, the propagating wave can be decomposed using the Laguerre-Gaussian mode basis and its wavefront distortion can be characterized by the decomposition coefficient. We find that this decomposition spectrum is symmetric for wave sources located near a Schwarzschild black hole, but is generically asymmetric if the host black hole is rotating. The spectrum asymmetry, or the net orbital angular momentum carried by the wave, is intimately related to the black hole spin and mass, the wave frequency and the locations of the source and the observer. We present semi-analytical expressions and numerical results for these parameter-dependences. If the radiation is temporally coherent, our results show that the secondary images of the source can be almost as bright as its primary image. In the case of temporally-incoherent radiation, we show that the non-fundamental spectrum components could be resolved by spatially-separated telescopes, although that would be degenerate with the telescope direction. Finally, our results suggest that the black-hole-induced spectrum asymmetry is generally too weak to be observed in radio astronomy, even if the observer were located near a caustic point.

Huan Yang; Marc Casals

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

431

New Puncture Initial Data for Black-Hole Binaries: High Spins and High Boosts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints of General Relativity for two black-holes with nearly extremal spins or ultra-relativistic boosts in the puncture formalism. We use a non-conformally-flat ansatz with an attenuated superposition of two conformally Kerr or Lorentz-boosted-Schwarzschild 3-metrics and their corresponding extrinsic curvatures. We compare evolutions of these data with the standard Bowen-York conformally-flat ansatz (technically limited to intrinsic spins $S/M_{\\text{ADM}}^2 = 0.928$ and boosts $P/M_{\\text{ADM}} = 0.897$), finding an order of magnitude smaller burst of spurious radiation. As a case study, we evolve two equal-mass black-holes from rest with an initial separation of $d = 12M$ and spins $S_i/m_i^2 = 0.99$, compute the waveforms produced by the collision, the energy radiated, and the recoil of the final remnant black-hole. We find that the black-hole trajectories curve at closer separation, which leads to the radiation of angular momentum. We also study orbiting (nonspinning) black-hole binaries and binaries with the two black-holes boosted towards each other at relativistic speeds. These non-spinning data also show a substantial reduction in the non-physical initial burst of radiation which leads to cleaner waveforms. Finally, we study different choices of the initial lapse and lapse evolution equation in the moving punctures approach to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulations.

Ian Ruchlin; James Healy; Carlos O. Lousto; Yosef Zlochower

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Understanding Brown Carbon Aerosols and Their Role in Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brown Carbon Aerosols Brown Carbon Aerosols Tiny aerosol particles in the atmosphere are a possible cause of climate change. Among the many contributors to climate change are aerosols in the atmosphere. These tiny particles suspended in the air come from many sources, some natural and some man-made. Some aerosols are organic (containing carbon), while others are inorganic (such as sea salt and sulfates). Most aerosols reflect sunlight, and some also absorb it. Many of these nanoparticles have severe health effects in addition to climate effects. Human activities that produce aerosols include transportation, industry, and agriculture. Black carbon particles (a component of soot) originating from combustion processes have been known for some time to absorb sunlight and warm the

433

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Title Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., and Tracy L. Thatcher Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 12 Pagination 6067-6072 Abstract A spectroscopic analysis of 115 wintertime partic- ulate matter samples collected in rural California shows that wood smoke absorbs solar radiation with a strong spectral se- lectivity. This is consistent with prior work that has demon- strated that organic carbon (OC), in addition to black car- bon (BC), appreciably absorbs solar radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. We apportion light absorp-

434

Accelerating and rotating black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact solution of Einstein's equations which represents a pair of accelerating and rotating black holes (a generalised form of the spinning C-metric) is presented. The starting point is a form of the Plebanski-Demianski metric which, in addition to the usual parameters, explicitly includes parameters which describe the acceleration and angular velocity of the sources. This is transformed to a form which explicitly contains the known special cases for either rotating or accelerating black holes. Electromagnetic charges and a NUT parameter are included, the relation between the NUT parameter $l$ and the Plebanski-Demianski parameter $n$ is given, and the physical meaning of all parameters is clarified. The possibility of finding an accelerating NUT solution is also discussed.

J. B. Griffiths; J. Podolsky

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

Black Holes at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In these two lectures, we will address the topic of the creation of small black holes during particle collisions in a ground-based accelerator, such as LHC, in the context of a higher-dimensional theory. We will cover the main assumptions, criteria and estimates for their creation, and we will discuss their properties after their formation. The most important observable effect associated with their creation is likely to be the emission of Hawking radiation during their evaporation process. After presenting the mathematical formalism for its study, we will review the current results for the emission of particles both on the brane and in the bulk. We will finish with a discussion of the methodology that will be used to study these spectra, and the observable signatures that will help us identify the black-hole events.

Panagiota Kanti

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metallic nanotubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carbon2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical and ElectronicStructure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical andElectronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .Photophysics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Dave Kaminsky Charles L. Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edwin D. McKay Thomas L. McNeely Jean C. Persons Neysa P. Pickens Armant C. Touchy Jack S. Zoller 19511935 $50.00 Dave Kaminsky 1938 $200.00 Charles L. Black 1940 $50.00 Harold S. Miropol 1941 $67. Tennison Ben Thompson 1945 $250.00 Paul Finkelstein Harold J. Jacobs Lawrence Kahn 1946 $2,250.00 David W

439

Red-Black Trees 11/26/2007 11:09 AM Red-Black Trees 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red-Black Trees 11/26/2007 11:09 AM 1 Red-Black Trees 1© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees 6 3 8 4 v z Red-Black Trees 2© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia From (2,4) to Red-Black Trees A red-black tree is a representation of a (2,4) tree by means of a binary tree whose nodes are colored red or black In comparison

Alechina, Natasha

440

Red-Black Trees 11/11/2004 10:02 AM Red-Black Trees 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red-Black Trees 11/11/2004 10:02 AM 1 Red-Black Trees 1© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees 6 3 8 4 v z Red-Black Trees 2© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia From (2,4) to Red-Black Trees A red-black tree is a representation of a (2,4) tree by means of a binary tree whose nodes are colored red or black In comparison

Alechina, Natasha

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Carbon2Algae, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon2Algae, LLC Carbon2Algae, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Solutions4CO2 Name Solutions4CO2 Address 2855 Bloor St W., Suite 616 Place Toronto, ON Zip M8X 3A1 Sector Bioenergy, Biofuels, Biomass, Carbon, Renewable energy, Carbon Capture Product Flue Gas CO2 Capture & mass transfer technology Year founded 2007 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 416-803-9435 Website http://s4co2.com Region Ontario References Solutios4CO2 is an algae-based CO2 solutions companies. Our focus is to Build, Train and Transfer the operation of industrial size algae facilities that will divert large streams of CO2 gas emissions at the stack. Our goal is to be the leading designer of industrial scale high lipid content algae production facilities through the utilization of captured CO2 emissions to produce high quality bio-fuel in all climatic conditions.

442

X-ray Probes of Black Hole Accretion Disks for Testing the No-Hair Theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spins of a number of supermassive and stellar-mass black holes have been measured based on detections of thermal continuum emission and relativistically broadened iron lines in their x-ray spectra. Likewise, quasiperiodic variability has been observed in several sources. Such measurements commonly make the assumption that black holes are described by the Kerr metric, which according to the no-hair theorem characterizes black holes uniquely in terms of their masses and spins. This fundamental property of black holes can be tested observationally by measuring potential deviations from the Kerr metric introduced by a parametrically deformed Kerr-like spacetime. Thermal spectra, iron lines, and variability have already been studied extensively in several such metrics, which usually depend on only one particular type of deviation or contain unphysical regions outside of the compact object. In this paper, I study these x-ray probes in the background of a new Kerr-like metric which depends on four independent deviation functions and is free of pathological regions outside of the event horizon. I show that the observed signals depend significantly on primarily two types of deviations and that the strong correlation between the spin and the deviation parameters found previously in other Kerr-like metrics is partially broken for rapidly spinning black holes. This suggests that high-spin sources are the best candidates for tests of the no-hair theorem with x-rays and I obtain first constraints on such deviations from the stellar-mass black hole Cygnus X-1.

Tim Johannsen

2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

DISCOVERY OF AN H{alpha} EMITTING DISK AROUND THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OF M31  

SciTech Connect

Due to its proximity, the mass of the supermassive black hole in the nucleus of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the most massive black hole in the Local Group of galaxies, has been measured by several methods involving the kinematics of a stellar disk which surrounds it. We report here the discovery of an eccentric H{alpha} emitting disk around the black hole at the center of M31 and show how modeling this disk can provide an independent determination of the mass of the black hole. Our model implies a mass of 5.0{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} for the central black hole, consistent with the average of determinations by methods involving stellar dynamics, and compatible (at 1{sigma} level) with measurements obtained from the most detailed models of the stellar disk around the central black hole. This value is also consistent with the M-{sigma} relation. In order to make a comparison, we applied our simulation on the stellar kinematics in the nucleus of M31 and concluded that the parameters obtained for the stellar disk are not formally compatible with the parameters obtained for the H{alpha} emitting disk. This result suggests that the stellar and the H{alpha} emitting disks are intrinsically different from each other. A plausible explanation is that the H{alpha} emission is associated with a gaseous disk. This hypothesis is supported by the detection of traces of weaker nebular lines in the nuclear region of M31. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that the H{alpha} emission is, at least partially, generated by stars.

Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V., E-mail: robertobm@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP CEP 05508-090 (Brazil)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Quantum Geometry and Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an overall picture of the advances in the description of black hole physics from the perspective of loop quantum gravity. After an introduction that discusses the main conceptual issues we present some details about the classical and quantum geometry of isolated horizons and their quantum geometry and then use this scheme to give a natural definition of the entropy of black holes. The entropy computations can be neatly expressed in the form of combinatorial problems solvable with the help of methods based on number theory and the use of generating functions. The recovery of the Bekenstein-Hawking law and corrections to it is explained in some detail. After this, due attention is paid to the discussion of semiclassical issues. An important point in this respect is the proper interpretation of the horizon area as the energy that should appear in the statistical-mechanical treatment of the black hole model presented here. The chapter ends with a comparison between the microscopic and semiclassical app...

G., J Fernando Barbero

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Entanglement entropy of black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The entanglement entropy is a fundamental quantity which characterizes the correlations between sub-systems in a larger quantum-mechanical system. For two sub-systems separated by a surface the entanglement entropy is proportional to the area of the surface and depends on the UV cutoff which regulates the short-distance correlations. The geometrical nature of the entanglement entropy calculation is particularly intriguing when applied to black holes when the entangling surface is the black hole horizon. I review a variety of aspects of this calculation: the useful mathematical tools such as the geometry of spaces with conical singularities and the heat kernel method, the UV divergences in the entropy and their renormalization, the logarithmic terms in the entanglement entropy in 4 and 6 dimensions and their relation to the conformal anomalies. The focus in the review is on the systematic use of the conical singularity method. The relations to other known approaches such as 't Hooft's brick wall model and the Euclidean path integral in the optical metric are discussed in detail. The puzzling behavior of the entanglement entropy due to fields which non-minimally couple to gravity is emphasized. The holographic description of the entanglement entropy of the black hole horizon is illustrated on the two- and four-dimensional examples. Finally, I examine the possibility to interpret the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy entirely as the entanglement entropy.

Sergey N. Solodukhin

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

Mass Transport within Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Optimizing energy yields in black locust through genetic selection: final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the magnitude of improvement in biomass yield of black locust possible through breeding, and to determine methods for efficiently capturing the yield improvement achievable from selective breeding. To meet this overall objective, six tasks were undertaken to determine: (1) the amount and geographic pattern of natural genetic variation, (2) the mating system of the species, (3) quantitative genetic parameters of relevant traits, (4) the relationship between nitrogen fixation and growth in black locust, (5) the viability of mass vegetative propagation, and (6) the feasibility of improvement through genetic transformation.

Bongarten, B.C.; Merkle, S.A. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). School of Forest Resources

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion Mass [amu] C60 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) LaC44 + LaC50 + LaC60 + Figure 2FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene-wall carbon nanotube), i.e. La, Y, Sc, Gd, Ce, Ca, and Ni-Y. An example of FT-ICR mass spectra is shown

Maruyama, Shigeo

449

New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-2% of the oil mass, however the calcium ion peak at m/z 40lubricating oil is characterized by a very intense Ca + peakand elemental carbon (EC) peaks. The HDDV oil mass spectra

Spencer, Matthew Todd

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Magnetized black holes and black rings in the higher dimensional dilaton gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider magnetized black holes and black rings in the higher dimensional dilaton gravity. Our study is based on exact solutions generated by applying a Harrison transformation to known asymptotically flat black hole and black ring solutions in higher dimensional spacetimes. The explicit solutions include the magnetized version of the higher dimensional Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black holes, Myers-Perry black holes and five dimensional (dipole) black rings. The basic physical quantities of the magnetized objects are calculated. We also discuss some properties of the solutions and their thermodynamics. The ultrarelativistic limits of the magnetized solutions are briefly discussed and an explicit example is given for the $D$-dimensional magnetized Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black holes.

Stoytcho S. Yazadjiev

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

451

The Evolution of Low Mass Helium Stars towards Supernova Type I Explosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the hypothesis, that helium stars in a certain mass range can evolve to a carbon core explosion similar to what is widely accepted as an explanation for the SN I phenomenon. This should happen when their carbon-oxygen core grows thanks to the helium shell burning above the core. We found that in the mass range of about 1.7-2.2 Msun, indeed this can happen. The main new insight we believe we gained is the crucial importance of an "early" off-center ignition of carbon, which at a later stage prevents the carbon which forms below the helium burning shell and ignites, from burning the carbon all the way to the center. When helium is almost depleted in the convective envelope by the helium burning shell at its bottom, the now super-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen core contracts, and the residual degenerate carbon at the center is ignited, resulting in a runaway similar to the classical SN I scenario. Since the structure and behavior of the carbon-oxygen core of the helium stars of our interest is very similar to that of a mass accreting carbon-oxygen star, we also thoroughly examined the behavior of carbon-oxygen stars. We discovered that the models which ignite carbon off-center (in the mass range of about 1.05-1.18 Msun, depending on the carbon mass fraction) present an interesting SN I progenitor scenario of their own, since whereas in the standard scenario runaway always takes place at the same density of about 2E9 gr/cm3, in our case, due to the small amount of carbon ignited, we get a whole range of densities from 1E9 up to 6E9 gr/cm3.

Roni Waldman; Zalman Barkat

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Tailored Recovery of Carbons from Waste Tires for Enhanced Performance as Anodes in Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Morphologically tailored pyrolysis-recovered carbon black is utilized in lithium-ion batteries as a potential solution for adding value to waste tire-rubber-derived materials. Micronized tire rubber was digested in a hot oleum bath to yield a sulfonated rubber slurry that was then filtered, washed, and compressed into a solid cake. Carbon was recovered from the modified rubber cake by pyrolysis in a nitrogen atmosphere. The chemical pretreatment of rubber produced a carbon monolith with higher yield than that from the control (a fluffy tire-rubber-derived carbon black). The carbon monolith showed a very small volume fraction of pores of widths 3 4 nm, reduced specific surface area, and an ordered assembly of graphitic domains. Electrochemical studies on the recovered-carbon-based anode revealed an improved Li-ion battery performance with higher reversible capacity than that of commercial carbon materials. Anodes made with a sulfonated tire-rubber-derived carbon and a control tire-rubber-derived carbon, respectively, exhibited an initial coulombic efficiency of 80% and 45%, respectively. The reversible capacity of the cell with the sulfonated carbon as anode was 400 mAh/g after 100 cycles, with nearly 100% coulombic efficiency. Our success in producing higher performance carbon material from waste tire rubber for potential use in energy storage applications adds a new avenue to tire rubber recycling.

Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Bi, [ORNL; Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Economic aspects of black bases in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Crack length ratios for District 5. . . . . . . 5cI Crack length ratios for District 25. . . . . . 60 Aggregate gradation for laboratory molded black base mixtures. . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 5 Asphalt properties. Determination of optimum...)5 Section identification of District 5 'black base projects. . 255 Structural characteristics of District & black base projects. 254 Section identification of District 5 flexible base projects 255 Structural characteristics of District 5 flexible base...

Schoen, Wayne Ayron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

Black hole entropy: inside or out?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A trialogue. Ted, Don, and Carlo consider the nature of black hole entropy. Ted and Carlo support the idea that this entropy measures in some sense ``the number of black hole microstates that can communicate with the outside world.'' Don is critical of this approach, and discussion ensues, focusing on the question of whether the first law of black hole thermodynamics can be understood from a statistical mechanics point of view.

Ted Jacobson; Donald Marolf; Carlo Rovelli

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

455

Interaction of fermions with black holes  

SciTech Connect

Bekenstein and Meisels used statistical thermodynamic arguments to obtain the probability distribution of fermions emitted by a black hole when a fermion is incident. In contrast with Bekenstein and Meisels, we model the black hole as a perfect blackbody surrounded by a mirror. Our probability distribution for emitted fermions agrees with the probability distribution of Bekenstein and Meisels, but the interpretation of how fermions interact with the black hole is different from the interpreteation given by Bekenstein and Meisels.

Jones T.O. III

1986-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Absorption cross section of RN black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of a charged scalar field in the RN black hole space time is studied using WKB approximation. In the present work it is assumed that matter waves can get reflected from the event horizon. Using this effect, the Hawking temperature and the absorption cross section for RN black hole placed in a charged scalar field are calculated. The absorption cross section $\\sigma _{abs}$ is found to be inversely proportional to square of the Hawking temperature of the black hole.

Sini R.; V. C. Kuriakose

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

Red-black Trees To know what a red-black tree is (10.1).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

809 CHAPTER 10 Red-black Trees Objectives · To know what a red-black tree is (§10.1). · To convert a red-black tree to a 2-4 tree and vice versa (§10.2). · To design the RBTree class that extends the BinaryTree class (§10.3). · To insert an element in a red-black tree and resolve the double red problem

Liang, Y. Daniel

458

Carbon International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingdom Zip: NW1 8LH Sector: Carbon Product: London-based energy and communications agency specialising in low carbon energy and climate change. References: Carbon...

459

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Strengthening Our Partnerships with Historically Black Colleges...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy Last February, President Obama renewed the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities to encourage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Black Hills Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Black Hills Power provides rebates for its commercial customers who install energy efficient heat pumps, motors, variable frequency drives, lighting, and water heaters. Custom rebates for approved...

462

Black Hills Power- Residential Customer Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Black Hills Power offers cash rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment in their homes. Incentives exist for water heaters, demand control units, air...

463

Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

Thomas W. Baumgarte

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

464

Mass Spectrometer: Orbitrap | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has gained importance...

465

Mass Spectrometry | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR Spectroscopy and Diffraction Subsurface Flow and Transport Mass Spectrometry Systems...

466

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) www.er.ethz.ch Didier hurricanes normalized to 1995 dollars by inflation, personal property increases and coastal county population;12 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS #12;Crises are not but "Dragon-kings" Dragon-king hypothesis #12;Black Swan story

467

Mass Spectroscopic Determination of Photoionization Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radio?frequency mass spectrometer of the Bennett type has been utilized to measure the mass of ions formed by photoionization of several gases by the ultraviolet radiation of a hydrogen discharge. Investigations were performed up to 11.4 electron volts the LiF cutoff. The mass spectra were found to be very simple and usually consisted of only one peak representing the mass of the whole molecule. This has been found to be true for acetone butadiene butene carbon disulfide methyl?ethyl ketone nitric oxide propylene and toluene. Only in the case of butane ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol fragment ions have been found. Some of them are even more intense than the parent ions. Undesirable ``secondary spectra '' reported by Lossing and Tanaka can be avoided by grounding of the lithium fluoride window.

Richard F. Herzog; Frederick F. Marmo

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Dynamics of oscillating relativistic tori around Kerr black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......angular momentum discs around Schwarzschild black holes, namely that...transmission of the signal recycling mirror (Shoemaker 2004)]. This...angular momentum discs around Schwarzschild black holes were considered...accretion solution on to a Schwarzschild black hole (Michel 1972......

Olindo Zanotti; Jos A. Font; Luciano Rezzolla; Pedro J. Montero

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

ESTIMATE OF THE TOTAL MECHANICAL FEEDBACK ENERGY FROM GALAXY CLUSTER-CENTERED BLACK HOLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR BLACK HOLE EVOLUTION, CLUSTER GAS FRACTION, AND ENTROPY  

SciTech Connect

The total feedback energy injected into hot gas in galaxy clusters by central black holes can be estimated by comparing the potential energy of observed cluster gas profiles with the potential energy of non-radiating, feedback-free hot gas atmospheres resulting from gravitational collapse in clusters of the same total mass. Feedback energy from cluster-centered black holes expands the cluster gas, lowering the gas-to-dark-matter mass ratio below the cosmic value. Feedback energy is unnecessarily delivered by radio-emitting jets to distant gas far beyond the cooling radius where the cooling time equals the cluster lifetime. For clusters of mass (4-11) x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}, estimates of the total feedback energy, (1-3) x 10{sup 63} erg, far exceed feedback energies estimated from observations of X-ray cavities and shocks in the cluster gas, energies gained from supernovae, and energies lost from cluster gas by radiation. The time-averaged mean feedback luminosity is comparable to those of powerful quasars, implying that some significant fraction of this energy may arise from the spin of the black hole. The universal entropy profile in feedback-free gaseous atmospheres in Navarro-Frenk-White cluster halos can be recovered by multiplying the observed gas entropy profile of any relaxed cluster by a factor involving the gas fraction profile. While the feedback energy and associated mass outflow in the clusters we consider far exceed that necessary to stop cooling inflow, the time-averaged mass outflow at the cooling radius almost exactly balances the mass that cools within this radius, an essential condition to shut down cluster cooling flows.

Mathews, William G.; Guo Fulai, E-mail: mathews@ucolick.org [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Locking Information in Black Holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that a central presumption in the debate over black-hole information loss is incorrect. Ensuring that information not escape during evaporation does not require that it all remain trapped until the final stage of the process. Using the recent quantum information-theoretic result of locking, we show that the amount of information that must remain can be very small, even as the amount already radiated is negligible. Information need not be additive: A small system can lock a large amount of information, making it inaccessible. Only if the set of initial states is restricted can information leak.

John A. Smolin and Jonathan Oppenheim

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

472

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

473

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protect yourself and your family from the de