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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing Title Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of...

2

Effects of Black Carbon Aerosols on the Indian Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-member ensemble of twentieth-century simulations with changes to only time-evolving global distributions of black carbon aerosols in a global coupled climate model is analyzed to study the effects of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the Indian ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Julie M. Arblaster; William D. Collins

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Climate Impacts of Atmospheric Sulfate and Black Carbon Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Although the global average surface temperature has increased by about 0.6°C during the last century (IPCC, 2001), some regions such as East Asia, Eastern North America, and Western Europe have cooled rather than warmed during the past decades (Jones, 1988; Qian and Giorgi, 2000). Coherent changes at the regional scale may reflect responses to different climate forcings that need to be understood in order to predict the future net climate response at the global and regional scales under different emission scenarios. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in global climate change (IPCC 2001). They perturb the earth’s radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing solar and long wave radiation, and indirectly by changing cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation efficiency via their role as cloud condensation nuclei. Because aerosols have much shorter lifetime (days to weeks) compared to most greenhouse gases, they tend to concentrate near their emission sources and distribute very unevenly both in time and space. This non-uniform distribution of aerosols, in conjunction with the greenhouse effect, may lead to differential net heating in some areas and net cooling in others (Penner et al. 1994). Sulfate aerosols come mainly from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from fossil fuel burning. Black carbon aerosols are directly emitted during incomplete combustion of biomass, coal, and diesel derived sources. Due to the different optical properties, sulfate and black carbon affect climate in different ways. Because of the massive emissions of sulfur and black carbon that accompany the rapid economic expansions in East Asia, understanding the effects of aerosols on climate is particularly important scientifically and politically in order to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Qian, Yun; Song, Qingyuan; Menon, Surabi; Yu, Shaocai; Liu, Shaw C.; Shi, Guangyu; Leung, Lai R.; Luo, Yunfeng

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

4

A modeling study on the climate impacts of black carbon aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The role of black carbon (BC) aerosols in climate change is important because of its strong capability in causing extinction of solar radiation. A three-dimensional interactive aerosol-climate model has been used to study ...

Wang, Chien.

5

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

SciTech Connect

Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

Yang, Bai [ORNL; Liu, Yu [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, China; Sun, Jiaren [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Guangzhou, China

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 18502000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We-related combustion, 1850­2000, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 21, GB2018, doi:10.1029/2006GB002840. 1. Importance

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

9

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ryu (2004), Carbonaceous aerosol characteristics ofPM 2.5Allen (1990), Transported acid aerosols measured in southernconference international aerosol carbon round robin test

Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $\\textnormal W^{-1} \\textnormal m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $\\textnormal PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the range represented by the full set of AeroCom models. Upper tropospheric concentrations of BC mass from the aircraft measurements are suggested to provide a unique new benchmark to test scavenging and vertical dispersion of BC in global models.

Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

12

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimations in global aerosol models, Atmos. Chem. Phys. ,Cloud mi- crophysics and aerosol indirect efefcts in theuncertainties in assessing aerosol effects on climate, Ann.

Menon, Surabi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The sensitivity of tropical convective precipitation to the direct radiative forcings of black carbon aerosols emitted from major regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous works have suggested that the direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) aerosols are able to force a significant change in tropical convective precipitation ranging from the Pacific and Indian Ocean to ...

Wang, Chien

14

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. This paper presents the results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4–SOM) ...

Salil Mahajan; Katherine J. Evans; James J. Hack; John E. Truesdale

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

16

Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

Paulson, S E

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black Carbon Reference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HULIS) in biomass-burning aerosols, Atmospheric Chemistrymicroscopical and aerosol dynamical characterizationof soot aerosols, Journal of Aerosol Science , 34 , 1347-

Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon particles in the Detroit urban area: Wintertimeparticulate concentrations in Detroit, Atmos. Environ. , 19,meteorological parameters in Detroit, Atmos. Environ. , 19,

Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018  

SciTech Connect

We present an emission inventory of primary black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We reconstruct fossil fuel consumption and represent changes in technology on a national and sectoral basis. Our estimates rely on new estimates of biofuel consumption, and updated emission factors for old technologies. Emissions of black carbon increase almost linearly, totaling about 1000 Gg in 1850, 2200 Gg in 1900, 3000 Gg in 1950, and 4400 Gg in 2000. Primary organic carbon shows a similar pattern, with emissions of 4100 Gg, 5800 Gg, 6700 Gg, and 8700 Gg in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, respectively. Biofuel is responsible for over half of BC emission until about 1890, and dominates energy-related primary OC emission throughout the entire period. Coal contributes the greatest fraction of BC emission between 1880 and 1975, and is overtaken by emissions from biofuel around 1975, and by diesel engines around 1990. Previous work suggests a rapid rise in BC emissions between 1950 and 2000. This work supports a more gradual increase between 1950 and 2000, similar to the increase between 1850 and 1925; implementation of clean technology is a primary reason.

Bond, T.C.; Bhardwaj, E.; Dong, R.; Jogani, R.; Jung, S.K.; Roden, C.; Streets, D.G.; Trautmann, N.M. [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Black carbon snow albedo reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black carbon snow albedo reduction Black carbon snow albedo reduction Title Black carbon snow albedo reduction Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hadley, Odelle L., and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Nature Climate Change Volume 2 Pagination 437-440 Abstract Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black-carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and near-worldwide melting of ice1, 2. In this study, we generated and characterized pure and black-carbon-laden snow in the laboratory and verified that black-carbon contamination appreciably reduces snow albedo at levels that have been found in natural settings1, 3, 4. Increasing the size of snow grains in our experiments decreased snow albedo and amplified the radiative perturbation of black carbon, which justifies the aging-related positive feedbacks that are included in climate models. Moreover, our data provide an extensive verification of the Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation model1, which will be included in the next assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change5.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM - Measurement - Black carbon concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AETH : Aethalometer DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments SP2 : Single Particle...

22

Understanding Brown Carbon Aerosols and Their Role in Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brown Carbon Aerosols Brown Carbon Aerosols Tiny aerosol particles in the atmosphere are a possible cause of climate change. Among the many contributors to climate change are aerosols in the atmosphere. These tiny particles suspended in the air come from many sources, some natural and some man-made. Some aerosols are organic (containing carbon), while others are inorganic (such as sea salt and sulfates). Most aerosols reflect sunlight, and some also absorb it. Many of these nanoparticles have severe health effects in addition to climate effects. Human activities that produce aerosols include transportation, industry, and agriculture. Black carbon particles (a component of soot) originating from combustion processes have been known for some time to absorb sunlight and warm the

23

5, 40834113, 2005 Black Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 4083­4113, 2005 Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area J. C and Physics Discussions Measurements of Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area License. 4083 #12;ACPD 5, 4083­4113, 2005 Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

6, 34193463, 2006 Black carbon or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. GelencsŽer Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous;ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. GelencsŽer Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the ?rst indirect aerosol effect, Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 5,Cloud susceptibility and the ?rst aerosol indirect forcing:to black carbon and aerosol concentrations, J. Geophys.

Lohmann, Ulrike

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Temperature Sensitivity of Black Carbon Decomposition and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature Sensitivity of Black Carbon Decomposition and Oxidation B I N H T H A N H N G U Y E N to physical protection, chemical recalcitrance influences SOC decomposition rates. Black carbon (BC isotope geochemistry and nanomorphology of soil black carbon: Black chernozemic soils in central Europe

Lehmann, Johannes

27

Present-day climate forcing and response from black carbon in snow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Construction of a 1 Â 1 fossil fuel emission data set forhistorical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols,relative contribution of fossil fuel and biomass combustion

Flanner, Mark G; Zender, Charles S; Randerson, James T; Rasch, Philip J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Black Carbon A Review and Policy Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Carbon A Review and Policy Recommendations Authors Karen Bice, Andrew Eil, Bilal Habib to integrate air quality and climate mitigation efforts, with a focus on black carbon. The group set out the latest science behind black carbon and researched possible mitigation policies. The latter included

Mauzerall, Denise

29

8, 98839929, 2008 Black carbon at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 9883­9929, 2008 Black carbon at Syowa station, Antarctica K. Hara et al. Title Page.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Measurement of black carbon at Syowa station on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9883 #12;ACPD 8, 9883­9929, 2008 Black carbon at Syowa station

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate ??1 ...

Robert W. Bergstrom; Philip B. Russell; Phillip Hignett

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHsAirborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

3, 211271, 2006 Black carbon in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 3, 211­271, 2006 Black carbon in the boreal C. M. Preston and M. W. I. Schmidt Title Page Discussions Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Black Correspondence to: C. M. Preston (cpreston@pfc.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca) 211 #12;BGD 3, 211­271, 2006 Black carbon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

The radiative influence of aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus clouds based on sensitivity studies with two climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global black carbon aerosol model. J Geophys Res 101:of interactions between aerosols and cloud microphysics overby anthropogenic sulfate aerosol. J Geophys Res 106: 5279-

Menon, Surabi; Rotstayn, Leon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Black, Brown and White Carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... JM; McIntosh, DM; Ramirez, SA; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, PV; Quinn, PK ... Based Aerosol Light Absorption Measurements Due to Organic Aerosol Loading ...

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

36

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003 Title Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel...

37

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India Title Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in...

38

Black Carbon Emission from Barbeque Activities during College...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Emission from Barbeque Activities during College Football Games Title Black Carbon Emission from Barbeque Activities during College Football Games Publication Type...

39

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOAA/ESRL. Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide Annual Mean Data.H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalanalysis of black carbon in soils. Global Biogeochem. Cycle.

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DETERMINATION OF CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deuteron irradiation of an atmospheric aerosol sample.CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEARCARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR

Clemenson, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Black carbon enrichment in atmospheric ice particle residuals observed in lower tropospheric mixed phase clouds  

SciTech Connect

The enrichment of black carbon (BC) in residuals of small ice crystals was investigated during intensive experiments in winter 2004 and 2005 at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl, Switzerland). Two inlets were used to sample the bulk aerosol (residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals as well as non-activated aerosol particles) and the residual particles of small ice crystals (diameter 5 - 20 ?m). An enrichment of the BC mass fraction in the ice particle residuals was observed by investigating the measured BC mass concentration as a fraction of the bulk (submicrometer) aerosol mass concentration sampled by the two inlets. On average, the BC mass fraction was 5% for the bulk aerosol and 27% for the ice particle residuals. The observed enrichment of BC in ice particle residuals suggests that BC containing particles preferentially act as ice nuclei, with important implications for the indirect aerosol effect via glaciation of clouds.

Cozic, J.; Mertes, S.; Verheggen, B.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Walter, S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Weingartner, E.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Black carbon enrichment in atmospheric ice particle residuals observed in lower trophospheric mixed phase clouds  

SciTech Connect

The enrichment of black carbon (BC) in residuals of small ice particles was investigated during intensive experiments in winter 2004 and 2005 at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl, Switzerland). Two inlets were used to sample the bulk aerosol (residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals as well as non-activated aerosol particles) and the residual particles of small ice crystals (diameter 5 - 20 m). An enrichment of the BC mass fraction in the ice particle residuals was observed by investigating the measured BC mass concentration as a fraction of the bulk (submicrometer) aerosol mass concentration sampled by the two inlets. On average, the BC mass fraction was 5% for the bulk aerosol and 14% for the ice particle residuals. The observed enrichment of BC in ice particle residuals suggests that BC may act as ice nuclei, with important implications for the indirect aerosol effect via glaciation of clouds.

Cozic, J.; Mertes, S.; Verheggen, B.; Cziczo, Dan; Gallavardin, S. J.; Walter, S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Weingartner, E.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

ME EET Seminar: Black Carbon in Fire and Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of black carbon in the environment. Black carbon is a main component of soot from the combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, which absorbs sunlight and contributes to the...

44

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Speaker(s): Odelle Hadley Date: August 13, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 This presentation examines the changing cryosphere and specifically the role of black carbon on the reflectivity of snow. Small amounts of black carbon in snow purportedly contribute to a reduction in snow albedo, contributing to regional climate change and early onset of melting. Our current research focuses on the connection between black carbon and albedo reduction. This presentation will describe our laboratory experiments wherein we make and characterize pure and contaminated snow and assess the black carbon snow albedo reduction as a function of black carbon mixing ratio and snow grain size. Experimental results are compared to verify or

45

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burning of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, optical and thermal-optical analysis methods Title Evaluation of the...

46

ARM - Field Campaign - Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCharacterization of Black Carbon Mixing State govCampaignsCharacterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Related Campaigns Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State - II 2014.02.15, Sedlacek, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State 2012.11.01 - 2013.06.14 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below. Description The objective of the proposed experiments was to characterize the mixing state of black carbon produced in biomass burning using the single particle soot photometer (SP2). The large uncertainty associated with black carbon (BC) direct forcing is due, in part, to the dependence of light absorption of BC-containing particles on the position of the BC aggregate within the particle. It is

47

Automatic morphological categorisation of carbon black nano-aggregates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nano-technology is the study of matter behaviour on atomic and molecular scale (i.e. nano-scale). In particular, carbon black is a nano-material generally used for the reinforcement of rubber compounds. Nevertheless, the exact reason behind its success ... Keywords: aggregate morphology classifying, carbon black, image processing, machine-learning

Juan López-de-Uralde; Iraide Ruiz; Igor Santos; Agustín Zubillaga; Pablo G. Bringas; Ana Okariz; Teresa Guraya

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate over the Past Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol direct (DE), indirect (IE), and black carbon–snow albedo (BAE) effects on climate between 1890 and 1995 are compared using equilibrium aerosol–climate simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model ...

Dorothy Koch; Surabi Menon; Anthony Del Genio; Reto Ruedy; Igor Alienov; Gavin A. Schmidt

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Quantifying and Minimizing Uncertainty of Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic aerosols are composed of a variety of aerosol types and components including water-soluble inorganic species (e.g., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), condensed organic species, elemental or black carbon, and mineral dust. Previous ...

J. E. Penner; R. J. Charlson; S. E. Schwartz; J. M. Hales; N. S. Laulainen; L. Travis; R. Leifer; T. Novakov; J. Ogren; L. F. Radke

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Title Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6062E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Chelsea Preble, Odelle L. Hadley, and Ashok J. Gadgil Keywords aethalometer, Berkeley Darfur Stove, black carbon, carbon monoxide, climate change, DustTrak, global warming, improved cookstoves, indoor air quality, LBNL Stove Testing Facility, particulate matter, photoacoustic absorption spectrometer, pollutant emission factor, three-stone fire Abstract Traditional methods of cooking in developing regions of the world emit pollutants that

51

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Speaker(s): Odelle Hadley Date: August 13, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 This presentation examines the...

52

ME EET Seminar: Black Carbon: Snow Albedo Reduction and Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ME EET Seminar: Black Carbon: Snow Albedo Reduction and Emissions from Cookstoves Speaker(s): Thomas Kirchstetter Date: February 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: Campus TBD For more...

53

Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth’s climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second most important individual climate-forcing agent in the industrial era, following carbon dioxide. Sources that emit black carbon also emit other short- lived species that may either cool or warm climate. Climate forcings from co-emitted species are estimated and used in the framework described herein. When the principal effects of co- emissions, including cooling agents such as sulfur dioxide, are included in net forcing, energy-related sources (fossil-fuel and biofuel) have a net climate forcing of +0.004 (-0.62 to +0.57) W m-2 during the first year after emission. For a few of these sources, such as diesel engines and possibly residential biofuels, warming is strong enough that eliminating all emissions from these sources would reduce net climate forcing (i.e., produce cooling). When open burning emissions, which emit high levels of organic matter, are included in the total, the best estimate of net industrial-era climate forcing by all black- carbon-rich sources becomes slightly negative (-0.08 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of -1.23 to +0.81 W m-2). The uncertainties in net climate forcing from black-carbon-rich sources are substantial, largely due to lack of knowledge about cloud interactions with both black carbon and co-emitted organic carbon. In prioritizing potential black-carbon mitigation actions, non-science factors, such as technical feasibility, costs, policy design, and implementation feasibility play important roles. The major sources of black carbon are presently in different stages with regard to the feasibility for near-term mitigation. This assessment, by evaluating the large number and complexity of the associated physical and radiative processes in black-carbon climate forcing, sets a baseline from which to improve future climate forcing estimates.

Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo Stephen Warren, University wavelengths: ice is nearly transparent. Absorptive impurities: Black carbon (soot) Brown carbon (organics broadband albedo: 83% 71% (2) by addition of black carbon (BC) (20 ppb): 0.5% for r = 100 ”m 1.6% for r

55

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Title Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Melissa M. Lunden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Abstract Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel-fueled trucks driving through a 1 km-long California highway tunnel in August 2006. Emission factors were based on concurrent increases in BC, PN, and COB2B concentrations (measured at 1 Hz) that corresponded to the passage of individual HD trucks. The distributions of BC and PN emission factors from individual HD trucks are skewed, meaning that a large fraction of pollution comes from a small fraction of the in-use vehicle fleet. The highest-emitting 10% of trucks were

56

Dust and Black Carbon in Seasonal Snow Across Northern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow is the most reflective natural surface on Earth. Its albedo (the fraction of sunlight reflected) can be reduced by small amounts of dark impurities such as dust and black carbon (BC) particles. This effect is significant for climate and the ...

Jianping Huang; Qiang Fu; Wu Zhang; Xin Wang; Rudong Zhang; Hao Ye; Stephen G. Warren

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

derived Black Carbon (Biochar) Marco Keiluweit † , Peter S.for carbon sequestration (‘biochar’). Here we present aaddition of synthetic BC (“biochar”) in soils combined with

Keiluweit, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Modified Pyrolytic Carbon Black from Scrap Tires and Its Reinforcement Performance in Natural Rubber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon blacks are the most widely used reinforcing fillers. The raw material of carbon black manufacture depends on petroleum industry to a great extent. Reclamation of used tires is to be enormously significant as oil will be used up in the near future. ... Keywords: Scrap Tire, Pyrolytic Carbon Black, Atomic Force Microscopy, Modification, Reinforcement

Zhou Jie; Wu Shengji; Yu Tianming; Xie Zhengmiao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EASE-Grid weekly snow cover and sea ice extent version 3.USA, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Digital media, 2005.climate forcing via snow and ice albedos, Proc. Natl. Acad.

Menon, Surabi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate response of fossil fuel and biofuel soot accounting0.1 ”gm ?3 ) from fossil and bio-fuel sources (left panel)organic matter, BC from fossil/bio-fuel and biomass sources

Menon, Surabi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tropical Tropospheric-Only Responses to Absorbing Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorbing aerosols affect the earth’s climate through direct radiative heating of the troposphere. This study analyzes the tropical tropospheric-only response to a globally uniform increase in black carbon, simulated with an atmospheric general ...

Geeta G. Persad; Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaporation–Condensation Effects on Resonant Photoacoustics of Volatile Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In determining the optical properties of the atmosphere, the measurement of light absorption by aerosols is particularly challenging, and yet it is important because of the influence of strongly absorbing black carbon on climate and atmospheric ...

Richard Raspet; William V. Slaton; W. Patrick Arnott; Hans Moosmüller

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the atmosphere from biomass burning.  Climatic Change Introduction to pyrolysis of biomass.  J.  Anal.  Appl.  Molecular Structure of Plant Biomass-derived Black Carbon (

Keiluweit, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

TethyanMediterranean organic carbon-rich sediments from Mesozoic black shales to sapropels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tethyan­Mediterranean organic carbon-rich sediments from Mesozoic black shales to sapropels KAY@geowiss.uni-hamburg.de) Geological Institute, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland ABSTRACT The Jurassic to Holocene record of black shale sections or drill cores. The term `black shale' is used here broadly for sediments with elevated organic

Gilli, Adrian

66

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

SciTech Connect

A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks An X-ray Rainbow An Insulating Breakthrough Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles JANUARY 11, 2007 Bookmark and Share Fig. 1. Diagram showing CB segregation to triple junctions during press sintering. Inset: USAXS image acquired from a press-sintered CB/PMMA sample with 1% CB mass fraction. Self-assembly is likely to play a decisive role in producing nanoscale elements for three dimensional (3D) electronic and nanoscale electro-mechanical systems. Until now, however, the difficult problem of fabricating a complex, interconnected 3D system of conductive nanoscale

68

Black carbon in the Gulf of Maine : new insights into inputs and cycling of combustion-derived organic carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of black carbon (BC), the soot and char formed during incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, have increased over the last century and are estimated to be between 8 and 270 Tg BC/yr. BC may affect ...

Flores Cervantes, Déborah Xanat, 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » September 2012 Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Atmospheric black carbon may not cause as much warming of the climate as we thought. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe

70

Rheopexy and tunable yield stress of carbon black suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that besides simple or thixotropic yield stress fluids there exists a third class of yield stress fluids. This is illustrated through the rheological behavior of a carbon black suspension, which is shown to exhibit a viscosity bifurcation effect around a critical stress along with rheopectic trends, i.e., after a preshear at a given stress the fluid tends to accelerate when it is submitted to a lower stress. Viscosity bifurcation displays here original features: the yield stress and the critical shear rate depend on the previous flow history. The most spectacular property due to these specificities is that the material structure can be adjusted at will through an appropriate flow history. In particular it is possible to tune the material yield stress to arbitrary low values. A simple model assuming that the stress is the sum of one component due to structure deformation and one component due to hydrodynamic interactions predicts all rheological trends observed and appears to well represent quantitatively the data.

Guillaume Ovarlez; Laurent Tocquer; François Bertrand; Philippe Coussot

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels  

SciTech Connect

This report supports the effort for development of small scale fabrication of UCO (a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2}) fuel kernels for the generation IV high temperature gas reactor program. In particular, it is focused on optimization of dispersion conditions of carbon black in the broths from which carbon-containing (UO{sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O + C) gel spheres are prepared by internal gelation. The broth results from mixing a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and urea solution with an acid-deficient uranyl nitrate (ADUN) solution. Carbon black, which is previously added to one or other of the components, must stay dispersed during gelation. The report provides a detailed description of characterization efforts and results, aimed at identification and testing carbon black and surfactant combinations that would produce stable dispersions, with carbon particle sizes below 1 {micro}m, in aqueous HMTA/urea and ADUN solutions. A battery of characterization methods was used to identify the properties affecting the water dispersability of carbon blacks, such as surface area, aggregate morphology, volatile content, and, most importantly, surface chemistry. The report introduces the basic principles for each physical or chemical method of carbon black characterization, lists the results obtained, and underlines cross-correlations between methods. Particular attention is given to a newly developed method for characterization of surface chemical groups on carbons in terms of their acid-base properties (pK{sub a} spectra) based on potentiometric titration. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic. In addition, background information on carbon black properties and the mechanism by which surfactants disperse carbon black in water is also provided. A list of main physical and chemical properties characterized, samples analyzed, and results obtained, as well as information on the desired trend or range of values generally associated with better dispersability, is provided in the Appendix. Special attention was given to characterization of several surface-modified carbon blacks produced by Cabot Corporation through proprietary diazonium salts chemistry. As demonstrated in the report, these advanced carbons offer many advantages over traditional dispersions. They disperse very easily, do not require intensive mechanical shearing or sonication, and the particle size of the dispersed carbon black aggregates is in the target range of 0.15-0.20 {micro}m. The dispersions in water and HMTA/urea solutions are stable for at least 30 days; in conditions of simulated broth, the dispersions are stable for at least 6 hours. It is proposed that the optimization of the carbon black dispersing process is possible by replacing traditional carbon blacks and surfactants with surface-modified carbon blacks having suitable chemical groups attached on their surface. It is recognized that the method advanced in this report for optimizing the carbon black dispersion process is based on a limited number of tests made in aqueous and simulated broth conditions. The findings were corroborated by a limited number of tests carried out with ADUN solutions by the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). More work is necessary, however, to confirm the overall recommendation based on the findings discussed in this report: namely, that the use of surface-modified carbon blacks in the uranium-containing broth will not adversely impact the chemistry of the gelation process, and that high quality uranium oxicarbide (UCO) kernels will be produced after calcination.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Long-term Black Carbon Dynamics in Cultivated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) is a quantitatively important C pool in the global carbon cycle due to its relative recalcitrance against decay compared with other C pools. However, how rapidly BC is oxidized and in what way the molecular structure changes during decomposition over decadal time scales, is largely unknown. In the present study, the long-term dynamics in quality and quantity of BC were investigated in cultivated soil using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. BC particles, obtained from soil samples at 8 conversion ages stretching over 100 years and from a forest soil sample from Kenya, were manually picked under a light microscope for characterization and quantification. BC contents rapidly decreased from 12.7 to 3.8 mg C g?č soil during the first 30 years since conversion, after which they slowly decreased to a steady state at 3.51 mg C g ?čsoil. BC-derived C losses over 100 years were estimated at 6000 kg C ha?č to a depth of 0.1 m. The initial rapid changes in BC stocks resulted in a mean residence time of only around 8.3 years, which was likely a function of both decomposition as well as transport processes. The molecular properties of BC changed more rapidly on surfaces than in the interior of BC particles and more rapidly during the first 30 years than during the following 70 years. The Oc/C ratios (Oc is O bound to C) and carbonyl groups (C=O) increased over time by 133 and 192 %, respectively, indicating oxidation was an important degradation process controlling BC quality. Al, Si, polysaccharides, and to a lesser extent Fe were rapidly adsorbed on BC particle surfaces within the first few years after BC deposition to soil. The protection by physical and chemical stabilization was apparently sufficient to not only minimize decomposition below detection between 30 and 100 years after deposition, but also physical export by erosion and vertical transport below 0.1 m.

Nguyen, Binh T.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Kinyangi, James; Smernik, Ron; Riha, Susan J.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Enhanced Solar Energy Absorption by Internally-mixed Black Carbon in Snow Grains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we explore light absorption by snowpack containing black carbon (BC) particles residing within ice grains. Basic considerations of particle volumes and BC/snow mass concentrations show that there are generally 0:05-109 BC particles for each ice grain. This suggests that internal BC is likely distributed as multiple inclusions within ice grains, and thus the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) (Chylek and Srivastava, 1983) is a more appropriate optical representation for BC/ice composites than coated-sphere or standard mixing approximations. DEMA calculations show that the 460 nm absorption cross-section of BC/ice composites, normalized to the mass of BC, is typically enhanced by factors of 1.8-2.1 relative to interstitial BC. BC effective radius is the dominant cause of variation in this enhancement, compared with ice grain size and BC volume fraction. We apply two atmospheric aerosol models that simulate interstitial and within-hydrometeor BC lifecycles. Although only {approx}2% of the atmospheric BC burden is cloud-borne, 71-83% of the BC deposited to global snow and sea-ice surfaces occurs within hydrometeors. Key processes responsible for within-snow BC deposition are development of hydrophilic coatings on BC, activation of liquid droplets, and subsequent snow formation through riming or ice nucleation by other species and aggregation/accretion of ice particles. Applying deposition fields from these aerosol models in offline snow and sea-ice simulations, we calculate that 32-73% of BC in global surface snow resides within ice grains. This fraction is smaller than the within-hydrometeor deposition fraction because meltwater flux preferentially removes internal BC, while sublimation and freezing within snowpack expose internal BC. Incorporating the DEMA into a global climate model, we simulate increases in BC/snow radiative forcing of 43-86%, relative to scenarios that apply external optical properties to all BC. We show that snow metamorphism driven by diffusive vapor transfer likely proceeds too slowly to alter the mass of internal BC while it is radiatively active, but neglected processes like wind pumping and convection may play much larger roles. These results suggest that a large portion of BC in surface snowpack may reside within ice grains and increase BC/snow radiative forcing, although measurements to evaluate this are lacking. Finally, previous studies of BC/snow forcing that neglected this absorption enhancement are not necessarily biased low, because of application of absorption-enhancing sulfate coatings to hydrophilic BC, neglect of coincident absorption by dust in snow, and implicit treatment of cloud-borne BC resulting in longer-range transport.

Flanner, M. G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Cheng; Penner, Joyce E.; Jiao, C.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Multi-Proxy Approach on Black Carbon Characterization and Combustion Products Source Discrimination in Environmental Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental applications of pyrogenic carbon, aka black carbon (BC), have been hampered due to the poor characterization and quantification of environmental BC. This dissertation was dedicated to the better characterization of environmental char/charcoal BC (char-BC), the most heterogeneous and the less identifiable group in the BC continuum. The analytical approach developed for char-BC was further incorporated with other BC methods in environmental samples for a comprehensive assessment of combustion-derived carbon inputs in different environmental systems. The present study firstly evaluated the feasibility of using levoglucosan, a marker derived from cellulose/hemocellulose combustion, to characterize and quantify char-BC in the environment. Levoglucosan was found exclusively in BC materials derived from biomass combustion albeit in highly variable yields across different char-BC. A further examination of synthetic chars showed that temperature is the most influential factor affecting levoglucosan yield in char. Notably, levoglucosan was only detectable in low temperature char samples (150-350 degrees C), regardless of plant species. These results demonstrated that levoglucosan could serve as a good qualitative indicator for the presence of char produced under low temperature conditions in soil, sediments, and aerosols. Results of lignin analysis on the synthetic chars further reveal that combustion can greatly decrease the yield of the eight major lignin phenols with no lignin phenols detected in any synthetic char produced at greater than or equal to 400 degrees C. The values of all lignin parameters show significant shifts with increasing combustion severity (temperature and/or duration), indicating that thermal alteration is an important abiotic lignin degradation process. Hence the input of char-BC in the environments represents a terrestrial organic matter source with highly altered lignin signatures. Finally, a multi-proxy approach, including elemental (soot-BC) and molecular (levoglucosan, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and lignin oxidation products) proxies, was adopted to investigate the centennial-scale temporal distribution of combustion products in four sediment cores from Puget Sound basins, WA. The observed temporal trends of soot-BC and combustion PAHs fluxes reflect the evolution of energy consumption and the positive effects of environmental regulations. The distinct temporal patterns of soot and PAHs among cores demonstrate that urbanization is a crucial factor controlling the inputs of combustion byproducts to the environment. On the other hand, the trends of levoglucosan may be more relevant to the climate oscillation and thus show a regional distribution pattern. Our results demonstrate that environmental loading of combustion byproducts is a complex function of urbanization and land use, fuel usage, combustion technology, environmental policies, and climate changes.

Kuo, Li-Jung

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: soil carbon sequestration; carbon budget;of an energy efficient carbon sequestration mechanism, asin the later section on carbon sequestration. In atmospheric

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Title Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Novakov, Tihomir, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Surabi Menon, and Jeffery Aguiar Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 35 Issue 19 Abstract In this paper, we compare constructed records of concentrations of black carbon (BC) - an indicator of anthropogenic aerosols - with observed surface temperature trends in California. Annual average BC concentrations in major air basins in California significantly decreased after about 1990, coincident with an observed statewide surface temperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends are consistent with observed seasonal temperature trends. These data suggest that the reduction in anthropogenic aerosol concentrations contributed to the observed surface temperature increase. Conversely, high aerosol concentrations may lower surface temperature and partially offset the temperature increase of greenhouse gases.

79

Lidar Observations of Sea-Breeze and Land-Breeze Aerosol Structure on the Black Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results of a lidar study of sea-breeze behavior near Akhtopol in the southeastern corner of Bulgaria. The lidar site was a few hundred meters from the western shore of the Black Sea. Analyses are presented of vertical cross ...

I. Kolev; O. Parvanov; B. Kaprielov; E. Donev; D. Ivanov

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sun, Y. et al. Size-resolved aerosol chemistry on Whistlerwith a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer duringBasis Set: 1. Organic-Aerosol Mixing Thermodynamics. Atmos.

Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Title Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50880 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Tihomir Novakov, and Peter V. Hobbs Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Keywords black carbon, evolved gas analysis, light absorption, organic carbon, positive sampling artifact, SAFARI Abstract Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60% larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60% more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18±0.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25±0.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

84

Atmospheric Measurements of Submicron Aerosols at the California-Mexico Border and in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an innovative arrangement of instruments to obtain a comprehensive set of properties, we present a description of the submicron aerosol properties for two distinct regions. During the 2009 SHARP/SOOT campaign in Houston, TX, the average effective density was 1.54 ± 0.07 g cm^-3, consistent with a population comprised largely of sulfates and organics Even in low concentrations (0.31 ± 0.22 ”g m^-3), black carbon concentration has a significant impact on the overall density and optical properties. Under prevailing northerly winds, the average black carbon concentration increases from 0.26 ± 0.18 ”g m^-3 to 0.60 ± 0.21 ”g m^-3. Throughout the campaign, aerosols are often internally mixed, with one peak in the effective density distribution located at 1.55 ± 0.07 g cm^-3. In addition, we conclude that in this region the meteorology has a discernible impact on the concentration and properties of aerosols. After a frontal passage, there is a significant shift in the size distribution as the concentration of aerosols are heavily influenced by vehicle emissions. We observe an average single scattering albedo of 0.75. This average SSA is lower than observed in many US urban environments, and indicates a high concentration of black carbon. The average black carbon concentration is 2.71 ± 2.65 g cm^-3. The aerosol size distributions reveal a high concentration of small particles (aerosol composition. 151 and 240 nm aerosols are less cyclical, and the hygroscopicity, volatility, and effect density distributions all exhibit a bimodal distribution, which indicates an external mixture of aerosols. Black carbon and vehicle and industrial organic emissions appear to be the main components of the external mixture.

Levy, Misti E

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, 9, 2559-2608. 135. International Biochar Initiative.How much carbon can biochar systems offset-and when?2009) 136. Tenenbaum, D.J. Biochar: carbon mitigation from

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Gasification behavior of carbon residue in bed solids of black liquor gasifier  

SciTech Connect

Steam gasification of carbon residue in bed solids of a low-temperature black liquor gasifier was studied using a thermogravimetric system at 3 bar. Complete gasification of the carbon residue, which remained unreactive at 600 C, was achieved in about 10 min as the temperature increased to 800 C. The rate of gasification and its temperature dependence were evaluated from the non-isothermal experiment results. Effects of particle size and adding H{sub 2} and CO to the gasification agent were also studied. The rate of steam gasification could be taken as zero order in carbon until 80% of carbon was gasified, and for the rest of the gasification process the rate appeared to be first order in carbon. The maximum rate of carbon conversion was around 0.003/s and the activation energy was estimated to be in the range of 230-300 kJ/mol. The particle size did not show significant effect on the rate of gasification. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide appeared to retard the onset of the gasification process. (author)

Preto, Fernando; Zhang, Xiaojie (Frank); Wang, Jinsheng [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon by biasing biomass pyrolysis practices to yield highof liquefaction and pyrolysis reactions of biomass. Energ.soot ? aromatics PYROLYSIS biomass lignin ? ? ? ? ? guaiacyl

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Atmospheric Trace Gases, Carbon Isotopes, Radionuclides, and Aerosols: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most datasets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to atmospheric carbon dioxide data includes: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Isotopes • Atmospheric carbon dioxide records from Mauna Loa, Hawaii • Monthly atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios and other data from the NOAA/CMDL continuous monitoring network • Data from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network • Atmospheric CO2 records from continuous measurements at Jubany Station, Antarctica and from 10 sites in the SIO air sampling network • Historical data from the extended Vostok ice core (2003) and the Siple Station ice core (1997) • Historical records from the Law Dome DE08, DE08-2, and DSS ice cores (1998) • AmeriFlux Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements • Data from the Canadian Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network • Flask Samples from at U.S.S.R.-Operated Sites (1991) • The CISIRO (Australia) Monitoring Program from Aircraft for 1972-1981 • CO2 Concentrations in Surface Water and the Atmosphere during 1986-1989 NOAA/PMEL Cruises in the Pacific and Indian Oceans • Surface Water and Atmospheric CO2 and Nitrous Oxide Observations by Shipboard Automated Gas Chromatography: Results from Expeditions Between 1977 and 1990 (1992) • IPCC Working Group 1, 1994: Modeling Results Relating Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations to Industrial Emissions (1995). New datasets are added when available to the category of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

92

Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this work is to design a bench-scale apparatus, for laboratory applications, that will perform solid processing operations for carbon black obtained through the thermal catalytic depolymerization of scrap tires. These operations are as follows: filtration and washing, extraction, and fine/coarse particle separation. It is beneficial to perform the three processing steps in a single apparatus to minimize, both, the amount of solid product lost and the time required for processing. By minimizing the time, a greater number of samples may be analyzed in a given amount of time. Thus, the effects of variations in process conditions can be determined in a shorter time span. The final design of the apparatus was formulated through combining the requirements of the three individual processing steps. Theoretical aspects, as well as quantitative and qualitative observations were important tools in generating the final design specifications. Without a doubt, the practical experience of working with the carbon black was the most important aid in performing this work.

Woodrow, Philip Travis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black Carbon Reference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. (1998), Determination of chemical- structural changes inOptical, physical, and chemical properties of tar ballsE. (2001), Study on the chemical character of water soluble

Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black Carbon Reference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic and biomass burn combustion is evident in theanthropogenic combustion and biomass burns, thus allowingAnthropogenic combustion and biomass burn particles can be

Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Black Carbon Aerosol Concentration in Five Cities and Its Scaling with City Population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A question of importance for urban planning and attainment of air quality standards is how pollutant concentrations scale with city population. This study uses measurements of light absorption and light scattering coefficients as proxies for primary (i.e.,...

G. Paredes-Miranda; W. P. Arnott; H. Moosmüller; M. C. Green; M. Gyawali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

SciTech Connect

Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration ('biochar'). Here we present a molecular-level assessment of the physical organization and chemical complexity of biomass-derived chars and, specifically, that of aromatic carbon in char structures. BET-N{sub 2} surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy are used to show how two plant materials (wood and grass) undergo analogous, but quantitatively different physical-chemical transitions as charring temperature increases from 100 to 700 C. These changes suggest the existence of four distinct categories of char consisting of a unique mixture of chemical phases and physical states: (i) in transition chars the crystalline character of the precursor materials is preserved, (ii) in amorphous chars the heat-altered molecules and incipient aromatic polycondensates are randomly mixed, (iii) composite chars consist of poorly ordered graphene stacks embedded in amorphous phases, and (iv) turbostratic chars are dominated by disordered graphitic crystallites. The molecular variations among the different char categories translate into differences in their ability to persist in the environment and function as environmental sorbents.

Keiluweit, M.; Nico, P.S.; Johnson, M.G.; Kleber, M.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Furnace Black Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher #12 of Crystallographic Studies #12;005F7 Methodologies #12;005F8 Summary · For all furnace carbon black 12� Surface Unorganized Carbon Identified #12;005F11 SRCC's Model #12;005F12 Carbon Black Surface Activity

98

Black carbon emissions in the United Kingdom during the past four decades: An empirical analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We use data from a unique 40-year record of 150 urban and rural stations in the ''Black Smoke and SO2 Network'' in Great Britain to infer information about sources of atmospheric black carbon (BC). The data show a rapid decline of ambient atmospheric BC between 1962 and the early 1990s that exceeds the decline in official estimates of BC emissions based only on amount of fuel use and mostly fixed emission factors. This provides empirical confirmation of the existence and large impact of a time-dependent ''technology factor'' that must multiply the rate of fossil fuel use. Current ambient BC amounts in Great Britain comparable to those in western and central Europe, with diesel engines being the principal present source. From comparison of BC and SO2 data we infer that current BC emission inventories understate true emissions in the U.K. by about a factor of two. The results imply that there is the potential for improved technology to achieve large reduction of global ambient BC. There is a need for comparable monitoring of BC in other countries.

Novakov, T.; Hansen, J.E.

2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models  

SciTech Connect

A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 {micro}m, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due to oversimplifications of the representation of sea salt emissions - sea salt emissions are only calculated for two size classes - than to inherent limitations of MATRIX.

Bauer,S.E.; Wright, D.L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E.R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S.E.; Ruedy, R.

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for measuring ecosystem carbon oxidation state and oxidativemean oxidation number of carbon (MOC) - A useful concept forJ.F. & Barsanti, K.C. The Carbon Number-Polarity Grid: A

Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Present-day climate forcing and response from black carbon in snow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fossil fuel and biomass combustion aerosols deposited atfrom biomass burning and low-temperature combustion. Futurebiofuel combustion [Bond et al. , 2004] and biomass burning

Flanner, Mark G; Zender, Charles S; Randerson, James T; Rasch, Philip J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Aerosol characterization study using multi-spectrum remote sensing measurement techniques.  

SciTech Connect

A unique aerosol flow chamber coupled with a bistatic LIDAR system was implemented to measure the optical scattering cross sections and depolarization ratio of common atmospheric particulates. Each of seven particle types (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, black carbon and Arizona road dust) was aged by three anthropogenically relevant mechanisms: 1. Sulfuric acid deposition, 2. Toluene ozonolysis reactions, and 3. m-Xylene ozonolysis reactions. The results of pure particle scattering properties were compared with their aged equivalents. Results show that as most particles age under industrial plume conditions, their scattering cross sections are similar to pure black carbon, which has significant impacts to our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate. In addition, evidence emerges that suggest chloride-containing aerosols are chemically altered during the organic aging process. Here we present the direct measured scattering cross section and depolarization ratios for pure and aged atmospheric particulates.

Glen, Crystal Chanea; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Servantes, Brandon Lee

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Green area effect and other aerosol scavenging processes in the Black Hills of South Dakota: final report  

SciTech Connect

Bi-weekly air sampling for particulates in the Black Hills has revealed several important scavenging mechanisms. A Gardner condensation nucleus counter was used to determine these particulate counts at fourteen stations. Analysis of the data has indicated that the forested Black Hills are a source of clean air when compared to the surrounding plains due mainly to greater precipitation and in-cloud scavenging events, an elevation variation, and the filtering effects of vegetation (green area sink effect). Little or no scavenging was indicated by certain meteorological variables when considered separately. The green area sink effect was substantiated after performing several tests on the data with a cleanup of as much as 50% evidenced.

Haggard, S.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

On the Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols, J. Geophys. Res. -particulate diesel exhaust, Aerosol Sci. Technol. 25: 221-climate forcing of carbonaceous aerosols, J. Geophys. Res. -

Pang, Y.; Turpin, B.J.; Gundel, L.A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Radical-Initiated Reactions of Alkenes: Development of Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Secondary Organic Aerosols in Southern California duringSources of Organic Carbon Aerosols in the Free Troposphere21 co-authors), 2005. Organic Aerosol and Global Climate

Matsunaga, Aiko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crutzen, P. : Atmospheric Aerosols: Biogeochemical sourcesof optically active aerosol particles over the Amazonproperties of Amazonian aerosol particles: Rev. Geophys. ,

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Black Carbon and West African Monsoon precipitation:observations and simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have recently investigated large-scale co-variability between aerosol and precipitation and other meteorological variables in the West African Monsoon (WAM) region using long term satellite observations and reanalysis ...

Huang, J.

108

Global and regional decreases in tropospheric oxidants from photochemical effects of aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We evaluate the sensitivity of tropospheric OH, O3, and O3 precursors to photochemical effects of aerosols not usually included in global models: (1) aerosol scattering and absorption of ultraviolet radiation and (2) reactive uptake of HO2,NO2, and NO3. Our approach is to couple a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-CHEM) with aerosol fields from a global 3-D aerosol model (GOCART). Reactive uptake by aerosols is computed using reaction probabilities from a recent review (gHO2 = 0.2, gNO2 =10 4, gNO3 =10 3). Aerosols decrease the O3! O ( 1 D) photolysis frequency by 5–20 % at the surface throughout the Northern Hemisphere (largely due to mineral dust) and by a factor of 2 in biomass burning regions (largely due to black carbon). Aerosol uptake of HO2 accounts for 10–40 % of total HOx radical ( OH + peroxy) loss in the boundary layer over polluted continental regions (largely due to sulfate and organic carbon) and for more than 70 % over tropical biomass burning regions (largely due to organic carbon). Uptake of NO2 and NO3 accounts for 10–20 % of total HNO3 production over biomass burning regions and less elsewhere. Annual mean OH concentrations decrease by 9 % globally and by 5–35 % in the boundary layer over the Northern

All V. Martin; Daniel J. Jacob; Robert M. Yantosca; Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60 percent larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60 percent more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18/2610.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25/2610.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Novakov, T.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Magi, Brian

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

114

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

117

Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is affected by organic carbon Title Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is affected by organic carbon Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-55056 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Tihomir Novakov, and Peter V. Hobbs Journal Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Volume 109 Issue D21 Keywords aerosol light absorption, biomass burning, organic carbon Abstract The wavelength dependence of light absorption by aerosols collected on filters is investigated throughout the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral region. Measurements were made using an optical transmission method. Aerosols produced by biomass combustion, including wood and savanna burning, and by motor vehicles, including diesel trucks, are included in the analysis. These aerosol types were distinguished by different wavelength (λ) dependences in light absorption. Light absorption by the motor vehicle aerosols exhibited relatively weak wavelength dependence; absorption varied approximately as λ-1, indicating that black carbon (BC) was the dominant absorbing aerosol component. By contrast, the biomass smoke aerosols had much stronger wavelength dependence, approximately λ-2. The stronger spectral dependence was the result of enhanced light absorption at wavelengths shorter than 600 nm and was largely reduced when much of the sample organic carbon (OC) was extracted by dissolution in acetone. This indicates that OC in addition to BC in the biomass smoke aerosols contributed significantly to measured light absorption in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions and that OC in biomass burning aerosols may appreciably absorb solar radiation. Estimated absorption efficiencies and imaginary refractive indices are presented for the OC extracted from biomass burning samples and the BC in motor vehicle-dominated aerosol samples. The uncertainty of these constants is discussed. Overall, results of this investigation show that low-temperature, incomplete combustion processes, including biomass burning, can produce light-absorbing aerosols that exhibit much stronger spectral dependence than high-temperature combustion processes, such as diesel combustion.

118

Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Secondary Organic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applicability of high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in organic aerosols was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were analyzed and corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of organic aerosols was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both (+) and (-) modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive and negative ESI modes with the octanol-water partition constant, and more importantly, with the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOA produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared to online O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS methods is comparable to that of the AMS, with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

Bateman, Adam P.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hydroxide Formation and Carbon Species Distributions During High-Temperature Kraft Black Liquor Gasification .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work focuses on high-temperature kraft black liquor gasification in the presence of H2O and CO2 in a laboratory-scale Laminar Entrained-Flow Reactor (LEFR). The effects… (more)

Dance, Michael Raymond, Jr.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate Over the Past Century  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol direct (DE), indirect (IE), and black carbon-snow albedo (BAE) effects on climate between 1890 and 1995 are compared using equilibrium aerosol-climate simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. Pairs of control(1890)-perturbation(1995) with successive aerosol effects allow isolation of each effect. The experiments are conducted both with and without concurrent changes in greenhouse gases (GHG's). A new scheme allowing dependence of snow albedo on black carbon snow concentration is introduced. The fixed GHG experiments global surface air temperature (SAT) changed -0.2, -1.0 and +0.2 C from the DE, IE, and BAE. Ice and snow cover increased 1.0% from the IE and decreased 0.3% from the BAE. These changes were a factor of 4 larger in the Arctic. Global cloud cover increased by 0.5% from the IE. Net aerosol cooling effects are about half as large as the GHG warming, and their combined climate effects are smaller than the sum of their individual effects. Increasing GHG's did not affect the IE impact on cloud cover, however they decreased aerosol effects on SAT by 20% and on snow/ice cover by 50%; they also obscure the BAE on snow/ice cover. Arctic snow, ice, cloud, and shortwave forcing changes occur mostly during summer-fall, but SAT, sea level pressure, and long-wave forcing changes occur during winter. An explanation is that aerosols impact the cryosphere during the warm-season but the associated SAT effect is delayed until winter.

Koch, Dorothy; Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony; Ruedy, Reto; Alienov, Igor; Schmidt, Gavin A.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

122

Black Carbon and Kerosene Lighting: An Opportunity for Rapid Action on Climate Change and Clean Energy for Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Replacing inefficient kerosene lighting with electric lighting or other clean alternatives can rapidly achieve development and energy access goals, save money and reduce climate warming. Many of the 250 million households that lack reliable access to electricity rely on inefficient and dangerous simple wick lamps and other kerosene-fueled light sources, using 4 to 25 billion liters of kerosene annually to meet basic lighting needs. Kerosene costs can be a significant household expense and subsidies are expensive. New information on kerosene lamp emissions reveals that their climate impacts are substantial. Eliminating current annual black carbon emissions would provide a climate benefit equivalent to 5 gigatons of carbon dioxide reductions over the next 20 years. Robust and low-cost technologies for supplanting simple wick and other kerosene-fueled lamps exist and are easily distributed and scalable. Improving household lighting offers a low-cost opportunity to improve development, cool the climate and reduce costs.

Jacobson, Arne [Humboldt State Univ., MN (United States). Schatz Energy Research Center; Bond, Tami C. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lam, Nicholoas L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences; Hultman, Nathan [The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

Koch, D

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Aerosol Characteristics and Radiative Impacts over the Arabian Sea during the Intermonsoon Season: Results from ARMEX Field Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the second phase of the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX-II), extensive measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth, mass concentration, and mass size distribution of ambient aerosols as well as mass concentration of aerosol black ...

K. Krishna Moorthy; S. Suresh Babu; S. K. Satheesh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Analysis of Devonian Black Shales in Kentucky for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Enhanced Natural Gas Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO2. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine both CO2 and CH4 adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO2 displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO2 adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton in the more organic-rich zones. There is a direct linear correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO2 adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial volumetric estimates based on these data indicate a CO2 sequestration capacity of as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. In the Big Sandy Gas Field area of eastern Kentucky, calculations using the net thickness of shale with 4 percent or greater total organic carbon, indicate that 6.8 billion tonnes of CO2 could be sequestered in the five county area. Discounting the uncertainties in reservoir volume and injection efficiency, these results indicate that the black shales of Kentucky are a potentially large geologic sink for CO2. Moreover, the extensive occurrence of gas shales in Paleozoic and Mesozoic basins across North America make them an attractive regional target for economic CO2 storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall; Cortland F. Eble; James A. Drahovzal; R. Marc Bustin

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008-2009 data) Outline * Receptor modeling overview * Results from 2007 data set * New goals arising from analysis of 2007 data * New data for 2008 * New data for 2009 * Tentative conclusions * Future analysis i Factor profiles from 2007 analysis Source attribution of Black Carbon from 2007 analysis Goals/Issues suggested by the analysis of the 2007 data set * Are there seasonal differences in the source strengths? * Are there other LAA chemical components besides black carbon. What are their sources? * Can the various data sets available (e.g., 2007, 2008, 2009) be combined in a single large PMF analysis 2008 Data Set For Receptor Analysis * 42 samples from Eastern Siberia including 4 depth profiles

127

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments HyytiÀlÀ, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

128

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Model simulations of the first aerosol indirect effect and comparison of cloud susceptibility fo satellite measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present-day global anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of the mass in submicron particles primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol components derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. These anthropogenic aerosols modify the microphysics of clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and enhance the reflectivity of low-level water clouds, leading to a cooling effect on climate (the Twomey effect or first indirect effect). The magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect is associated with cloud frequency as well as a quantity representing the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in cloud drop number concentration. This quantity is referred to as cloud susceptibility [Twomey, 1991]. Analysis of satellite measurements demonstrates that marine stratus clouds are likely to be of higher susceptibility than continental clouds because of their lower number concentrations of cloud drops [Platnick and Twomey, 1994]. Here, we use an improved version of the fully coupled climate/chemistry model [Chuang et al., 1997] to calculate the global concentrations Of sulfate, dust, sea salt, and carbonaceous aerosols (biomass smoke and fossil fuel organic matter and black carbon). We investigated the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud susceptibility and calculated the associated changes of shortwave radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We also examined the correspondence between the model simulation of cloud susceptibility and that inferred from satellite measurements to test whether our simulated aerosol concentrations and aerosol/cloud interactions give a faithful representation of these features.

Chuang, C; Penner, J E; Kawamoto, K

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

133

Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modeling the spectral optical properties of ammonium sulfate and biomass burning aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The importance of including the global and regional radiative effects of aerosols in climate models has increasingly been realized. Accurate modeling of solar radiative forcing due to aerosols from anthropogenic sulfate and biomass burning emissions requires adequate spectral resolution and treatment of spatial and temporal variability. The variation of aerosol spectral optical properties with local relative humidity and dry aerosol composition must be considered. Because the cost of directly including Mie calculations within a climate model is prohibitive, parameterizations from offline calculations must be used. Starting from a log-normal size distribution of dry ammonium sulfate, we developed optical properties for tropospheric sulfate aerosol at 15 relative humidities up to 99 percent. The resulting aerosol size distributions were then used to calculate bulk optical properties at wavelengths between 0.175 {micro}m and 4 {micro}m. Finally, functional fits of optical properties were made for each of 12 wavelength bands as a function of relative humidity. Significant variations in optical properties occurred across the total solar spectrum. Relative increases in specific extinction and asymmetry factor with increasing relative humidity became larger at longer wavelengths. Significant variation in single-scattering albedo was found only in the longest near-IR band. This is also the band with the lowest albedo. A similar treatment was done for aerosols from biomass burning. In this case, size distributions were taken as having two carbonaceous size modes and a larger dust mode. The two carbonaceous modes were considered to be humidity dependent. Equilibrium size distributions and compositions were calculated for 15 relative humidities and five black carbon fractions. Mie calculations and Chandrasekhar averages of optical properties were done for each of the resulting 75 cases. Finally, fits were made for each of 12 spectral bands as functions of relative humidity and black carbon fraction.

Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.C.; Grossman, A.S.; Penner, J.E. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Climate response of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium climate response to the total effects (direct, indirect and semi-direct effects) of aerosols arising from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions on the South Asian summer monsoon system is studied using a coupled atmosphere-slab ocean model. Our results suggest that anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols generally induce a reduction in mean summer monsoon precipitation over most parts of the Indian subcontinent, strongest along the western coastline of the Indian peninsula and eastern Nepal region, but modest increases also occur over the north western part of the subcontinent. While most of the noted reduction in precipitation is triggered by increased emissions of aerosols from anthropogenic activities, modest increases in the north west are mostly associated with decreases in local emissions of aerosols from forest fire and grass fire sources. Anthropogenic aerosols from outside Asia also contribute to the overall reduction in precipitation but the dominant contribution comes from aerosol sources within Asia. Local emissions play a more important role in the total rainfall response to anthropogenic aerosol sources during the early monsoon period, whereas both local as well as remote emissions of aerosols play almost equally important roles during the later part of the monsoon period. While precipitation responses are primarily driven by local aerosol forcing, regional surface temperature changes over the region are strongly influenced by anthropogenic aerosols from sources further away (non-local changes). Changes in local anthropogenic organic and black carbon emissions by as much as a factor of two (preserving their ratio) produce the same basic signatures in the model's summer monsoon temperature and precipitation responses.

Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

A New Method for Measuring Aerosol Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique has recently been developed to measure aerosol absorption by means of a microdensitometer. Black particulate material is collected into six spots on membrane filters by a laboratory-tested impaction/concentration technique. Follow-...

B. B. Murphey; S. I. Reynolds

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of planned data analyses and focused modeling efforts that will facilitate the integration of new knowledge into improved representations of key aerosol processes in climate models.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness from the GOCART Model and Comparisons with Satellite and Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Georgia Institute of Technology–Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the aerosol optical thickness ? for major types of tropospheric aerosols including sulfate, dust, organic carbon ...

Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Stefan Kinne; Omar Torres; Brent N. Holben; Bryan N. Duncan; Randall V. Martin; Jennifer A. Logan; Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Soiling by atmospheric aerosols in an urban industrial area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gradual and progressive soiling of structures exposed to the atmosphere is commonplace. Material soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric aerosols. Both wet and dry deposition occurs. The particle size and the orientation, exposure and roughness of the surface determine the dominant deposition mechanisms. Wet deposition is not an important cause of surface soiling, but precipitation removes particles from a surface. Aged atmospheric particles are characterized by a bimodal size distribution of coarse and fine particles. Coarse particles tend to be inactive chemically and are removed by washout and runoff. A primary cause of building soiling in urban areas has been attributed to the fine-particle mode. When fine particles contain carbon they tend to be black, and adhere more tenaciously to surface than do course particles. Elemental carbon is usually 10-20 percent of the urban fine aerosol mass, and vehicular emissions, particularly diesel emissions, are the major source of urban black smoke. The soiling of buildings occurs over the years from fine particle deposition and is associated with low atmospheric concentrations. This paper describes the influences of particle size and rainfall on the deposition, and on the soiling of surfaces with different surface glosses, orientations and exposures.

Creighton, P.J. (Rutgers: The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA)); Lioy, P.J. (Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, NJ (USA)); Haynie, F.H.; Lemmons, T.J.; Miller, J.L.; Gerhart, J. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

6, 1187711912, 2006 Scavenging of black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 11877­11912, 2006 Scavenging of black carbon in mixed phase clouds J. Cozic et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Scavenging of black carbon in mixed phase clouds at the high alpine site, 11877­11912, 2006 Scavenging of black carbon in mixed phase clouds J. Cozic et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

4, 871891, 2007 Mobility of black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 871­891, 2007 Mobility of black carbon J. Leifeld et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Mobility of black carbon in drained­891, 2007 Mobility of black carbon J. Leifeld et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Long-term biobarriers to plant and animal intrusions of uranium tailings. [24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black, and 58% polymer  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of physical and chemical barriers designed to prevent plant and animal breachment of uranium mill tailings containment systems for an extended period of time. A polymeric carrier/biocide delivery system was developed and tested in the laboratory, greenhouse and field. A continuous flow technique was established to determine the release rates of the biocides from the PCD systems; polymeric carrier specifications were established. Studies were conducted to determine effective biocide concentrations required to produce a phytotoxic response and the relative rates of phytotoxin degradation resulting from chemical and biological breakdown in soils. The final PCD system developed was a pelletized system containing 24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black and 58% polymer. Pellets were placed in the soil at the Grand Junction U-tailings site at one in. and two in. intervals. Data obtained in the field determined that the pellets released enough herbicide to the soil layer to stop root elongation past the barrier. Physical barriers to subsurface movement of burrowing animals were investigated. Small crushed stone (1 to 1 1/2 in. diameter) placed over asphalt emulsion and multilayer soil seals proved effective as barriers to a small mammal (ground squirrels) but were not of sufficient size to stop a larger animal (the prairie dog). No penetrations were made through the asphalt emulsion or the clay layer of the multilayer soil seals by either of the two mammals tested. A literature survey was prepared and published on the burrowing habits of the animals that may be found at U-tailings sites.

Cline, J.F.; Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Gano, K.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments HyytiÀlÀ, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

144

Addition of Tropospheric Chemistry and Aerosols to the NCAR Community Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry and aerosols have several important roles in climate change. They affect the Earth's radiative balance directly: cooling the earth by scattering sunlight (aerosols) and warming the Earth by trapping the Earth's thermal radiation (methane, ozone, nitrous oxide, and CFCs are greenhouse gases). Atmospheric chemistry and aerosols also impact many other parts of the climate system: modifying cloud properties (aerosols can be cloud condensation nuclei), fertilizing the biosphere (nitrogen species and soil dust), and damaging the biosphere (acid rain and ozone damage). In order to understand and quantify the effects of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols on the climate and the biosphere in the future, it is necessary to incorporate atmospheric chemistry and aerosols into state-of-the-art climate system models. We have taken several important strides down that path. Working with the latest NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM), we have incorporated a state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry model to simulate tropospheric ozone. Ozone is not just a greenhouse gas, it damages biological systems including lungs, tires, and crops. Ozone chemistry is also central to the oxidizing power of the atmosphere, which destroys a lot of pollutants in the atmosphere (which is a good thing). We have also implemented a fast chemical mechanism that has high fidelity with the full mechanism, for significantly reduced computational cost (to facilitate millennium scale simulations). Sulfate aerosols have a strong effect on climate by reflecting sunlight and modifying cloud properties. So in order to simulate the sulfur cycle more fully in CCSM simulations, we have linked the formation of sulfate aerosols to the oxidizing power of the atmosphere calculated by the ozone mechanisms, and to dimethyl sulfide emissions from the ocean ecosystem in the model. Since the impact of sulfate aerosols depends on the relative abundance of other aerosols in the atmosphere, we also implemented interactive simulation of nitrate, sea-salt, black carbon, and both primary and secondary organic aerosols into CCSM (using assumed size distributions). These new capabilities are opening the door to studies of the role atmospheric chemistry and aerosols in climate change, and their impact on the biosphere, that were previously impossible.

Cameron-Smith, P; Lamarque, J; Connell, P; Chuang, C; Rotman, D; Taylor, J

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Automated Chemical Analysis of Internally Mixed Aerosol Particles Using X-ray Spectromicroscopy at the Carbon K-Edge  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an automated data analysis method for atmospheric particles using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). This method is applied to complex internally mixed submicrometer particles containing organic and inorganic material. Several algorithms were developed to exploit NEXAFS spectral features in the energy range from 278 to 320 eV for quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of elemental carbon, organic carbon, potassium, and noncarbonaceous elements in particles of mixed composition. This energy range encompasses the carbon K-edge and potassium L2 and L3 edges. STXM/NEXAFS maps of different chemical components were complemented with a subsequent analysis using elemental maps obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). We demonstrate the application of the automated mapping algorithms for data analysis and the statistical classification of particles.

Gilles, Mary K; Moffet, R.C.; Henn, T.; Laskin, A.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Furnace Black Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Black Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher 005F 2 Definitions Particle Aggregate = 20nm to 100nm "Diameter" = 200nm to 1,000nm "Length" = Set of Percolated Aggregates Particle (?) Aggregate Agglomerate Constituents Size = Tech/Scientific Challenge 005F 3 Furnace Process High Temperature Refractory Feedstock Oil Air Natural Gas Reaction Zone Quench 005F 4 Specific Surface Area 005F 5 Structure 3-D Morphology Key Characteristic Summary of Crystallographic Studies 005F 7 Methodologies 005F 8 Summary * For all furnace carbon black 12Å < L C < 17Å * Crystallite L a ≈ 25Å * Amorphous Carbon * No micropores * Very few surface groups (hetero atoms) { 005F 9 Effect of Heat Treatment on Amorphous Carbon

147

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectrometry capabilities to analyze the molecular composition of atmospheric organic aerosols, or OA, containing nitrogen- containing organic compounds (NOC) and only carbon,...

148

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer RL : Raman Lidar Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments AEROSOL-TOWER-EML :...

149

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol extinction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments IAP : In-situ Aerosol...

150

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Smoldering Biomass Combustion. Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 10,aerosols emitted during biomass combustion [Robinson et al.burning samples. Combustion of biomass produces EC a and

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

BLACK ISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK ISSUES :: Your Portal To Diversity :: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::: http transactions in recent years include Viacom's acquisition of Black Entertainment Television, NBC's purchase Bookshelf Events Tech Briefs - more - #12;BLACK ISSUES :: Your Portal To Diversity

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

152

Del Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Del Black Del Black dblack.jpg Del C. Black HPC Technician, Operations Technology Group, DCBlack@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-6821 , Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop...

153

Atmospheric Trace Gases, Carbon Isotopes, Radionuclides, and Aerosols: Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Scroll down to find Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, a subheading under the broader heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases, etc.) CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to isotopes in greenhouse gases includes: • Monthly atmospheric 13C/12C isotopic ratios for 10 SIO stations, (2005) (Trends Online) • Mixing ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and isotope ratios of associated 13C, 18O, and 2H in air samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Monta±a de Oro, California, USA (2004) • Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values from Fossil-Fuel Consumption in the U.S.A., (2004) (Trends Online) ?13C in CO2 from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network (Trends Online) • In Situ 13CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (2001) (Trends Online) • In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (1995) • Carbon-13 Isotopic Abundance and concentration of Atmospheric Methane for Background Air in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres from 1978 to 1989 (1995) • Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999) • 14CO 2 Observations from Schauinsland, Germany (1997) (Trends Online) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Atmospheric CO 2 from Northern and Southern Hemisphere Sites, 1962-1992 (1996) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 (1998) (Specialized Interface)

154

Black Funnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hartle-Hawking state of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM at strong coupling and large $N$ on a fixed black hole background has two proposed gravitational duals: a black funnel or a black droplet. We construct the black funnel solutions that are dual to the Hartle-Hawking state on a Schwarzschild black hole and on a class of three-dimensional asymptotically flat black hole backgrounds. We compute their holographic stress tensor and argue for the stability of these solutions.

Santos, Jorge E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Black Funnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hartle-Hawking state of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM at strong coupling and large $N$ on a fixed black hole background has two proposed gravitational duals: a black funnel or a black droplet. We construct the black funnel solutions that are dual to the Hartle-Hawking state on a Schwarzschild black hole and on a class of three-dimensional asymptotically flat black hole backgrounds. We compute their holographic stress tensor and argue for the stability of these solutions.

Jorge E. Santos; Benson Way

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Douglas Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Black Doug Black Indoor Environment Group Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-3058 Berkeley CA 94720 Office...

157

Enhanced research program on the long-range climatic effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and sulfate aerosols. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Consistent with the objectives to extract as much as possible from existing models on the role of the oceans in the greenhouse effect and to improve various aspects of the coupled system, the authors made significant progress in three areas. (1) In a series of manuscripts, they documented how the El Nino-Southern Oscillation operates in the model and how it is enhanced with increased carbon dioxide. (2) In studies with collaborators Branstator, Karoly, and Karl, they explored the possible carbon dioxide ``fingerprint`` in zonal mean temperatures, the effects of changes in extratropical teleconnections, and the regional effects of low-frequency variability and climate change. (3) They experimented with an advanced version of the NCAR community climate model (CCM0) that also includes the Ramanathan and Collins cirrus albedo feedback mechanism. This model was run with a mixed layer and was tested with the 1{degree} 20-level Semtner and Chervin ocean model. The latter includes the Arctic Ocean and dynamic sea ice, both showing realistic results. The authors completed the coupling of the advanced models. The dynamic ocean model was a 1{degree}x1{degree} version of the Semtner-Chervin 1/2{degree}x1/2{degree} ocean model with 20 vertical levels. The 1{degree}x1{degree} version of the Semtner-Chervin model used in this research explicitly resolved some aspects of the mesoscale eddies as did the parent model. The new coupled model system for greenhouse gas simulations on climate change was tested on multidecadal runs.

Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama Jack C. Pashin (jpashin@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Richard H. Groshong, Jr. (rgroshon@wgs.geo.ua.edu; 205-348-1882) Deparment of Geology University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Richard E. Carroll (rcarroll@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Abstract Sequestration of CO 2 in coal is a market-based environmental solution with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while increasing coalbed methane recovery. Producing coalbed methane through injection of CO 2 is also more efficient than current techniques requiring

159

Electrical, electromagnetic and structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DDL. Partial replacement of carbon fiber by carbon black incarbon nanotubes and carbon fibers. Composites, Part A.carbon nanotubes for carbon fiber-epoxy composites. Journal

Park, Sung-Hoon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

SciTech Connect

We investigate aerosol effects on climate for 1980, 1995 (meant to reflect present-day) and 2030 using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model coupled to an on-line aerosol source and transport model with interactive oxidant and aerosol chemistry. Aerosols simulated include sulfates, organic matter (OM), black carbon (BC), sea-salt and dust and additionally, the amount of tropospheric ozone is calculated, allowing us to estimate both changes to air quality and climate for different time periods and emission amounts. We include both the direct aerosol effect and indirect aerosol effects for liquid-phase clouds. Future changes for the 2030 A1B scenario are examined, focusing on the Arctic and Asia, since changes are pronounced in these regions. Our results for the different time periods include both emission changes and physical climate changes. We find that the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a large impact on photochemical processing, decreasing ozone amount and ozone forcing, especially for the future (2030-1995). Ozone forcings increase from 0 to 0.12 Wm{sup -2} and the total aerosol forcing increases from -0.10 Wm{sup -2} to -0.94 Wm{sup -2} (AIE increases from -0.13 to -0.68 Wm{sup -2}) for 1995-1980 versus 2030-1995. Over the Arctic we find that compared to ozone and the direct aerosol effect, the AIE contributes the most to net radiative flux changes. The AIE, calculated for 1995-1980, is positive (1.0 Wm{sup -2}), but the magnitude decreases (-0.3Wm{sup -2}) considerably for the future scenario. Over Asia, we evaluate the role of biofuel and transportation-based emissions (for BC and OM) via a scenario (2030A) that includes a projected increase (factor of two) in biofuel and transport-based emissions for 2030 A1B over Asia. Projected changes from present-day due to the 2030A emissions versus 2030 A1B are a factor of 4 decrease in summertime precipitation in Asia. Our results are sensitive to emissions used. Uncertainty in present-day emissions suggest that future climate projections warrant particular scrutiny.

Menon, Surabi; Menon, Surabi; Unger, Nadine; Koch, Dorothy; Francis, Jennifer; Garrett, Tim; Sednev, Igor; Shindell, Drew; Streets, David

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Description and Evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modal aerosol module (MAM) has been developed for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1). MAM is capable of simulating the aerosol size distribution and both internal and external mixing between aerosol components, treating numerous complicated aerosol processes and aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties in a physically based manner. Two MAM versions were developed: a more complete version with seven-lognormal modes (MAM7), and a three-lognormal mode version (MAM3) for the purpose of long-term (decades to centuries) simulations. Major approximations in MAM3 include assuming immediate mixing of primary organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC) with other aerosol components, merging of the MAM7 fine dust and fine sea salt modes into the accumulation mode, merging of the MAM7 coarse dust and coarse sea salt modes into the single coarse mode, and neglecting the explicit treatment of ammonia and ammonium cycles. Simulated sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentrations are remarkably similar between MAM3 and MAM7 as most ({approx}90%) of these aerosol species are in the accumulation mode. Differences of POM and BC concentrations between MAM3 and MAM7 are also small (mostly within 10%) because of the assumed hygroscopic nature of POM, so that freshly emitted POM and BC are wet-removed before mixing internally with soluble aerosol species. Sensitivity tests with the POM assumed to be hydrophobic and with slower aging process increase the POM and BC concentrations, especially at high latitudes (by several times). The mineral dust global burden differs by 10% and sea salt burden by 30-40% between MAM3 and MAM7 mainly due to the different size ranges for dust and sea salt modes and different standard deviations of log-normal size distribution for sea salt modes between MAM3 and MAM7. The model is able to qualitatively capture the observed geographical and temporal variations of aerosol mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and aerosol optical properties. However, there are noticeable biases, e.g., simulated sulfate and mineral dust concentrations at surface over the oceans are too low. Simulated BC concentrations are significant low in the Arctic. There is a low bias in modeled aerosol optical depth on the global scale, especially in the developing counties. There biases in aerosol simulations clearly indicate the need for improvements of aerosol processes (e.g., emission fluxes of anthropogenic aerosols and precursor gases in developing countries, boundary layer nucleation) and properties (e.g., primary aerosol emission size, POM hygroscopicity). In addition the critical role of cloud properties (e.g., liquid water content, cloud fraction) responsible for the wet scavenging of aerosol is highlighted.

Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Shi, Xiangjun; Lamarque, J.-F.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Vitt, Francis; Conley, Andrew; Park, S.; Neale, Richard; Hannay, Cecile; Ekman, A. M.; Hess, Peter; Mahowald, N.; Collins, William D.; Iacono, Michael J.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Flanner, M. G.; Mitchell, David

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

The importance of aerosol mixing state and size-resolved composition on CCN concentration and the variation of the importance with atmospheric aging of aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN concentrations were measured at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City during Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) in March 2006. The aerosol size distribution and composition often showed strong diurnal variation associated with traffic emissions and aging of aerosols through coagulation and local photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. CCN concentrations (N{sub CCN}) are derived using Kohler theory from the measured aerosol size distribution and various simplified aerosol mixing state and chemical composition, and are compared to concurrent measurements at five supersaturations ranging from 0.11% to 0.35%. The influence of assumed mixing state on calculated N{sub CCN} is examined using both aerosols observed during MILAGRO and representative aerosol types. The results indicate that while ambient aerosols often consist of particles with a wide range of compositions at a given size, N{sub CCN} may be derived within {approx}20% assuming an internal mixture (i.e., particles at a given size are mixtures of all participating species, and have the identical composition) if great majority of particles has an overall {kappa} (hygroscopicity parameter) value greater than 0.1. For a non-hygroscopic particle with a diameter of 100 nm, a 3 nm coating of sulfate or nitrate is sufficient to increase its {kappa} from 0 to 0.1. The measurements during MILAGRO suggest that the mixing of non-hygroscopic primary organic aerosol (POA) and black carbon (BC) particles with photochemically produced hygroscopic species and thereby the increase of their {kappa} to 0.1 take place in a few hours during daytime. This rapid process suggests that during daytime, a few tens of kilometers away for POA and BC sources, N{sub CCN} may be derived with sufficient accuracy by assuming an internal mixture, and using bulk chemical composition. The rapid mixing also indicates that, at least for very active photochemical environments such as Mexico City, a substantially shorter timescale during daytime for the conversion of hydrophobic POA and BC to hydrophilic particles than the 1-2 days used in some global models. The conversion time scale is substantially longer during night. Most POA and BC particles emitted during evening hours likely remain non-hygroscopic until efficiently internally mixed with secondary species in the next morning. The results also suggest that the assumed mixing state strongly impacts calculated N{sub CCN} only when POA and BC represent a large fraction of the total aerosol volume. One of the implications is that while physically unrealistic, external mixtures, which are used in many global models, may also sufficiently predict N{sub CCN} for aged aerosol, as the contribution of non-hygroscopic POA and BC to overall aerosol volume is often substantially reduced due to the condensation of secondary species.

Wang, J.; Cubison, M. J.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Collins, D. R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization  

SciTech Connect

Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68ș latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identified strategic process-science foci: aerosol nucleation and growth and aerosol aging and mixing state. BNL is the lead laboratory responsible for the design and...

168

Aerosol Can Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aerosol Can Failure ... Abstract Scope, A three-piece, welded seam aerosol can of liquid undercoating material failed catastrophically, ...

169

Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign  

SciTech Connect

A comparison between observed aerosol optical properties from the MILAGRO field campaign, which took place in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during March 2006, and values simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) model, reveals large differences. To help identify the source of the discrepancies, data from the MILAGRO campaign are used to evaluate the "aerosol chemical to aerosol optical properties" module implemented in the full chemistry version of the WRF-Chem model. The evaluation uses measurements of aerosol size distributions and chemical properties obtained at the MILAGRO T1 site. These observations are fed to the module, which makes predictions of various aerosol optical properties, including the scattering coefficient, Bscat; the absorption coefficient, Babs; and the single-scattering albedo, v0; all as a function of time. This simulation is compared with independent measurements obtained from a photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) at a wavelength of 870 nm. Because of line losses and other factors, only "fine mode" aerosols with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 mm are considered here. Over a 10-day period, the simulations of hour-by-hour variations of Bscat are not satisfactory, but simulations of Babs and v0 are considerably better. When averaged over the 10-day period, the computed and observed optical properties agree within the uncertainty limits of the measurements and simulations. Specifically, the observed and calculated values are, respectively: (1) Bscat, 34.1 ± 5.1 Mm-1 versus 30.4 ± 4.3 Mm-1; (2) Babs, 9.7 ± 1.0 Mm-1 versus 11.7 ± 1.5 Mm-1; and (3) v0, 0.78 ± 0.04 and 0.74 ± 0.03. The discrepancies in values of v0 simulated by the full WRF-Chem model thus cannot be attributed to the "aerosol chemistry to optics" module. The discrepancy is more likely due, in part, to poor characterization of emissions near the T1 site, particularly black carbon emissions.

Barnard, James C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe L.; Arnott, W. P.; Laskin, Alexander

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

170

Spatial and temporal variations of aerosols around Beijing in summer 2006: 2. Local and column aerosol optical properties  

SciTech Connect

Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-chem model calculations were conducted to study aerosol optical properties around Beijing, China, during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006 (CAREBeijing-2006) period. In this paper, we interpret aerosol optical properties in terms of aerosol mass concentrations and their chemical compositions by linking model calculations with measurements. In general, model calculations reproduced observed features of spatial and temporal variations of various surface and column aerosol optical parameters in and around Beijing. Spatial and temporal variations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and extinction coefficient corresponded well to those of elemental carbon (primary aerosol), sulfate (secondary aerosol), and the total aerosol mass concentration, respectively. These results show that spatial and temporal variations of the absorption coefficient are controlled by local emissions (within 100 km around Beijing during the preceding 24 h), while those of the scattering coefficient are controlled by regional-scale emissions (within 500 km around Beijing during the preceding 3 days) under synoptic-scale meteorological conditions, as discussed in our previous study of aerosol mass concentration. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction revealed that the contribution of secondary aerosols and their water uptake increased with altitude within the planetary boundary layer, leading to a considerable increase in column aerosol optical depth (AOD) around Beijing. These effects are the main factors causing differences in regional and temporal variations between particulate matter (PM) mass concentration at the surface and column AOD over a wide region in the northern part of the Great North China Plain.

Matsui, Hitoshi; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Fast, Jerome D.; Poschl, U.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Wiedensohler, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Zhu, T.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Historical (1850-2000) gridded anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of reactive gases and aerosols:methodology and application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present and discuss a new dataset of gridded emissions covering the historical period (1850-2000) in decadal increments at a horizontal resolution of 0.5° in latitude and longitude. The primary purpose of this inventory is to provide consistent gridded emissions of reactive gases and aerosols for use in chemistry model simulations needed by climate models for the Climate Model Intercomparison Program #5 (CMIP5) in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment report. Our best estimate for the year 2000 inventory represents a combination of existing regional and global inventories to capture the best information available at this point; 40 regions and 12 sectors were used to combine the various sources. The historical reconstruction of each emitted compound, for each region and sector, was then forced to agree with our 2000 estimate, ensuring continuity between past and 2000 emissions. Application of these emissions into two chemistry-climate models is used to test their ability to capture long-term changes in atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide and aerosols distributions. The simulated long-term change in the Northern mid-latitudes surface and mid-troposphere ozone is not quite as rapid as observed. However, stations outside this latitude band show much better agreement in both present-day and long-term trend. The model simulations consistently underestimate the carbon monoxide trend, while capturing the long-term trend at the Mace Head station. The simulated sulfate and black carbon deposition over Greenland is in very good agreement with the ice-core observations spanning the simulation period. Finally, aerosol optical depth and additional aerosol diagnostics are shown to be in good agreement with previously published estimates.

Lamarque, J. F.; Bond, Tami C.; Eyring, Veronika; Granier, Claire; Heil, Angelika; Klimont, Z.; Lee, David S.; Liousse, Catherine; Mieville, Aude; Owen, Bethan; Schultz, Martin; Shindell, Drew; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; van Aardenne, John; Cooper, Owen; Kainuma, M.; Mahowald, Natalie; McConnell, J.R.; Naik, Vaishali; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

172

Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.Z. (2002). Control of fossil-fuel particulate black carboncarbon aerosols from fossil fuel combustion. J. Geophys.Climate response of fossil fuel and biofuel soot, accounting

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

Richards, Powell (New Bern, NC); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Prach, Thomas F. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Beryllium-7 labeled carbon particles made from the proton irradiation of carbon materials, preferably from dry carbon black are disclosed. Such particles are useful as gamma emitting radiotracers.

Richards, P.; Mausner, L.F.; Prach, T.F.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

176

A 700 year sediment record of black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near the EMEP air monitoring station in Aspvreten, Sweden  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of poor constraints on historical combustion emissions, past environmental loadings of black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) were reconstructed from dated lake sediment cores collected 70 km south of Stockholm, Sweden. Compared to several dramatic variations over the recent 150 years, the preindustrial loadings were steady within {+-}50% through the entire medieval with BC fluxes of 0.071 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} and PAH fluxes of 6 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. In the wood-burning dominated century leading up to the industrial revolution around 1850, increasing BC fluxes were leading PAH fluxes. BC fluxes reached their millennial-scale maximum around 1920, whereas PAH fluxes increased exponentially to its record maximum around 1960, 50-fold above preindustrial values. For 1920-1950, BC fluxes consistently decreased as PAH fluxes kept increasing. Coal and coke represented >50% of the Swedish energy market in the 1930s. Combined with sharply decreasing (1,7-)/(1,7{+-}2,6-dimethylphenanthrene), indicative of diminishing wood combustion, and decreasing methylphenanthrenes/phenanthrene, indicative of higher-temperature combustion (coal instead of wood), the sediment archive suggests that the relative BC/PAH emission factors thus are lower for coal than for wood combustion. For the first time, both BC and PAH fluxes decreased after 1960. This trend break is a testament to the positive effects of decreasing reliance on petroleum fuels and a number of legislative actions aimed at curbing emissions and by 1990, the loading of BC was back at preindustrial levels, whereas that of PAH were the lowest since the 1910s. However, for the most recent period (1990-2004) the BC and PAH fluxes are no longer decreasing. 55 refs., 3 figs.

Marie Elmquist; Zdenek Zencak; Oerjan Gustafsson [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Role of Circulation Features on Black Carbon Transport into the Arctic in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5)  

SciTech Connect

Current climate models generally under-predict the surface concentration of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic due to the uncertainties associated with emissions, transport, and removal. This bias is also present in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5.1 (CAM5). In this study, we investigate the uncertainty of Arctic BC due to transport processes simulated by CAM5 by configuring the model to run in an “offline mode” in which the large-scale circulations are prescribed. We compare the simulated BC transport when the offline model is driven by the meteorology predicted by the standard free-running CAM5 with simulations where the meteorology is constrained to agree with reanalysis products. Some circulation biases are apparent: the free-running CAM5 produces about 50% less transient eddy transport of BC than the reanalysis-driven simulations, which may be attributed to the coarse model resolution insufficient to represent eddies. Our analysis shows that the free-running CAM5 reasonably captures the essence of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), but some discernable differences in the spatial pattern of the AO between the free-running CAM5 and the reanalysis-driven simulations result in significantly different AO modulation of BC transport over Northeast Asia and Eastern Europe. Nevertheless, we find that the overall climatological circulation patterns simulated by the free-running CAM5 generally resembles those from the reanalysis products, and BC transport is very similar in both simulation sets. Therefore, the simulated circulation features regulating the long-range BC transport is unlikely the most important cause of the large under-prediction of surface BC concentration in the Arctic.

Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Easter, Richard C.; Tilmes, S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Liu, Xiaohong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

179

On Surface Temperature, Greenhouse Gases, and Aerosols: Models and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight ...

J. F. B. Mitchell; R. A. Davis; W. J. Ingram; C. A. Senior

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Black Mountain Insulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation Insulation Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Mountain Insulation Place United Kingdom Sector Carbon Product UK-based manufacturer of sheeps wool insulation which has a low carbon footprint than traditional glassfiber insulation. Website http://www.blackmountaininsula References Black Mountain Insulation Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Black Mountain Insulation is a company located in United Kingdom. It was formerly known as Ochre Natural Insulation Company. [2] References ↑ "Black Mountain Insulation Website" ↑ http://www.companiesintheuk.co.uk/ltd/black-mountain-insulation Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Black_Mountain_Insulation&oldid=391648

182

Black Genetics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Genetics Name: Andrea Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why does the child of a blonde haired woman and a dark haired man usually have dark hair. Also, why does...

183

Steve Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise...

184

Black mothers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study is about how a group of professional, middle-aged Black1 women, between the ages of 50 and 55, define motherhood. It explores their self-definitions… (more)

Jenkins, Nina Lyon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cobalt-polypyrrole-carbon black (Co-PPY-CB) Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in Fuel Cells: Composition and Kinetic Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrocatalysts consisting of polypyrrole (PPY) and Co deposited on carbon black (CB) at several compositions were prepared and tested for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in a HClO4 buffer (pH = 1) using a rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE). It was determined that the most favorable catalyst composition (prior to calcination) had a CB:PPY weight ratio of 2 and a pyrrole:Co (i.e., PY:Co) molar ratio of 4. This catalyst had an onset potential of 0.785 V (vs. RHE) and a mass activity of ca. 1 A/g{sub cata} at the fuel cell relevant voltage of 0.65 V. Furthermore, it was found that the number of electrons exchanged during the ORR with the catalyst was ca. 3.5 and resulted in 28% yield of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 0.65 V, which hints to an indirect 4e{sup -} reduction of O{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an intermdiate. From energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, it is proposed that a PY:Co ratio of 4 favors the formation, prior to calcination, in the catalyst precursor of Co-N complexes in which Co is coordinated to 3 or 4 N atoms, resulting in strong Co-N interactions that limit the formation upon calcination of low ORR activity Co nanoparticles. These Co-N complexes give rise upon calcination to CoN{sub x-2} sites in which the coordination of Co could favor the adsorption on them of O{sub 2}, which would make those sites particularly active and selective. At the same mass acitivity of 1 A/g{sub cata}, the voltage yielded by the catalyst was 200 mV lower than that for a state-of-the-art Pt (10 wt.%) catalyst, whoch H{sub 2}O{sub 2} output at 0.85 V was 39% and involves the exchange of 3.2 e{sup -}, overall making our material an attractive substitute to noble metal ORR electrocatalysts.

D Nguyen-Thanh; A Frenkel; J Wang; S OBrien; D Akins

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosols using Semi-Continuous Thermal-Optical Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols are major components in air pollution as a result of energy consumption, thus measurement of them is important to waste management. Increasing interest has been drawn to the identification, measurement, analysis, and modeling of carbon aerosols in the past decade. This book chapter will provide a review of current state-of-art techniques to determine carbonaceous aerosols in relation to air pollution and waste management. The chapter will be composed of four parts. The introduction will discuss why carbon aerosols including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and total carbon (TC=EC+OC) are important to energy consumption, air pollution, waste management, and global climate change. Key definitions will be introduced. Relevant terminologies will be provided. The second part will be a review of the current state-of the art measurement techniques that are used to determine carbon aerosols. Both on-line and off-line methods will be described. Comparisons of different techniques that provide the same physical quantity will be provided based on recent literature findings. Differences among the physical parameters determined by various techniques will be discussed. The third part will focus on data analysis and products obtained from carbon aerosol measurements. In addition to EC, OC, and TC, primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) are of interest to researchers to understand the source and sink of carbonaceous aerosols. Techniques used to determine POC and SOC, such as the EC tracer method and positive matrix factorization, will be described and their differences discussed. Examples will be provided showing field data comparison between the Sunset organic carbon and elemental carbon field analyzer and the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, both of which are widely used for on-line aerosol measurements. The last part will report new trends and summarize future research needs in carbon aerosol measurement. Emerging problems will be identified and research priorities will be recommended.

Yu, Xiao-Ying

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

Prescott, Donald S. (Shelley, ID); Schober, Robert K. (Midwest City, OK); Beller, John (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ARM - Black Forest News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GermanyBlack Forest News Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update,...

189

Black ring deconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rotating black holes from 5d black rings,” hep-th/0504125. [fuzzball proposal for black holes: An elementary review,”The quantum structure of black holes,” hep-th/0510180. [5

Gimon, Eric G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Combustion properties of Kraft Black Liquors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a previous study of the phenomena involved in the combustion of black liquor droplets a numerical model was developed. The model required certain black liquor specific combustion information which was then not currently available, and additional data were needed for evaluating the model. The overall objectives of the project reported here was to provide experimental data on key aspects of black liquor combustion, to interpret the data, and to put it into a form which would be useful for computational models for recovery boilers. The specific topics to be investigated were the volatiles and char carbon yields from pyrolysis of single black liquor droplets; a criterion for the onset of devolatilization and the accompanying rapid swelling; and the surface temperature of black liquor droplets during pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification. Additional information on the swelling characteristics of black liquor droplets was also obtained as part of the experiments conducted.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Hupa, M. (Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

absorption absorption ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol absorption The process in which radiation energy is retained by aerosols. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) PSAP : Particle Soot Absorption Photometer PASS : Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer External Instruments OMI : Ozone Monitoring Instrument

192

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

193

Aerosols and solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief description is presented of the involvement of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in atmospheric research, including aerosol characterization and modeling. The use of both rigorous and simple models for radiation transport is described. Modeled broadband solar irradiance data are shown to illustrate the important influence that aerosols have on the energy available to solar systems and the economics of solar systems design. Standard aerosol measurement methods for solar applications are discussed along with the need for improved instrumentation and methods.

Bird, R. E.; Hulstrom, R. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Satellite-Based Modeling of the Carbon Fluxes in Mature Black Spruce Forests in Alaska: A Synthesis of the Eddy Covariance Data and Satellite Remote Sensing Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaling up of observed point data to estimate regional carbon fluxes is an important issue in the context of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. In this study, the authors proposed a new model to scale up the eddy covariance data to estimate ...

Masahito Ueyama; Yoshinobu Harazono; Kazuhito Ichii

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Research Report Black 1 White 5 Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Black 1 White 5 Black Hypodescent in Reflexive Categorization of Racially Ambiguous--Historically, the principle of hypodescent specified that individuals with one Black and one White parent should be considered Black. Two experiments ex- amined whether categorizations of racially ambiguous targets reflect

Reber, Paul J.

196

Impact of new particle formation on the concentrations of aerosol number and cloud condensation nuclei around Beijing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New particle formation (NPF) is one of the most important processes in controlling the concentrations of aerosol number (condensation nuclei, CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. In this study, we introduced a new aerosol model representation with 20 size bins between 1 nm and 10 {mu}m and activation-type and kinetic nucleation parameterizations into the WRF-chem model (called NPF-explicit WRF-chem). Model calculations were conducted in the Beijing region in China for the periods during the CARE-Beijing 2006 campaign conducted in August and September 2006. Model calculations successfully reproduced the timing of NPF and no-NPF days in the measurements (21 of 26 days). Model calculations also reproduced the subsequent rapid growth of new particles with a time scale of half a day. These results suggest that once a reasonable nucleation rate at a diameter of 1 nm is given, explicit calculations of condensation and coagulation processes can reproduce the clear contrast between NPF and no-NPF days as well as further growth up to several tens nanometers. With this reasonable representation of the NPF process, we show that NPF contributed 20-30% of CN concentrations (> 10 nm in diameter) in and around Beijing on average. We also show that NPF increases CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (S > 0.2%), while it decreases them at lower supersaturations (S aerosol emissions, such as black carbon (BC), would not necessarily decrease CCN concentrations because of an increase in NPF. Sensitivity calculations also suggest that the reduction ratio of primary aerosol and SO2 emissions will be key in enhancing or damping the BC mitigation effect.

Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Wiedensohler, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

197

Computational simulation of aerosol behaviour.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, computational methods have been developed for the simulation of aerosol dynamics and transport. Two different coupled aerosol-computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are… (more)

Pyykönen, Jouni

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo YOUR PAYCHECKPAYROLL TAXES AND EMPLOYMENT LAW BY SPONSORED BY #12;BlackLining Demo e BlackLining Demo e BlackLining Demo e AMERICAN PAYROLL ASSOCIATION i Design by PRIWORKS.com. Images from Thinkstock.com. #12;BlackLining Demo BlackLining Demo Black

Harms, Kyle E.

199

Black Holes in Higher Dimensions (Black Strings and Black Rings)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main focus of this session was the presentation of new higher-dimensional black hole solutions, including black rings, black strings, and multi black holes, and the study of their properties. Besides new asymptotically flat and locally asymptotically flat black objects also new black holes with anti-de Sitter asymptotics were reported. The studies of their properties included the investigation of their stability, their thermodynamics, their analyticity and their existence. Furthermore, the geodesics in such higher-dimensional space-times were investigated.

Kunz, Jutta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Composite Silicon Carbon Nano-fiber Anode for High Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Composite Silicon Carbon Nano-fiber Anode for High .... of Super P Carbon Black and Silicon Carbide in Si-based Lithium Ion Batteries.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Chemical and Physical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols (a) A Case Study in the Unique Properties of Agricultural Aerosols (b) The Role of Chemical Composition in Ice Nucleation during the Arctic Spring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the analysis of atmospheric particles sampled from two different field campaigns: the field study at a cattle feeding facility in the summer from 2005 to 2008 and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in 2008. A ground site field study at a representative large cattle feeding facility in the Texas Panhandle was conducted to characterize the particle size distributions, hygroscopicity, and chemical composition of agricultural aerosols. Here, a first comprehensive dataset is reported for these physical and chemical properties of agricultural aerosols appropriate for use in a site-specific emission inventory. The emission rate and transport of the aerosols are also discussed. In addition, mixing ratios of total and gaseous ammonia were measured at the same field in 2007 and 2008. Measurements such as these provide a means to determine whether the fugitive dust emitted from a typical large feedlot represents a health concern for employees of the feeding operation and the nearby community. Detailed chemical composition of aircraft-sampled particles collected during ISDAC was studied. Filter samples were collected under a variety of conditions in and out of mixed phase and ice clouds in the Arctic. Specifically, particles were sampled from a mixed-phase cloud during a period of observed high concentrations of ice nuclei (IN), a biomass plume, and under relatively clean ambient conditions. Composition of particles was studied on a particle-by-particle basis using several microspectroscopy techniques. Based on the elemental composition analysis, more magnesium was found in Arctic cloud residues relative to ambient air. Likewise, based on the carbon speciation analysis, high IN samples contained coated inorganics, carbonate, and black or brown carbon particles. In the samples collected during a flight through a biomass burning plume, water-soluble organic carbon was the dominant overall composition. Due to their hygroscopic nature, these organics may preferably act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) rather than IN. Other ambient samples contained relatively higher fractions of organic and inorganic mixtures and less purely water-soluble organics than found in the biomass particles. The most likely source of inorganics would be sea salt. When present, sea salt may further enhance ice nucleation.

Moon, Seong-Gi

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Ganges valley aerosol experiment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Black holes 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black holes 1. Introduction What is a black hole? Roughly it can be described as a region that nothing can escape from it. Light falling into a black hole cannot escape from it. It is called `black' because it does not reflect anything. Since nothing can escape from it, it means that a black hole

Glass, Ian S.

205

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Aerosol Life Cycle IOP The primary objectives that make up the Aerosol Life Cycle IOP can be broken down into three categories: Scientific; Logistical; and GVAX preparation. Scientific Objectives The science goals are to conduct intensive aerosol observations in a region exposed to anthropogenic, biogenic, and marine emissions with atmospheric processing times depending on air mass trajectories and time of day. Take advantage of new instruments in the MAOS (e.g., SP2, HR-PTRMS, ACSM, Trace Gas Suite, PASS-3, Aethelometer, UHSAS). Within this broad umbrella are embedded three main foci: Aerosol light absorption: How does the aerosol mass absorption coefficient (absorption per unit mass of BC) vary with atmospheric processing? Do observations agree with a shell-core model?

206

On the Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding OrganicAerosol Particles  

SciTech Connect

This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass (OM) concentration has been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC) factor, usually 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This large uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health. New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) averaged 1.13. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6 {+-} 0.2 for urban and 2.1 {+-} 0.2 for non-urban areas). This analysis suggests that, when aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1 g per 100 g water.

Pang, Y.; Turpin, B.J.; Gundel, L.A.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

Dr. Timothy Onasch

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

Black hole masking and black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masking of black holes means that, for given total mass and Hawking temperatures, these data may correspond to either "pure" black hole or a black hole of a lesser mass surrounded by a massive shell. It is shown that there is one-to one correspondence between this phenomenon and thermodynamics of a black hole in a finite size cavity: masking of black holes is possible if and only if there exists at least one locally unstable black hole solution in the corresponding canonical ensemble.

Zaslavskii, Oleg B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles  

SciTech Connect

A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Rob Newsom; John Goldsmith

211

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

212

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P.M. Forster (2004), The semi-direct aerosol effect: Impactof absorbing aerosols on marine stratocumulus. Q. J .2005), Global anthropogenic aerosol direct forcing derived

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Carbonaceous Aerosol Study Using Advanced Particle Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and atmospheric organic aerosol formation. Envir. Sci.of secondary organic aerosol mass fraction, Atmos. Chem.composition of ambient aerosol particles. Environ. Sci.

Qi, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] This study simulates the direct radiative forcing of organic aerosol using the GFDL AM2 GCM. The aerosol climatology is provided by the MOZART chemical transport model (CTM). The approach to calculating aerosol optical properties explicitly considers relative humidity–dependent hygroscopic growth by employing a functional group– based thermodynamic model, and makes use of the size distribution derived from AERONET measurements. The preindustrial (PI) and present-day (PD) global burdens of organic carbon are 0.17 and 1.36 Tg OC, respectively. The annual global mean total-sky and clear-sky top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) forcings (PI to PD) are estimated as 0.34 and 0.71 W m 2, respectively. Geographically the radiative cooling largely lies over the source regions, namely part of South America, Central Africa, Europe and South and East Asia. The annual global mean total-sky and clear-sky surface forcings are 0.63 and 0.98 W m 2, respectively. A series of sensitivity analyses shows that the treatments of hygroscopic growth and optical properties of organic aerosol are intertwined in the determination of the global organic aerosol forcing. For example, complete deprivation of water uptake by hydrophilic organic particles reduces the standard (total-sky) and clearsky TOA forcing estimates by 18 % and 20%, respectively, while the uptake by a highly soluble organic compound (malonic acid) enhances them by 18 % and 32%, respectively. Treating particles as non-absorbing enhances aerosol reflection and increases the total-sky and clear-sky TOA forcing by 47 % and 18%, respectively, while neglecting the scattering brought about by the water associated with particles reduces them by 24% and 7%, respectively.

Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy; Paul A. Ginoux; Larry H. Horowitz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

(Black)Largemouth Bass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

negra, black bass, huro y otros Netherlands: Florellenbaars Poland: weilkogebowy, bas weilkohebowy Portugal: Black bass, perca americana, perca trucha, boca grande, robal...

218

Rapid Solar-thermal Dissociation of Natural Gas in an Aerosol Flow Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as compared to conventional steam-methane reforming and furnace black processing. Introduction by the furnace black process. For steam reforming, steam is reacted with methane over a reforming catalyst. Currently, hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas and carbon black is produced

219

Classification of Multiple Types of Organic Carbon Composition in Atmospheric Particles by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning transmission X-ray microscope at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is used to measure organic functional group abundance and morphology of atmospheric aerosols. We present a summary of spectra, sizes, and shapes observed in 595 particles that were collected and analyzed between 2000 and 2006. These particles ranged between 0.1 and 12 mm and represent aerosols found in a large range of geographical areas, altitudes, and times. They include samples from seven different field campaigns: PELTI, ACE-ASIA, DYCOMS II, Princeton, MILAGRO (urban), MILAGRO (C-130), and INTEX-B. At least 14 different classes of organic particles show different types of spectroscopic signatures. Different particle types are found within the same region while the same particle types are also found in different geographical domains. Particles chemically resembling black carbon, humic-like aerosols, pine ultisol, and secondary or processed aerosol have been identified from functional group abundance and comparison of spectra with those published in the literature.

Kilcoyne, Arthur L; Takahama, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Russell, L.M.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle size particle size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of an aerosol particle. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer CPI : Cloud Particle Imager DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments DRUM-AEROSOL : Drum Aerosol Sampler AEROSOL-TOWER-EML : EML Tower based Aerosol Measurements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Monodisperse aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

Ortiz, L.W.; Soderholm, S.C.

1988-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

RACORO aerosol data processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

Elisabeth Andrews

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

color: DIVPOP; black: low;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

color: DIVPOP; black: low; red: middle; green: high. Vesicle dynamcis · Maturation rate comparison black: low DIVPOP red: middle DIVPOP green: high DIVPOP · Quality of vesicles black: low death rate red: master; red: mutants; black: vesicle boundary. Neutral model Step division model Conclusions (1

Utrecht, Universiteit

224

Concentric Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional minimal supergravity that describe concentric black rings with an optional black hole at the common centre. Configurations of two black rings are found which have the same conserved charges as a single rotating black hole; these black rings can have a total horizon area less than, equal to, or greater than the black hole with the same charges. A numerical investigation of these particular black ring solutions suggests that they do not have closed timelike curves.

Jerome P. Gauntlett; Jan B. Gutowski

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Wavelength Dependence of Aerosol Extinction Coefficient for Stratospheric Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple empirical formula for the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinction coefficient is proposed. The relationship between the constants in the formula and the variable parameter in the aerosol size distribution is explicitly expressed. ...

Glenn K. Yue

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar...

227

TheTheTheThe MysteryMysteryMysteryMystery ofofofof the Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TheTheTheThe MysteryMysteryMysteryMystery ofofofof the Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lakethe Black Lake Manuel AlfonsecaManuel AlfonsecaManuel AlfonsecaManuel Alfonseca #12;Manuel Alfonseca 2 #12;The Mystery of the Black Lake 3 The Mystery of the Black LakeThe Mystery of the Black LakeThe Mystery

Alfonseca, Manuel

228

Aerosol–CCN Closure at a Semi-rural Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

aerosol size distributions and size-resolved aerosol compositions measured by ... Keywords Cloud condensation nuclei, closure study, organic aerosols, Köhler.

229

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Brane World Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five dimensional neutral rotating black rings are described from a Randall-Sundrum brane world perspective in the bulk black string framework. To this end we consider a rotating black string extension of a five dimensional black ring into the bulk of a six dimensional Randall-Sundrum brane world with a single four brane. The bulk solution intercepts the four brane in a five dimensional black ring with the usual curvature singularity on the brane. The bulk geodesics restricted to the plane of rotation of the black ring are constructed and their projections on the four brane match with the usual black ring geodesics restricted to the same plane. The asymptotic nature of the bulk geodesics are elucidated with reference to a bulk singularity at the AdS horizon. We further discuss the description of a brane world black ring as a limit of a boosted bulk black 2 brane with periodic identification.

Anurag Sahay; Gautam Sengupta

2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Ruedy, Matrix (multiconfiguration aerosol tracker ofmixing state): An aerosol microphysical module for globalAn investigative review, Aerosol Sci. Technol. , Vol. 40,

Bauer, Susanne E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Black Hole Horizons and Black Hole Thermodynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work investigates how black holes can be described in terms of different definitions of horizons. Global definitions in terms of event horizons and Killing… (more)

Nielsen, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Black String Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an exact description of the steady flow of a black string into a planar horizon. The event horizon is out of equilibrium and provides a simple, exact instance of a `flowing black funnel' in any dimension D>=5. It is also an approximation to a smooth intersection between a black string and a black hole, in the limit in which the black hole is much larger than the black string thickness. The construction extends easily to more general flows, in particular charged flows.

Emparan, Roberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences laminated, Cenoma- nian­Santonian black shale sequences contain between 2% and 15% organic carbon about the depositional conditions leading to the black shale accumulations. The low d13 Corg values

Gilli, Adrian

235

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA); Clark, Mark L. (Kennewick, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

237

Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

239

Jankovic Aerosol Characterization.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization, Characterization, Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data NSRC Symposium NSRC Symposium July 8, 2008 John Jankovic, CIH CIH Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data Department of Energy (DOE) Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC) developing Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H - The CNMS Approach * Establish Exposure Control Guideline (ECG) - Characterize Aerosol * Collect and interpret data * Assign Process to a Control Band Aerosol Particle Characterization * Size distribution (geometric mean and geometric standard deviation related to either mass, surface, or number)

240

Black and White Sight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black and White Sight Name: Andy Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do some animals see in black and White? Replies: In the animal kingdom, sight is accomplished by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ACCRETORBLACK DONOR BLACK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIELD NO FIELD FIELD NO FIELD FIELD NO FIELD FIELD NO FIELD FIELD DONOR BLACK STREAM HOLE WIND NEUTRON

242

Quantum Harmonic Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by the recent conjecture that black holes are condensates (of gravitons), we investigate a simple model for the black hole degrees of freedom that is consistent both from the point of view of Quantum mechanics and of General Relativity. Since the two perspectives should converge for small, Planck size, black holes, we expect our construction is useful for understanding the physics of microscopic, quantum black holes.

Casadio, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Black holes without firewalls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The postulates of black hole complementarity do not imply a firewall for infalling observers at a black hole horizon. The dynamics of the stretched horizon, that scrambles and re-emits information, determines whether infalling observers experience anything out of the ordinary when entering a large black hole. In particular, there is no firewall if the stretched horizon degrees of freedom retain information for a time of order the black hole scrambling time.

Larjo, Klaus; Thorlacius, Larus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Publications Salmonid Broodstock, Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publications Salmonid Broodstock, Black Cod, and Successful Fishing Piers "Salmon Broodstock Avenue. N.E.. Seattle, WA 98105. "Black Cod, Boom or Bust?", also published by Washington Sea Grant- page paper- bound booklet addresses the location and status of black cod stocks. harvest methods

245

Nonstationary artificial black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the existence of artificial non-stationary spherically symmetric black holes. We give examples of the appearance of black holes and of disappearance of white holes. We also discuss the relation between the apparent and the event horizons for the case of artificial black holes.

Eskin, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Melissa M. Lunden 1 ∗ , Thomas W. Kirchstetter 1 , Tracy L. Thatcher 2 , Susanne V. Hering 3 , and Nancy J. Brown 1 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA 2 Aerosol Dynamics Inc., 2329 4th Street, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA Abstract A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a

247

Phantom Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exact solutions of electrically charged phantom black holes with the cosmological constant are constructed. They are labelled by the mass, the electrical charge, the cosmological constant and the coupling constant between the phantom and the Maxwell field. It is found that the phantom has important consequences on the properties of black holes. In particular, the extremal charged phantom black holes can never be achieved and so the third law of thermodynamics for black holes still holds. The cosmological aspects of the phantom black hole and phantom field are also briefly discussed.

C. J. Gao; S. N. Zhang

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, However, understanding the net effect of multi-source emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is

249

RHIC | Black Holes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in the universe. The gravitational field of a black hole is so strong that Einstein's general relativity tells us that nothing, not even light, can escape from the black hole's interior. However, in 1974 physicist Stephen Hawking demonstrated that black holes must emit radiation once the quantum effects are included. According to quantum mechanics, the physical vacuum is bubbling with short-lived virtual particle-antiparticle pairs. Creation of a particle-antiparticle pair from the vacuum conflicts with energy conservation, but energy need not be conserved at short times in quantum mechanics, according to Heisenberg's

250

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

251

THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of aerosols." in Nature. Aim. and MethodsLAWRENCE THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY T. NovakovTHE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY* T. Novakov Lawrence

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Flagan, R.C. (1990) Aerosol Sci. and Technol. 13 , 230.and Seinfeld, J.H. (2002) Aerosol Science and Technology ,light absorption by atmospheric aerosol, in preparation for

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paulson, S. E. ; Chung, A. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 2007 , 41,Y. G. ; Daum, P. H. J. Aerosol Sci 2008 , 39, 974-986. (32)Accurate Monitoring of Terrestrial Aerosols and Total Solar

Kim, Hwajin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

255

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

257

Aerosol Metrology for Climate Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the interaction of aerosols with solar radiation ... that will accelerate the development of new ... together experts from government, industry and academia ...

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

"Black Star" or Astrophysical Black Hole? K. Petrovay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Black Star" or Astrophysical Black Hole? K. Petrovay Eötvös University, Department of Astronomy. Recently wide publicity has been given to a claim by T. Vachaspati that "black holes do not exist", that the objects known as black holes in astrophysics should rather be called "black stars" and they not only do

Petrovay, KristĂłf

259

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May...

260

Evolution of Ozone, Particulates, and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Vicinity of Houston Using a Fully Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry-Aerosol Model  

SciTech Connect

A new fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban to regional scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a five day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still under-estimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg; Peckham, S. E.

2006-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thousand Cankers of Black Walnut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thousand Cankers Disease of Black Walnut How to Identify and Prevent the Spread of Thousand Cankers counties. Remember: Only YOU can help prevent the spread of thousand cankers disease! Black Walnuts Facts Native range of black walnut in the United States. Uses of Black Walnut Mature black walnuts grown

262

A Black Hole Levitron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of spatially stabilising four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes kept in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al's multi-center solutions provides a supergravity description of such backgrounds within which a black hole can be trapped in a given volume. This is realised by levitating a black hole over a magnetic dipole base. We comment on how such a construction resembles a mechanical Levitron.

Xerxes D. Arsiwalla; Erik P. Verlinde

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

7, 1426514294, 2007 Black carbon trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the measured BC concentrations most were traffic, wind speed and mixing height. On weekdays, traffic had clearly the most important influence and on weekends the effect of wind speed diluted the effect and power plants. In traffic, especially diesel engines are known to emit BC (e.g. Watson et al., 1994

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State  

SciTech Connect

This measurement characterizes the types of BC emissions that result in near­surface BC­ containing particles in a region that is dominated by biomass and open pit/stove cooking. Specifically, examine three primary BC emission sources: (i) urban setting (e.g., fossil fuel emissions); and (ii) biomass burning. Source (i) are captured at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Biomass emissions (ii) contains a series of 1­2 day measurement excursions to the rural area surrounding Bangalore.

Arthur Sedlacek; Satheesh S; Stephen Springston

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This measurement characterizes the types of BC emissions that result in near­surface BC­ containing particles in a region that is dominated by biomass and open pit/stove cooking. Specifically, examine three primary BC emission sources: (i) urban setting (e.g., fossil fuel emissions); and (ii) biomass burning. Source (i) are captured at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Biomass emissions (ii) contains a series of 1­2 day measurement excursions to the rural area surrounding Bangalore.

Arthur Sedlacek; Satheesh S; Stephen Springston

266

Available Technologies: Improved Carbon Black Additives for ...  

Low cost ; ABSTRACT: ... commonly used as a conducting additive in lithium ion battery composite cathodes, can be highly reactive toward organic ...

267

Organic Aerosol Partition Module Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM-2.5), data and analytical tools are needed to support their implementation. This report documents an EPRI modeling component for efficiently simulating aspects of organic aerosol formation. Without this component, simulations would tend to overestimate the contribution of power plant emissions to atmospheric aerosol mass.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

268

Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Dark core of a low mass star left when  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Black Dwarf Dark core of a low mass star left when a white dwarf cools. Black dwarfs disappear from view. Mass: 0.5 - 1.4 SM StarPower Points: 1 Dark core of a low mass star left when a white dwarf cools. Black dwarfs, like the charcoal briquette pictured in the sky, are made

Bechtold, Jill

269

Spectro-Microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of pollution accumulation event (June 27-29, 2010), when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm diameter) increased with plume age as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic data set with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that individual particles in Mexico City contained twice as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (30%) was larger than at the CARES urban site (10%) and the most aged samples from CARES contained less carbon-carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol precursors. The detailed results provided by these spectro-microscopic measurements will allow for a comprehensive evaluation of aerosol process models used in climate research.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Rodel, Tobias; Kelly, Stephen T.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Carroll, Gregory; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Black Hole Mergers Manuela Campanelli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Hole Mergers Manuela Campanelli Center for Computa6 Department of Physics Duke University Feb 15-17, 2012 #12;Black Holes Antennae galaxies, op6cal, HST · In General Rela6vity (GR), Black Holes (BHs

Wolpert, Robert L

271

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig Abstract We review the theory of stationary black hole solutions of vacuum Einstein equations. Keywords: black holes, event horizons, Schwarzschild metric, Kerr metric, no-hair theorems 1

ChruÂ?ciel, Piotr T.

272

Rotating Hairy Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arid regions in China and Africa. Such aerosol streams have been shown to travel around the globe with silica aerosols from China impacting air quality in the continental US and #12;2 alumina and titania delivery mechanisms for a variety of drugs as an alternative to injections. As delivery devices

Beaucage, Gregory

274

Black Hole Shadows of Charged Spinning Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method for measuring the black hole charge by imaging a black hole shadow in a galactic center by future interferometers. Even when the black hole is uncharged, it is possible to confirm the charge neutrality by this method. We first derive the analytic formulae of the black hole shadow in an optically thin medium around a charged spinning black hole, and then investigate how contours of the black hole shadow depend on the spin and the charge of the black hole for several inclination angles between the rotation axis of the black hole and the observer. This method only assumes stationary black hole and general relativity. By fitting the formula of the contours of the shadow to the observed image of the shadow, in addition to the black hole charge, one can also determine the black hole spin and the inclination angle without any degeneracy among the charge, the spin, and the inclination angle unless the inclination angle is null.

Rohta Takahashi

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

THE RELATIONSHIP OF BLACK POWER AND BLACK ARTS/CONSCIUSNESS MOVEMENTS TO THE BLACK STUDIES MOVEMENT .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is an examination of three social movements that occurred during the 1960s and 1970s: the Black Power Movement, Black Arts/Consciousness Movement, and Black… (more)

Woods, Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Black holes and beyond  

SciTech Connect

The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

Mathur, Samir D., E-mail: mathur.16@osu.edu

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Aerosol Laboratory - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Engineering Capabilities > Engineering Experimentation > Aerosol Laboratory Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Aerosol Laboratory The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) houses equipment to measure and record the physical parameters necessary to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols. Bookmark and Share The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) has extensive analytic and experimental capabilities to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols formed from the condensation of vapors. Computer codes have been developed to

278

Lumens Placard (Black) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lumensplacard-black.eps More Documents & Publications Lumens Placard (Black) Lumens Placard (Green) Energy Savers Guide...

279

Relating Secondary Organic Aerosol Characteristics with Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and microphysical characterization of ambient aerosols withthe aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, Mass Spectrom Rev,of secondary organic aerosol under near atmospheric

Tang, Xiaochen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ ][Dca ? ]. Figure 2. Aerosol particle size distribution ofhypergolic ionic liquid aerosols Christine J. Koh † , Chen-ionization of evaporated IL aerosols Isolated ion pairs of a

Koh, Christine J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this room ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH -RECEIVED •I.AWSSKCEDIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTMass and Composition of Aerosol as a Function of Time,

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes T. Novakov, T.W.indicator of anthropogenic aerosols – with observed surfacetemperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends

Novakov, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Aerosol measurements with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Tellus, Ser. A, vol. 43, p.Twomey, Atmospheric Aerosols. New York : Elsevier ScientificCo. , 45. B.A. Albrecht, Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Lithgow, Gregg Arthur

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The cost-benefit outlook of black liquor gasification (BLG) could be greatly improved if the smelt causticization step could be achieved in situ during the gasification step. Or, at a minimum, the increase in causticizing load associated with BLG could be mitigated. A number of chemistries have been proven successful during black liquor combustion. In this project, three in situ causticizing processes (titanate, manganate, and borate) were evaluated under conditions suitable for high temperature entrained flow BLG, and low temperature steam reforming of black liquor. The evaluation included both thermodynamic modeling and lab experimentation. Titanate and manganate were tested for complete direct causticizing (to thus eliminate the lime cycle), and borates were evaluated for partial causticizing (to mitigate the load increase associated with BLG). Criteria included high carbonate conversion, corresponding hydroxide recovery upon hydrolysis, non process element (NPE) removal, and economics. Of the six cases (three chemistries at two BLG conditions), only two were found to be industrially viable: titanates for complete causticizing during high temperature BLG, and borates for partial causticizing during high temperature BLG. These two cases were evaluated for integration into a gasification-based recovery island. The Larsen [28] BLG cost-benefit study was used as a reference case for economic forecasting (i.e. a 1500 tpd pulp mill using BLG and upgrading the lime cycle). By comparison, using the titanate direct causticizing process yielded a net present value (NPV) of $25M over the NPV of BLG with conventional lime cycle. Using the existing lime cycle plus borate autocausticizing for extra capacity yielded a NPV of $16M.

Scott Sinquefeld; James Cantrell; Xiaoyan Zeng; Alan Ball; Jeff Empie

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

GCM Aerosol Radiative Effects Using Geographically Varying Aerosol Sizes Deduced from AERONET Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical properties, and hence the direct radiative effects, are largely determined by the assumed aerosol size distribution. In order to relax the fixed aerosol size constraint commonly used in general circulation models (GCMs), ...

Glen Lesins; Ulrike Lohmann

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

288

Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satellite retrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirect effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud developmentclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,1014– Albrecht, B. A. , Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Black holes at accelerators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collision of high-energy particles,” Phys. Rev. D 67, 024009 (2003) [arXiv:gr-qc/0209003]. [6] D. M. Eardley and S. B. Giddings, “Classical black hole production in high-energy collisions,” Phys. Rev. D 66, 044011 (2002) [arXiv:gr-qc/0201034]. [7] H. Yoshino... about black hole formation in high-energy collisions,” Class. Quant. Grav. 22, L61 (2005) [arXiv:hep-ph/0505125]. [16] G. T. Horowitz, “Higher dimensional generalizations of the Kerr black hole,” arXiv:gr-qc/0507080. [17] C. M. Harris and P. Kanti...

Webber, Bryan R

290

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

291

American Black Bear: Ursus americanus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3/21/2011 1 USFWS American Black Bear: Ursus americanus www.bear.org LDWF Historic Distribution, forested regions (Pelton et al. 1994) Glacier Kenai Queen Charlotte Island. Kermode Dall American Black regions (Pelton et al. 1994) #12;3/21/2011 2 Historic Range Louisiana black bear Louisiana Black Bear

Gray, Matthew

292

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig # Piotr T. Chru�sciel + February 8, 2005 Abstract We review the theory of stationary black hole solutions of vacuum Einstein equations. Keywords: black holes, event. this space­time a natural model for a non­rotating black hole. We can now come back to the problem

ChruÂ?ciel, Piotr T.

293

Physics of AGN Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of AGN Black Holes Heino Falcke MPIfR Bonn Contents: ffl Why Black Holes? ffl What are black holes? ffl Luminosity ffl Observational Evidence Literature: ``An Introduction to Active Galactic. #12; Black Hole Paradigm Not really hollow For typical quasar luminosity of L = 10 46 L 46 erg sec

Falcke, Heino

294

Black Box Checking Doron Peled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Box Checking Doron Peled The University of Texas at Austin Department of Electrical and formalize this problem of black box checking and suggest several algorithms. Since the input to black box the given property. We call this problem black box checking. To simplify the discussion, we will not deal

Peled, Doron A.

295

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stationary Black Holes Robert Beig Piotr T. ChruÂŽsciel February 8, 2005 Abstract We review the theory of stationary black hole solutions of vacuum Einstein equations. Keywords: black holes, event-Szekeres extension of the Schwarzschild solution. this space-time a natural model for a non-rotating black hole. We

ChruÂ?ciel, Piotr T.

296

BLACK HISTORY @ Your Education Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK HISTORY @ Your Education Library Focus on Canadian Resources: Songs Granfield, Linda. Illus, Rella. Solme Black Women: Profiles of Black Women in Canada. Sister Vision, 1993. FC106.B6B73 1993 Bramble, Linda. Black Fugitive Slaves in Early Canada. Vanwell, 1987. Juv E450.B73 1987 Carter, Velma

Ellis, Randy

297

Two-Column Aerosol Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Research Facility is conducting the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod National Seashore. From July 2012 to June 2013, the ARM Mobile Facility-a portable...

298

Mesoscale Variations of Tropospheric Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropospheric aerosols are calculated to cause global-scale changes in the earth's heat balance, but these forcings are space/time integrals over highly variable quantities. Accurate quantification of these forcings will require an unprecedented ...

Theodore L. Anderson; Robert J. Charlson; David M. Winker; John A. Ogren; Kim Holmén

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

RHIC | Black Holes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Before RHIC began operations in 2000, some were concerned that it would produce black holes that would threaten the earth. Here's why those concerns were unfounded. Committee Review of Speculative "Disaster Scenarios" at RHIC In July 1999, Brookhaven Lab Director John Marburger convened a committee of distinguished physicists to write a comprehensive report on the arguments that address the safety of speculative disaster scenarios at RHIC. The scenarios are: Creation of a black hole that would "eat" ordinary matter. Initiation of a transition to a new, more stable universe. Formation of a "strangelet" that would convert ordinary matter to a new form. jaffee "We conclude that there are no credible mechanisms for catastrophic

300

Northern Black Widows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Black Widows Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I live in Fairbanks, Alaska and came across a spider that I've never seen before. It is about 1.5 cm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Black Bear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Bear Black Bear Nature Bulletin No. 286-A December 9, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BLACK BEAR The most amusing and human-like of all our American wild animals is the Black Bear. Slow, clumsy and loose-jointed in appearance, with a shambling gait, he can be very swift and nimble. Like any good clown he is also a good acrobat with a fine sense of balance and timing. He is a great climber in spite of his bulk. Shrewd and droll, he is very popular in menageries and as a performer in circuses and side shows because he learns tricks easily. He can stand on his hind legs to wrestle, box, dance, or beg for food and, occasionally, one becomes a graceful artist on roller skates. They love applause.

302

Method for producing monodisperse aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

Ortiz, Lawrence W. (Los Alamos, NM); Soderholm, Sidney C. (Pittsford, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Black suit with a white, button down, collared dress shirt and conservative tie Black socks and black shoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dress Code Men · Black suit with a white, button down, collared dress shirt and conservative tie · Black socks and black shoes Women · Black dress, black suit pant or skirt (dress or skirt must be at or below the knee) · Black hose (without pattern) and black dress shoes MSC OPAS provides: · A volunteer

Boas, Harold P.

304

10-04-2010 CA-B-10-0154  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

incandescence sensor to measure black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) organic aerosols and their optical and chemical characteristics. Fabrication and laboratory testing...

305

Black Saturn with dipole ring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new stationary, asymptotically flat solution of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity describing a Saturn-like black object: a rotating black hole surrounded by a rotating dipole black ring. The solution is generated by combining the vacuum black Saturn solution and the vacuum black ring solution with appropriately chosen parameters. Some basic properties of the solution are analyzed and the basic quantities are calculated.

Stoytcho Yazadjiev

2007-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

306

Background Stratospheric Aerosol Variations Deduced from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products from 1998 to 2004 have been analyzed for the tendency of changes in background stratospheric aerosol properties. The aerosol extinction coefficient E has apparently ...

Yu Liu; Xuepeng Zhao; Weiliang Li; Xiuji Zhou

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol during MILAGRO 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol duringA computationally efficient thermodynamic equilibrium modelurban aerosols determined by thermodynamic equilibrium? An

Fountoukis, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

In Situ Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Black liquor gasification offers a number of attractive incentives to replace Tomlinson boilers but it also leads to an increase in the causticizing load. Reasons for this have been described in previous reports (FY04 ERC, et.al.). The chemistries have also been covered but will be reviewed here briefly. Experimental results of the causticizing reactions with black liquor are presented here. Results of the modeling work were presented in detail in the Phase 1 report. They are included in Table 2 for comparison but will not be discussed in detail. The causticizing agents were added to black liquor in the ratios shown in Table 1, mixed, and then spray-dried. The mixture ratios (doping levels) reflect amount calculated from the stoichiometry above to achieve specified conversions shown in the table. The solids were sieved to 63-90 microns for use in the entrained flow reactors. The firing conditions are shown in Table 2. Pictures and descriptions of the reactors can be found in the Phase 1 annual report. Following gasification, the solids (char) was collected and analyzed by coulometric titration (for carbonate and total carbon), and by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP) for a wide array of metals.

Scott Alan Sinquefield

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Scoping studies: behavior and control of lithium and lithium aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HEDL scoping studies examining the behavior of lithium and lithium aerosols have been conducted to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues for postulated accident conditions associated with the use of lithium as a fusion reactor blanket and/or coolant. Liquid lithium reactions with air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and concretes have been characterized. The effectiveness of various powder extinguishing agents and methods of application were determined for lithium-air reactions. The effectiveness of various lithium aerosol collection methods were determined and the volatilization and transport of radioactive metals potentially associated with lithium-air reactions were evaluated. Liquid lithium atmosphere reactions can be safely controlled under postulated accident conditions, but special handling practices must be provided. Lithium-concrete reactions should be avoided because of the potential production of high temperatures, corrosive environment and hydrogen. Carbon microspheres are effective in extinguishing well established lithium-air reactions for the lithium quantities tested (up to 10 kg). Large mass loading of lithium aerosols can be efficiently collected with conventional air cleaning systems. Potentially radioactive species (cobalt, iron and manganese) will be volatilized in a lithium-air reaction in contact with neutron activated stainless steel.

Jeppson, D.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermodynamic black di-rings  

SciTech Connect

Previously the five dimensional S{sup 1}-rotating black rings have been superposed in a concentric way by some solitonic methods, and regular systems of two S{sup 1}-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions 'black di-rings'). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings is shown, in which both isothermality and isorotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi [Laboratory of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thermodynamic black di-rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previously the five dimensional $S^1$-rotating black rings have been superposed in concentric way by some solitonic methods and regular systems of two $S^1$-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions black di-rings). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution-sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings are shown, in which both iso-thermality and iso-rotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

Iguchi, Hideo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Black Hole Shadows of Charged Spinning Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method for measuring the black hole charge by imaging a black hole shadow in a galactic center by future interferometers. Even when the black hole is uncharged, it is possible to confirm the charge neutrality by this method. We first derive the analytic formulae of the black hole shadow in an optically thin medium around a charged spinning black hole, and then investigate how contours of the black hole shadow depend on the spin and the charge of the black hole for several inclination angles between the rotation axis of the black hole and the observer. This method only assumes stationary black hole and general relativity. By fitting the formula of the contours of the shadow to the observed image of the shadow, in addition to the black hole charge, one can also determine the black hole spin and the inclination angle without any degeneracy among the charge, the spin, and the inclination angle unless the inclination angle is null. If the maximum width of the shadow smaller than 4(1 + 2 1/2)M or the minimum width of the shadow smaller than 9M are measured observationally, we can safely conclude that the black hole is charged. Here, M is the gravitational radius, i.e. the half of the Schwarzschild radius. Key words: black hole physics—Galaxy: nucleus—galaxies: nuclei — techniques: high angular resolution—techniques: interferometric 1.

Rohta Takahashi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

314

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol IOP Aerosol IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Stephen Schwartz For data sets, see below. Summary The Aerosol IOP was highlighted by the Gulfstream-1 aircraft flying clear-sky aerosol missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on clear sky radiation fields, with weather particularly favorable for these flights during the first and third weeks of the IOP. A secondary but important goal of this IOP was to fly cloudy-sky missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on cloud microphysics, and the effect of the microphysics on cloud optical properties. The Gulfstream obtained aerosol data in support of some of the

315

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

316

Volcanoes and Climate Effects of Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTENTS 8.1 Importance of volcanoes, natural aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols 341 8.2 Major scientific questions and hypotheses 342 8.2.1 Stratospheric volcanic aerosols and climate 342 8.2.1.1 Source gases for stratospheric aerosols 342 8.2.1.2 Explosiveness and plume history during individual eruptions 343 8.2.1.3 Frequency of eruptions, tectonic setting, rock/ash vs. SO 2 343 8.2.1.4 Gas-to-particle conversion and removal mechanisms 343 8.2.1.5 Radiative properties and climatic effects of stratospheric aerosols 345 8.2.1.6 Needed satellite and in situ measurements 347 8.2.1.6.1 Global observations of stratospheric aerosol optical properties 347 8.2.1.6.2 Lidar measurements of aerosols 347 8.2.2 Volcanic aerosols and stratospheric ozone depletion 349 8.2.3 Climatic effects of t

Hartmann And Mouginis-Mark; Volcanoes; D. L. Hartmann; P. Mouginis-mark; G. J. Bluth; J. A. Coakley; J. Crisp; R. E. Dickinson; P. W. Francis; J. E. Hansen; P. V. Hobbs; B. L. Isacks; Y. J. Kaufman; M. D. King; W. I. Rose; S. Self; L. D. Travis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Climate Response to Soil Dust Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols upon climate is calculated. Two atmospheric GCM (AGCM) simulations are compared, one containing a prescribed seasonally varying concentration of dust aerosols, and the other omitting dust. ...

R. L. Miller; I. Tegen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Indirect and Semi-direct Aerosol Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Steven Ghan; Johannes Verlinde; Alexei Korolev; J. Walter Strapp; Beat Schmid; Jason M. Tomlinson; Mengistu Wolde; Sarah D. Brooks; Dan Cziczo; Manvendra K. Dubey; Jiwen Fan; Connor Flynn; Ismail Gultepe; John Hubbe; Mary K. Gilles; Alexander Laskin; Paul Lawson; W. Richard Leaitch; Peter Liu; Xiaohong Liu; Dan Lubin; Claudio Mazzoleni; Ann-Marie Macdonald; Ryan C. Moffet; Hugh Morrison; Mikhail Ovchinnikov; Matthew D. Shupe; David D. Turner; Shaocheng Xie; Alla Zelenyuk; Kenny Bae; Matt Freer; Andrew Glen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Charged black holes from near extremal black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We recover the properties of a wide class of far from extremal charged black branes from the properties of near extremal black branes, generalizing the results of Danielsson, Guijosa and Kruczenski.

Gilad Lifschytz

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sodium and sulfur release and recapture during black liquor burning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide data on sulfur and sodium volatilization during black liquor burning, and on SO2 capture by solid sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. This data was interpreted and modeled into rate equations suitable for use in computational models for recovery boilers.

Frederick, W.J.; Iisa, K.; Wag, K.; Reis, V.V.; Boonsongsup, L.; Forssen, M.; Hupa, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Composition and sources of carbonaceous aerosols at three contrasting sites in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detritus, coal combustion, and natural gas combustion. Diesel engine exhaust dominated fine organic carbonComposition and sources of carbonaceous aerosols at three contrasting sites in Hong Kong Mei Zheng monitoring sites located at roadside, urban, and rural areas in Hong Kong are quantified using gas

Zheng, Mei

324

FOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz For presentation of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide differs2 is intrinsically coupled to production of the energy on which our industrial society relies

325

Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography  

SciTech Connect

In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Winstead, E.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

Gilles, D.A.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

327

Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of competition between aerosol particle removal andof secondary organic aerosol. Part I: ?-pinene/ozone system.data when measuring ambient aerosol. Aerosol Science and

Coleman, Beverly K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary organic aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 41 ,particles from an urban aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 26 ,carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols. Journal of Aerosol

Moffet, Ryan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

properties properties ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical properties The optical properties of aerosols, including asymmetry factor, phase-function, single-scattering albedo, refractive index, and backscatter fraction. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

330

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

331

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

332

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River R D 4 0 0 RD 415 HWY41 RD 207 REVISRD YO SEM ITE SP RINGS P KY LILLEY County Rosedale Ranch Revis Mountain Daulton Spring Red Top Lookout Buford Mountain Black Hawk Lake

Wang, Zhi

333

String-Corrected Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for black holes and strings, Phys. Rev. D 55, 6189 (1997) [black holes and elementary string states, Mod. Phys. Lett. A= 2 supergravity and Calabi-Yau string back- grounds, Phys.

Hubeny, Veronika

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sensitivity Studies of the Importance of Dust Ice Nuclei for the Indirect Aerosol Effect on Stratiform Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New parameterizations of contact freezing and immersion freezing in stratiform mixed-phase clouds (with temperatures between 0° and ?35°C) for black carbon and mineral dust assumed to be composed of either kaolinite (simulation KAO) or ...

U. Lohmann; K. Diehl

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Real time infrared aerosol analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12 Relativity? · What are some of the consequences of GR? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What? · What are Black Holes like and do they exist? · What can we learn from Gravity Waves? · To do all

Cook, Greg

337

black ears to blonde cats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

black ears to blonde cats: paths for designing change Ben Bederson & Allison Druin Computer Science of cats lived in a remote village. A river divided the village in two. Black cats lived on one bank and blonde cats lived on the other... In summer and autumn, a black cat ruled the village and in spring

Golbeck, Jennifer

338

Black Cat 2 Aufgenommene Mewerte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Cat 2 Aufgenommene MeĂ?werte Version: 0 Stand: 13.05.2005 Autor: Henry Westphal Tigris: X:\\2003_2004_Roehrenverstaerker\\Black_Cat_2\\REV0\\Documents\\2006-07-15_Black_Cat_2_Messwerte.doc #12

Wichmann, Felix

339

Acoustic black holes Matt Visser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic black holes Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint Louis USA Ole Miss you develop a number of use- ful connections between supersonic uid ow and black holes in general is the basis underlying a deep and fruitful analogy between the black holes of Einstein gravity and supersonic

Visser, Matt

340

Numerical Simulations of Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Simulations of Black Holes 26 Aug 2009 Frank Herrmann (fherrman@umd.edu) Department · merger of compact objects Much more than just black hole evolutions · Formulations · Hyperboloidal)/2.0; . . . high arithmetic intensity Operator Number of times used 12,961 + 5,398 - 3,438 / 69 14 #12;Black Hole

Maryland at College Park, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dave Kaminsky Charles L. Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1935 $50.00 Dave Kaminsky 1938 $200.00 Charles L. Black 1940 $50.00 Harold S. Miropol 1941 $67,770.00 Phillip B. Bandel Robert C. Batson Charles L. Black Russell Blaylock Barry Boston Lawrence J. Danna James $5,650.00 Robert A. Alexander Bradley C. Black James C. Boothe Joseph C. Bremer Theodore W. Burns

342

BLACK BOX CHECKING DORON PELED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK BOX CHECKING DORON PELED Bell Laboratories 600 Mountain Ave. Murray Hill, NJ 07974, USA MOSHE properties. We propose and formalize this problem of black box checking and suggest several algorithms. Since the input to black box checking is not given initially, as is the case in the classical model of computation

Vardi, Moshe Y.

343

"Exotic" black holes with torsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of three-dimensional gravity with torsion, the concepts of standard and "exotic" Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes are generalized by going over to black holes with torsion. This approach provides a unified insight into thermodynamics of black holes, with or without torsion.

Blagojevi?, M; Vasili?, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Extremal black disks in QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that in the high energy QCD a true black disk wave function necessarily contains many quarks. This corresponds to necessity of non-vacuum reggeon loops in formation of a black disk. The result comes from decomposition of the black disk S-matrix in characters on group manifold.

Alexey V. Popov

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Black holes and black strings in plane waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the construction of black holes and black strings in vacuum plane wave spacetimes using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. We find solutions of the linearised equations of motion in the asymptotic region for a general source on a plane wave background. We observe that these solutions do not satisfy our previously defined conditions for being asymptotically plane wave. We consider the solution in the near region, treating the plane wave as a perturbation of a black object, and find that there is a regular black string solution but no regular black hole solution.

Witt, Julian Le

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Black Diamond Internal network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

�� � ��Ð � � � �� �����Ð Ž� ” Ð � Ð �� � � �� #12;Black Diamond Internet 123456 789101112 A B 12x 6x

Imperial College, London

347

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediately above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone. 2 figs.

Kohl, A.L.

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediatley above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone.

Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Algorithm Design Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia #12;Red-Black Tree A red-black tree is a binary search tree, and each node contains one extra field: its color, it can be either black or red of the binary search tree. If a binary search tree satisfies all the following red-black properties, it is a red-black

Chen, Yangjun

350

Particle-resolved simulation of aerosol size, composition, mixing state, and the associated optical and cloud condensation nuclei activation properties in an evolving urban plume  

SciTech Connect

The recently developed particle-resolved aerosol box model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to simulate the evolution of aerosol mixing state and the associated optical and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation properties in an idealized urban plume. The model explicitly resolved the size and composition of individual particles from a number of sources and tracked their evolution due to condensation/evaporation, coagulation, emission, and dilution. The ensemble black carbon (BC) specific absorption cross section increased by 40% over the course of two days as a result of BC aging by condensation and coagulation. Three- and four-fold enhancements in CCN/CN ratios were predicted to occur within 6 hours for 0.2% and 0.5% supersaturations (S), respectively. The particle-resolved results were used to evaluate the errors in the optical and CCN activation properties that would be predicted by a conventional sectional framework that assumes monodisperse, internally-mixed particles within each bin. This assumption artificially increased the ensemble BC specific absorption by 14-30% and decreased the single scattering albedo by 0.03-0.07 while the bin resolution had a negligible effect. In contrast, the errors in CCN/CN ratios were sensitive to the bin resolution, and they depended on the chosen supersaturation. For S = 0.2%, the CCN/CN ratio predicted using 100 internally-mixed bins was up to 25% higher than the particle-resolved results, while it was up to 125% higher using 10 internally-mixed bins. Errors introduced in the predicted optical and CCN properties by neglecting coagulation were also quantified.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Easter, Richard C.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of Empirical Aerosol Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the adequacy of novel scaling and correlation methods used to analyze aerosol behavior in versions 2.0 and 3.0 of the MAAP computer code. The results show that the MAAP 2.0 method suffers from inaccurate scaling. The method used in MAAP 3.0 is theoretically superior and more consistent with experimental data.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidative evolution (“aging”) of organic species in the atmosphere is thought to have a major influence on the composition and properties of organic particulate matter, but remains poorly understood, particularly for the most oxidized fraction of the aerosol. Here we measure the kinetics and products of the heterogeneous oxidation of highly oxidized organic aerosol, with an aim of better constraining such atmospheric aging processes. Submicron particles composed of model oxidized organics—1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}O{sub 8}), citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}), tartaric acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}), and Suwannee River fulvic acid—were oxidized by gas-phase OH in a flow reactor, and the masses and elemental composition of the particles were monitored as a function of OH exposure. In contrast to our previous studies of less-oxidized model systems (squalane, erythritol, and levoglucosan), particle mass did not decrease significantly with heterogeneous oxidation. Carbon content of the aerosol always decreased somewhat, but this mass loss was approximately balanced by an increase in oxygen content. The estimated reactive uptake coefficients of the reactions range from 0.37 to 0.51 and indicate that such transformations occur at rates corresponding to 1-2 weeks in the atmosphere, suggesting their importance in the atmospheric lifecycle of organic particulate matter.

Kessler, Sean H.; Nah, Theodora; Daumit, Kelly E.; Smith, Jared D.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

353

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Black-hole astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

Bender, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bloom, E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cominsky, L. [Sonoma State Univ., Rohnert Park, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of Satellite Aerosol Retrievals: Methodology for INDOEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system for simulating aerosols has been developed using a chemical transport model together with an assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals. The methodology and model components are described in this paper, and the modeled distribution of aerosols for the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) is presented by Rasch et al. [this issue]. The system generated aerosol forecasts to guide deployment of ships and aircraft during INDOEX. The system consists of the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) combined with an assimilation package developed for applications in atmospheric chemistry. MATCH predicts the evolution of sulfate, carbonaceous, and mineral dust aerosols, and it diagnoses the distribution of sea salt aerosols. The model includes a detailed treatment of the sources, chemical transformation, transport, and deposition of the aerosol species. The aerosol forecasts involve a two-stage process. During the assimilation phase the total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) is estimated from the model aerosol fields. The model state is then adjusted to improve the agreement between the simulated AOD and satellite retrievals of AOD. During the subsequent integration phase the aerosol fields are evolved using meteorological fields from an external model. Comparison of the modeled AOD against estimates of the AOD from INDOEX Sun photometer data show that the differences in daily means are #0.03 # 0.06. Although the initial application is limited to the Indian Ocean, the methodology could be extended to derive global aerosol analyses combining in situ and remotely sensed aerosol observations.

William D. Collins; Phillip J. Rasch; Brian E. Eaton; Boris V. Khattatov; Jean-francois Lamarque; C. Zender

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Combustion of biomass as a global carbon sink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note is intended to highlight the important role of black carbon produced from biomass burning in the global carbon cycle, and encourage further research in this area. Consideration of the fundamental physical chemistry of cellulose thermal decomposition suggests that suppression of biomass burning or biasing burning practices to produce soot-free flames must inevitably transfer more carbon to the atmosphere. A simple order-of-magnitude quantitative analysis indicates that black carbon may be a significant carbon reservoir that persists over geological time scales.

Ball, Rowena

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Black Holes with Skyrme Hair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is intended to give a review of the recent developments on black holes with Skyrme hair. The Einstein-Skyrme system is known to possess black hole solutions with Skyrme hair. The spherically symmetric black hole skyrmion with B=1 was the first discovered counter example of the no-hair conjecture for black holes. Recently we found the B=2 axially symmetric black hole skyrmion. In this system, the black hole at the center of the skyrmion absorbs the baryon number partially, leaving fractional charge outside the horizon. Therefore the baryon number is no longer conserved. We examine the B=1, 2 black hole solutions in detail in this paper. The model has a natural extension to the gauged version which can describe monopole black hole skyrmions. Callan and Witten discussed the monopole catalysis of proton decay within the Skyrme model. We apply the idea to the Einstein-Maxwell-Skyrme system and obtain monopole black hole skyrmions. Remarkably there exist multi-black hole skyrmion solutions in which the gravitational, electromagnetic, and strong forces between the monopoles are all in balance. The solutions turn out to be stable under spherically symmetric linear perturbations.

Noriko Shiiki; Nobuyuki Sawado

2005-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

Design and Sampling Characteristics of a New Airborne Aerosol Inlet for Aerosol Measurements in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of a new submicron aerosol inlet (SMAI) for airborne sampling of aerosol particles is introduced and its performance characteristics under a range of sampling conditions are presented. Analysis of inlet performance in clear-air and cloud ...

Lucas Craig; Allen Schanot; Arash Moharreri; David C. Rogers; Suresh Dhaniyala

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A Community Tool to Objectively Evaluate Aerosol Process Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paradigm of developing and testing new aerosol process modules is haphazard and slow. Aerosol modules are often tested for short simulation periods using limited data so that their overall performance over a wide range of ...

Jerome D. Fast; William I. Gustafson Jr.; Elaine G. Chapman; Richard C. Easter; Jeremy P. Rishel; Rahul A. Zaveri; Georg A. Grell; Mary C. Barth

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Another Look at the Influence of Absorbing Aerosols in Drops on Cloud Absorption: Large Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since as early as 1969, solar absorbing aerosols inside of cloud drops have been suggested to influence cloud radiative properties. The absorbing aerosols were invoked to help explain two “anomalies”: 1) the maximum visible albedo of thick ...

Carynelisa Erlick; Dana Schlesinger

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Assessment of Aerosol Modes Used in the MODIS Ocean Aerosol Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal and island Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites are used to determine characteristic aerosol modes over marine environments. They are compared with the assumed modes used in the operational Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (...

Jiacheng Wang; Qiang Zhao; Shengcheng Cui; Chengjie Zhu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Near-Ground Aerosol by the Methods of Optical-Acoustic Spectrometry and Diff...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Near-Ground Aerosol by the Methods of Optical-Acoustic Spectrometry and Diffuse Extinction V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, A. B. Tikhomirov, and B. A. Tikhomirov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol absorption is an important factor in the formation of non-selective radiation extinction in the visible wavelength range, and plays a great role in solving many radiative and climatic problems. The principal absorbing substance in atmospheric aerosol is soot (crystal carbon), which strongly affects the atmospheric transparency, albedo of clouds, and snow cover. The non-selective absorption by finely dispersed soot aerosol is considered to be one of the most plausible reasons for the appearance of

363

5D Black Rings and 4D Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has recently been shown that the M theory lift of a IIA 4D BPS Calabi-Yau black hole is a 5D BPS black hole spinning at the center of a Taub-NUT-flux geometries, and a certain linear relation between 4D and 5D BPS partition functions was accordingly proposed. In the present work we fortify and enrich this proposal by showing that the M-theory lift of the general 4D multi-black hole geometry are 5D black rings in a Taub-NUT-flux geometry.

Davide Gaiotto; Andrew Strominger; Xi Yin

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

ARM - PI Product - Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in

365

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Campaign Links TCAP website Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST 2013.04.15, Scott, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Winter Aerosol Effects on Cloud Formation 2013.02.04, Cziczo, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): CU GMAX-DOAS Deployment 2012.07.15, Volkamer, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerosol Light Extinction Measurements 2012.07.15, Dubey, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial Campaign 2012.07.07, Berg, AAF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerodynamic Particle Sizer 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): KASPRR Engineering Tests 2012.07.01, Mead, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements

366

Using MODIS and AERONET to Determine GCM Aerosol Size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol size is still a poorly constrained quantity in general circulation models (GCMs). By using the modal radii of the coarse and fine mode retrieved from 103 stations in the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the fine mode aerosol optical ...

Glen Lesins; Ulrike Lohmann

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Aerosol Remote Sensing over Clouds Using A-Train Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of aerosol above clouds is critical for the estimate of both the aerosol and cloud radiative impacts. In this study, the authors present a new method to retrieve the aerosol properties over clouds that uses the multiangle ...

F. Waquet; J. Riedi; L. C. Labonnote; P. Goloub; B. Cairns; J-L. Deuzé; D. Tanré

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

AEROSOL ANALYSIS FOR THE REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY - FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beta-Gauge Methods Applied to Aerosol Samples." Submitted toHusar and B.Y.H. Liu. "The Aerosol Size Distribution of LosAngeles Smog." In: Aerosols and Atmospheric Chemistry, G.M.

Jaklevic, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate Over the Past Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Aerosol Characteristics Species Emissions Burdenc and h), IE (d, i) and BAE (e, f). List of Tables AerosolEmission of trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning,

Koch, Dorothy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. ; Jimenez, J. L. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004, 38,A. G. Highly dispersed aerosols; Halsted Press, New York,highly oxidized organic aerosol Sean H. Kessler 1 , Theodora

Kessler, Sean H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The CALIPSO Automated Aerosol Classification and Lidar Ratio Selection Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptions are provided of the aerosol classification algorithms and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) selection schemes for the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) aerosol products. One ...

Ali H. Omar; David M. Winker; Mark A. Vaughan; Yongxiang Hu; Charles R. Trepte; Richard A. Ferrare; Kam-Pui Lee; Chris A. Hostetler; Chieko Kittaka; Raymond R. Rogers; Ralph E. Kuehn; Zhaoyan Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

374

Information Storage in Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The information loss paradox for Schwarzschild black holes is examined, using the ADS/CFT correspondence extended to the $M_6 (4,2)$ bulk. It is found that the only option compatible with the preservation of the quantum unitarity is when a regular remnant region of the black hole survives to the black hole evaporation process, where information can be stored and eventually retrieved.

M. D. Maia

2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Interplay Between Galaxies and Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Interplay Between Galaxies and Black Holes A Theoretical Overview Massimo Ricotti (U · Formation of "Seed Black Holes" 1. Primordial Black Holes 2. Pop III Stars Remnants 3. Direct Collapse 4. Stellar Dynamics · Black Hole Growth 1. Gas Accretion vs BH-BH Mergers 2. Feeding Black Holes » M

Maryland at College Park, University of

376

Black-Scholes 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black-Scholes #12;1 2 2 5 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2-Ocone) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 4 Black-Scholes 25 4.1 Black-Scholes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 4}(d) . , (t) , (t)S t dWt . = 1 [8] , Black-Scholes . [8] , Black-Scholes . , . , 1 t log(St S0 ) . , [8] [6

Hattori, Tetsuya

377

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change. Tiny Specks with Large Effects Most people equate aerosols with hairspray and household cleaning products, but a large portion of these microscopic particles floating...

378

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over the southwest summer monsoon region, Meteorol. Atmos.Absorbing aerosols and summer monsoon evolution over SouthK. M. Kim (2006), Asian summer monsoon anomalies induced by

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Micro Aerosol-based Decontamination System - Available ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Micro Aerosol-based Decontamination System. Battelle Number(s): 15847. ...

380

Carbonaceous Aerosol Study Using Advanced Particle Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range transport of biomass combustion aerosols. Environ.6 6.1 Introduction Biomass combustion emissions contributeparticles from the combustion of biomass fuels. Environ.

Qi, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Aerosol Retrieval Using Remote-sensed Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electromagnetic solar radiation. The amount of atmosphericas the amount of solar radiation that aerosols scatter andbased on reflected solar radiation field measurements

Wang, Yueqing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing  

SciTech Connect

Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Black entrepreneurship| Literature and reality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation provides two major contributions to the entrepreneurship literature. First, it provides the first comprehensive survey of the papers published on black entrepreneurship… (more)

Crump, Micah E. S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Quantum Mechanics and Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the existence of black holes from the foundations of quantum mechanics. It is found that quantum mechanics rule out a possible gravitational collapse.

Jose N. Pecina-Cruz

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION Title THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report...

386

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient model investigation: Trends in short-lived species and climate responses Title Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate...

387

OLIGOMERIZATION OF LEVOGLUCOSAN IN PROXIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOLS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere and therefore, affect global climate. Biomass burning aerosols are generally… (more)

Holmes, Bryan J.

388

Evaluating the Direct and Indirect Aerosol Effect on Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one of the largest uncertainties in climate forcing studies is the effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols affect the radiation budget under both clear...

389

Aerosol Jetź Material Deposition for High Resolution Printed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Aerosol Jet printing, is finding wide use in a number of ... The Aerosol Jet systems deposit a wide variety of functional materials onto a wide ...

390

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Title Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Publication Type Report...

391

Modeling Corrosion of a Metal under an Aerosol Droplet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of aerosol droplets produced either by marine or industrial activity on the ... The atmospheric corrosion caused by aerosols is a result of a complex ...

392

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton,...

393

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

394

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment Title The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment...

395

Retrieval of Aerosol Mass Concentration from Elastic Lidar Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Agricultural aerosol sources can contribute significantly to air pollution in many regions of the country. Characterization of the aerosol emissions of agricultural operations is required… (more)

Marchant, Christian C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Studies of urban atmospheric aerosols using lidar and sky radiometer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis discusses the remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, the corresponding instrumental technology and inversion algorithm. The urban aerosol optical properties in Hong Kong have… (more)

Yang, Xun (??)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Black Strings, Black Rings and State-space Manifold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State-space geometry is considered, for diverse three and four parameter non-spherical horizon rotating black brane configurations, in string theory and $M$-theory. We have explicitly examined the case of unit Kaluza-Klein momentum $D_1D_5P$ black strings, circular strings, small black rings and black supertubes. An investigation of the state-space pair correlation functions shows that there exist two classes of brane statistical configurations, {\\it viz.}, the first category divulges a degenerate intrinsic equilibrium basis, while the second yields a non-degenerate, curved, intrinsic Riemannian geometry. Specifically, the solutions with finitely many branes expose that the two charged rotating $D_1D_5$ black strings and three charged rotating small black rings consort real degenerate state-space manifolds. Interestingly, arbitrary valued $M_5$-dipole charged rotating circular strings and Maldacena Strominger Witten black rings exhibit non-degenerate, positively curved, comprehensively regular state-space configurations. Furthermore, the state-space geometry of single bubbled rings admits a well-defined, positive definite, everywhere regular and curved intrinsic Riemannian manifold; except for the two finite values of conserved electric charge. We also discuss the implication and potential significance of this work for the physics of black holes in string theory.

Stefano Bellucci; Bhupendra Nath Tiwari

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

398

Variability of building environmental assessment tools on evaluating carbon emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an increasing importance of sustainability in construction, more and more clients and designers employ building environmental assessment (BEA) tools to evaluate the environmental friendliness of their building facilities, and one important aspect of evaluation in the BEA models is the assessment of carbon emissions. However, in the absence of any agreed framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking, the results generated by the BEA tools might vary significantly which could lead to confusion or misinterpretation on the carbon performance of a building. This study thus aims to unveil the properties of and the standard imposed by the current BEA models on evaluating the life cycle carbon emissions. The analyses cover the (i) weighting of energy efficiency and emission levels among various environmental performance indicators; (ii) building life cycle stages in which carbon is taken into consideration; (iii) objectiveness of assessment; (iv) baseline set for carbon assessment; (v) mechanism for benchmarking the emission level; and (v) limitations of the carbon assessment approaches. Results indicate that the current BEA schemes focus primarily on operational carbon instead of the emissions generated throughout the entire building life cycle. Besides, the baseline and benchmark for carbon evaluation vary significantly among the BEA tools based on the analytical results of a hypothetical building. The findings point to the needs for a more transparent framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking in BEA modeling. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon emission evaluation in building environmental assessment schemes are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulative carbon emission is modeled for building environmental assessment schemes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon assessments focus primarily on operational stage instead of entire lifecycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baseline and benchmark of carbon assessment vary greatly among BEA schemes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more transparent and comprehensive framework for carbon assessment is required.

Ng, S. Thomas, E-mail: tstng@hkucc.hku.hk; Chen Yuan, E-mail: chenyuan4@gmail.com; Wong, James M.W., E-mail: jmwwong@hku.hk

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Black holes, AdS, and CFTs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

count all states inside the black hole, but only those thatis the bag of gold? . . . . . Black hole entropy · AdS/CFT 12000) [arXiv:hep-th/9911230] Black holes, AdS, and CFTs 11.

Marolf, Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel burning and fossil fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel tracer for biomass/biofuel burning, 16 number concentration of submicrometer carbon-containing particles and biomass/biofuel 22 burning are subject to long-range transport, thereby contributing to anthropogenic 23

Dickerson, Russell R.

402

Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

Tanmay Vachaspati

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Nonlinear Electrodynamics and black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is addressed the issue of black holes with nonlinear electromagnetic field, focussing mainly in the Born-Infeld case. The main features of these systems are described, for instance, geodesics, energy conditions, thermodynamics and isolated horizon aspects. Also are revised some black hole solutions of alternative nonlinear electrodynamics and its inconveniences.

Nora Breton; Ricardo Garcia-Salcedo

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009 Experiment Planning COPS Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan (PDF, 12.4M) Outreach COPS Backgrounder (PDF, 306K) Posters AMF Poster, German Vesion Researching Raindrops in the Black Forest News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany Main Site: 48° 32' 24.18" N, 08° 23' 48.72" E Altitude: 511.43 meters In March 2007, the third deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will take place in the Black Forest region of Germany, where scientists will study rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. ARM

406

Pressure Effects on Black Liquor Gasification .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gasification of black liquor is an alternative to the combustion of black liquor, which is currently the dominant form of chemical recovery in the paper… (more)

Young, Christopher Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

BlackGold Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BlackGold Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name BlackGold Biofuels Place Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Zip 19107 Product Philadelphia-based developer of a waste...

408

Black Hills Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Hills Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Hills Corporation Place Rapid City, South Dakota Zip 57709 Product Diversified energy and communications company....

409

BNL | Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) The Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) is a platform and instrument suite for Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) to conduct in situ measurements of aerosols and their precursors. MAOS is part of the ARM Climate Research Facility. Physically MAOS is contained in two 20' SeaTainers custom adapted to provide a sheltered laboratory environment for operators and instruments even under harsh conditions. The two structures are designated MAOS-A and MAOS-C for Aerosol and Chemistry respectively. Although independent, with separate data systems, inlets and power distribution, the two structures are normally a single operating unit. The two enclosures comprising MAOS are designed for rapid deployment. All components (except for the Radar Wind Profiler) are transported internally

410

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) Speaker(s): Harmony Gates Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Melissa Lunden A new differential mobility classifier will be described. The instrument classifies aerosol particles in a channel flow between porous (or screen) electrodes. The aerosol enters the channel parallel to the porous electrodes, while a larger, particle-free cross-flow enters through one of the porous electrode. A potential difference between electrodes causes the charged aerosol particles to migrate upstream against the cross-flow. Only particles whose upward migration velocity balances the cross flow will be transmitted along the path of the classifier. Simulations of the OMAC show that it should give the same resolution at the traditional

411

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Black carbon (BC), the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, can be present therein as pure BC particles distinct...

412

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Aerosols and the Third Polar Ice Cap Submitter: Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

413

AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Black optic display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Black hole remnant of black hole-neutron star coalescing binaries with arbitrary black hole spin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for determining the dimensionless spin parameter and mass of the black hole remnant of black hole-neutron star mergers with arbitrary initial black hole spin angular momentum, binary mass ratio, and neutron star mass and cold equation of state is formulated. Tests against numerical-relativity results are carried out, showing that both the dimensionless spin parameter and the final mass are accurately reproduced. For the first time, the behaviour of both quantities and of the l = 2, m = 2, n = 0 quasinormal mode frequency is inspected throughout the parameter space. Predictions of this frequency may be exploited to guide gravitational wave modelling and detection efforts, and to extract physical information from detected gravitational wave signals that would help us break degeneracies between binary black hole and black hole-neutron star systems, improve our understanding of compact binary formation, and constrain the neutron star equation of state.

Francesco Pannarale

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

Red-Black Trees Red-black trees are binary search trees that sat-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Red-Black Trees Red-black trees are binary search trees that sat- isfy: 1. Every node is either red or black. 2. If a node is red, then its parent is black. 3. For a given node, every path to a nil has the same number of black nodes, called black- height. A red-black tree with n nodes has h 2 lg

Bylander, Tom

417

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

418

NSA-Old Black Spruce Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-OBS) NSA-OBS) The NSA-OBS site from the air. This aerial shot of the OBS site shows the generator in the lower-right corner, one of the huts in the upper-left corner, and part of the boardwalk leading away from the hut. View an aerial photo-map of the NSA-OBS site. OBS spruce trees and flux tower The road to the OBS site. The road to the OBS site was often a muddy mess, accessable only by ARGO all-terrain vehicles, and even they got stuck often. The OBS flux tower The NSA black spruce carbon model evaluation site and TE canopy access tower. Oblique view of the trail leading into the NSA Old Black Spruce site. Highway 391 is beyond the image at the bottom and the power line is viewable at the top of the image. The NSA-OBS site would be off to the upper left. The NSA-OBS Rohn tower where Amar Bazzaz of Harvard University is climbing the tower for maintenance.

419

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Black Holes in Brane Worlds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a Randall-Sundrum theory (RS1) 3+1 dimensional black holes and higher dimensional black holes are not the natural continuations of each other. 3+1 dimensional black holes decay into a large number of 4+1 dimensional black holes at a critical mass, Mcrit ? 10 32 TeV. Those black holes themselves may become unstable above another, albeit much smaller critical mass, M0 ? 10 3 TeV. Models of the universe with extra dimensions larger than the Planck length have been under intense investigation during the last few years [1, 2, 3, 4]. The general feature of these models is that standard model particles are compelled to live on 3-branes, to satisfy momentum conservation in 3+1 dimensions and to conform to other phenomenological bounds, while gravity pervades all dimensions. Many of these models predict the observation of black holes at future accelerators [1, 5, 6, 7]. The models either use flat but compact extra dimensions(ADD scenario) [1] or a number of branes embedded in AdS space, with warped extra dimension(s) [2, 3]. Black holes in theories with extra dimensions have been studied widely. The classic paper of Myers and Perry [8] found solutions in D-dimensional flat space. Black hole solutions were also found in AdS space [9, 10]. No non-trivial black hole solutions have been found in closed form in brane theories of the Randall Sundrum type. Yet, it is important to learn as much as possible about black holes in such models. The black string solution [11] that extends in a uniform manner from the brane into the extra dimension has the Gregory-Laflamme instability in the ADD scenario [11, 12]. It is easy to invoke an entropy argument [13], to show that an instability will occur at a critical mass. An alternative interpretation is given in [14]. To understand the arguments by Gregory and Laflamme, compare the entropies of standard 3+1 and 4+1 dimensional Schwarzschild black holes of the same mass. Then one obtains a critical mass

P. Suranyi; L. C. R. Wijewardhana; Mcrit M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME burning events. It is found that the regional AAI data follow the regional tropospheric NO2 data well sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

422

Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Seinfeld, J. H. : Organic aerosol formation from theJ. : A large organic aerosol source in the free troposphereand Worsnop, D. R. : Organic aerosol components observed in

Cappa, Christopher D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban, and desert dust aerosols ." JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICALand K. V. S. Badarinath. "Aerosol climatology: dependence ofUsing a Sky Imager for aerosol characterization."

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in press), Organic aerosols in the earth's atmosphere,loss, and trace gas and aerosol emissions during laboratoryproperties of biomass burn aerosols, Geophysical Research

McMeeking, Gavin R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. : A parameterization of aerosol activation - 3. Sectionalclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Primary Aliphatic Amines with Nitrate Radical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

back- ground atmospheric aerosol in the UK determined inof secondary organic aerosols, Atmos. Environ. , 31, 3921–et al. : Secondary organic aerosol formation from amines

Malloy, Q G J; Qi, L; Warren, B; Cocker III, D R; Erupe, M E; Silva, P J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas-phase chemistry-aerosol interactions on directforcing by anthropogenic aerosols and ozone, J. Geophys.GCM to constrain the aerosol indirect effect, J. Geophys.

Menon, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Composition, sources, and formation of secondary organic aerosols from urban emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles200 5.1v aerosol Chapter 3 Meteorological conditions during theSecondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources

Liu, Shang; Liu, Shang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

X-RAY METHODS FOR THE CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goulding Fine Particles: Aerosol Generation, Sampling andCHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J.M. Jaklevic andCHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J.M. Jaklevic and

Jaklevic, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud susceptibility and the first aerosol indirect forcing:Sensitivity to BC and aerosol concentrations. J. Geophys.of cloud droplet and aerosols number concentrations:

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Characterization of the Molecular Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosols using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene, Proc.biogenic secondary organic aerosol, J. Phys. Chem. A, 112(in secondary organic aerosol, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 41(

Sellon, Rachel Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of ambient aerosol particles, EnvironmentalParticle Measurement of Ambient Aerosol Particles Containingfor quantifying direct aerosol forcing of climate, Bull. Am.

Moffet, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oscillation influence aerosol variability? , J. Geophys.clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008,H. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from reactionsec- ondary organic aerosol yields. Atmospheric Chemistry

Rollins, Andrew W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH FY-1979, CHAPTER IN THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California atmospheric aerosols," Environ. Sci. Technol. ll•suspensions," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,formation," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Modeling Organic Aerosols in a Megacity: Comparison of Simple and Complex Representations of the Volatility Basis Set Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is modified to include a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation. The VBS approach, coupled with SAPRC-99 gas-phase chemistry mechanism, is used to model gas-particle partitioning and multiple generations of gas-phase oxidation of organic vapors. In addition to the detailed 9-species VBS, a simplified mechanism using 2 volatility species (2-species VBS) is developed and tested for similarity to the 9-species VBS in terms of both mass and oxygen-to-carbon ratios of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. WRF-Chem results are evaluated against field measurements of organic aerosols collected during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign in the vicinity of Mexico City. The simplified 2-species mechanism reduces the computational cost by a factor of 2 as compared to 9-species VBS. Both ground site and aircraft measurements suggest that the 9-species and 2-species VBS predictions of total organic aerosol mass as well as individual organic aerosol components including primary, secondary, and biomass burning are comparable in magnitude. In addition, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions from both approaches agree within 25%, providing evidence that the 2-species VBS is well suited to represent the complex evolution of organic aerosols. Model sensitivity to amount of anthropogenic semi-volatile and intermediate volatility (S/IVOC) precursor emissions is also examined by doubling the default emissions. Both the emission cases significantly under-predict primary organic aerosols in the city center and along aircraft flight transects. Secondary organic aerosols are predicted reasonably well along flight tracks surrounding the city, but are consistently over-predicted downwind of the city. Also, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions are significantly improved compared to prior studies by adding 15% oxygen mass per generation of oxidation; however, all modeling cases still under-predict these ratios downwind as compared to measurements, suggesting a need to further improve chemistry parameterizations of secondary organic aerosol formation.

Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Saide, Pablo; Hodzic, Alma

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

PERSPECTIVE Quantum Mechanics of Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERSPECTIVE Quantum Mechanics of Black Holes Edward Witten The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived

438

Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Aerosols over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of accurate polarized reflectance measurements over a broad spectral (410 -2250 nm) and angular (±60° from nadir) range to the presence of aerosols over land is analyzed and the consequent ability to retrieve the aerosol burden and microphysical model is assessed. Here we present a new approach to the correction of polarization observations for the effects of the surface that uses longer wavelength observations to provide a direct estimate of the surface polarized reflectance. This approach to surface modeling is incorporated into an optimal estimation framework for retrieving the particle number density and a detailed aerosol microphysical model: effective radius, effective variance and complex refractive index of aerosols. A sensitivity analysis shows that the uncertainties in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) increase with AOT while the uncertainties in the microphysical model decrease. Of particular note is that the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo is less than 0.05 by the time the AOT is greater than 0.2. We also find that calibration is the major source of uncertainty and that perfect angular and spectral correlation of calibration errors reduces the uncertainties in retrieved quantities compared with the case of uncorrelated errors. Finally, in terms of required spectral range, we observe that shorter wavelength (aerosols from polarized reflectance observations. The optimal estimation scheme is then tested on observations made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter during the Aerosol Lidar Validation experiment and over Southern California wild fires. These two sets of observations test the retrieval scheme under pristine and polluted conditions respectively. In both cases we find that the retrievals are within the combined uncertainties of the retrieval and the Aerosol Robotic Network Cimel products and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Aerosol Index that we are comparing to. This confirms the validity of the sensitivity analysis of the polarized reflectance observations to the aerosol number density and microphysical model and demonstrates the unique capability to accurately retrieve aerosol optical depths under pristine conditions and also the single scattering albedo of aerosols at higher optical depths.

Waquet, F.; Cairns, Brian; Knobelspiesse, Kirk D.; Chowdhary, J.; Travis, Larry D.; Schmid, Beat; Mishchenko, M.

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

439

Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Black in the Non-Black Imagination: How Anti-Black Ideology Shapes Non-Black Racial Discourse.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the (re)production of anti-Black ideology in critical discourses on race. Though contemporary critical discourses on race have been concerned with theorizing about… (more)

Howard, Natasha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Black Peak and Enchantments - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Peak, North Cascades. A nice two day outing. We hiked on the Maple Pass trail, from Hwy. 20, to Heather Pass, and then on a path to Lewis lake, where ...

442

Of the Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About thirty years ago, Bekenstein and Hawking introduced three basic concepts relating to black hole, namely, the "area entropy", "gravitation temperature" and "thermal radiation". The author analyzes these concepts systematically and concludes that they are mostly inadequate or wrong. He points out that a black hole's taking in thermal radiation from the space is an energy-gathering process. It is special, even extraordinary. It reduces entropy, violating Clausius' second law.

Xinyong Fu

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

443

Are Black Holes Elementary Particles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum black holes are the smallest and heaviest conceivable elementary particles. They have a microscopic size but a macroscopic mass. Several fundamental types have been constructed with some remarkable properties. Quantum black holes in the neighborhood of the Galaxy could resolve the paradox of ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected in Earth’s atmosphere. They may also play a role as dark matter in cosmology. 1 1

Yuan K. Ha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Regular black hole in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find a new black hole in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space by introducing an anisotropic perfect fluid inspired by the noncommutative black hole. This is a regular black hole with two horizons. We compare thermodynamics of this black hole with that of non-rotating BTZ black hole. The first-law of thermodynamics is not compatible with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

Yun Soo Myung; Myungseok Yoon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Rotating Black Holes in Higher Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of higher-dimensional black holes can differ significantly from those of black holes in four dimensions, since neither the uniqueness theorem, nor the staticity theorem or the topological censorship theorem generalize to higher dimensions. We first discuss black holes of Einstein-Maxwell theory and Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with spherical horizon topology. Here new types of stationary black holes are encountered. We then discuss nonuniform black strings and present evidence for a horizon topology changing transition.

Burkhard Kleihaus; Jutta Kunz; Francisco Navarro-Lerida

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Fishing in Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

A. Brotas

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Emerging Technology for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosol Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Laboratory and with funding from the DOE STTR program. DMT is developing a new technique for measuring aerosol size distributions in the sub-0.1 um size range. The...

449

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

450

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle size distribution particle size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size distribution The number of aerosol particles present in any given volume of air within a specificied size range Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer UHSAS : Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer Field Campaign Instruments

451

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

452

BNL | Two-Column Aerosol Program (TCAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) There remain many key knowledge gaps despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. Many climatically important processes depend on particles that undergo continuous changes within a size range spanning a few nanometers to a few microns, and with compositions that consist of a variety of carbonaceous materials, soluble inorganic salts and acids and insoluble mineral dust. Primary particles, which are externally-mixed when emitted, are subject to coagulation and chemical changes associated with the condensation of semi-volatile gases to their surface resulting in a spectrum of compositions or mixing-states with a range of climate-affecting optical and hygroscopic properties. The numerical treatments of aerosol transformation

453

Exploring Atmospheric Aerosols by Twilight Photometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instrument twilight photometer was designed, developed, and installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India (18°43?N, 73°51?E), to monitor the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols. The instrument, based ...

B. Padma Kumari; S. H. Kulkarni; D. B. Jadhav; A. L. Londhe; H. K. Trimbake

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol–cloud–radiation interactions are widely held to be the largest single source of uncertainty in climate model projections of future radiative forcing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions. The underlying causes of this uncertainty among modeled ...

Lynn M. Russell; Armin Sorooshian; John H. Seinfeld; Bruce A. Albrecht; Athanasios Nenes; Lars Ahlm; Yi-Chun Chen; Matthew Coggon; Jill S. Craven; Richard C. Flagan; Amanda A. Frossard; Haflidi Jonsson; Eunsil Jung; Jack J. Lin; Andrew R. Metcalf; Robin Modini; Johannes Mülmenstädt; Greg Roberts; Taylor Shingler; Siwon Song; Zhen Wang; Anna Wonaschütz

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

ARM - Campaign Instrument - aerosol-tower-eml  

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govInstrumentsaerosol-tower-eml Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : EML Tower based Aerosol...

456

Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES  

SciTech Connect

One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Life Cycle of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the life cycle of the background (nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosol. The authors assume the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation near the tropical tropopause and are carried aloft into the stratosphere. The ...

Patrick Hamill; Eric J. Jensen; P. B. Russell; Jill J. Bauman

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

On the Background Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balloonborne aerosol particle counter measurements are used in studying the stratospheric sulfate layer at Laramie, Wyoming, during 1978 and 1979, a 2-year volcanically quiescent period in which the layer appears to have been in a near ...

D. J. Hofmann; J. M. Rosen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol Indirect Effects in China In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile...

460

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during SHADE: 1. Solar spectrum, J. Geophys. Res . , 108(sensed data in the solar spectrum, J. Geophys. Res , 106 (a scattering aerosol in the solar spectrum with a SSA=1 and

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "black carbon aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aerosol Transport in the Southern Sierra Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol transport and meteorology were investigated during 10 days in August 1985, at three elevations in the southern Sierra. Ground weather station and pilot balloon data revealed the diurnal variation of the topographic winds to be remarkably ...

D. M. Ewell; R. G. Flocchini; L. O. Myrup; T. A. Cahill

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Urban Aerosol Impacts on Downwind Convective Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of urban-enhanced aerosol concentrations on convective storm development and precipitation over and downwind of St. Louis, Missouri, are investigated. This is achieved through the use of a cloud-resolving mesoscale model, in which ...

Susan C. van den Heever; William R. Cotton

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

465

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE Campaign Links ALIVE Website Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

466

Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

469

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: A decade long aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at the ARM SGP site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Twelve-year data of MFRSR and MWR have been used to derive aerosol and cloud optical properties at the ARM SGP. Diurnal, monthly, seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol (optical depth and Angstrom coefficient) and cloud (optical depth and effective radius) have been analyzed. We specially focused on aerosol-cloud interactions. We found a signature of indirect aerosol effect for summer data: increased aerosol index has a statistically-significant anti-correlation with mean effective radius. No

470

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL SIZE DISTRIBUTION FROM MEASUREMENTS OF LIGHT TRANSMITTANCE AND SCATTERING Ernie R. Lewis and Stephen E. Schwartz Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11933 ses@bnl.gov elewis@bnl.gov MOMENTS FROM MEASUREMENTS As each of the measured quantities is linear in the size distribution dn/dr, it is possible to construct linear combinations of measurements that yield

471

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z