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1

By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leila Belkora, Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs I want to complete some analysis on DZero's Run Ib data and prepare for Run II. Right now I'm at the begin- ning of multiple analyses, and I'm eager to see where they lead. -Harry Melanson, Research Division DZero Collaborator I want to get the fixed-target pro- gram going. It's been four years since we shut down in 1992. It's time to run again. My own experiment is one of those getting ready to run. In the first half of 1996, I'll work to get it installed, and in the last half of the year, hopefully I'll be running it. -Peter Garbincius, Research Division Fixed-Target Run Coordinator Volume 19 FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1996 Number 2 I n s i d e f ACCELERATOR ARCHAEOLOGY . . . . . . . . .2 FESS KEEPS DATA FLOWING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

2

Migratory Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Migratory Birds Migratory Birds Migratory Birds By avoiding or minimizing the impact of Laboratory activities on migratory bird populations, LANL can reduce or eliminate the biological significance of any potential violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. April 12, 2012 A bird of the Pacific Northwest, the Townsend's Warbler nests in coniferous forests from Alaska to Oregon. It winters in two distinct areas: in a narrow strip along the Pacific Coast, and in Mexico and Central America. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Best management practices provide mitigation measures for projects to reduce risks to migratory birds. Protecting migratory birds In the biological sense, a migratory bird is a bird that has a seasonal and

3

Bird Habitats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Habitats Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to investigate the health and condition of bird populations that nest in bird houses on the Pajarito plateau. April 12, 2012 Avian nest box on LANL land Boxes are placed in the open ponderosa pine forest of the canyons and piñon-juniper woodland on the Pajarito plateau mesas. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The monitoring data are used in a population viability analysis that can determine the status of the population and potential impacts of contaminants. Who nests in our network? More than two dozen North American bird species prefer to nest in bird houses. At LANL, we provide nestboxes for the following native bird

4

Bird guard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

Fairchild, Dana M. (Armour, SD)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

5

Birds' Nests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are pressed into place and reinforced with blades of dead grass. With the exception of eagles and certain hawks it is one of the few birds that uses the same nest more than one...

6

Talking Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more words and sing songs or utter several sentences. Birds have varying degrees of intelligence and some, like the crow, are very intelligent but they do not think as we do and...

7

Sleeping Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleeping Birds Sleeping Birds Nature Bulletin No. 445-A February 19, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SLEEPING BIRDS Each winter, a few years ago, several thousand crows, roosted in the big woods near our house. In daytime they spread out over the countryside to find food but each evening, about sundown, they came streaming back in a continuous parade that took almost an hour to pass. In flocks of dozens or hundreds with scattered birds between, they flew the same route every day. In downstate Illinois, similar flocks roost in overgrown hedgerows of osage orange, isolated groves of timber, or on willow grown islands in large rivers. A much smaller flock still roosts the year-round in our woods. Ordinarily they slip in a little before dusk and settle down quietly but occasionally there is a hullabaloo as if they were squabbling over a favorite perch occupied by some newcomers. Just before dawn, one old bird we call "the bugler" caws three times. A minute or two later he repeats it. Then, one by one, drowsy voices of other crows are heard -- much like human sleepyheads in the morning. Sometimes an alarm call is heard during the night followed by a general clamor as if the flock had been disturbed by a marauding owl, weasel or raccoon. Crows are very wary and, like most birds, light sleepers.

8

Bird Banding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Banding Bird Banding Name: Matthew Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am researching why the US fish and wildlife agency bands ducks and what information is used to set hunting daily and possession limits. Replies: Matt, The USFW service has been doing this for decades to have statistical data on the population fluctuations of all birds. This information serves to warn when over hunting has taken a toll on a species or if a species is declining due to habitat loss or whatever. This information also indicates need for increased habitat areas as well as possible hunting restrictions. This organization has a formula for setting hunting limits based upon the data received from banding. It is important that all hunters return these bands for they are the ones who will suffer if the information is not there. Females of any species are the most important for reproduction and often they are protected over the males. This should explain the differences in what can be bagged.

9

Bird Feet Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Feet Biology Name: Jeanne Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why don't birds feet freeze during the cold winter months? Replies: I'm not sure about all birds, but...

10

Bird Beaks and Feet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a bird gives a good clue to its feeding habits. Carnivorous birds like hawks, owls and eagles have strong hooked beaks for tearing flesh. Herons, egrets and kingfishers, with their...

11

Migratory Birds Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Migratory Birds Update Jane Powers Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, HS-22 SAN Call July 19, 2012 Migratory Bird MOU * Final draft was distributed to U.S. Fish and...

12

Migratory Birds Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Migratory Birds Update Jane Powers Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, HS-22 SAN Call October 18, 2012 Migratory Bird MOU * Draft distributed to U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

13

Bird Protection in Illinois  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection in Illinois Protection in Illinois Nature Bulletin No. 550-A January 18, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BIRD PROTECTION IN ILLINOIS Very few people are indifferent about birds. Almost every bird is the feathered friend of somebody or some organization ready to do battle in its behalf. At present, in Illinois, songbirds and most other wild birds, together with their nests and eggs, are completely protected by law at all times. A few kinds, called game birds, may be shot by hunters -- pheasants and quail, also migratory ducks, geese, coots, jacksnipes, woodcocks, and doves. Such hunting must be done with shotguns in certain places in certain open seasons with many other detailed restrictions. Now, even crow hunters are licensed. The only unprotected birds are those three immigrants or exotics: the English sparrow, the European starling and the "domestic " pigeon. These, too, have their friends .

14

Incubation of Birds' Eggs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incubation of Birds' Eggs Nature Bulletin No. 456-A May 6, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation...

15

Pantex Migratory Bird Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Migratory Bird Program James D. Ray Wildlife Biologist Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC What is Pantex? U.S. Department of EnergyNational Nuclear...

16

Fish-Eating Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish-Eating Birds Nature Bulletin No. 307-A May 18, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation...

17

Migration of Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birds Birds Nature Bulletin No. 146 March 13, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N, Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation MIGRATION OF BIRDS High in the sky, wild geese are honking as they return to their nesting ground in the far north. Presently, our summer songbirds will appear and the ponds and marshes be repopulated by ducks and shore birds. Some birds, like the juncos and tree sparrows, resident here all winter, will leave for Canada or our northern states, in May, great flocks of warblers will arrive, tarry briefly, and pass on, not to be seen again until they migrate southward in autumn. The spectacular annual journeys of many kinds of birds, and their homing "instincts", have been a source of wonder since ancient times. In recent years, large-scale marking with small aluminum identification bands upon their legs, has yielded much information about birds their migration routes, speed of travel, summer and winter homes, length of life and life histories.

18

Uncommon Large Aquatic Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

swans, largest of the swimming birds, are known to breed in Yellowstone Park, in the Red Rock Lakes Refuge in Montana, and along the Snake River in Idaho. A few hundred more...

19

Crested Flycatcher Bird House  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crested Flycatcher Bird House Name: kristin Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What would be the best wood to use to build a house for a crested flycatcher? And what...

20

Wild Birds in Captivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wild Birds in Captivity Name: Suzanne Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Our cat has found a young cedar waxwing - which he left unharmed - on our lawn. We have taken...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Fermilab Bird List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Fermilab Bird List The Fermilab Bird List Data compilation by Peter Kasper. See the following link information concerning the Current Status of Access to Fermilab The following pages contain lists, of nearly all the bird species recorded within the Fermilab site boundaries. The names and ordering follow that of the American Ornithologists Union's check-list of North American birds. The lists also indicate at what time of year each species was found. To do this we have divided each year into 48 quarter-months and split the entire survey into five year periods. The first period started in 1987. A symbol is entered into the table for each record, indicating in which survey periods the record occurred. A legend describing these symbols is included with each page. Each list entry also contains a link to some text describing the bird's status on the site. Some exotic species have been excluded from the main list since they are extremely unlikely to have occurred naturally.

22

IMAGE: Gaby Dagher and Benjamin Fung, Concordia Institute for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University To catch a cyber-thief New search tool helps in fight against child porn, permits quick capture of e-criminals Montreal, June 5, 2013 ­ When local police came calling with child porn allegations last

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

23

Bird orientation: compensation for wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bird orientation: compensation for wind drift in migrating raptors is age dependent Kasper Thorup1 14.04.03 Despite the potentially strong effect of wind on bird orientation, our understanding of how wind drift affects migrating birds is still very limited. Using data from satellite-based radio

Thorup, Kasper

24

NREL: Energy Analysis - Lori Bird  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E-mail: lori.bird@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Market analysis Policy analysis Primary research interests Renewable energy and carbon markets Renewable energy policy...

25

Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt Nature Bulletin No. 305 May 5, 1984 Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRAIRIE BIRDS OF THE CORNBELT The Ideal way to get acquainted with the birds of the open fields and prairies is to take a team of horses and raise a crop of corn. Birds are not afraid of horses and a farmer or his boy can watch them, close up, day after day. Unlike tractors, horses guide themselves most of the time and the driver has plenty of chances to look and listen -- especially while plowing. The small animal life uncovered by a freshly turned furrow offers a free lunch for birds. Several sorts of typical ground-nesting birds are loined by blackbirds, cowbirds, robins, and even the wary crows, from nearby hedgerows, farmsteads and woodlands to form a flying, running, hopping parade behind the plow. They and the prairie birds rush to grab earthworms. cutworms, white grubs, beetles and ants.

26

Bird Nest Predation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Nest Predation Bird Nest Predation Name: Susan Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: On the 18th of April, a pair of Northern Cardinals selected a nest site near the top of a dense, 8 foot holly tree, a foundation planting that obscures about 1/4 of our open front porch. They located the nest under the overhang of the roof, facing our front door. By the 21st, a clutch of three eggs had been laid and Mrs. C began to sit on the nest. We succeeded at keeping a low profile, despite the near proximity to our main entrance. She was relaxed and seemingly unworried by our quiet comings and goings. Yesterday morning, all was well, but sometime around midday, after almost a week of incubation, all three eggs and, it appears, Mrs. C, vanished without a trace! There is no obvious disturbance or damage to the nest or the immediate area. The interior of the nest is pristine ~ no feathers, eggshell bits, membrane material. Cats are rarely a problem. In addition to the typical Blue Jays and Crows, we have a lot of squirrels, raccoons, opossums, skunks and even a pair of red-tail hawks on our wooded acre and the surrounds. Due to, I believe, some nearby housing construction, I have observed a opossum during the day several times this past week and have noticed a new arrival, a woodchuck. With temperatures in the 50's, I think it is too chilly for snakes to be active. What would be your best guess as to what happened? Any chance the pair will return to the same nest and try again?

27

by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

With the help of the Main Injector acceler- With the help of the Main Injector acceler- ator, due to come on line in 1999, protons and antiprotons will swarm more thickly than ever before into the interaction areas at Fermilab's Tevatron. Top quarks and other rare particles will appear a hundred times more frequently than they did in the 1991-95 run, enabling experimenters to do more physics in less time. Scientists at Fermilab's two collider detectors are scrambling to upgrade their detectors to take advantage of the faster pace. For the moment, however, those quarks are just a gleam in their eyes; first, the Lab must finish building the Main Injector and connect it to the Tevatron. More than 40 people crowded into the Comitium meeting room on September 17, eager to hear the deliberations as DOE began

28

by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An invisible hand draws a white circle against a black background, almost filling the screen of a computer monitor. The circle represents the outer edge of the CDF detector at Fermilab. A spray of green, blue, and red lines blooms rapidly from the cen- ter of the circle, revealing the trajecto- ries of particles stemming from the latest collision of a proton and an antiproton in the Tevatron accelera- tor. One green line arcs toward the upper right of the screen, two more curl around to the lower left. Faster than you can say data visualization, the invisible hand draws a yellow box around the green line on the right, the path of the particle with the high- est calculated momentum. The screen goes black again. The image of another proton-antiproton collision at CDF-an ordinary event, as these

29

Recent Bird Sightings at Fermilab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Bird Sightings at Fermilab Recent Bird Sightings at Fermilab Author: Peter Kasper See the following link information concerning the Current Status of Access to Fermilab Summaries from past years .. '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 and past months .. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year List: Contains the list of birds seen so far this year. Seasonal List: The list of birds recorded on site at this time of year. Recent entries ... Dec 29 Dec 22 Dec 19 Dec 14 Dec 9 Dec 8 Dec 5 Dec 1 Nov 24 Nov 22 Nov 17 Nov 13 Nov 10 Nov 7 Nov 3 Nov 2 Oct 30 Oct 28 Oct 27 Oct 23 Oct 20 Oct 13 Oct 10 Oct 6 Oct 3 Oct 2 Sep 29 Sep 27 Sep 26 Sep 1 Aug 30 Aug 23 Aug 18 Aug 16 Aug 11 Aug 9 Aug 4 Aug 1 Jul 28 Jul 25 Jul 21 Jul 17 Jul 14 Jul 11 Jul 7 Jul 5 Jun 30 Jun 27

30

Local Bird Populations and "The Birds of Fermilab"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Bird Populations and "The Birds of Fermilab" Local Bird Populations and "The Birds of Fermilab" If you are a birder yourself, or if your students study birds you may want to keep up to date on the local bird populations. If you're new to birding this may be of even more interest. This article discusses some local resources and includes some tips from a Fermilab expert birder on how to begin. Peter Kasper, birding expert at Fermilab, and our featured physicist in this newsletter has an outstanding resource on the Internet, the Birds of Fermilab. If you have WWW access connect at: http://fnnews.fnal.gov/ecology/wildlife/list.html . Here Peter has reports of sightings of 252 species. The basis of the information on this site are two research periods during which Peter and Vicki Byre (while with the

31

Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that use these areas include anhingas, great egrets, little blue herons, and bald eagles. A few species, including wood ducks, mallards, and great blue herons, are year-round...

32

Bird's Eggs - Their Size, Shape and Color  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Engine Table of Contents Copyright Disclaimer Bird's Eggs - Their Size, Shape and Color Nature Bulletin No. 455-A April 29, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook...

33

Migratory Bird Treaty Act: Lessons Learned  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 17, 2013 1 THERESA ALDRIDGE, PACIFIC NORTHWEST SITE OFFICE NEPA Compliance Office Richland Washington Migratory Bird Treaty Act: Lessons Learned Along with 800 other...

34

Chernobyl Birds Have Smaller Brains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material from Chernobyl suffer from increased oxidative stress and low levels of antioxidants. Therefore, normal development of the nervous system is jeopardized as reflected by high frequencies of developmental errors, reduced brain size and impaired cognitive abilities in humans. Alternatively, associations between psychological effects and radiation have been attributed to post-traumatic stress in humans. Methodology/Principal Finding: Here we used an extensive sample of 550 birds belonging to 48 species to test the prediction that even in the absence of post-traumatic stress, there is a negative association between relative brain size and level of background radiation. We found a negative association between brain size as reflected by external head volume and level of background radiation, independent of structural body size and body mass. The observed reduction in brain size in relation to background radiation amounted to 5 % across the range of almost a factor 5,000 in radiation level. Species differed significantly in reduction in brain size with increasing background radiation, and brain size was the only morphological character that showed a negative relationship with radiation. Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings than in older individuals. Conclusions/Significance: Low dose radiation can have significant effects on normal brain development as reflected by brain size and therefore potentially cognitive ability. The fact that brain size was smaller in yearlings than in older individuals

Anders Pape Mller; Andea Bonisoli-alquati; Geir Rudolfsen; Timothy A. Mousseau

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES #12;A-1 APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES 1.0 INTRODUCTION Differential composition of wind turbines at wind energy used is the number of fatalities per wind turbine per year (Anderson et al. 1999). This metric has

36

Migratory Bird Treaty Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Migratory Bird Treaty Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Migratory Bird Treaty Act Year 1918 Url [[File:|160px|link=http://law2.house.gov/uscode-cgi/fastweb.exe?getdoc+uscview+t13t16+6189+0++%28%29%20%20AND%20%28%2816%29%20ADJ%20USC%29%3ACITE%20AND%20%28USC%20w%2F10%20%28703%29%29%3ACITE%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20]] Description References FWS Overview[1] The original 1918 statute implemented the 1916 Convention between the U.S. and Great Britain (for Canada) for the protection of migratory birds. Later amendments implemented treaties between the U.S. and Mexico, the U.S. and Japan, and the U.S. and the Soviet Union (now Russia). Specific provisions in the statute include: Establishment of a Federal prohibition, unless permitted by regulations, to

37

A Conservation Blueprint for Neotropical Migratory Birds in Western Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Conservation Blueprint for Neotropical Migratory Birds in Western Colorado Michelle Fink, David opportunities for conservation of Neotropical migratory birds in coniferous and aspen forest habitats in Western, and SPOT, a conservation portfolio optimization software, to analyze information about bird distribution

38

CHAPTER XVIII THE BIRDS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER XVIII THE BIRDS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;THE BIRDS. The birds of the Gulf of Mexico are thus, without exception, adapted to at least two media and endowed difficult, the area de- ~Ilnited by the salt water of the Gulf of Mexico as It twice daily moves landward

39

by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs O  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O O n a spring day in Chicago, if you long for the crack of the bat and the scent of mustard on hotdogs, head to Wrigley Field. In the seventh inning stretch you'll sing a chorus of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game," along with announcer Harry Caray; baseball at Wrigley just wouldn't be the same without it. After the game, should you travel about 40 miles west to Fermilab, you'd find another essential pair- ing: Fermilab depends on funding from the Depart- ment of Energy, but high-energy physics here would be incom- plete without the s u p p o r t o f t h e N a t i o n a l S c i e n c e Foundation, as well. N S F ' s l a r g e s t c o n t r i b u t i o n a t Fermilab is to the col- l i d e r p r o g r a m . A t DZero, seven NSF-sup- ported groups built the central drift chamber, the trigger system, the calorime- ter electronics, and other compo-

40

Battling bird flu by the numbers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May » May » Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Marienne S. de Villiers Birds and Environmental Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's eastern Nama Karoo region and survival and repro- duction in South Africa's national bird, the blue crane to specialised fynbos and karoo habitats. The birds rely on natural vegetation for protection, and avoid. Although korhaans still occur in parts of the karoo and fynbos biomes, they are now harder to find

de Villiers, Marienne

42

Quality Assessment of Weather Radar Wind Profiles during Bird Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind profiles from an operational C-band Doppler radar have been combined with data from a bird tracking radar to assess the wind profile quality during bird migration. The weather radar wind profiles (WRWPs) are retrieved using the well-known ...

Iwan Holleman; Hans van Gasteren; Willem Bouten

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Studying Wind Energy/Bird Interactions: A Guidance Document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidance document is a product of the Avian Subcommittee of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC). The NWCC was formed to better understand and promote responsible, credible, and comparable avian/wind energy interaction studies. Bird mortality is a concern and wind power is a potential clean and green source of electricity, making study of wind energy/bird interactions essential. This document provides an overview for regulators and stakeholders concerned with wind energy/bird interactions, as well as a more technical discussion of the basic concepts and tools for studying such interactions.

Anderson, R. [California Energy Commission (US); Morrison, M. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (US); Sinclair, K. [Dept. of Energy/National Renewable Energy Lab. (US); Strickland, D. [WEST, Inc. (US)

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

853 853 Federal Register Vol. 66, No. 11 Wednesday, January 17, 2001 Title 3- The President Executive Order 13186 of January 10, 2001 Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in furtherance of the purposes of the migratory bird conventions, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703-711), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts (16 U.S.C. 668-668d), the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661-666c), the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531-1544), the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321-4347), and other pertinent statutes, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. Migratory birds are of great ecological and economic

45

Bird Migration and Bias of WSR-88D Wind Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migrating birds can greatly influence base velocity, velocity azimuth display (VAD), and VAD wind profile products of the WSR-88D. This is documented by comparing estimates of wind velocity and direction from these products with corresponding ...

Sidney A. Gauthreaux Jr.; David S. Mizrahi; Carroll G. Belser

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Seen Above SLAC: A Bird...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seen Above SLAC: A Bird's-Eye View of the Lab By Mike Ross February 8, 2012 About 50 new aerial photos of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have been added to the lab's Flickr...

47

Removal of bird contamination in wind profiler signal spectra.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problem of bird interference with radar performance is as old as radar itself; however, the problem specific to wind profiler operation has not drawn the attention of researchers until the last 5 or 6 years. Since then, the problem has been addressed in many publications and several ways to solve it have been indicated. Recent advances in radar hardware and software made the last generation of profilers much more immune to bird contamination. However, many older profilers are still in use; errors in averaged (hourly) winds due to bird interference may be as high as 15 m/s. The objective of the present study is to develop a practical method to derive mean winds from averaged spectral data of a 915-MHz wind profiler under the condition of bird contamination.

Pekour, M. S.

1998-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Comparative Analysis of the Influence of Weather on the Flight Altitudes of Birds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Birds pose a serious risk to flight safety worldwide. A Bird Avoidance Model (BAM) is being developed in the Netherlands to reduce the risk of birdaircraft collisions. In order to develop a temporally and spatially dynamic model of bird ...

Judy Shamoun-Baranes; Emiel van Loon; Hans van Gasteren; Jelmer van Belle; Willem Bouten; Luit Buurma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

GRR/Section 12-FD-a - Migratory Bird Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a - Migratory Bird Permit a - Migratory Bird Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-FD-a - Migratory Bird Permit 12FDAMigratoryBirdPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Fish and Wildlife Service Regulations & Policies Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, as amended, 16 U.S.C. § 703 50 CFR 21 Migratory Bird Permits Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12FDAMigratoryBirdPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Migratory birds should be addressed in every NEPA document that analyzes actions that may have the potential to adversely impact migratory bird

50

Thermal soaring flight of birds and unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal soaring saves much energy, but flying large distances in this form represents a great challenge for birds, people and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The solution is to make use of so-called thermals, which are localized, warmer regions in the atmosphere moving upwards with a speed exceeding the descent rate of birds and planes. Saving energy by exploiting the environment more efficiently is an important possibility for autonomous UAVs as well. Successful control strategies have been developed recently for UAVs in simulations and in real applications. This paper first presents an overview of our knowledge of the soaring flight and strategy of birds, followed by a discussion of control strategies that have been developed for soaring UAVs both in simulations and applications on real platforms. To improve the accuracy of simulation of thermal exploitation strategies we propose a method to take into account the effect of turbulence. Finally we propose a new GPS independent control strategy for exploiting...

kos, Zsuzsa; Leven, Severin; Vicsek, Tams; 10.1088/1748-3182/5/4/045003

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proceedings of the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop: Understanding and Resolving Bird and Bat Impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most conservation groups support the development of wind energy in the US as an alternative to fossil and nuclear-fueled power plants to meet growing demand for electrical energy. However, concerns have surfaced over the potential threat to birds, bats, and other wildlife from the construction and operation of wind turbine facilities. Co-sponsored by the American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop was convened to examine current research on the impacts of wind energy development on avian and bat species and to discuss the most effective ways to mitigate such impacts. On 18-19 May 2004, 82 representatives from government, non-government organizations, private business, and academia met to (1) review the status of the wind industry and current project development practices, including pre-development risk assessment and post-construction monitoring; (2) learn what is known about direct, indirect (habitat), and cumulative impacts on birds and bats from existing wind projects; about relevant aspects of bat and bird migration ecology; about offshore wind development experience in Europe; and about preventing, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts; (3) review wind development guidelines developed by the USFWS and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife; and (4) identify topics needing further research and to discuss what can be done to ensure that research is both credible and accessible. These Workshop Proceedings include detailed summaries of the presentations made and the discussions that followed.

Schwartz, Susan Savitt (ed.)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

New England Wind Forum: Environmental Impacts? Interaction with Birds,  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Environmental Impacts? Environmental Impacts? The construction and operation of a wind farm will have some local impact to the natural environment, but the specific impacts are site specific. Effects can include avian (bird), bat, and other wildlife activity. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Birds Largely because of the unique circumstances and experiences surrounding one region in Northern California with significant wind energy development in the 1980s, wind power proponents now conduct wildlife (and particularly avian) studies as a regular part of screening sites for development. Earlier generations of wind turbines were smaller and located close together. They were mounted on lattice towers and had rapidly spinning blades. These wind turbines were located in great numbers in the Altamont Pass, an area of rolling grassland home to a substantial population of raptors. A high number of bird kills resulted. Wind technology has advanced substantially since the 1980s. Today's larger turbines have wider spacing, more slowly spinning blades, and are mounted on tubular towers. Nonetheless, wind turbines, like all manmade structures, do have the potential to impact birds and/or bats. Careful selection of development sites avoids placement in particularly sensitive locations, and for well-sited wind projects, avian impacts can be minimal including relative to other sources of avian collision. The National Wind Coordinating Collaborative published a report discussing bird interaction with wind turbines in the Spring of 2010, "Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions (PDF 2.0 MB)."

53

Turbine Nozzles Failure Due to Bird Strike - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Turbine Nozzles Failure Due to Bird Strike ... crystal (SX) nickel-based superalloy with environmental coatings on the flow path ... was caused by clogged cooling holes and film cooling reduction, resulting in ... Analysis of Crack Development Involving a Pressure Vessel in a Synthetic Gas Production Plant.

54

CALIFORNIA GUIDELINES FOR REDUCING IMPACTS TO BIRDS AND BATS FROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treaty Act, rotorswept area, wind energy, wind siting guidelines, wind turbines. #12; #12; i development projects and wind turbine repowering projects in California. The objectives of the Guidelines of Wind Energy Research Bird and bat interactions with wind turbines is an area of active research

55

Extrapair paternity, migration, and breeding synchrony in birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standardized linear contrasts to show that this positive relationship persists when all bird species for which distribution maps published in standard ornithological handbooks (e.g., Cramp, 1977­1994; Marchant and Higgins standardized, may be entered into conventional statistical analyses. Standardization of contrasts is dependent

Cambridge, University of

56

The Influence of Woodlot Size and Location in Suburban and Rural Matrices on Bird Species Richness and Individual Abundance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study assessed the influence of woodlot area and matrix composition on bird species richness and individual abundance. Bird surveys were conducted in winter 2004 (more)

Chartier, Neil Allen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND ENERGY GENERATION 4.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

77 CHAPTER 4 IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND ENERGY GENERATION 4.1 INTRODUCTION Bird mortality studies reporting on wind energy facilities elsewhere regularly report that bird mortality in the APWRA is unusually high there and is, therefore, an anomaly among wind energy facilities in the United States. We

58

DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection December 4, 2013 - 7:00am Addthis DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will enhance collaboration in promoting the conservation of migratory birds. DOE manages land that includes wetlands, shrub-steppe, shortgrass prairie, desert, and forested areas that provide habitat for migratory birds. In the MOU, DOE recognizes that some of its activities have the potential to affect migratory birds (e.g., transmission lines, power poles, invasive weed control, and various construction activities), and agrees that it is important to conserve

59

White Bird, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bird, Idaho: Energy Resources Bird, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.7615508°, -116.3006974° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.7615508,"lon":-116.3006974,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

A Review on Fish Swimming and Bird/Insect Flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This expository review is devoted to fish swimming and bird/insect flight. (i) The simple waving motion of an elongated flexible ribbon plate of constant width, immersed in a fluid at rest, propagating a wave distally down the plate to swim forward is first considered to provide a fundamental concept on energy conservation. It is generalized to include variations in body width and thickness, vortex shedding from appended dorsal, ventral and caudal fins to closely simulate fish swimming for which a nonlinear theory is presented for large-amplitude propulsion. (ii) For bird flight, the pioneering studies on oscillating rigid wings are briefed, followed by presenting a nonlinear unsteady theory for flexible wing with arbitrary variations in shape and trajectory with a comparative study with experiments. (iii) For insect flight, more recent advances are reviewed under aerodynamic theory and modeling, computational methods, and experiments, on forward and hovering flights with producing leading-edge vortex to give...

Wu, Theodore Yaotsu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Review on Fish Swimming and Bird/Insect Flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This expository review is devoted to fish swimming and bird/insect flight. (i) The simple waving motion of an elongated flexible ribbon plate of constant width, immersed in a fluid at rest, propagating a wave distally down the plate to swim forward is first considered to provide a fundamental concept on energy conservation. It is generalized to include variations in body width and thickness, vortex shedding from appended dorsal, ventral and caudal fins to closely simulate fish swimming for which a nonlinear theory is presented for large-amplitude propulsion. (ii) For bird flight, the pioneering studies on oscillating rigid wings are briefed, followed by presenting a nonlinear unsteady theory for flexible wing with arbitrary variations in shape and trajectory with a comparative study with experiments. (iii) For insect flight, more recent advances are reviewed under aerodynamic theory and modeling, computational methods, and experiments, on forward and hovering flights with producing leading-edge vortex to give unsteady high lift. (iv) Prospects are explored on extracting intrinsic flow energy by fish and bird to gain thrust for propulsion. (v) The mechanical and biological principles are drawn together for unified studies on the energetics in deriving metabolic power for animal locomotion, leading to a surprising discovery that the hydrodynamic viscous drag on swimming fish is largely associated with laminar boundary layers, thus drawing valid and sound evidences for a resolution to the fish-swim paradox proclaimed by Gray (1936, 1968).

Theodore Yaotsu Wu

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Potential for enhancing nongame bird habitat values on abandoned mine lands of western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Throughout western North Dakota the number of unreclaimed surface coal and coal-uranium mines might total over 1100. We examined the potential for enhancing the nongame bird habitat values of unreclaimed mine lands in the arid, western region of North Dakota. Generally, the greatest variety of birds occurred in natural and planted woodlands, while fewer birds occurred in unreclaimed mine lands, grasslands, shrublands and croplands. Deciduous woodland types supported more species of birds than coniferous types. Planted woodlands supported about the same number of bird species as some natural deciduous woodland types and more species than coniferous woods. Unreclaimed mine lands supported more species than grasslands and croplands, and about the same number of species as native shrublands. The highest bird densities were in planted woodlands. Bird diversity varied positively with habitat diversity. The bird fauna of unreclaimed mine lands can be enhanced by creating more diverse habitats. Seventeen guidelines to enhance unreclaimed mine lands for nongame birds are presented. These guidelines can be used in preserving habitats threatened by surface mining and reclaiming previously mined lands.

Burley, J.B.; Hopkins, R.B.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

IDENTIFYING PRIORITY CONSERVATION AREAS FOR GRASSLAND BIRDS IN THE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY OF VERMONT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For several decades, grassland bird populations have been facing consistent declines throughout North America with population declines >1.5% per year in the past 40 years (more)

Sutti, Flavio

64

th e american bir d conse rvan c y g u id e to bird conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

th e american bir d conse rvan c y g u id e to bird conservation by daniel j. lebbin, michael j CONSERVATION 1886 George Grinnell founds the first Audubon So- ciety. 1896 Harriet Hemenway, her cousin Minna conservation for waterfowl and other birds. 1934 Roger Tory Peterson publishes his landmark Field Guide

McReynolds, Ben

65

We encountered a particularly intriguing imita-tion bird-dropping on the dorsal wing surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to have false images of flies on its wings. It may be our imagination, but don't those red compound eyesWe encountered a particularly intriguing imita- tion bird-dropping on the dorsal wing surface the imitation bird dropping and odor was accom- panied by a most extraordinary wing pattern. To our astonishment

Monteiro, Antónia

66

Displays of Bird Movements on the WSR-88D: Patterns and Quantification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WSR-88D can readily detect birds in the atmosphere in both clear air and precipitation mode, and echo reflectivities of 3035 dBZ may be realized during heavy migration events or when birds are departing a roosting site. This paper describes ...

Sidney A. Gauthreaux Jr.; Carroll G. Belser

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mercury contamination in non-fish-eating birds from a polluted watershed  

SciTech Connect

Mercury levels in birds collected along the mercury-contaminated Cheyenne river system in South Dakota were analyzed. The study dealt with small birds which feed mainly on insects, aquatic insect larvae and seeds. The levels found are not lethal, but may be hindering reproduction.

Brown, R.L.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mercury contamination in fish-eating birds from a polluted watershed  

SciTech Connect

The mercury contents of selected fish-eating birds in the watershed affected by the Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota are reported. The mine had used the mercury amalgamation process to recover gold, and had discharged 12 to 40 pounds of mercury per day. Elevated mercury levels were found in the birds.

Hesse, L.W.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Identi cation of Mechanical Inclusions Marc Schoenauer Francois Jouve Leila Kallel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ciently handle inverse problems is a good numerical model of the direct problem, and a representation of both materials from these experimental data. In steel manufacturing plants, for instance, it is of vital importance to check if coal scories are included in steel parts, and if their repartition does

Jouve, François

70

Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

Morrison, M. L.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

Strickland, Dale

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Influence of El Nio on the Spring Fallout of Asian Bird Species at Attu Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several studies have documented the effect of the recent secular climate warming on the distributions and geographical ranges of birds. Here the authors report the strong impact of a recurring climatic pattern in the equatorial Pacific, the El ...

Sultan Hameed; Henry H. Norwood; Michael Flanagan; Steven Feldstein; Chien-hsiung Yang

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Identifying Doppler Velocity Contamination Caused by Migrating Birds. Part II: Bayes Identification and Probability Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the Bayesian statistical decision theory, a probabilistic quality control (QC) technique is developed to identify and flag migrating-bird-contaminated sweeps of level II velocity scans at the lowest elevation angle using the QC ...

Shun Liu; Qin Xu; Pengfei Zhang

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Technique for Removing the Effect of Migrating Birds in 915-MHz Wind Profiler Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described and evaluated for decreasing artifacts in radar wind profiler data resulting from overflying, migrating birds. The method processes the prerecorded, averaged spectral data of a wind profiler to derive hourly wind profiles ...

M. S. Pekour; R. L. Coulter

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I studied flock composition, distribution and foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast. I focused on geographic variability in wintering wading bird assemblages, the processes that structured these assemblages and habitat use by wading birds. I found considerable variation among three sites, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Texas; Marsh Island Wildlife Refuge (MIWR), Louisiana; and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), Florida. Species comprising wintering wading bird assemblages varied regionally. ANWR had the most species-rich assemblage, with eight species. MIWR had only six wading bird species. And CNWR had only three different species. Processes that structured wintering wading bird assemblages also varied regionally. In ANWR, Texas, the Random Fraction niche apportionment model (RF model) best explained the empirical abundance data for ANWR. For abundance data from MIWR a good fit was obtained with the MacArthur Fraction (MF) model and the Power Fraction (PF) models. None of the models fully explained the CNWR abundance data. I also examined patterns of habitat partitioning among wintering wading birds at three different scales at two sites, Matagorda Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (LANWR). At the macrohabitat level, wintering wading birds showed interspecific differences in macrohabitat use of both open water habitats and vegetated flats. At the mesohabitat level all species at MINWR used the category nearest the edge most often, alternatively, at LANWR wading birds were most often in the mesohabitat category of 8.1- 12 m. from the edge. In both locations wading birds partitioned habitat based on water depth. Finally, I found that Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets participated more often in flock foraging and derived more benefits from feeding in flocks than other species. Great Egrets feeding in flocks had a higher mean strike rate than those foraging alone, whereas Snowy Egrets had a higher success rate foraging in flocks than those foraging alone. In the case of the darkercolored species (e.g., Great Blue Herons, etc.) they either showed no difference in behaviors between birds foraging in flocks versus those foraging alone or they actually did worse when they foraged in flocks.

Sherry, Dawn Ann

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hardwood energy crops and wildlife diversity: Investigating potential benefits for breeding birds and small mammals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hardwood energy crops have the potential to provide a profit to growers as well as environmental benefits (for water quality, soil stabilization, chemical runoff, and wildlife habitat). Environmental considerations are important for both sustainable development of bioenergy technologies on agricultural lands, and for public support. The Environmental Task of the US DOE`s Biofuels feedstock Development Program (BFDP) is working with industry, universities and others to determine how to plant, manage and harvest these crops to maximize environmental advantages and minimize impacts while economically meeting production needs. One research objective is to define and improve wildlife habitat value of these energy crops by exploring how breeding birds and small mammals use them. The authors have found increased diversity of birds in tree plantings compared to row crops. However, fewer bird and small mammal species use the tree plantings than use natural forest. Bird species composition on hardwood crops studied to date is a mixture of openland and forest bird species. Restricted research site availability to date has limited research to small acreage sites of several years of age, or to a few larger acreage but young (1--2 year) plantings. Through industry collaboration, research began this season on bird use of diverse hardwood plantings (different ages, acreages, tree species) in the southeast. Together with results of previous studies, this research will help define practical energy crop guidelines to integrate native wildlife benefits with productive energy crops.

Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States); Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Automated Thermal Image Processing for Detection and Classification of Birds and Bats - FY2012 Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Surveying wildlife at risk from offshore wind energy development is difficult and expensive. Infrared video can be used to record birds and bats that pass through the camera view, but it is also time consuming and expensive to review video and determine what was recorded. We proposed to conduct algorithm and software development to identify and to differentiate thermally detected targets of interest that would allow automated processing of thermal image data to enumerate birds, bats, and insects. During FY2012 we developed computer code within MATLAB to identify objects recorded in video and extract attribute information that describes the objects recorded. We tested the efficiency of track identification using observer-based counts of tracks within segments of sample video. We examined object attributes, modeled the effects of random variability on attributes, and produced data smoothing techniques to limit random variation within attribute data. We also began drafting and testing methodology to identify objects recorded on video. We also recorded approximately 10 hours of infrared video of various marine birds, passerine birds, and bats near the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) at Sequim, Washington. A total of 6 hours of bird video was captured overlooking Sequim Bay over a series of weeks. An additional 2 hours of video of birds was also captured during two weeks overlooking Dungeness Bay within the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Bats and passerine birds (swallows) were also recorded at dusk on the MSL campus during nine evenings. An observer noted the identity of objects viewed through the camera concurrently with recording. These video files will provide the information necessary to produce and test software developed during FY2013. The annotation will also form the basis for creation of a method to reliably identify recorded objects.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Virden, Daniel J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Food abundance does not determine bird use of early-successional habitat.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Few attempts have been made to experimentally address the extent to which temporal or spatial variation in food availability influences avian habitat use. We used an experimental approach to investigate whether bird use differed between treated (arthropods reduced through insecticide application) and control (untreated) forest canopy gaps within a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA. Gaps were two- to three-year-old group selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted during four bird use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration) in 2002 and 2003. Arthropods were reduced in treated gaps by 68% in 2002 and 73% in 2003. We used mist-netting captures and foraging attack rates to assess the influence of arthropod abundance on avian habitat use. Evidence that birds responded to arthropod abundance was limited and inconsistent. In 2002, we generally captured more birds in treated gaps of the smallest size (0.13 ha) and fewer birds in treated gaps of the larger sizes. In 2003, we recorded few differences in the number of captures in treated and control gaps. Foraging attack rates generally were lower in treated than in control gaps, indicating that birds were able to adapt to the reduced food availability and remain in treated gaps. We conclude that arthropod abundance was not a proximate factor controlling whether forest birds used our gaps. The abundance of food resources may not be as important in determining avian habitat selection as previous research has indicated, at least for passerines in temperate subtropical regions.

Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Moorman, Christopher E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Distribution and Habitat Associations of Breeding Secretive Marsh Birds in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley of Northeast Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Populations of many North American secretive marsh birds (SMBs) have declined over the past 30 years, primarily as a function of wetland loss. Ranges for (more)

Valente, Jonathon Joseph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds June 30, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis A collage of images. Top, optical images of: blue jay feather, squid, and fossil fish with feather. Bottom: x-ray images showing the distribution of copper (red) in the same organisms. | Photo Courtesy of Gregory Stewart, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory A collage of images. Top, optical images of: blue jay feather, squid, and fossil fish with feather. Bottom: x-ray images showing the distribution of copper (red) in the same organisms. | Photo Courtesy of Gregory Stewart, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Through x-ray fluorescent imaging techniques developed at the

82

It's a bird...It's a plane...It's an intern! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

It's a bird...It's a plane...It's an intern! It's a bird...It's a plane...It's an intern! It's a bird...It's a plane...It's an intern! June 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Office of External Affairs Acting Communications Director Dave Borak talks with EM intern Valerie Edwards. EM Office of External Affairs Acting Communications Director Dave Borak talks with EM intern Valerie Edwards. Experienced Pilot and Robot Builder Lands Summer Internship at EM Only 22 years old, Valerie Edwards has accomplished significant feats, from flying airplanes to building award-winning robots. Now, Edwards is ready to achieve more as a DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of External Affairs intern. Her assignment: help improve EM's public communications across the DOE complex. Edwards is poring over the websites of EM sites to determine ways to better

83

RADIONUCLIDES IN MARINE FISHES AND BIRDS FROM AMCHITKA AND KISKA ISLANDS IN THE ALEUTIANS:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RADIONUCLIDES IN MARINE FISHES AND BIRDS FROM RADIONUCLIDES IN MARINE FISHES AND BIRDS FROM AMCHITKA AND KISKA ISLANDS IN THE ALEUTIANS: ESTABLISHING A BASELINE Joanna ~ur~er,*'"ichael Gochfeld,"% David ~osson,'** Charles W. ~owers,~~"an-y ~riedlander,':~ ~ i c h a e l tabi in,^** Derek ~avret,'** Stephen ~ewett,'." Daniel ~ n i ~ a r o f f , " Ronald ~ n i g a r o f f , ~ ~ Tim ~ t a m m , ~ ~ James Weston,*** Christian ~eitner,"' and Conrad ~olz'."' Abstmct-Amchitka Island (51" N lat, 179' E long) was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965-1971. There have been no substantive studies of radionuclides in marine fishes and birds in the area since the mid-1970's. In this study, levels of wCo, "Eu, 90Sr, 99Tc, "q, I3'Cs, and the actinides (241~m, U 8 ~ u , "

84

Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

Strickland, Dale

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Development of a practical modeling framework for estimating the impact of wind technology on bird populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most pressing environmental concerns related to wind project development is the potential for avian fatalities caused by the turbines. The goal of this project is to develop a useful, practical modeling framework for evaluating potential wind power plant impacts that can be generalized to most bird species. This modeling framework could be used to get a preliminary understanding of the likelihood of significant impacts to birds, in a cost-effective way. The authors accomplish this by (1) reviewing the major factors that can influence the persistence of a wild population; (2) briefly reviewing various models that can aid in estimating population status and trend, including methods of evaluating model structure and performance; (3) reviewing survivorship and population projections; and (4) developing a framework for using models to evaluate the potential impacts of wind development on birds.

Morrison, M.L. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States); Pollock, K.H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Is it a bird? Or a plane? It's a solar plane! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Is it a bird? Or a plane? It's a solar plane! Is it a bird? Or a plane? It's a solar plane! Is it a bird? Or a plane? It's a solar plane! May 14, 2013 - 5:20pm Addthis Solar Impulse's HB-SIA prototype is starting the crossing of America. First leg is Moffett Airfield at the Ames Research Center of NASA to Phoenix Sky Harbour Airport. Solar Impulse will fly across America in stages from San Francisco to Washington D.C. and New York City. | Photo by Fred Merz, Solar Impulse. Solar Impulse's HB-SIA prototype is starting the crossing of America. First leg is Moffett Airfield at the Ames Research Center of NASA to Phoenix Sky Harbour Airport. Solar Impulse will fly across America in stages from San Francisco to Washington D.C. and New York City. | Photo by Fred Merz, Solar Impulse. Solar Impulse's HB-SIA prototype. | Photo by J. Revillard, Solar Impulse.

87

Final Department of Energy US Fish & Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Memorandum of Understanding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

between between THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Regarding Implementation of Executive Order 13186, "Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds" Prepared by: United States Department of Energy and United States Fish and Wildlife Service September 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Regarding Implementation of Executive Order 13186, "Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds" This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by and between the United States Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) and the United States Department of the Interior,

88

A Bayesian sensitivity analysis applied to an Agent-based model of bird population response to landscape change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural land management has important impacts on land use and vegetation that can rapidly induce ecosystem change. Birds are often used as indicators of such impacts of landscape change on ecosystems. However, predicting the response of birds to ... Keywords: ALMaSS, Agent-based model, BACCO, Emulator, Land use policy, Meta-model, Sensitivity analysis, Set-aside removal, Skylarks, Uncertainty

Hazel R. Parry, Christopher J. Topping, Marc C. Kennedy, Nigel D. Boatman, Alistair W. A. Murray

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Surveys of forest bird populations found in the vicinity of proposed geothermal project subzones in the district of Puna, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents data on the distribution and status of forest bird species found within the vicinity of proposed geothermal resource development on the Island of Hawaii. Potential impacts of the proposed development on the native bird populations found in the project are are addressed.

Jacobi, J.D.; Reynolds, M.; Ritchotte, G.; Nielsen, B.; Viggiano, A.; Dwyer, J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Bird Checklist for the East Coast Seen Common Name Latin Name Seen Common Name Latin Name  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herodias Red-shouldered Hawk Buteo lineatus Great Egret Casmerodius albus Broad-winged Hawk ButeoBird Checklist for the East Coast 1 Seen Common Name Latin Name Seen Common Name Latin Name Red-throated Loon Gavia stellata Common Scoter Melanitta nigra Pacific Loon Gavia pacifica White-winged Scoter

Sharp, Kim

91

Reproductive success of oak woodland birds in Sonoma and Napa counties. In  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Birds are often used as environmental indicators because they are conspicuous, they have a very broad constituency, respond to change at multiple spatial scales, and are sampled by standard protocols. However simple counts of birds may provide an incomplete picture of the response of bird populations to environmental change in rapidly changing landscapes like Californias oak woodlands. Demographic data such as reproductive success provide a better measure of habitat quality and response to landscape modification. We collected reproductive success information on 398 nests of 38 species of birds nesting in oak woodlands of Sonoma and Napa counties in 2003 and 2004. We found no evidence that the extent of vineyard at the landscape-level had negative effects on the number of nests, frequency of nests per nest type, nor nest success. In fact, high vineyard-influence sites had slightly higher nest success. Our results suggest that remaining oak woodlands in vineyard landscapes, if properly managed and of sufficient size, can still support a diverse and productive avifauna.

Mark Reynolds; Thomas Gardali; Matt Merrifield; Amon Armstrong; David Wood; Julia Smith; Emily Heaton; Gretchen Lebuhn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Landscape and Urban Planning 71 (2005) 263275 Bird communities of the Colorado Rocky Mountains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at each survey point and derived digital land-cover maps from aerial photographs to characterizeLandscape and Urban Planning 71 (2005) 263­275 Bird communities of the Colorado Rocky Mountains and Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA Received 11

Fraterrigo, Jennifer

93

In Situ Calibration of the SeaBird 9plus CTD Thermometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Sea-Bird Electronics (SBE 35) deep ocean reference thermometer is used with the SBE 9plus CTD system to calibrate the SBE 3 ocean thermometers of the CTD. The SBE 35 is standardized in water-triple-point and gallium-melting-point cells. The SBE ...

Hiroshi Uchida; Kentaro Ohyama; Satoshi Ozawa; Masao Fukasawa

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cloudy Sky Version of Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model given by NREL's Daryl Myers at SOLAR 2006. The objective of this report is to produce ''all sky'' modeled hourly solar radiation. This is based on observed cloud cover data using a SIMPLE model.

Myers, D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Thermal Inertia of Conductivity Cells: Observations with a Sea-Bird Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have examined the magnitude and relaxation time of the thermal anomaly of the fluid flowing through the conductivity cell manufactured by Sea-Bird Electronics (SBE) that is induced by the heat stored in the wall of this cell using oceanic data ...

Rolf G. Lueck; James J. Picklo

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Building detection in an urban area using lidar data and QuickBird imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a hierarchical approach to detect buildings in an urban area through the combined usage of lidar data and QuickBird imagery. A normalized digital surface model nDSM was first generated on the basis of the difference between a digital ...

Lei Chen; Shuhe Zhao; Wenquan Han; Yun Li

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Using a collision model to design safer wind turbine rotors for birds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model for collisions between birds and propeller-type turbine rotors identifies the variables that can be manipulated to reduce the probability that birds will collide with the rotor. This study defines a safety index--the clearance power density--that allows rotors of different sizes and designs to be compared in terms of the amount of wind energy converted to electrical energy per bird collision. The collision model accounts for variations in wind speed during the year and shows that for model rotors with simple, one-dimensional blades, the safety index increases in proportion to rotor diameter, and variable speed rotors have higher safety indexes than constant speed rotors. The safety index can also be increased by enlarging the region near the center of the rotor hub where the blades move slowly enough for birds to avoid them. Painting the blades to make them more visible might have this effect. Model rotors with practical designs can have safety indexes an order of magnitude higher than those for model rotors typical of the constant speeds rotors in common use today. This finding suggests that redesigned rotors could have collision rates with birds perhaps an order of magnitude lower than today`s rotors, with no reduction in the production of wind power. The empirical data that exist for collisions between raptors, such as hawks and eagles, and rotors are consistent with the model: the numbers of raptor carcasses found beneath large variable speed rotors, relative to the numbers found under small constant speed rotors, are in the proportions predicted by the collision model rather than in proportion to the areas swept by the rotor blades. However, uncontrolled variables associated with these data prevent a stronger claim of support for the model.

Tucker, V.A. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The effects of human disturbance on birds in Bastrop State Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rapidly disappearing natural areas due to development and fragmentation, public lands provide important habitat for birds. However, the increasing use of public lands for recreation may decrease the value of these areas for bird use. Human disturbance can damage birds in many ways, including disrupting foraging or social behavior, increasing nest predation, interfering with parent-offspring and pair bonds, increasing nesting failures, and reducing the viability of fledglings. Additionally, birds may perceive humans as predators and leave an area, and the resulting decline in species abundance resembles the effects of habitat loss. Increased human outdoor activity has created the need for information regarding the effects of human disturbance on birds. I investigated the effects of human disturbance on birds in Bastrop State Park (BSP) in central Texas in 1998 and 1999. A wide variety of people use much of BSP, and many areas within the park experience significant amounts of disturbance from people and vehicles, particularly in campgrounds. I evaluated the effects of various types of human disturbance on the presence of 20 avian species, including seven neotropical migratory species. Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura), Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), and Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra), were sensitive to human presence, and Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata), and Downy Woodpeckers (Picoides pubescens) occurred in lower abundances in sites with higher numbers of vehicles. However, other species (e.g., American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos], Black-and-white Warbler [Mniotilta varia], Pileated Woodpecker [Dryocopus pileatus], Red-eyed Vireo [Vireo olivaceus], Ruby-throated Hummingbird [Archilochus colubris], White-eyed Vireo [Vireo griseus], and Yellow-billed Cuckoo [Coccyzus americanus]) tolerated humans, vehicles, or both. Neotropical migratory species did not show higher sensitivity to disturbance when compared to resident species, and forest interior species were not more sensitive than edge species. My results indicate that some species, including migrants, can become habituated to human presence in protected areas with low harassment and low-intensity, predictable disturbances. Management recommendations for BSP include protecting habitat, minimizing human disturbance in some areas, providing buffer zones between humandominated zones and sites containing vulnerable species, and softening edges in campgrounds.

Marcum, Heidi Ann

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effect of Group-Selection Opening Size on Breeding Bird Habitat Use in a Bottomland Forest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the effects of creating group-selection openings of various sizes on breeding birds habitat use in a bottomland hardwood forest of the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Creation of 0.5-ha group selection openings in southern bottomland forests should provide breeding habitat for some field-edge species in gaps and habitat for forest-interior species and canopy-dwelling forest-edge species between gaps provided that enough mature forest is made available.

Moorman, C.E.; D.C. Guynn, Jr.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Variation in the Structure of Bird Nests between Northern Manitoba and Southeastern Ontario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traits that converge in appearance under similar environmental conditions among phylogenetically independent lineages are thought to represent adaptations to local environments. We tested for convergence in nest morphology and composition of birds breeding in two ecologically different locations in Canada: Churchill in northern Manitoba and Elgin in southeastern Ontario. We examined nests from four families of passerine birds (Turdidae: Turdus, Parulidae: Dendroica, Emberizidae: Passerculus and Fringillidae: Carduelis) where closely related populations or species breed in both locations. Nests of American Robins, Yellow Warblers, and Carduelis finches had heavier nest masses, and tended to have thicker nestwalls, in northern Manitoba compared with conspecifics or congenerics breeding in southeastern Ontario. Together, all species showed evidence for wider internal and external nest-cup diameters in northern Manitoba, while individual species showed varying patterns for internal nest-cup and external nest depths. American Robins, Yellow Warblers, and Carduelis finches in northern Manitoba achieved heavier nest masses in different ways. American Robins increased all materials in similar proportions, and Yellow Warblers and Common Redpolls used greater amounts of select materials. While changes in nest composition vary uniquely for each species, the pattern of larger nests in northern Manitoba compared to southeastern Ontario in three of our four phylogenetically-independent comparisons suggests that birds are adapting to similar selective

Carla A. Crossman; Vanya G. Rohwer; Paul R. Martin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Migratory Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risk factors associated with LANL activities, such as: Installation of power poles and transmission lines Construction projects Invasive weed species eradication Waste treatment...

102

Bird Habitats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nestbox Network is in the position to be a cost-effective and efficient surveillance tool for long-term environmental stewardship at Los Alamos, coupled with monitoring...

103

Bird Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

she lost patience, fluttered her wings angrily in front of it, and sounded like a long string of flicker cusswords. The youngster squatted and then went floundering off, a little...

104

Organochlorine insecticide, polychlorinated biphenyl, and metal residues in some South Dakota birds, 1975-76  

SciTech Connect

Common species of South Dakota birds with different feeding habits were analyzed in 1975-76 for 11 insecticide residues, six metals, and PCB's. Crows, American coots, starlings, and Franklin's gulls were analyzed. DDE was the most prevalent residue, detected in 93% of all samples. Dieldrin was detected in 61% of all samples. PCB's were not found to be above the minimum detectable level in any sample. Gulls had higher insecticide and metal residues than coots, starlings, or crows had. (16 references, 2 tables)

Greichus, Y.A.; Gueck, B.D.; Ammann, B.D.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Long-term monitoring of fleshy fruit and hard mast production and seasonal bird distribution at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

A final report of Fruit and hard mast production in five habitat types at SRS with a comparison of fruit consumption by fledgling versus adult birds at SRS and Relative importance of fruit, seeds, and insects in the diets of overwintering birds at SRS.

Greenberg, Cathryn, H.; Levey, Douglas J.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity How to Make a Splash Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Manipulating Genes with Hidden TALENs Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors MAY 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share This collage shows the ring-shaped, isotropic x-ray diffraction pattern and electron microscope cross-section of the three-dimensional amorphous or quasi-ordered biophotonic nanostructure in spongy medullary feather barbs responsible for the vivid turquoise plumage of the Plum-throated Cotinga

107

Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hearing the Highest Pitches Hearing the Highest Pitches Unveiling the Secrets of Nanoparticle Haloing A Fruit-Fly Protein that Captures Tumor Growth Factors A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure JULY 16, 2008 Bookmark and Share The overall structure of the PAC -PB1 N complex. The structure is colored according to secondary structure and elements are labeled. Helices are shown as cylinders and are red in the brain domain and blue in the mouth domain; strands are yellow and loops are green. The PB1 N peptide is

108

JAN 183 26 [1] R.S. Bird. Lectures on constructive functional programming. In M. Broy, editor, Constructive Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Technology, 1990. [3] C. Morgan. Programming from Specifications. Series in Computer Science (C.A.RJAN 183 ­26 END OD END References [1] R.S. Bird. Lectures on constructive functional programming. In M. Broy, editor, Constructive Methods in Computing Science, NATO ASI Series F, pages 151

109

Ecological Modelling 117 (1999) 261267 Modeling bird mortality associated with the M/V Citrus oil spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Modelling 117 (1999) 261­267 Modeling bird mortality associated with the M/V Citrus oil of Ornithology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York NY 10024, USA/V Citrus oil spill in February 1996. Most of the islands beaches were searched on an irregular schedule

Rockwell, Robert F.

110

Assessment of the Impacts of Green Mountain Power Corporation's Wind Power Facility on Breeding and Migrating Birds in Searsburg, Vermont: July 1996--July 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 6-megawatt, 11 turbine wind power development was constructed by Green Mountain Power Corporation in Searsburg, southern Vermont, in 1996. To determine whether birds were impacted, a series of modified BA (Before, After) studies was conducted before construction (1993-1996), during (1996), and after (1997) construction on the project site. The studies were designed to monitor changes in breeding bird community (species composition and abundance) on the site, examine the behavior and numbers of songbirds migrating at night over the site and hawks migrating over the site in daylight, and search for carcasses of birds that might have collided with the turbines.

Kerlinger, P.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Session: What have studies of communications towers suggested regarding the impact of guy wires and lights on birds and bats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The paper ''Wind turbines and Avian Risk: Lessons from Communications Towers'' was given by Paul Kerlinger. The presenter outlined lessons that have been learned from research on communications (not cell) towers and about the impacts of guy wires and lights on birds and bats and how they could be useful to wind energy developers. The paper also provided specific information about a large 'fatality' event that occurred at the Mountaineer, WC wind energy site in May 2003, and a table of Night Migrant Carcass search findings for various wind sites in the US.

Kerlinger, Paul

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Bird Diversity, Birdwatching Tourism and Conservation in Peru: A Geographic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the face of the continuing global biodiversity loss, it is important not only to assess the need for conservation, through e.g. gap analyses, but also to seek practical solutions for protecting biodiversity. Environmentally and socially sustainable tourism can be one such solution. We present a method to spatially link data on conservation needs and tourism-based economic opportunities, using bird-related tourism in Peru as an example. Our analysis highlighted areas in Peru where potential for such projects could be particularly high. Several areas within the central and northern Andean regions, as well as within the lowland Amazonian regions of Madre de Dios and Loreto emerge as promising for this type of activity. Mechanisms to implement conservation in these areas include e.g. conservation and ecotourism concessions, private conservation areas, and conservation easements. Some of these mechanisms also offer opportunities for local communities seeking to secure their traditional land ownership and use rights. (Spanish language abstract, Abstract S1).

Liisa Puhakka; Matti Salo; Ilari E. Sksjrvi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Size-Abundance Relationships in an Amazonian Bird Community: Implications for the Energetic Equivalence Rule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

abstract: We studied size-abundance relationships in a speciesrich Amazonian bird community and found that the slope of the logarithmic relationship between population density and body mass ( b p ?0.22) is significantly shallower than expected under Damuths energetic equivalence rule (EER), which states that population energy use (PEU) is independent of species body mass. We used estimates of avian field metabolic rates to examine the logarithmic relationship between PEU and body mass and its variation among ecological guilds. The relationship for all species had a significantly positive slope ( b p 0.46), indicating that PEU of larger species was greater than that of smaller species. Analyses of guilds revealed significant variation. The slopes of the frugivore-omnivore, insectivore, and granivore guilds were all significantly positive, with that of the frugivore-omnivore guild being the steepest. In contrast, PEU did not vary significantly with species body mass among raptors. These results were confirmed in analyses using both species values and phylogenetically independent contrasts, and the results do not support the EER in this community. The spatial distribution of resources and mechanisms of interference competition within guilds may explain why most patterns differed from the predictions of the EER. Other sources of variation, including the effects of scale, are also discussed.

Sabrina E. Russo; Scott K. Robinson; John Terborgh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparing functions of natural and created marshes for shorebirds and wading birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shorebirds and wading birds were observed November 1997 to April 1998 and September 1998 to April 1999 to compare functional values of natural and created marshes on the Texas coast. Study locations included Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Nueces Delta Mitigation Project, and Mustang Island, Texas. Analysis focused on black-bellied plover (Pluvialis squatarola), long-billed curlew (Numenitus americanus, peeps (Calidris sandpipers), willet (Cataptrophorus semipalmatus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), and great egret (Ardea alba). Invertebrate benthos were sampled to determine prey availability. Few significant differences existed in invertebrate density or biomass between sites. No significant differences existed for any variable at Aransas NWR (p>0.05). At Nueces Delta, total biomass (p=0.031) and polychaete biomass (p=0.029) were significantly lower in October 1998 than in February 1998 or 1999, or April 1998 or 1999. Total density (p=0.042) and crustacean density (p=0.049) were significantly higher at the Mustang Island natural site than at the created site. Insect density (p=0.002) and insect biomass (p=0.001) increased significantly from November 1998 to April 1999 on Mustang Island. Cluster analysis showed no overall pattern among avian species' activities by site, location, year, or type of site (natural or created). Mustang Island sites were most similar for black-bellied plover, long- billed curlew, peeps, and willet. Peeps fed in >78% of observations at all sites except Nueces Island 1997-98 (61.3%). Great blue heron and great egret were rarely recorded feeding (<20%) at any site. Patterns of utilization among sites appear species specific, related more to habitat than type of site. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling using the 11 most abundant species separated Mustang Island sites from Nueces Delta sites. Dunlin, peeps, sanderling, willet, snowy egret, and great egret were much more abundant on Mustang Island than Nueces Delta. Availability of tidal flats at Mustang Island probably explains differences in community composition.

Brusati, Elizabeth Diane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bird Risk Behaviors and Fatalities at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: Period of Performance, March 1998--December 2000  

SciTech Connect

It has been documented that wind turbine operations at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area kill large numbers of birds of multiple species, including raptors. We initiated a study that integrates research on bird behaviors, raptor prey availability, turbine design, inter-turbine distribution, landscape attributes, and range management practices to explain the variation in avian mortality at two levels of analysis: the turbine and the string of turbines. We found that inter-specific differences in intensities of use of airspace within close proximity did not explain the variation in mortality among species. Unique suites of attributes relate to mortality of each species, so species-specific analyses are required to understand the factors that underlie turbine-caused fatalities. We found that golden eagles are killed by turbines located in the canyons and that rock piles produced during preparation of the wind tower laydown areas related positively to eagle mortality, perhaps due to the use of these rock piles as cover by desert cottontails. Other similar relationships between fatalities and environmental factors are identified and discussed. The tasks remaining to complete the project are summarized.

Thelander, C. G.; Smallwood, K. S.; Rugge, L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Distribution of Energy Use and Biomass Among Species of North American Terrestrial Birds Author(s): Brian A. Maurer and James H. Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution of Energy Use and Biomass Among Species of North American Terrestrial Birds Author, 69(6), 1988, pp. 1923-1932 ? 1988 by the Ecological Society of America DISTRIBUTION OF ENERGY USE. The distribution of biomass and energy use among species with different body sizes provides an empirical basis

Brown, James H.

119

Long-Term Performance of Aanderaa Optodes and Sea-Bird SBE-43 Dissolved-Oxygen Sensors Bottom Mounted at 32 m in Massachusetts Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field evaluation of two new dissolved-oxygen sensing technologies, the Aanderaa Instruments AS optode model 3830 and the Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc., model SBE43, was carried out at about 32-m water depth in western Massachusetts Bay. The optode ...

Marinna Martini; Bradford Butman; Michael J. Mickelson

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Webinar on Improving Methods for Estimating Fatality of Birds and Bats at Wind Energy Facilities 10Noon Pacific Wednesday, September 26, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Webinar on Improving Methods for Estimating Fatality of Birds and Bats at Wind Energy Facilities 10 results from a California Wind Energy Association (CalWEA)sponsored, California Energy Commissionfunded associated with wind energy facilities, including an improved equation developed to adjust mortality

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

6/16/13 To catch a cyber-thief healthmedicinet.com/news/to-catch-a-cyber-thief/ 1/4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

against child porn, permits quick capture of e- criminals IMAGE: Gaby Dagher and Benjamin Fung, Concordia, June 5, 2013 When local police came calling with child porn allegations last January, former Saint John

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

122

Tuna-Dolphin-Bird Feeding Assemblages in the Galapagos Islands and Their Response to the Physical Characteristics of the Upper Water Column  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tuna-dolphin-bird feeding assemblages are unique to the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean (ETP). These multiple species groups are believed to forage together in response to the physical properties of the near surface ocean as these constrain the distribution of prey. In the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR), intra-annual and interannual changes affect the properties of the water column, inducing mesoscale and fine scale temporal variability. Four three-week oceanographic surveys took place, in September 2008, April 2009, October 2009, and September 2010, between the coast of Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands and one small boat survey took place in June 2010 within the GMR. Marine mammal surveys were conducted during daylight hours and Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) sensor casts were taken throughout the survey. Data were analyzed to determine the types of water masses present and the strength and depth of the thermocline layer. These data were compared with the sightings of marine mammals, bird feeding groups, and tuna-dolphin-bird assemblages. Additionally, these data were used to predict where tuna would be likely to associate with dolphin groups. Results show Equatorial Surface Water was the dominant water mass throughout the archipelago, regardless of season or ENSO index. High salinity, cold water west of Isla Isabela indicated topographic upwelling of the Equatorial Undercurrent. Tropical Surface Waters from the Panama Current were detected north of the Equatorial Front to the east of the islands. Obvious changes in the water column properties were observed between El Nio and La Nia events in the GMR. Most mixed groups were sighted west and south of Isla Isabela during the four oceanographic surveys, as well as north and west of Isla San Cristobal in June 2010. Most sightings were in cool, high salinity waters, and high chlorophyll concentrations. There were a greater number of sightings during the April 2009 survey (ENSO-neutral conditions) than during any of the three fall surveys. Additionally, tuna-dolphin-bird groups were more likely to be seen near Isla Isabela, with the majority of them sighted during the April 2009 survey and a few sighted in each of the September 2008 and October 2009 surveys. No tuna-dolphin-bird groups were sighted during the September 2010 surveys. Results show that the presence and location of these multi-species groups may be controlled by the inter-annual cycles, the intra-annual cycles, or a combination of both types of changes seen within the Galapagos.

Johnston, Michelle

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Birds in Winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

some of them in considerable number. Crow Bluejay Tree sparrow Evening grosbeak Herring gull Junco Goldfinch Horned lark Pheasant Black-capped chickadee Redpoll Cardinal...

124

Bird-Feeding Boards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

live here all winter. Now is the time. The simplest device is a board or a piece of plywood nailed on a window sill. It should be at least 12 inches wide and 24 inches long, set...

125

Bird Egg Colors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

most exposed eggs whether on the ground or not. A second purpose to darker eggs is to shield it from harmful sun radiation. especially if the eggs are exposed. Steve Sample Not an...

126

The Christmas Bird Count  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

region are the Palos forest preserves, the DesPlaines River and Salt Creek valleys, Lincoln Park and the Chicago lake front, Waukegan and the Illinois Dunes, the...

127

Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance of fish-eating birds, primarily ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California (L. californicus) gulls and monitored their behavior at two man-made structures within the Yakima River in eastern Washington: Horn Rapids Dam, a low-head irrigation dam, and the return pipe for the Chandler Juvenile Fish Handling Facility. Earlier observations of congregations of gulls at these structures suggested an increased likelihood of predation of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. We estimated the number of fish consumed and examined the relationship between river flow and gull numbers and fish taken. Numbers of gulls at the structures varied daily between their arrival in Late March-early April and departure in late June (mean ({+-}SE) - Horn Rapids: 11.7 ({+-}2.0), Chandler: 20.1 ({+-}1.5) ). During the 4-yr study, numbers at Horn Rapids peaked dramatically during the last 2 weeks in May (between 132.9 ({+-}4.2) to 36.6 ({+-}2.2) gulls/day) and appeared to the associated with the release of > 1-mil hatchery juvenile fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) above the 2 study sites. A comparable peak in gull abundance was not observed at Chandler. Diurnal patterns of gull abundance also varied among years and sites. The relationship between foraging efficiency and gull numbers was not consistent among years or sites. Gull numbers were not correlated with river flow when year was considered. However, variations in flow among years appeared to be associated with average gull numbers at each site, but trends were not consistent between sites. Low seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Chandler, whereas high seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Horn Rapids. Assuming all fish taken were salmonids, we estimate gulls consumed between 0.1-10.3 % of the juvenile salmonids passing or being released from the Chandler Juvenile Fish Monitoring Facility located above the two structures. Staggered releases of hatchery fish, nocturnal releases of fish entrained in the Chandler facility, changes in the orientation of the outflow from the f

Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, Quantitive Ecology Program, Seattle, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Multivariate Ornstein--Uhlenbeck process in studies of home range. Technical report No. 2. [Radiotelemetry tracking of birds, deer, and coyotes  

SciTech Connect

In home range studies, the statistical analysis of radio telemetry data poses special problems due to lack of independence of successive observations along the sample path. Assuming, however, that such data is generated by a continuous, stationary, Gaussian process possessing the Markov property, then a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion process is necessarily the source and is proposed here to be a workable model. Its characterization is given in terms of the typical descriptive properties of home range such as center of activity, homing tendency, and confidence regions. Invariance of the model with respect to the choice of an observational coordinate system is established, while data for twin deer is used to illustrate the manner in which the model may be used for the study of territorial interaction. An approximate maximum likelihood procedure is proposed for estimation purposes, with results being reported for deer, coyote, and bird tracking data. Estimates based on the coyote tracking data are used to illustrate how the concept of statistical information may be utilized to examine various sampling strategies.

Dunn, J. E.

1976-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

JGI - Credits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Credits The following people are responsible for developing and maintaining the www.jgi.doe.gov web site: David Gilbert: manager, content development, photography Leila Hornick:...

130

Birds Sighted at Freels Bend  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and water, an increasingly rare combination in the region. Common loon Eastern wood-pewee c Black-throated green warbler Pied-billed grebe Acadian flycatcher c...

131

Development of Novel High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Assays for Gender Identification of Caribbean Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber) and other Birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unambiguous gender identification (ID) is needed to assess parameters in studies of population dynamics, behavior, and evolutionary biology of Caribbean Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber) and other birds. Due to its importance for management and conservation, molecular (DNA-based) avian gender ID assays targeting intron-size differences of the Chromosome Helicase ATPase DNA Binding (CHD) gene of males (CHD-Z) and females (CHD-W) have been developed. Male (ZZ) and female (WZ) genotypes are usually scored as size polymorphisms through agarose or acrylamide gels. For certain species, W-specific restriction sites or multiplex polymerase chain-reaction (PCR) involving CHD-W specific primers are needed. These approaches involve a minimum of three steps following DNA isolation: PCR, gel electrophoresis, and photo-documentation, which limit high throughput scoring and automation potential. In here, a short amplicon (SA) High-resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) assay for avian gender ID is developed. SA-HRMA of an 81-Base Pair (bp) segment differentiates heteroduplex female (WZ) from homoduplex male (ZZ) genotypes by targeting Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) instead of intron-size differences between CHD-Z and CHD-W genes. To demonstrate the utility of the approach, the gender of Caribbean Flamingo (P. ruber ruber) (17 captive from the Dallas Zoo and 359 wild from Ria Lagartos, Yucatan, Mexico) was determined. The assay was also tested on specimens of Lesser Flamingo (P. minor), Chilean Flamingo (P. chilensis), Saddle-billed Stork (Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis), Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber), White-bellied Stork (Ciconia abdimii), Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), Marabou Stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus), Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus), and Attwater's Prairie Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). Although the orthologous 81 bp segments of Z and W are highly conserved, sequence alignments with 50 avian species across 15 families revealed mismatches affecting one or more nucleotides within the SA-HRMA forward or reverse primers. Most mismatches were located along the CHD-Z gene that may generate heteroduplex curves and thus gender ID errors. For such cases, taxon and species-specific primer sets were designed. The SA-HRMA gender ID assay can be used in studies of avian ecology and behavior, to assess sex-associated demographics and migratory patterns, and as a proxy to determine the health of the flock and the degree by which conservation and captive breeding programs are functioning.

Chapman, Alexandra

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

New search tool helps in fight against child porn, permits quick capture of e-criminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New search tool helps in fight against child porn, permits quick capture of e-criminals Gaby Dagher Desjardins When local police came calling with child porn allegations last January, former Saint John city to the identified criminal topics, and "New search tool helps in fight against child porn, permits quick capture

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

133

Bird Bones in Bending and Torsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial synthesis and fabrication of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by using the metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae Micromechanical...

134

Many Birds Fly, Some Dont  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ever since the publication of Programs With Common Sense by McCarthy, the problem of qualification has been a source of intense research and debate. While it is undoubtful that now the common sense research community knows ... Keywords: belief revision, commonsense reasoning, nonmonotonic reasoning, partial set inclusion, qualification problem

Luia M. M. Custdio; Carlos Pinto-Ferreira

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Winter Birds from Canada in Chicagoland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Canada in Chicagoland Nature Bulletin No. 704-A February 10, 1979 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W, Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation...

136

A bird's eye view of quantum computers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum computers are discussed in the general framework of computation, the laws of physics and the foundations of quantum mechanics.

Giuliano Benenti; Giuliano Strini

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

1 www.aviandemographyunit.orgBirds in Reserves Project Guide BIRDS IN RESERVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-western and southern coastal belt and Little Karoo 2. West coast, Karoo and western Orange River 3. Kalahari 4 to the habitats on red Kalahari sands. West coast and Karoo include Strandveld, Succulent Karoo, Nama Karoo and Bushmanland. The birdlife of the western Orange River is very different from the surrounding Karoo

de Villiers, Marienne

138

fixed2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part Deux Part Deux Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

139

rf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RF RF It's what makes the protons go 'round. The latest in a series explaining particle physics in everyday language. Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

140

beamcooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM COOLING BEAM COOLING Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I I Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

142

magnets2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II II Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

143

crosssection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CROSS SECTION CROSS SECTION Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

144

Adaptive management of migratory birds under sea level rise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The best practice method for managing ecological systems under uncertainty is adaptive management (AM), an iterative process of reducing uncertainty while simultaneously optimizing a management objective. Existing solution methods used for AM problems ...

Samuel Nicol, Olivier Buffet, Takuya Iwamura, Iadine Chads

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

BIRD FATALITY ASSOCIATIONS AND PREDICTIVE MODELS FOR THE APWRA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at those models in our sample in the APWRA Micon 65 Bonus Danwin Flowind Windmatic Enertech KCS-56 KVS-33 Enertech KCS-56 KVS-33 Howden Nordtank W.E.G. 25002000150010005000 N Effort Turbine model Sum proportion Predictor Variable df GOEA RTHA AMKE BUOW BAOW GHOW Turbine model 10 17.98t 20.70* 78.59** 44.59** 7.23 5

146

SOUTHERN AFRICAN BIRD ATLAS PROJECT 2 INSTRUCTION MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

features (e.g. in the Karoo or Kalahari) or that are unfamiliar may present problems if you are using maps-Western Cape, Southern Coastal Belt & Little Karoo (Blue) Field Data Sheet 2 = West Coast and Succulent Karoo 4. Woodlands (incl. savanha, thornveld, bushveld, alien trees) 5. Fynbos 6. Karoo 7. Farmland 8

de Villiers, Marienne

147

For the birds | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a protected zone - the native grass plot." The 3-acre native grass area reduces fuel usage and greenhouse gas emissions while saving money; it is only mowed (bush-hogged) once...

148

A riverscape perspective on habitat associations among riverine bird ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

used the straight-line valley distance and the sur- ... In each plot, we identified all trees (live and dead) ...... result is supported by other work that suggests that.

149

Winter Bird Use of the Chinese Tallow Tree in Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) is a non-native invasive tree that is of particular concern in the Southeastern United States. It has become naturalized in a (more)

Baldwin, Michael John

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Audubon of South Jordan: a migratory bird awareness / education center.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I have always been an admirer of nature. I have always wanted to contribute and give back to the community by doing something that involved (more)

Jensen, Adam Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Workshop: Tcnicas Avanadas de Anlise de Imagens de Sensoriamento Remoto (Recent Advances in Image Analysis Techniques for Remote Sensing)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Image Analysis Techniques for Remote Sensing) Coordenadores: Leila Maria G. Fonseca (INPE) e João Paulo in remote sensing technology, especially improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions, have put different from more conventional approaches for remote sensing image analysis. Hora Título das Palestras

152

REMEMBERING LEE BIRD, 1918-2013 Born February 20, 1918 in Bala-Cynwyd, a Philadelphia suburb, Benjamin Lee Bird died  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and then in offensive operations against the Japanese first in New Guinea and ending four years later in Okinawa. He

Wolfe, Patrick J.

153

Birds prefer to breed in sites with low radioactivity in Chernobyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the final report on mutations in children of atomic bomb survivors showed little or no effect (Neel et al consider- able attention by scientists since the Hiroshima and Nagasaki nuclear bombs in 1945. However. 1988). Likewise, a recent report on the biological consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl

Mousseau, Timothy A.

154

Complementary Descriptive and Experimental Studies of Clinal Variation in Birds Author(s): Frances C. James  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the survival and reproduction of individuals at different localities. Laboratory and field experiments with Red-winged

Weston, Ken

155

Contamination of Wind Profiler Data by Migrating Birds: Characteristics of Corrupted Data and Potential Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winds measured with 915- and 404-MHz wind profilers are frequently found to have nonrandom errors as large as 15 m s?1 when compared to simultaneously measured rawinsonde winds. Detailed studies of these errors which occur only at night below ...

J. M. Wilczak; R. G. Strauch; F. M. Ralph; B. L. Weber; D. A. Merritt; J. R. Jordan; D. E. Wolfe; L. K. Lewis; D. B. Wuertz; J. E. Gaynor; S. A. McLaughlin; R. R. Rogers; A. C. Riddle; T. S. Dye

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with a total fuel alcohol consumption of 13.8 ? 106 m3/year (ANP, 1999). In the U.S., several recent political

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

157

Selection and Testing of an Internet Protocol Video Camera for the Bird Activity Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Avian interactions such as collisions and electrocutions with overhead power lines, communication towers, wind turbines, and other utility structures are subjects of increasing concern among utilities, regulatory agencies, and environmental organizations. However, our ability to quantify the temporal and spatial extent of the problem or the efficacy of mitigating measures is severely hampered by a lack of standard monitoring methods and tools. EPRI initiated a project in 2000 that led to the development ...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

BIRD BEHAVIORS IN THE ALTAMONT PASS WIND RESOURCE AREA 8.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

57 34 2.21 Micon 28 18 1.80 KCS-56 58 9 0.36 Enertech 29 27 2.70 KCS-56 59 11 0.44 Enertech 30 40 4, Flowind 42 52 5.20 KVS-33 13 29 3.48 Bonus 43 45 4.50 KCS-56 14 12 1.80 Bonus 44 52 5.20 KCS-56 15 15 2.13 Bonus 45 31 1.24 Enertech 16 15 3.10 Bonus, Flowind 46 21 1.17 Micon, Enertech 17 18 2.64 Bonus, Flowind

159

CHI-SQUARE TEST STATISTICS AND DERIVED MEASURES OF EFFECT FOR HAWKS, RAPTORS, AND ALL BIRDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.31 1.22 6 Danwin 1 1.25 0.80 0 Flowind 4 9.96 0.40 -2 Windmatic 2 2.79 0.72 0 Enertech 4 12.66 0.32 -4 1.10 2.73 1 41.2 3 2.54 1.18 0 44.9 0 0.04 0 0 48.6 0 0.15 0 0 52.0 4 6.00 0.67 -1 Height (m ÷ Exp Accountable percent Turbine congestion (no. in 300 m) ** 0 - ­12 44 27.87 1.58 7 13 - ­24 102 109

160

CHI-SQUARE TEST STATISTICS AND DERIVED MEASURES OF EFFECT FOR VARIOUS BIRDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.28 0 -1 Flowind 0 2.21 0 -4 Windmatic 0 0.62 0 -1 Enertech 2 2.81 0.71 -2 KCS-56 30 27.30 1.10 5 KVS-33.28 0 -1 34.4 10 10.04 1 0 36.9 7 5.11 1.37 4 37.2 0 0.06 0 0 40.3 2 0.24 8.20 3 41.2 0 0.57 0 -1 44.9 0.18 5 Intense control 16 26.44 0.61 -19 Rodent control through 2002 * Unknown 1 0.65 1.53 1 None 17 9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Limits to Species' Distributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding Bird Populations Along an Ecological Gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Energy and water budgets of larks in a life history2004. Energy and water budgets of larks in a life history

Hargrove, Lori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Post-Eocene climate change, niche conservatism, and the latitudinal diversity gradient of New World birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Paleobotany, 7th Quadrennial Conference, Bariloche,of Paleobotany, 7th Quadrennial Conference, Bariloche,

Hawkins, Bradford A.; Diniz, JAF; Jaramillo, C A; Soeller, S A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Limits to Species' Distributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding Bird Populations Along an Ecological Gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spp. (mostly polycarpa) Ambrosia dumosa CylindropuntiaWashingtonia filifera) Ambrosia salsola Agave desertiincluded: (E) white bur-sage (Ambrosia dumosa), ocotillo (

Hargrove, Lori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Host diversity begets parasite diversity: bird final hosts and trematodes in snail intermediate hosts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disease risk: the case of lyme disease. Conserv. Biol. 14,the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease decreases with2000). Ixodid ticks vector Lyme disease (a spirochaete

Hechinger, R F; Lafferty, K D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Aerial Righting, Directed Aerial Descent, and Maneuvering in the Evolution of Flight in Birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of a force sensor and 3D printer. Chapter 4 Disturbancewere then output to a 3D printer (ProJet HD 3000; 3D Systems

Evangelista, Dennis Jose

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The value of forest strips for understorey birds in an Amazonian plantation landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Jari´ Celulose S.A., located on the border between the states of Amapa´ and Para´ in north of the landscape, was developed from a combination of land-use data provided by Jari Celulose S.A and a 2003 Land of Orsa Florestal and Jari Celulose in Jari for permission to work on in their landholding, as well

Barlow, Jos

167

The value of primary, secondary and plantation forests for Amazonian birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, lignina e celulose, que fortalecem as paredes da célula (Mandell e Baker, 1991). Jabaji-Hare et al. (1994

Barlow, Jos

168

Limits to Species' Distributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding Bird Populations Along an Ecological Gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Peninsular Mountains in the Colorado Desert, California,between the Peninsular Range and Colorado Desert in southernthe Peninsular Ranges and Colorado Desert. The Peninsular

Hargrove, Lori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Host diversity begets parasite diversity: bird final hosts and trematodes in snail intermediate hosts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trans- mission. Am. Nat. 138, 867880. Host diversity begetsparasite diversity Combes, C. 2001 Parasitism: the ecology2004 Measuring biological diversity. Maldan, MA: Blackwell

Hechinger, R F; Lafferty, K D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A p system based model of an ecosystem of some scavenger birds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In [1], we presented a P system in order to study the evolution of the bearded vulture in the Pyrenees (NE Spain). Here, we present a new model that overcomes some limitations of the previous work incorporating other scavenger species and additional ...

Mnica Cardona; M. Angels Colomer; Antoni Margalida; Ignacio Prez-Hurtado; Mario J. Prez-Jimnez; Delf Sanuy

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Bird in the Hand: Stipulated Settlements and Electricity Regulation in Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to water and wastewater utilities. 3 It is the policy of the law to encourage and favour the compromise and settlement of controversies when such settlement is entered into fairly and in good faith by competent parties, and is not procured by fraud... of substantial rate increases in the 1970s and early 1980s. The increases reflected a variety of factors, including inflation, the oil crisis, system expansion and the building of new generation plant including nuclear. In this context the OPC was created...

Littlechild, Stephen C

172

The Correction for Thermal-Lag Effects in Sea-Bird CTD Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A practical method for determining the CTD thermal-lag correction amplitude ? and time constant ? is presented. The method is based upon minimizing the salinity separation of temperature-salinity curves from upcasts and downcasts of a yo-yo ...

James Morison; Roger Andersen; Nordeen Larson; Eric D'Asaro; Tim Boyd

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Appendix 35 Pre-1850 Species List for the Flathead Subbasin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common Name Birds Red-necked Grebe Podiceps grisegena Birds Eared Grebe Podiceps nigricollis Birds Birds Mallard Anas platyrhynchos Birds Blue-winged Teal Anas discors Birds Cinnamon Teal Anas cyanoptera Birds Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata Birds Northern Pintail Anas acuta Birds Green-winged Teal Anas

174

13 (1): 100-xxx (2006)13 (1): 100-110 (2006) Distribution and survival of birds within a landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the fact that small passerines have very high energy reuirements, especially in wintertime (Calder & King

Carrascal, Luis M.

175

Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing Support Retail Competition and Demand Response?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competition and Demand Response? Galen Barbose, Ranjitbenefit of stimulating demand response. To evaluate themarket development and demand response we conducted a

Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing Support Retail Competition and Demand Response?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other states are indexed to the PJM real-time energy market.Pricing New Jersey Maryland PJM region* NYISO region ISO-NEpenetration data for the PJM region as a whole in addition

Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine foundations (Patrick and Henderson) was commissioned to design a foundation. More detailHull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation", the largest wind turbine (660 kW) yet installed in the state. That project proved to be so popular that HMLP

178

Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing Support Retail Competition and Demand Response?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America. 2004. Texas 2004 Energy Usage and Sourcing Trend100% of their hourly energy usage at hourly prices indexedits total usage in that hour by the prevailing hourly energy

Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing Support Retail Competition and Demand Response?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are paying prices indexed to the real-time spot market, andusage at hourly prices indexed to the real-time and/or day-who pay prices indexed to the real-time market. Utility and

Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- sässig. Der Nordwesten ist auch Basisstandort für Offshore-Windenergie. Hier profilieren sich Offshore-Windenergie. DEWI, Wilhelmshaven Das vom Land Niedersachsen gegründete Insti- tut DEWI gilt als Behörden an. Ein aktu- elles Schwerpunktthema ist dabei die Offshore- Windenergie-Nutzung, die intensiv

Hanson, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bird species abundanceoccupancy patterns and sensitivity to forest fragmentation: Implications for conservation in the Brazilian Atlantic forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007, a Associação Brasileira Técnica de Celulose e Papel (ABTCP) e a Universidade Federal do Paraná voltados aos alunos que querem adquirir conhecimento sobre as áreas produtivas de celulose e papel e PRODU??O DE CELULOSE E PAPEL - Parte 1 8:00-12:00 24/04/2007 13:00-17:00 PROCESSO DE PRODU??O DE CELULOSE E

Holt, Robert D.

182

Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing Support Retail Competition and Demand Response?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ahead energy market, for which hourly prices are published aPJM real-time energy market. Hourly prices in this marketenergy market provide customers with a more compelling incentive for price

Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Seeing the world through the nose of a bird: new developments in the sensory ecology of procellariiform seabirds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CN) systems. Functionally, SNs are velocity detectors, i.e.that nerve fibers innervating SNs exhibit increased activitybetween responses of CNs vs. SNs is due to the fact that in

Nevitt, G A; Bonadonna, F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Structure and Evolution of an Undular Bore on the High Plains and Its Effects on Migrating Birds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 18 September 1992 a series of thunderstorms in Nebraska and eastern Colorado, which formed south of a synoptic-scale cold front and north of a Rocky Mountain lee trough, produced a cold outflow gust front that moved southeastward into Kansas, ...

John D. Locatelli; Mark T. Stoelinga; Peter V. Hobbs; Jim Johnson

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Effects of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill on bald eagles. Bird study number 4. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We estimated that about 8000 bald eagles (Halieetus leucocephalus) inhabited the area affected by the spill at the time of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. We conducted a 3-year study to determine effects of the spill on the bald eagle population and reproduction and survival of adults and fledglings. The greatest injuries to bald eagles occurred in 1989 and were manifested by direct mortality of bald eagles throughout the spill area and significantly reduced reproduction in PWS. We could not discern negative effects on the population or reproduction of eagles after 1989.

Bowman, T.D.; Schempf, P.F.; Bernatowicz, J.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Savorphos as an All Natural Phosphate Replacer in Water and Oil Based Marinades for Rotisserie Birds and Boneless-Skinless Breast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As consumer demand for all-natural marinades increases, the need to replace phosphate with a natural product that can produce equivalent or improved yield in products such as but not limited to rotisserie chickens (RWOG) and boneless/skinless breast (BSB) is a challenge for processors. The objective of this study was to determine if using an all-natural non-phosphate blend (savorphos-200, SP) in water-based (WB) and oil-based (OB) marinades would perform better in quality and yield parameters than a commercial phosphate blend (PB). The treatments included WB+PB (water, 0.4% phosphate, 0.7% salt), WB+SP (water, 0.5% savorphos-200, 0.7% salt), OB+PB (water, 3% canola oil, 0.4% phosphate, 0.7% salt), and OB+SP (water, 3% oil, 0.5% savorphos-200, 0.7% salt). RWOG and BSB were injected with a multi-needle injector to 20% (wt/wt) pick-up at a constant pressure (15-20 psi). The parameters measured were marinade pick-up %, 20 min and 24 hr marinade retention %, and cook loss %. Color, tenderness, total moisture, and sensory test were conducted on BSB. Data were analyzed within marination type (WB and OB). Results for the RWOG indicated SP obtained higher pick-up yield (p0.05). Therefore, savorphos-200 can be used as a natural non-phosphate blend in water based marinades with no detriment to yield. In addition, savorphos-200 can be used as a natural non-phosphate blend in oil-based marinades with yield improvements.

Casco Montenegro, Gerardo

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Using object-based analysis of image data to count birds: mapping of Lesser Flamingos at Kamfers Dam, Northern Cape, South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowing instantaneous locations and numbers of individuals in animal populations is a major requirement for wildlife and conservation ecology. Recent advances in very high spatial resolution digital-imaging systems and in object-based image-analysis ...

Geoff Groom; Ib Krag Petersen; Mark D. Anderson; Anthony D. Fox

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Publications of Galen B. Rathbun, 1963-1999 1. Rathbun, G. B. 1963. Common mammals, birds, reptiles, and shrubs of Huddart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:301-308. 22. Kochman, H.I., G.B. Rathbun, and J.A. Powell. 1983. Use of Kings Bay, Crystal River, Florida/Management Plan for Crystal River Manatees, Vol. III, Compendium. Technical Report No. 7, Florida Cooperative Fish

190

Am. MidI. Nat. l:i9:29-3R Bird Flight Characteristics Near Wind Turbines in Minnesota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)IIIl!1I 1 ill tlie Iwliollal illleres!. > T/ie La/}o/'{/!rJ/:r:I' pltilosop/i): missiolls nle Microwave LimbSounder Since its launch aboard NASA's 'pper Atmo- sphere Rl!search Satellite in September

191

Using light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology to assess bird-habitat relationships| A case study from the Northwoods of Maine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is a remote sensing technology that quantifies the travel time of photons emitted in pulses from a LiDAR (more)

Newton, Wesley Eugene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The signing of the 19th Meeting Record. Seated are Alexandre Jakovsky, left, of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

signing of the 19th Meeting Record. Seated are Alexandre Jakovsky, left, of the Russian Federation signing of the 19th Meeting Record. Seated are Alexandre Jakovsky, left, of the Russian Federation Ministry of Atomic Energy, and John O'Fallon, of the U.S. Department of Energy. Behind them are Fermilab Director John Peoples (far left), U.S. and Russian delegates and Fermilab Directorate staff. Photos by Reidar Hahn by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs When Russian delegates to the Joint Coordinating Committee for Research on the Fundamental Properties of Matter came to Fermilab November 13 and 14 to discuss U.S.- Russian collaboration on high-energy physics research, they had every reason to feel at home. The first high-energy physics experiment ever carried out at Fermilab was a joint Soviet-U.S. collaboration that began taking data "as soon as

193

Memorandum of Understanding II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical characterization of concentrated gas hydrate Geochemical characterization of concentrated gas hydrate deposits on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand Preliminary Geochemical Cruise Report Dr. Richard Coffin Dr. Leila Hamdan Dr. John Pohlman Marine Biogeochemistry Section Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC, USA Dr. Warren Wood Geology and Geophysics Section Naval Research Laboratory Stennis, MS, USA Dr. Ingo Pecher Dr. Stuart Henrys Dr. Jens Greinert Dr. Kevin Faure Geological and Nuclear Sciences P.O. Box 30-368, Lower Hutt, NZ Dr. Andrew Gorman University of Otago Dept. of Geology P.O.Box 56 Dunedin, 9015, NZ Dr. Alan Orpin National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Private Bag 14-901 Kilbirnie, Wellington, NZ 2 i. Table of Contents i. Table of Contents ................................................................................. 2

194

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rationale Health Forests Restoration Act of 2003 area. Migratory Birds Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 EO 131186 X Migratory birds may be affected by the construction of the...

195

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel system Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 6.8...

196

NREL: Energy Analysis - Market and Policy Impact Analysis Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research interests Policy & environmental Energy planning & project development More information on Kelli Anderson Photo of Lori Bird Lori Bird Senior Analyst Areas of expertise...

197

Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix B  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy Searchlight BBCS i October 2012 Searchlight Wind Energy Project Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy Prepared for: Duke Energy Renewables 550...

198

Effects of Hayfield Management on Grassland Songbirds:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the last 40 years North American grassland bird populations have declined more than any other bird guild. This trend is especially evident in Vermont, (more)

Perlut, Noah G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Summer 2008 Vol.32, No. 2 Cindy Hudson collecting seed in the Rob Roy Glacier,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and flora. Emeritus professor Todd Newberry's early morning bird walk was, as always, very popular. Oliver

California at Santa Cruz, University of

200

Berkeley Emeriti Dr. Marshall Stoller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included Ebola virus, AIDS, hepatitis C, bird flu, Legionnaires'disease, Lyme disease, mad cow disease

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Biol. Lett. (2007) 3, 280283 doi:10.1098/rsbl.2007.0053  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Miltenberger, H. & Querner, U. 1990 Genetic transmission of migratory behavior into a nonmigratory bird

202

An Enskog based Monte Carlo method for high Knudsen number non-ideal gas flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high Knudsen number non-ideal gas flows References [1] Gad-121: [2] Bird GA. Molecular gas dynamics. Oxford: Clarendon1976. [3] Bird GA. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct

Wang, Moran; Li, Zhixin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Miami Herald January 28, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to tear down existing dams. Hydro is the largest source of renewable electricity, providing about 12 kill birds and ruin landscapes. A million times more birds are killed by cats, windows and cars than

Columbia University

204

Annual prey consumption of the Common Murre, a Dominant Seabird in the California Current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Prey Consumption of the Common Murre, a Dominantthe birds annual prey consumption between Cape Blanco, Ore.for the annual prey consumption estimate was 13.2%.

Sydeman, William J.; Nur, Nadav

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Contacting Fermilab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

form. Email Fermilab Topic Name E-mail address Web site Web pages Webmaster Submit a query Birds Peter Kasper kasper@fnal.gov Birds of Fermilab BuffaloAmerican Bison Mike...

206

Interacting with computers using images for search and automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A picture is worth a thousand words. Images have been used extensively by us to interact with other human beings to solve certain problems, for example, showing an image of a bird to a bird expert to identify its species ...

Yeh, Pei-Hsiu, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane...

208

Bright Future for CPV (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrator photovoltaics may play significant role in growth of solar electricity because of scalability. Need to take a bird?s eye view for the design and a worm?s eye view for diagnosis.

Kurtz, S.

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Field Guide: Visual Inspection of Avian Issues on Transmission and Distribution Structures (Hard Copy and Standard PDF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission lines and wild birds must co-exist. Power lines traverse birds' flight routes, birds commonly roost on lines and poles, and birds make their neststhe largest of which weigh thousands of poundson transmission structures. Some avian activities can have deleterious effects on outdoor structures and transmissionfor example, nests have been known to collapse and span critical clearances during storms, resulting in outages. Accordingly, it is important for ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional, State and Local Green Energy and Climate Changegreen power (Bird et al. , 2007), state renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Flocks, herds, and schools: a distributed behavioral model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: actor, aggregate motion, behavioral animation, bird, constraints, fish, flight, flock, herd, particle system, path planning, school

Craig W. Reynolds

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Field Guide: Transmission Line Aerial Marking and Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission lines and wild birds must co-exist. Power lines traverse birds' flight routes, birds commonly roost on lines and poles, and birds make their neststhe largest of which weigh thousands of poundson transmission structures. Some avian activities can have deleterious effects on outdoor structures and transmissionfor example, nests have been known to collapse and span critical clearances during storms, resulting in outages. Accordingly, it is important for ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mariana Islands Irian Jaya New Guinea Birds Head Peninsula Sulawesi Palau Islands HALMAHERA TRENCH P A C I

Fleskes, Joe

214

Field Guide: Visual Inspection of Avian Issues on Transmission and Distribution Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission lines and wild birds must co-exist. Power lines traverse birds' flight routes, birds commonly roost on lines and poles, and birds make their neststhe largest of which weigh thousands of poundson transmission structures. Some avian activities can have deleterious effects on outdoor structures and transmissionfor example, nests have been known to collapse and span critical clearances during storms, resulting in outages. Accordingly, it is important for ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Data-driven control of flapping flight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a physically based controller that simulates the flapping behavior of a bird in flight. We recorded the motion of a dove using marker-based optical motion capture and high-speed video cameras. The bird flight data thus acquired allow us to ... Keywords: Bird flight, animal locomotion, data-driven control, flapping, motion capture, physically based simulation

Eunjung Ju, Jungdam Won, Jehee Lee, Byungkuk Choi, Junyong Noh, Min Gyu Choi

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 40-50' wide, 400-500' length § Bird density: 1 square foot/bird, 20,000 birds1 GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm per house § Heating and cooling required § Intensive ventilation to maintain air

217

Session: Why avian impacts are a concern in wind energy development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This lunchtime session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session provided a more detailed overview of the environmental community's perspective on wind power's impacts on birds. The presentation described how wind projects impact birds, detailing the species distribution of collisions at various sites around the US and discussing problems such as avoidance, habitat disturbance, and cumulative effects on populations. The presentation, ''Wind Turbines and Birds'', was given by Gerald Winegrad from the American Bird Conservancy.

Winegrad, Gerald

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds September 12, 2013 DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. In order to enhance collaboration in promoting the conservation of migratory bird populations, DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) and Executive Order 13186, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds. The MBTA protects migratory birds by governing the taking, killing,

219

Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds September 12, 2013 DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. In order to enhance collaboration in promoting the conservation of migratory bird populations, DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) and Executive Order 13186, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds. The MBTA protects migratory birds by governing the taking, killing,

220

Coal, Smoke, and Death: Bituminous Coal and American Home Heating, 1920-1959  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution was severe in many parts of the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. Much of the air pollution was attributable to bituminous coal. This paper uses newly digitized state-month mortality data to estimate the effects of bituminous coal consumption for heating on mortality rates in the U.S. between 1920 and 1959. The use of coal for heating was high until the mid-1940s, and then declined sharply. The switch to cleaner fuels was driven by plausibly exogenous changes in the availability of natural gas, the end of war-related supply restrictions, and a series of coal strikes from 1946-1950. The identification strategy leverages the fact that coal consumption for heating increases during cold weather. Specifically, the mortality effects are identified from differences in the temperature-mortality response functions in state-years with greater coal consumption. Cold weather spells in high coal state-years saw greater increases in the mortality rates than cold weather spells in low coal state-years. Our estimates suggest that reductions in the use of bituminous coal for heating between 1945 and 1959 decreased average annual mortality by 2.2-3.5 percent, January mortality by 3.2-5.1 percent, average annual infant mortality by 1.6-2.8 percent, and January infant mortality by 3.1-4.6 percent. Our estimates are likely to be a lower-bound, since they only capture short-run relationships between coal and mortality. We thank Leila Abu-Orf, Paula Levin, and Katherine Rudolph for excellent research assistance. We are grateful to

Alan Barreca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

About Fermilab - The Fermilab Campus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birds of Fermilab Birds of Fermilab Current Status of Access to Fermilab The diversity of habitats to be found on the 6,800 acre site of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) make it a favorite location for birdwatchers in Chicago's western suburbs. As a result the site has produced a large array of unusual bird sightings including a Gargany Teal which in 1982 attracted birdwatchers to site from as far away as Arizona. Since 1987 the Fermilab's bird population has been intensively monitored, resulting in extensive data on what birds can be seen on the site and where and when they can be found. The links below access lots of information from the survey as well as much additional information for the interested visitor. Survey Results The Full List: Each bird species recorded on site is listed here

222

Session: Monitoring wind turbine project sites for avian impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This third session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the session was on existing wind projects that are monitored for their impacts on birds and bats. The presentation given was titled ''Bird and Bat Fatality Monitoring Methods'' by Wally Erickson, West, Inc. Sections included protocol development and review, methodology, adjusting for scavenging rates, and adjusting for observer detection bias.

Erickson, Wally

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix B  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8B 8B Appendix B-4: Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy Searchlight Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy Searchlight BBCS i October 2012 Searchlight Wind Energy Project Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy Prepared for: Duke Energy Renewables 550 South Tryon Street Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 Prepared by: Tetra Tech EC, Inc. 1750 SW Harbor Way, Suite 400 Portland, OR 97201 November 2012 Searchlight Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy Searchlight BBCS ii October 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 6 1.1 Duke Energy Renewables' Corporate Policy .......................................................... 6

224

Answers: Strangler fig, wolverine, roadrunner, Musk ox, Hesperornis, scapolite, mosquito, Pakicetus, coevolution, Galapagos finches, Yucca, Beagle, platypus, milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Bugtown) Aquatic diver Flightless bird with wings reduced Penguin I am not Minerals a glow Bright yellow stripes black on red Haiku - All ages #12;

Peterson, Blake R.

225

PMC*Erza U.S. DER-sARTAIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coastal foraging water birds; classify and map fisheries habitats; study the effects of offshore wind farms on fish and fisheries of different gear types; analyze recreational...

226

1:after school program evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3012:native birds of florida. 3013:weather records. 3014:tornado news in nw arkansas. 3015:variations in solar luminosity since origin of sun. ...

227

Given that water is the sine qua non of life, it is intriguing that animals can live in deserts, environments with little  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in deserts, environments with little drinking water, high ambient temperatures (Ta), intense solar radiation, low humidity and desiccating winds. Because desert birds are typically diurnal, at times

Williams, Jos. B.

228

Avian risk behavior and fatalities at the Altamont Wind Resource Area: March 1998 - February 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1981, more than 7,000 wind turbines have been installed in the Altamont Wind Resource Area in north-central California. Currently, about 5,000 turbines are operating. Past research efforts demonstrated that wind turbines frequently kill birds, especially raptors. Little is known about the specific flight and perching behaviors by birds near wind turbines. A better understanding of these interactions may one day yield insights on how to minimize bird fatalities. This Phase 1 progress report summarizes research findings obtained at 20 study plots totaling 785 turbines of various configurations and conducted between March 1998 and February 1999. The authors examined bird use and behaviors and collected data on fatalities at the same turbines throughout the course of the surveys. They completed 745 30-minute point counts (1,702 bird observations) that quantified bird risk behaviors and bird use of the study plots. The four most frequently observed bird species were red-tailed hawks, common ravens, turkey vultures, and golden eagles. During the same period, the authors recorded 95 bird fatalities. Raptors represent 51% (n=49) of the kills found. The data indicate that the relative abundance of species observed does not predict the relative frequency of fatalities per species. Phase II of the research is underway.

Thelander, C.; Rugge, L.

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Kath Williams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Australia (councileducation development advisor); Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center (LEED-Existing Buildings pilot project): U.S. Green Building Council (case study development...

230

Robert Kennicott  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

were spent in the Mackenzie and Yukon River Basins, collecting geological specimens, fishes, mammals, birds, and all kinds of insects for the Smithsonian Institution. His...

231

DOE/EIS-0380  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan Annual Report MBTA Migratory Bird Treaty Act MDA Material Disposal Area MOU Memorandum of Understanding NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NGO...

232

Why aren't pigeon guillemots in Prince William Sound, Alaska recovering from the Exxon Valdez oil spill?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba) is now the only species of marine bird in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska that is listed as "not recovering" (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Estimates of Renewable Energy Capacity Serving U.S. Green Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimates of Renewable Energy Capacity Serving U.S. Green Power Markets (as of December 2004) Lori Bird and Blair Swezey National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 2005 This...

234

Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer Response February 2004 * NRELTP-620-35618 Lori Bird, Blair Swezey, and Jrn Aabakken National Renewable Energy...

235

F F F O O O R R R F F F A A A M M M I I I L L L Y Y Y F  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a fair focused on pet ownersbreeders. The fair targets all types of pets - dogs, cats, exotic birds, terrarium animals, small mammals, rodents and aquarium animals....

236

Teacher Resource Center: sciencelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Data at Fermilab Fermilab's Birds Fermilab Bison Harvesting the Prairie Fermilab ARISE Project Resources Cancer Education Elementary and Midlevel School Science Powers of Ten...

237

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbine replaced - MI-50 Upper power supply brought back online - Pbar dry engine flywheel replaced Read the Current Accelerator Update Read the Early Bird Report View the...

238

0891 1-5 KEY VISUAL CUES: geysers, bus, flags 0891 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a black T shirt and sun glasses shooing away white birds on ocean beach, 1144 1 ... shrimp, white bowls, checkered tablecloth, glass with some ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

239

TRECVID 2012 Runs and Detailed Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Glasses 297. ... Skier 440. Soldiers 10 FEATUREPAIRS (judged): 901 Beach + Mountain 902 Old_People + Flags 903 Animal + Snow 904 Bird ...

240

Atmospheric Energy Harvesting for Small Uninhabited Aircraft by Gust Soaring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Applying bird-inspired flight planning and control techniques to small robotic aircraft can greatly improve flight performance. This paper discusses a method for improving cruise performance (more)

Depenbusch, Nathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cabron Sequestration Main Menu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy Robert Beck National Coal Council David Beecy USDOE, Environ. Sys., Fossil Energy Jacqueline F. Bird Ohio Coal Development Office Howard Herzog Massachusetts...

242

present.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birds Of A Feather Summary Scenario Student Pages Index of Projects Subject: ScienceLife Sciences;Language Arts Descriptive Writing; Math Number Skills Grade Level: Grades...

243

NATURE WALKS SCHEDULE - SPRING 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

items include water, binoculars, field guide to birds, field guide to stars, bug spray if needed. We should see American woodcock flight displays, we will have a...

244

Natural Resource Management, Environmental Protection Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPD Home Site Details Home Page Management Amphibians Birds Fish Invertebrates Mammals Plants Pictures Reptiles ResearchInternships Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View...

245

ESH100.2.ENV.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia-controlled premises that have the potential to affect: Protected species (e.g., fish, plants, wildlife) or their habitats. Migratory birds, their nests, eggs, or...

246

Microsoft Word - S07121_CY2010 Annual Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

monitoring, wildlife surveys (including birds, small mammals, frogs, insects, and fish), Preble's mouse habitat characterization and telemetry tracking, a small amount of...

247

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update Read the Early Bird Report View the Tevatron Luminosity Charts Announcements Power Outage Due to the holiday weekend, the September 3 power outage has been rescheduled...

248

DFKI and University of Kaiserslautern Participation at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... animal dog cat horse birds - Asian People aisan -hot -sexy -bikini People&Blog & Entertainment Bicycling riding bicycle fahrrad Sports Boat Ship ...

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

University of Marburg at TRECVID 2011: Semantic Indexing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to find object appearances for the following 21 object classes: face, aeroplane, bicycle, bird, boat, bottle, bus, car, cat, chair, cow ...

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

TRECVID 2012 Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... are the pairs: [901] Beach + Mountain [902] Old_People + Flags [903] Animal + Snow [904] Bird + Waterscape_waterfront [905] Dog + Indoor [906 ...

251

CX-002865: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002865: Categorical Exclusion Determination Density and Occupancy Patterns of Grassland Birds in the Competitive Renewable Energy Zones of...

252

Role of Renewable Energy Certificates in Developing New Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Certificates in Developing New Renewable Energy Projects Edward Holt Ed Holt & Associates, Inc. Jenny Sumner and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

253

Diversity, Body Mass, and Latitudinal Gradients in Primates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gradients in regional diversity of New World birds. GlobalT. (2003). Assessment of the diversity of African primates.of the latitudinal diversity gradient. American Naturalist,

Harcourt, A. H.; Schreier, B. M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Prison Songs of Lili'uokalani  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

46 Out of the snare of the fowler In this hymn the Queena bird Out of the snare of the fowler Ua moku ka upena A ua

Morris, Cynthia L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Identification of two interacting quantitative trait loci controlling for condensed tannin in sorghum grain and grain quality analysis of a sorghum diverse collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tannin, a second metabolic product in sorghum, has been directly related to resistance to insects and birds. Tannin also impacts sorghum nutritional value. Previous studies (more)

Xiang, Wenwen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - All American Rear Engine Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 84 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

257

elevated temperature coatings:science and technology iv  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vladamir K. Tolpygo and David R. Clarke. MODELING .... R. Keith Bird, Terryl A. Wallace and. Sankara N. ... Narendra B. Dahotre and Lalitha R. Katipelli.

258

Fermi 3/29/02  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Companions Photo by Merilee Janusz FERMINEWS Friday, December 20, 2002 7 According to Peter Kasper, a Fermilab physicist and local bird expert, 2002 was the best year for...

259

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fowl in a number of Asian countries, including China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Indonesia, Japan, and Cambodia, and has now spread to wild bird populations. More recently,...

260

Landscape Characteristics Of Upland Sandpiper Habitat In Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grassland bird populations have declined across North America due to habitat loss but at a disproportionately higher rate in the midwestern United States, where extensive (more)

Korte, Jacob Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix C Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird Introduction The red-winged black bird is one of the most abundant birds in North America (Marshall et al. 2003). Red-winged Blackbirds are extremely adaptable; successfully colonizing many small

262

Characterize computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

colorings. 106 #12; Examplary proceeding r 1 : penguin(tweety) # r 2 : bird(tweety) # r 3 : f lies(tweety) # bird(tweety), not ¬f lies(tweety) r 4 : ¬f lies(tweety) # penguin(tweety), not f lies(tweety). Building the graph r 1 ## ## r 2 ## ## r 4 ## ## r 3 ## ## # # # # Coloring the graph Propagation # Propagation

Schaub, Torsten

263

International Journal of Phytoremediation, 14:939949, 2012 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

songs? Despite the mini- mal motif sharing between the experience songs and the #12;2484 K. W. Sockman- mation by seasonally breeding birds. Am. Zool. 33, 185­199. Ball, G. F. & Balthazart, J. 2001 Ethological repertoire and mate choice in birds. Am. Zool. 32, 71­80. Searcy, W. A. & Yasukawa, K. 1996 Song and female

Ma, Lena

264

ABSTRACT The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Disaster: A Graphical Assessment of its Impact on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010. Considered the largest accidental marine oil spill in history, oil flowed for three months and approximately five million barrels of oil spilled through by mid-July 2010. In this report, we analyse fish and bird data to assess the impact of the oil spill on the Gulf wildlife. Our findings based on the available fish data for 2005, 2006, and 2010 are not very helpful to make a judgement on the negative impact of the oil spill on fish species. On the other hand, the bird data analysis shows that the closer the surface oil spill area approached to bird habitats, the more dead birds were observed. The highest number of dead birds was observed in July and August when birds bred and raised their offspring. However, the migration behaviour of different bird species makes it impossible to entirely estimate the full impact of the oil spill on birds. (362 pages) iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my advisor Dr. Jrgen Symanzik for spending countless hours in assistance and guidance over the completion of this project. His wisdom,

Anvar Suyundikov; Dr. Jrgen Symanzik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Pennsylvania State University The Graduate School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patterns of the birds without incurring the cost of employing more people or buying specialized equipment and a processor, set up in a user specified geometry, along the ridge under observation. The estimation process collision. A cost effective method that can continuously monitor the flight path of birds around

Langelaan, Jack W.

266

One stop search It is important to be aware that One stop does not search all of the Library's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the singular term (e.g. bird). You can also choose to search for the word or phrase you enter in the Title is not case sensitive and when you search for the plural term (e.g. birds) it will also search Terms. The Refine Search link will allow you to improve your search by narrowing to Full text

Bandara, Arosha

267

NERI Report Commissioned by Tech-wise A/S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods 8 2.1 Aerial surveys 8 2.2 Within-year and between-year variation in bird numbers 8 2 species recorded during 13 aerial surveys, there were no indications that the wind farm area was of any in the April 2001 survey. Preference analyses of bird exploitation of the Horns Rev area showed

268

Session: What can we learn from developed wind resource areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was composed of two parts intended to examine what existing science tells us about wind turbine impacts at existing wind project sites. Part one dealt with the Altamont Wind Resource area, one of the older wind projects in the US, with a paper presented by Carl Thelander titled ''Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part 1''. Questions addressed by the presenter included: how is avian habitat affected at Altamont and do birds avoid turbine sites; are birds being attracted to turbine strings; what factors contribute to direct impacts on birds by wind turbines at Altamont; how do use, behavior, avoidance and other factors affect risk to avian species, and particularly impacts those species listed as threatened, endangered, or of conservation concern, and other state listed species. The second part dealt with direct impacts to birds at new generation wind plants outside of California, examining such is sues as mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts from terrestrial wind projects, species and numbers killed per turbine rates/MW generated, impacts to listed threatened and endangered species, to USFWS Birds of Conservation Concern, and to state listed species. This session focused on newer wind project sites with a paper titled ''Bird Fatality and Risk at New Generation Wind Projects'' by Wally Erickson. Each paper was followed by a discussion/question and answer period.

Thelander, Carl; Erickson, Wally

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Private Citizens/Individuals Written Comments | A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Citizens/Individuals Written Comments | A Citizens/Individuals Written Comments | A 74BPrivate Citizen/Individual's Written Comments Private Citizens/Individuals Written Comments | 1 While anecdotal suggestions of health effects from wind turbine sound can be found online, No evidence exists regarding direct negative health effects associated with wind turbine sound in any peer reviewed, scientific papers or studies. Impacts to birds and bats are disclosed in Section 4.4.5.11-Migratory Birds - Direct and Indirect Effects by Alternative and 4.4.5.8-Bats - Direct and Indirect Effects by Alternative, respectively. Impacts to Birds and Bats will be minimized by MM-BIO-5 Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy. Additionally, refer to Appendix B-4: Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy (formerly known as the Avian and Bat

270

A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu and assessment of potential impacts to waterbirds from the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu was conducted during August and September 1993 to identify potential waterbird habitats within the general area of the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor and to assess the potential impacts to endangered waterbird of installing and operating a high voltage transmission line from the Island of Hawaii to the islands of Oahu and Maui. Annual waterbird survey information and other literature containing information on specific wetland sites were summarized. Literature describing impacts of overhead transmission lines on birds was used to evaluate potential impacts of the proposed project on endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. On Oahu, five wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within 2.5 miles of the proposed transmission line corridor. On Maui, three wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within the general area of the proposed transmission line corridor. Several of the wetlands identified on Oahu and Maui also supported resident wading birds and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. Endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory birds may collide with the proposed transmission lines wires. The frequency and numbers of bird collisions is expected to be greater on Oahu than on Maui because more wetland habitat exists and greater numbers of birds occur in the project area on Oahu. In addition, the endangered Hawaiian goose and the endangered Hawaiian petrel may be impacted by the proposed segment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission line on Maui.

Evans, K.; Woodside, D.; Bruegmann, M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Honolulu, HI (United States). Pacific Islands Office

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Avian Monitoring and Risk Assessment at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area was to estimate and compare bird utilization, fatality rates, and the risk index among factors including bird taxonomic groups, wind turbine and reference areas, wind turbine sizes and types, and geographic locations. The key questions addressed to meet this objective include: (1) Are there any differences in the level of bird activity, called ''utilization rate'' or ''use'', with the operating wind plant and within the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (2) Are there any differences in the rate of bird fatalities (or avian fatality) within the operating wind plant or the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (3) Does bird use, fatality rates, or bird risk index vary according to the geographic location, type and size of wind turbine, and/or type of bird within the operating wind plant and surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; and (4) How do raptor fatality rates at San Gorgonio compare to other wind projects with comparable data?

Anderson, R.; Tom, J.; Neumann, N.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Bourassa, M.; Bay, K. J.; Sernka, K. J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ornithological Survey of the Proposed Geothermal Well Site No. 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1983) and the State of Hawaii (DLNR 1986) have listed as endangered six forest bird species for the Island of Hawaii. Two of these birds, the O'u (Psittirostra psittacea) and the Hawaiian hawk (Buteo solitarius) may be present within the Geothermal resource sub-zone (Scott et al. 1986). Thus, their presence could impact future development within the resource area. This report presents the results of a bird survey conducted August 11 and 12, 1990 in the sub-zone in and around the proposed well site and pad for True/Mid Pacific Geothermal Well No.2.

Jeffrey, Jack

1990-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

274

CX-010098: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010098: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phoenix to Lone Butte 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Bird Diverter Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) proposes to install bird discouragers on a portion of the PHX-LOB 230-kV (kilovolt) transmission line. Access is via existing rural and transmission line access roads. Birds perching on structures are causing line faults and tripping the line out of service. The purpose of the project is to insure the continued safe and reliable operation of the bulk power system by reducing or eliminating faults due to bird activity along the line.

275

Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 4 3.2.3.3 Additional Wildlife Observations In September, a dead crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) was observed dangling from the top of a spruce tree at the Site. Closer inspection revealed there was fishing line wrapped around the foot of the bird. Evidently the crow picked up the fishing line on its foot at one of the nearby reservoirs (since fishing is not allowed at the Site). The line was probably dangling from its foot when it landed on the branch. When it attempted to take off the line probably got caught in the tree branch, and the more the bird tried to free itself, the more it wrapped itself around the branch. Finally its foot was so tightly entangled around the branch that the bird could not move and eventually died on the branch. The bird was removed from the tree and disposed of.

276

Biogeographic patterns of the East African coastal forest vertebrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PAD analysis for the combined data set (birds + mammals + reptiles) resulted in. 35 MPTs (L = 710, CI = 0.33, RI = 0.47). The strict consensus was mostly...

277

The Marsh Hawk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

back and forth like a well-trained bird dog. Now and then it makes a few deliberate wing strokes but when it spies a moving prey the hawk halts -- may even do a back...

278

The Killdeer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and a third -- from eye to eye -- above its white forehead. The eye is surrounded by a red ring. The rump and upper tail feathers are orange- brown. This bird is so easily...

279

Llwybrau Pos Puzzle Trails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'm a broadleaf tree often called mountain ash, I have lots of red berries in the autumn which birds like to eat mouse! I have colourful wings, From flower to flower I fly, Sipping nectar on long summer days

280

The Waxwings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from something not found in any other family of birds. Usually, on the tips of the inner wing feathers of both males and females, there are shiny red appendages like blobs of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Optimal Gabor-Frame-Expansion-Based Intermittent-Clutter-Filtering Method for Radar Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intermittent clutter signals are frequently observed by radar wind profilers during the seasonal bird migration. A novel statistical filtering algorithm based on a simultaneous timefrequency analysis of the profilers raw data was recently ...

Volker Lehmann

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Renewable Energy at Channel Islands National Park; Federal Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scuba diving, bird watching, and fishing. And now they'll also enjoy the benefits of renewable energy systems. The park is located off the coast of southern California and...

283

special events and resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Resources School and Fermilab Prairie Data Fermilab is putting prairie and bird data on the Web so it can be accessed by the general public, especially students and...

284

Thermal Mass Correction for the Evaluation of Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper revisits the thermal mass inertia correction of Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc., (SBE4) conductivity probes for the calculation of salinity. In particular, it is shown that the standard parameters recommended for the correction method are ...

Vigan Mensah; Marc Le Menn; Yves Morel

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrity, food safety, and energy usage are associated with large farming operations. Warranted or not-fed poultry are terms commonly used with small-scale poultry operations. These birds are typically reared

Navara, Kristen

286

Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisions with wind turbines can be a problem for many species of birds. Of particular concern are collisions by eagles and other protected species. This research study used the laboratory methods of physiological optics, animal psychophysics, and retinal electrophysiology to analyze the causes of collisions and to evaluate visual deterrents based on the results of this analysis. Bird collisions with the seemingly slow-moving turbines seem paradoxical given the superb vision that most birds, especially raptors, possess. However, our optical analysis indicated that as the eye approaches the rotating blades, the retinal image of the blade (which is the information that is transmitted to the animal's brain) increases in velocity until it is moving so fast that the retina cannot keep up with it. At this point, the retinal image becomes a transparent blur that the bird probably interprets as a safe area to fly through, with disastrous consequences. This phenomenon is called"motion smear" or"motion blur."

Hodos, W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Eyes of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"simple" eyes for close vision. Birds have the keenest eyes and those of the hawks, eagles and vultures can see small objects at incredible distances. By their eyes ye shall...

288

Golden Eagles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golden Eagles Name: Karen Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am in first grade.Can you please tell me where do golden eagles eat. Replies: Golden eagles are birds of...

289

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is not doom and gloom, though. Several predatory birds, such as Cooper's hawks, bald eagles, peregrine falcons and ospreys, seem to be making a comeback at Fermilab. This is...

290

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory avian research program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As wind energy use continues to expand, concern over the possible impacts of wind farms on birds continues to be an issue. The concern includes two primary areas: the effect of avian mortality on bird populations, and possible litigation over the killing of even one bird if it is protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act or the Endangered Species Act or both. In order to address these concerns, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), working collaboratively with all stakeholders including utilities, environmental groups, consumer advocates, utility regulators, government officials, and the wind industry, has an active avian-wind power research program. DOE/NREL is conducting and sponsoring research with the expectation of developing solutions to educe or avoid avian mortality due to wind energy development throughout the US. This paper outlines the DOE/NREL approach and summarizes completed, current, and planned projects.

Sinclair, K.C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Morrison, M.L. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

PHASE II REMEDIAL INVESTlGATlOE FORMER AMCHITKA ARMY AIR BASE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

One of these was at Kirilof Point, near Base Camp, where water contaminated with diesel oil was seeping into a wetland and the Bering Sea. The other area was at Bird Cape, where...

292

Stephen Alfred Forbes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to issue simple clear accounts of his pioneer investigations of the foods of birds, of fishes, and insects. Above all, he was aware of and pointed out the interrelationships of...

293

Original Article Gastrointestinal Helminths of Magpies (Pica pica), Rooks (Corvus frugilegus) and Carrion Crows (Corvus corone) in Mazandaran Province, North of Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Corvidae is a cosmopolitan family of oscine birds including crows, rooks, magpies, jays, chough, and ravens. These birds are migratory species, especially in the shortage of foods, so they can act like vectors for a wide range of microorganisms. They live generally in temperate climates and in a very close contact with human residential areas as well as poultry farms. There is no available information in the literature concerning the parasitic infections of these three species of corvidae in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran, so this study was conducted to clarify this. Methods: As there are three species of corvid birds in Mazandaran Province, 106 birds including 79 magpies, 11 rooks, and 16 carrion crows were examined between winter 2007 and spring 2008 at post mortem for gastrointestinal helminths. The helminths were drawn and identified morphologically in the

Iranian J Parasitol; A Halajian; A Eslami; I Mobedi; O Amin; J Mariaux; J Mansoori; S Tavakol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Certificate-Based Approach to Marketing Green Power and Constructing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certificate-Based Approach to Marketing Green Power and Constructing New Wind Energy Facilities Preprint May 2002 * NRELCP-620-32430 E. Blank Community Energy, Inc. L. Bird and B....

295

Color blind animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not color blind. I believe that all the primates also see color as well as dogs, cats, some birds, fish, and insects. --- jade Apes and monkeys see color. So do bees, in a...

296

Cardinal Nesting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

night. There are no signs of it below---cat attack or anything. However, I do have 4 cats that I hope didn't get it. Thanks Replies: No, birds can't move their nests - it is a...

297

Models and simulations of collective motion in biomimetic robots and bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In nature, one finds many examples of collective motion, from flocking birds to swarming bees. Any one organism makes its decisions based solely on local information; either it can sense what its close neighbors are doing, ...

Cohen, Joanna (Joanna Renee)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Solar Renewable Energy Certificate (SREC) Markets: Status and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Solar Renewable Energy Certificate (SREC) Markets: Status and Trends Lori Bird, Jenny...

299

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brought back online - Tevatron collimator issue resolved - Tevatron stuck at 90 GeV due to bad UPS in sector A2 Read the Current Accelerator Update Read the Early Bird...

300

Imact of Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy Michael Mendelsohn, Claire Kreycik, Lori Bird, Paul Schwabe, and Karlynn Cory Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-53086 March 2012 NREL is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Field instrumentation for vocalizing avian survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present automated instruments to facilitate the monitoring of vocalizing species in their environment with minimal disruption. These devices offer recording and acoustic localization of bird calls and relay data via the ...

Elliott, Grant (Grant Andrew)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

House Wrens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wrens Name: Rebecca Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How long does a house wren live. I'm doing research on this bird I can't seem to find that much info. on it...

303

Introduction: The Fabric of Life In the beginning is the relation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; blue- collar jobs or wilderness preservation; open immigration or tighter borders; nuclear power that may kill large numbers of bats and birds. The decisions we make as consumers and citi- zens will have

304

Numerical Study of Rarefied Hypersonic Flow Interacting With a Continuum Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An uncoupled CFD-DSMC technique is developed and applied to provide solutions for continuum jets interacting with rarefied external flows. The technique is based on a correlation of the appropriate Bird breakdown parameter for a transitional-rarefied ...

Glass Christopher E.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the fresh to slightly saline Birds-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formations Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft...

306

Green Power Network: Library of Green Power Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heeter, J., P. Armstrong, L. Bird, 2012. Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data). NRELTP-6A20-52925 (PDF 974 KB) Market Research...

307

Heartbeat of a Nest: Using imagers as biological sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the nest (Fig. 4). An infrared light emitting diode (LED) which consumes 24 mW continuously illuminates down with minimal intrusion into the bird's nesting activities. Infrared light emitting diodes (LEDs

Hamilton, Michael P.

308

Kangaroo Mice and Deer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

quiet. As an experiment, he tossed it onto the snow In front of his cocker spaniel. The dog, trained to retrieve birds, tossed it in the air. The mouse dropped back on the snow...

309

The Mockingbirds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

borrowed from as many as twenty birds in its neighborhood but also the barking of a dog, the cackling of a hen, the squeal of a pig, or even the squeaking of a wagon wheel....

310

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of avian influenza, or bird flu. You go to the advanced search page and enter your search terms. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile320x340 Icon64x64 Reply (If you're a human,...

311

Slide13 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

an advanced search on the topic of avian influenza, or bird flu. You go to the advanced search page and enter your search terms. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile320x340 Icon64x64...

312

INTRODUCTION The World Bank (African Development Indicators) estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or the subsequent impact with the ground. The species that are most vulnerable to this impact are the large, heavy and in substations Abird electrocution occurs when a bird is perched or attempts to perch on the electrical structure

de Villiers, Marienne

313

Utility green pricing programs: A statistical analysis of program effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bird, L. , Swezey, B. 2003. Green Power Marketing in theR. , Aabakken, J. 2002. Green Power Marketing Abroad: RecentHolt, E. , Holt, M. 2004. Green Pricing Resource Guide.

Wiser, Ryan; Olson, Scott; Bird, Lori; Swezey, Blair

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Marsh Collapse Does Not Require Sea Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing nurseries for fish species and shelter and food for endangered birds. Salt marshes also mitigate the impacts of hurricanes and tsunamis, and sequester ...

Fagherazzi, Sergio

315

C A T A L O G Undergraduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vicente Wetland Project: Baseline Condition Report / David Menzie 65 Fish Assemblage Dynamics, and the pair set off for Mexico. They drove south to Louisiana and did some birding along the Gulf Coast before

Gelfond, Michael

316

ES&H Advisory Avian Influenza, October 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

re- ported in Southeast Asia (Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Ja- pan, Laos, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam). In recent months, H5N1 was isolated from birds in Russia. The virus...

317

TRC Bibliographies: Prairie Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1994. ISBN: 0-02-728466-2. Ham, John and David Mohrhardt, Kitchen Table Bird Book, Two Peninsula Press, 1995. ISBN: 1882376153. Jenkins, Priscilla Belz, A Nest Full of...

318

Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report NRELTP-670-43532 August 2008 Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs Lori A. Bird and Karlynn S. Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

319

Calibration and Stability of Oxygen Sensors on Autonomous Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration accuracy and stability of three Aanderaa 3835 optodes and three Sea-Bird Electronics SBE-43 oxygen sensors were evaluated over four years using in situ and laboratory calibrations. The sensors were mostly in storage, being in the ...

Eric A. D'Asaro; Craig McNeil

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Slide25 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

decades upon decades of progress to come 1928 Model A 1937 Coupe 1950 convertible 1960 Sun Star 1975 Luxury T-Bird 1994 New "global family mid-size" Add new comment Thumbnail...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

decades upon decades of progress to come 1928 Model A 1937 Coupe 1950 convertible 1960 Sun Star 1975 Luxury T-Bird 1994 New "global family mid-size" Add new comment Thumbnail...

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 77 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel...

323

Mourning Dove Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mourning Dove Biology Name: Bettina Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I have found a bird egg. I'm pretty sure it's a morning dove egg. I would like to know how to...

324

Dynamic Response of CTD Pressure Sensors to Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure sensors used in CTDs (conductivity temperature depth) respond to transients in temperature. It is often assumed that these transients have a negligible effect on pressure. However, in a Sea-Bird CTD used in Hawaiian waters, these ...

S. M. Chiswell

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Microsoft Word - NMMSS 2011 FINAL Attendee List.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 Marissa Bailey NRC 7 Natasha Bajema DOD 8 Steve Baker ORNL 9 John Ballard PSINMMSS 10 Jim Bird DOE-ORO 11 Sheri Bone NNSA 12 Len Bowers SRNS 13 Glen Bradham9* AEPDC Cook 14...

326

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRI to lake, transport, and posses - 30 rnigratOf'Y birds for scientific purposes. All survey efforts would be conducted according to FAA regulations for smaU aircraft, and...

327

A Fuzzy Logic Method for Improved Moment Estimation from Doppler Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for estimating moments from wind measurement devices that measure Doppler spectra as a function of range is presented. Quite often the spectra are contaminated by a wide variety of sources, including (but not limited to) birds, ...

Larry B. Cornman; Robert K. Goodrich; Corinne S. Morse; Warner L. Ecklund

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Democratizing global tourism or designing diversity to reach harmony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest lake in the Balkans, the largest bird "airport" in Europe, multinational, protected under the Ramsar Convention, a candidate for the UNESCO transboundary biosphere enlisting, the Skadar Lake is yet, economically ...

Radoman, Slobodan, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

CX-008825: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX(s) Applied: B3.8 Date: 07/26/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

330

SRS - Environmental Report for 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chloropusAnolis), a medium-sized water bird that nests on SRS, is a member of the rail family (Rallidae) and a relative of the coot. The Common Moorhen The common moorhen...

331

A Statistical Averaging Method for Wind Profiler Doppler Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is presented for Doppler spectral averaging that more reliably identifies the profiler radar return from clear air in the presence of contaminationfor example, from migrating bird echoes. These very sensitive radars profile the wind ...

David A. Merritt

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jenny Heeter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44 pp.; NREL Report No. TP-6A20-49938. Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Kreycik, C. (2011). "Solar Renewable Energy Certificate (SREC) Markets: Status and Trends." 58 pp.; NREL Report...

333

Avian Communities in Tidal Salt Marshes of San Francisco Bay: A Review of Functional Groups by Foraging Guild and Habitat Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FWS/OBS-83/23. 102pp. Grenier JL. 2004. Ecology, behavior,Management 63(1):116-125. Grenier JL, Greenberg R. 2006.Marsh Bird project, J. L. Grenier (San Francisco Estuary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Around Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

first atomic bomb components were assembled. Don't want to walk? Book a van tour of the Atomic City. Explore the natural history of Los Alamos (rocks, fossils, plants, birds,...

335

Adopt-A-Platoon, Brookhaven Veterans Association, Brookhaven...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundraisers Car Wash on July 28, 2011 - May thanks to our wonderful volunteers (Fire Dept & co-workers) Plant Sale, April 14 & 15, 2011 - we sold hardy pansies to some early bird...

336

Mapping Bragg Scatter with a Polarimetric WSR-88D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a polarimetric Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar to distinguish Bragg scatterers from insects and birds in an optically clear atmosphere has the potential to provide information on convective boundary layer depth. ...

Valery M. Melnikov; Richard J. Doviak; Dusan S. Zrni?; David. J. Stensrud

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

main_title.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Nests Buffalo Canada Geese Deer Fungi Grass Insects Lichens Math Patterns in Nature Poison Ivy Prairie Insects in Winter Red-tailed Hawk West Nile Virus Woodchuck Prairie...

338

Polarimetric Radar Observations of Biological Scatterers in Hurricanes Irene (2011) and Sandy (2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biological scatterers, consisting of birds and insects, may become trapped near the circulation center of tropical cyclones, particularly if a well-developed eyewall is present. These scatterers may be observed using weather radar, where they may ...

Matthew S. Van Den Broeke

339

Spatio-temporal patterns of beaked whale echolocation signals in the North Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Oahu; 4001l, east of Kauai; 4010, east of Kauai; 4145, west of Kauai, Bird Island. Da81J8copel"8 pri8 to 3\\17 fathoms; 8979, vicinity of Bird Island, 222 to 887 fathoms; 3994, vicinity of Kauai, 830 to 882 fathoms; 4014, vicinity of Kauai, :362 to 899 fathoms; 4021, vicinity of Kauai, 28n to :199 fathoms; 4025

340

UNDERSTANDING THE PROBLEM 1.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period at two wind resource areas: the APWRA and the Montezuma Hills WRA. Bird fatalities consisted of 44 (experimentally) to increase their visibility to birds Photo 1-6. An Enertech 40-kW wind turbine with two turkey.3 24.0 50 % 3 Enertech 40 Lattice 13.5 148.03 48.3 18.5 unknown 3 Flowind 150 Vertical axis 17.2 193

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

RANGE MANAGEMENT AND ECOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS IN THE APWRA 5.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period at two wind resource areas: the APWRA and the Montezuma Hills WRA. Bird fatalities consisted of 44 (experimentally) to increase their visibility to birds Photo 1-6. An Enertech 40-kW wind turbine with two turkey.3 24.0 50 % 3 Enertech 40 Lattice 13.5 148.03 48.3 18.5 unknown 3 Flowind 150 Vertical axis 17.2 193

342

Feathers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feathers Feathers Nature Bulletin No. 480-A February 10, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W, Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FEATHERS "Feathers make the bird" is an old saying that is scientifically accurate, Any creature with a body covered by feathers must be a bird but let's take a closer look. Feathers are unique. They represent one of the finest works of design and engineering that nature has produced. There is a lot of evidence that birds originated from reptiles. During the Age of Reptiles there was a group of animals called "bird-footed dinosaurs". They ran about on their hind legs which resembled the legs of modern ostriches, and some of them were no larger than our chickens. It is supposed that birds are descended from this group of reptiles and that, as they became able to fly, their scales gradually changed to feathers. It is not easy to see how a scale could become a light flexible-web but the theory is that natural selection, after millions of years, produced the miracle. Thenceforth, birds entered the realm of the air to prey upon its teeming insects.

343

The English Sparrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

English Sparrow English Sparrow Nature Bulletin No. 139 January 24, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE ENGLISH SPARROW The first bird a child sees, most places in the civilized world, is likely to be an English sparrow. In the cities, towns and country, the sparrow is a familiar part of everyday life. Like the cockroach, the rat, the house mouse and the house fly, the English sparrow has followed man over most of the earth, adjusting itself to different climates, foods, enemies and nesting places. Everybody thinks he "knows" the English sparrow. Yet this bird -- common as dirt, unloved and neglected -- is more of a world citizen than most birds and less studied than many rarer birds. It has so few distinctive markings that it is hard to describe, particularly the female, and may fool even skilled bird fans. It is of average size, average shape, average color, and has an average chirp. Furthermore, it is not a sparrow but one of the weaver finches a group of birds that build nests with openings in the side. Moreover, they are not particularly English, being native to Europe, Asia and North Africa, it is the " sparrow" mentioned in the Bible.

344

Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tor the addition ot bird tor the addition ot bird diversion equipment along the existing Prescott-Pinnacle Peak 230-kV transmission line right-ot-way located in Yavapai County, Arizona . RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes installing Firefly type bird diversion equipment onto static wires (overhead ground wires) of the Prescott-Pinnacle Peak 230-kV transmission line between structures 144/3 and 145/2. The diverters will be spaced approximately 15 ft apart alternating between the two static lines. The diverters will be installed using a hot stick from a helicopter or by accessing the line using existing access roads and rubber-tired vehicles such as cherry pickers, pickup trucks, crew trucks. All work will be done within Westerns existing right-of-way. This

345

file://Z:\2010 CX Rulemaking\01 Comments on Proposed Rule\Comme  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

02 02 Rulemaking to Amend 10 CFR Part 1021: National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures Comment On: DOE-HQ-2010-0002-0014 National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures Document: DOE-HQ-2010-0002-0019 Comment on FR Doc # 2010-32316 Submitter Information Name: William Kirk Williams Address: 5428 S. Broadwing Way 5428 S. Broadwing Way Boise, Idaho, 83716 Email: wkwllc@earthlink.net Fax: (208) 333-9506 General Comment Please do not include "Wind Turbines" and "Solar Potovoltaic" systems among categorical exclusions. Such projects are far too big and consume far too much land to be build without following the EIS process. Wind Turbines kill birds in violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Without mandatory compliance with EIS no mechanism to assurme BMPs for minimizing bird kills will be in

346

Seeing the Smallest Steps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Bird Flu Protein Link to Virulence A Bird Flu Protein Link to Virulence Smart viruses infect without killing the host, at least in the short term. In such low-level infections, the virus gains time to persist, reproduce, infect other individuals, and spread through the population. Some viruses persist in certain host populations without killing them, but in other hosts they have a rapid and deadly effect. The H5N1 virus strains responsible for recent lethal outbreaks of bird flu apparently existed for quite some time in wild goose populations without doing much harm. But when the same strains infected chickens, the results were disastrous, leading to high chicken mortality and a health risk for humans living in proximity. In fact, the risk of epidemic was considered high enough to lead China to

347

Reflection Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Reflection Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes After reviewing bids from six firms, LDG contracted with Bird Geophysical Services ("Bird") to conduct a test to determine if relatively small, spring-assisted, drop weights could be used to successfully acquire deep reflections. This test showed that the contractor could produce usable data to depths of more than 1,500 ms two-way travel time. (For a given velocity model, this two-way travel time is equivalent to several kilometers of depth penetration.) Subsequently, LDG used Bird's services to acquire new traverses totaling about 27.6 km (17.2 mi.) along roads leading through the

348

Turkey vs. human digestion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turkey vs. human digestion Turkey vs. human digestion Name: wallyb Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How is the digestive system of turkeys different from that of humans? Replies: Hmmm.. been a while since I had sophomore biology, so I can't completely answer this one, but I can say a few things. One, since turkeys are birds, and birds as a general rule have not had teeth for several million years at least, the turkey needs a way to mash up its food -- thus, the crop, which is essentially like another stomach: the turkey (and many other birds, for that matter) swallows small stones which serve in lieu of teeth, mashing up food via muscular action in the crop, from whence the "chewed" food moves on into the rest of the digestive tract. As for any other differences, I'll have to leave that to someone else with more ornithological experience...

349

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Parker-Gila 161-kV Transmission Line Maintenance, Cross Arm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parker-Gila 161-kV Transmission Line Maintenance, Cross Arm Parker-Gila 161-kV Transmission Line Maintenance, Cross Arm Replacements at Structure 0/7 - Continuation Sheet Special Conditions Biological Resources 1. To avoid impacts to nesting birds, project activities will be scheduled between August 1 and February 15, as feasible. Crews shall not cause injury or death to nesting birds, active nests, eggs, or nestlings. If evidence of a nesting bird is found in the project area, crews shall immediately stop work in that area until Western's Environmental Group has been contacted. 2. A qualified biologist will be present during all project activities and serve as the project's Biological Monitor. The Biological Monitor will be authorized by Western to temporarily halt construction activity if needed to prevent harm to desert tortoise. The Biological Monitor's

350

Response of wintering bald eagles to industrial construction in southeastern Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Columbia River at the Hanford Site is a regionally important refugium for overwintering birds. Some of the river shoreline has been designated by the U.S. Department of Energy for environmental clean-up following past production of materials for nuclear weapons. We evaluated the effects of soil remediation on winter birds at six inactive nuclear reactor areas. Remediation activities consisted of daily removal of approximately 1,035 t of contaminated soil from previously herbicided and denuded areas located between 30 m and 400 m and in partial line-of-sight of the river shoreline. Remediation activities had no apparent effect on numbers of riverine or terrestrial birds using adjacent undisturbed shoreline and riparian habitat.

Becker, James M.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Quantum Coherence and Entanglement in the Avian Compass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radical pair mechanism is one of two distinct mechanisms used to explain the navigation of birds in geomagnetic fields. However, little research has been done to explore the role of quantum entanglement in this mechanism. In this paper, we study the lifetime of radical pair entanglement corresponding to the magnitude and direction of magnetic fields to show that the entanglement lasts long enough in birds to be used for navigation. We also demonstrate that, due to a lack of orientational sensitivity of the entanglement in the geomagnetic field, the birds are not able to orient themselves by the mechanism based directly on radical-pair entanglement. To explore the entanglement mechanism further, we propose a model in which the hyperfine interactions are replaced by local magnetic fields of similar strength. The entanglement of the radical pair in this model lasts longer and displays an angular sensitivity in weak magnetic fields, both of these factors are not present in the previous models.

James A. Pauls; Yiteng Zhang; Gennady P. Berman; Sabre Kais

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Session: Avian migration and implications for wind power development in the Eastern United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session was arranged to convey what is known about avian migration, particularly in the eastern US. The first presentation ''Migration Ecology: Issues of Scale and Behavior'' by Sarah Mabey frames the issue of migratory bird interactions with wind energy facilities from an ecological perspective: when, where, and why are migrant bird species vulnerable to wind turbine collision. The second presentation ''Radar Studies of Nocturnal Migration at Wind Sites in the Eastern US'' by Brian Cooper reported on radar studies conducted at wind sites in the eastern US, including Mount Storm, Clipper Wind, and others.

Mabey, Sarah; Cooper, Brian

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Simplified clear sky model for direct and diffuse insolation on horizontal surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed comparison was made between five simple broadband models for clear sky global insolation. Compared models were those of Atwater and Ball, Davies and Hay, Watt, Hoyt, and Lacis and Hansen. A sixth simple model, called the Bird model, has been formulated by using parts of these five models and by comparison with the results from three rigorous radiative transfer codes. All of the simple models provide results that agree within < 10% with the three rigorous codes when the sun is in the zenith position. The Bird and Hoyt models agree within 3% with each other and with the results of the rigorous codes. However, the Bird model is easier to implement and has broader application than the Hoyt model.

Bird, R.E.; Hulstrom, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Wildlife's Winter Diet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife's Winter Diet Wildlife's Winter Diet Nature Bulletin No. 659 December 9, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE'S WINTER DIET Anyone who regularly feeds wild birds, and counts up the amount of food that they eat in the course of a winter, often wonders how they could get along without his help. In one day of freezing weather two or three dozen small birds commonly clean up a half pound of food -- suet, sunflower seed, cracked corn or small grain. This does not take into account raids by squirrels and rabbits. Winter in this region is a time of food crisis for all warm-blooded wildlife. Most of our summer song birds, especially the insect eaters, avoid cold by migrating to warm climates until spring. Likewise, most waterfowl and shorebirds go south during the months when our waters are locked in ice.

356

SSRL HEADLINES June 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 June, 2011 2 June, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Looking Ahead Science Highlight - Estimating Cr(VI) in Coal-Derived Fly-Ash Science Highlight - Staying One Step Ahead of Antibiotic Resistance Science Highlight - SSRL's Microfocus Macromolecular Crystallography Beam Line 12-2 First SSRL Pump-Probe Experiments Under Way SSRL X-rays Reveal Patterns in the Plumage of the First Birds Upcoming SSRL Events: Detectors, XRMS, 2011 Users' Conference Call for Nominations for Spicer and Klein Awards New SSRL Artwork Inspired by Science Talk User Administration Update Stig Hagström, Spectroscopy Pioneer, Dies at 78 In the News: Birds, Bacteria, SESAME __________________________________________________________________________

357

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shore Environmental Concerns Shore Environmental Concerns Jim Gibson Devine Tarbell & Associates, Inc. October 27, 2005 2 Near Shore Impacts Near Shore * Region of sea between but not including the shoreline and the off shore * Combination of riparian, beach, and tidal zones * No official definition - cannot be distance based * Includes Estuaries * Complex and Productive Systems * Defined by vegetative zone 3 Near Shore Impacts Near Shore Substrate * Vegetation, Mineral Nutrients, Gravel, Sand, Silt, Mud, Rock, Water Producers * Wetland Flora, Algae, Phytoplankton Converters * Aquatic Invertebrates, Fish, Birds, Marine Mammals, Lowland Wildlife, Bacteria Off Shore Substrate * Sand, Mud, Detritus, Water Producers * Phytoplankton Converters * Aquatic Invertebrates, Fish, Birds, Marine Mammals 4 Near Shore Functions

358

Session: Pre-development project risk assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the presentations was on the practices and methodologies used in the wind energy industry for assessing risk to birds and bats at candidate project sites. Presenters offered examples of pre-development siting evaluation requirements set by certain states. Presentation one was titled ''Practices and Methodologies and Initial Screening Tools'' by Richard Curry of Curry and Kerlinger, LLC. Presentation two was titled ''State of the Industry in the Pacific Northwest'' by Andy Linehan, CH2MHILL.

Curry, Richard; Linehan, Andy

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The sociality, ontogeny, and function of corvid post-conflict affiliation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

females, 4 males) in large outdoor aviaries, in which birds were able to fly freely, at the University of Cambridge Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour in Madingley, U. K. Rooks and jackdaws were housed in the same aviary (17 x 9 x 3m) and jays... back, oriented such that both birds heads face the same direction. Accompanied by growling vocalizations. R, JD, J Affiliative: passive Proximity Individuals within one body length of each other, but more than 5 cm apart. R, JD, J Co...

Logan, Corina

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pet House Sparrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pet House Sparrow Pet House Sparrow Name: mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I found a Baby House Sparrow and raised it. This Sparrow is a female and is about 5 months old and very tame. We are keeping this bird as a pet. We are interested in possibly breeding this bird and was wondering if you can mix breed the House Sparrow with a Finch or type of Sparrow that you could purchase at a pet store? What is the life expectancy of the House Sparrow? Replies: In the wild most small birds only live a year or two; well cared for in captivity they might be able to make it twice that long, but don't count on it. There are some records of exceptional life lengths for some species of small birds, 8 or 10 years, but I haven't heard of any for house sparrows. I don't think you would be able to cross breed house sparrows with any of the others, but I couldn't say for sure. Hybridization normally occurs only between very closely related species; I don't know enough about genetics.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flightless Birds Flightless Birds Name: Nick Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: Outside U.S. Country: Canada Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Since the bird Emu is flightless, do their wings server another purpose? Also have they always been flightless? Replies: Nick: Emu wings are vestigial, meaning they probably serve no purpose now. The emu as a species is flightless, but most likely evolved from ancestors that had wings. This from http://tolweb.org/treehouses/?treehouse_id=4729 may help. "The Emu has lost almost all need for the function of its wings. Through evolutionary time, their wing skeleton has degraded to only a single functional digit. In accordance with a reduced skeleton, there have been significant reductions in the muscles of the wing, even when comparing the Emu to other non-flying birds. Still, many muscles show diversity in their shape, where they are attached to the bone ,and whether they are even present or not. Evolutionary theory predicts that relaxed selection on vestigial organs should allow more variation to persist in the population, and this corresponds to what is observed in Emu populations."

362

Property:NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imposed Mitigation Imposed Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation Property Type Text Description Agency imposed mitigation plan to minimize the risk of a potential negative impact to a NEPA resource with a geothermal development effort. Pages using the property "NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Migratory_Birds + Initial ground disturbing activities would not be conducted during the migratory bird nesting season (March through July) unless necessary, and then only after inventories for migratory birds and nests were conducted by a qualified biologist acceptable to the BLM. This survey would be conducted to identify either breeding adult birds or nest sites within the specific areas to be disturbed. If active nests are present within these areas to be disturbed, NGP would coordinate with the authorized officer to develop appropriate protection measures for these sites, which may include avoidance, construction constraints, and/or the establishment of buffers.

363

4 Assessment 4.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Washington State Gap Analysis Program (GAP) Analysis database, Partners in Flight (PIF) information and pristine shrub steppe habitat. Washington State GAP data was also used extensively throughout the wildlife, Washington (IBIS 2003). Class Number Amphibians 21 Birds 222 Mammals 85 Reptiles 21 Total 349 #12;3 Many

364

Owyhee Subbasin Plan Appendix 1 General Supplemental Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of southwestern Idaho, southeastern Oregon, and north central Nevada (Figure 1.1). The Idaho portion. The Owyhee River originates in north central Nevada and flows in a northwest direction through the southwest, and birds migrating to Mexico and Central and South America are still contaminated with relatively high

365

Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion" (The Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan, http://www.efw.bpa.gov/cgi-bin/FW/welcome.cgi).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean. War Department Vol. IX. Birds. Washington, D.C. Barnhart, R.A. 1986. Species profiles: life and Snake rivers, 1991. National Marine Fisheries Science, Seattle, Washington. #12;291 Akeson, J. J., and H. A. Akeson. 1992. Bighorn sheep movements and summer lamb mortality in central Idaho. Proceedings

366

Malamalama 1 Platinum Sponsors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: it is situated on the edges of the Eura- sian and Philippine tectonic plates at the meeting point of the Ryukyu is a joint project of the Philippines, Taiwan and Japan to identify the biodi- versity of the region and how, "Bird/Plant Interactions in Hawaii as Seen Through the Fossil Record.", in Lihue, Kauai

367

NOAAINMFS Developments Arctic Marine Research Contracts Awarded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on tunal porpoise, and the economic and biolog- August 1977 pacts of gas and oil exploration pre- dict the probable ecological impacts of oil and gas development on Alaska's outer continental mammals, and birds, and smaller organisms which oc- cupy the two Arctic coastal areas prior to oil and gas

368

Biological effects of underground nuclear testing on marine organisms. II. Observed effects of Amchitka Island, Alaska, tests on marine fauna  

SciTech Connect

>From conference on the environmental effects of explosives and explosions; White Oak, Maryland, USA (30 May 1973). The biological effects of the Longshot, Milrow, and Cannikin underground nuclear tests at Amchitka lsland, Alaska, on marine mammals, fishes, and birds are summarized. The biological effects observed were related to the water-borne shock waves produced by the explosions. (CH)

Isakson, J.S.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Disposal: Science and Theory Disposal: Science and Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal: Science and Theory #12;Disposal: Science and Theory · Field recommendations based of activity ­ Corticosterone ­ EEG, ECG and motion studies · Large scale testing ­ Field scale units Science of Foam #12;Disposal: Science and Theory Cessation Time · Multiple bird species can be depopulated

Benson, Eric R.

370

Coseismic and Postseismic Deformations Associated With the 1992 Landers, California, Earthquake Measured by Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv "Not everything that I do with my roast chicken is necessarily scientific. Many aspects of my method are based on my feeling and experience. For instance, I always give my bird a generous butter massage before I put it in the oven. Why?

Yehuda Bock; J. Bernard Minster; Hubert Staudigel; Evelyn J. Price; Dr. Albert; M. Price; Virginia L. Price; Julia Child

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Slum upgrading in India and Kenya: investigating the sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and red-herring vendors in the front parlours, cobblers in the back; a bird-fancier in the first floor, three families on the second, starvation in the attics, Irishmen in the passage, a musician in the front kitchen, a charwoman and five hungry...

Cronin, Victoria Louise Molly

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

2009 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 2902-1095 Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will cause birds to become hostile toward one another. Never use white light bulbs larger than 40 watts or older, use 15 or 25 watt bulbs above feeding and watering areas. #12;2 Don't light fowl more than 16 to the recommended temperature. 3. Excessive light: Extremely bright light or excessively long periods of light

Liskiewicz, Maciej

373

SUPPORTING SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH GREEN POWER MARKETS Blair Swezey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kW* 1997 17.6¢/kWh Austin Energy GreenChoice 153 kW 1997 1.08¢/kWh Salt River Project EarthSUPPORTING SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH GREEN POWER MARKETS Blair Swezey Lori Bird Christy Herig National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 blair

374

Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluated potential effects on Federally recognized Indian Tribes and have determined that there are no potential effects. This rule will not interfere with the Tribes ability to manage themselves or their funds or to regulate migratory bird activities on Tribal lands.

In Accordance The Presidents

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Proceedings of the 38th SIGCSE technical symposium on Computer science education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the Northern Kentucky area and the 38th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education.We are pleased to present the proceedings of SIGCSE 2007. It includes papers, panels, special sessions, posters, workshops, and birds-of-a-feather ...

Ingrid Russell; Susan Haller; J. D. Dougherty; Susan Rodger

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Design and optimization strategies for muscle-like direct-drive linear permanent-magnet motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a new approach to the design of direct-drive linear permanent-magnet motors for use in general-purpose robotic actuation, with particular attention to applications in bird-scale flapping-wing robots. We show a simple, quantitative analytical ... Keywords: Actuator design, electric motors, muscle

Bryan P Ruddy; Ian W Hunter

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Towards Palm-Size Autonomous Helicopters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

muFly EU project started in 2006 with the idea to build an autonomous micro helicopter, comparable in size and weight to a small bird. Several scientific and technological objectives were identified. This spanned from system-level integration, high efficiency ... Keywords: Graph based SLAM, Micro actuators, Micro helicopter, Multi-directional triangulation

Samir Bouabdallah; Christian Bermes; Slawomir Grzonka; Christiane Gimkiewicz; Alain Brenzikofer; Robert Hahn; Dario Schafroth; Giorgio Grisetti; Wolfram Burgard; Roland Siegwart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nest Record Card Scheme 1 Welcome to the Nest Record Card Scheme, NERCS for short. The project aims to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of November. In arid areas, such as the Karoo, many small birds breed erratically at any time of the year than 2 m high, including much of the fynbos, Karoo and Kalahari biomes) DESERT (natural plant growth) fynbos,Karoo,Kalahari, riparian,largely alien trees, other (specify) gravel, sand, rock, grass, scrub

de Villiers, Marienne

379

Newsletter 32, June 2012 Animal Demography Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 or fewer in 2010 in both the Swartland and Overberg precincts. In the Eastern Cape Karoo region the species range (which coincides with many of the CAR Eastern Cape Karoo routes), and that it probably declined precincts in which more than half of the birds were in natural veld were the Eastern Karoo (NK routes

de Villiers, Marienne

380

Annual cycles in southern African weavers: breeding seasonality and moult patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in response to late rains (Table 2) are from the Karoo, Northern Cape, Botswana and Namibia, i.e. semi bird atlassing trip to the western Karoo and eastern Bushmanland. Promerops 178: 4-5 Cole DT 1958 in response to rain. Ostrich 41: 219 Martin R, Martin J, Martin E and Neatherway M 1985. The Karoo National

de Villiers, Marienne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Journal of Insect Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 6, November 2005 ( C 2005) DOI: 10.1007/s10905-005-8745-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mounds, while burial ritual shifted from Colonial/Sedentary practices to inhumation. Similarly (or "mounds") most famously at Hohokam sites but also at Chaco Canyon (Anasazi/Pueblo). Both regions conical or pyramidal platforms/mounds, and quite remarkably, effigy mounds one of a headless bird

Tschinkel, Walter R.

382

Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grassland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

end up eliminating or harming many non-target species. This can only benefit RIFAs, which will quickly of the southern U.S. Costs for various control methods vary considerably. Per mound treatment costs range from- eral bird species, spiders, lizards, and toads. Their effectiveness at mound control undoubtedly var

Davidson, Ana

383

Dear Rollins Community, Thank you for participating in the Rollins Environmental Health Community Arts Project, co-sponsored by Rollins School of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from coal mined from the Appalachian Mountains. Burning coal and other fossil fuels contributes to air referenced is coal, as seen by the coal plant in the larger mural and the canaries in the second mural, which references the use of the birds for detecting toxic gases within the mines. The two pieces are linked

Duong, Timothy Q.

384

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the morphological (e.g. low wing loading, high wing aspect ratios), physiological (e.g. energy storage as stomach foraging trips) characteristics that allow breeding seabirds to provision concentrated energy to the nest to determine the origin, gender, and reproductive status of birds sighted at sea (Prince et al. 1999, Hyrenbach

Anderson, David J.

385

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Biodiversity and Habitat Changes Modelling Experiences in Ukraine and Eastern Europe Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is updated study on biodiversity and its conditions in Ukraine and seven surrounding countries. It includes four different methods: the indicative-index approach, the Mean Species Abundance MSA and two species based approaches, one using habitat ... Keywords: Biodiversity, Birds, DIVA, Eastern Europe, GLOBIO, Generalized Linear Model GLM, Insects, Mammals, Mean Species Abundance MSA, Modelling, Plants, Ukraine

Vasyl Prydatko, Grygoriy Kolomytsev

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Yukon Southern Lakes Nest Box Project Report, 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report with permission of the photographers and the credited photographer retains copyright on all photos. Reference this report as: Eckert, C.D., Rousseau, A., and T. Davey. 2001. Yukon Southern Lakes Nest Box Project Report, 2000. Yukon Bird Club & Yukon Conservation Society. Whitehorse, Yukon. Yukon Southern Lakes Nest Box Project ii CONTENTS 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...................................................................................................................................... 1 2.

Cameron Eckert Amlie; Cameron D. Eckert; Tanis Davey; Tanis Davey; Yukon Fish; Wildlife Enhancement; Trust Fund; Amlie Rousseau; Amlie Rousseau; Cameron Eckert; Cameron Eckert; Jeanette Mccrie; Heidi Hehn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields

389

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...M. Baker New Age Industries, Inc. Charles E. Bates Southern Research Institute Bruce A. Becherer Teledyne Vasco Corporation Tom Bell University of Birmingham Eugene L. Bird Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Bruce L. Bramfitt Bethlehem Steel Corporation Robert L. Brennan E.F. Houghton & Company...

390

2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM A Global Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standardized linear contrasts to show that this positive relationship persists when all bird species for which distribution maps published in standard ornithological handbooks (e.g., Cramp, 1977­1994; Marchant and Higgins standardized, may be entered into conventional statistical analyses. Standardization of contrasts is dependent

Reynolds, John D.

391

Implementation of a Gabor Transform Data Quality Control Algorithm for UHF Wind Profiling Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we apply a Gabor transform based algorithm to identify and eliminate intermittent signal contamination in UHF wind profiling radars, such as that produced by migrating birds. The algorithm is applied in the time-domain, and so can be ...

Laura Bianco; Daniel Gottas; James M. Wilczak

392

Wind Farm Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saint Francis University has assessed the Swallow Farm property located in Shade Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania as a potential wind power development site. Saint Francis worked with McLean Energy Partners to have a 50-meter meteorological tower installed on the property in April 2004 and continues to conduct a meteorological assessment of the site. Results suggest a mean average wind speed at 80 meters of 17 mph with a net capacity factor of 31 - 33%. Approximate electricity generation capacity of the project is 10 megawatts. Also, the University used matching funds provided by the federal government to contract with ABR, Inc. to conduct radar studies of nocturnal migration of birds and bats during the migrations seasons in the Spring and Fall of 2005 with a mean nocturnal flight altitude of 402 meters with less than 5% of targets at altitudes of less than 125 meters. The mean nocturnal passage rate was 166 targets/km/h in the fall and 145 targets/km/h in the spring. Lastly, University faculty and students conducted a nesting bird study May - July 2006. Seventy-three (73) species of birds were observed with 65 determined to be breeding or potentially breeding species; this figure represents approximately 30% of the 214 breeding bird species in Pennsylvania. No officially protected avian species were determined to be nesting at Swallow Farm.

Richard Curry; Erik Foley; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sam Slowinski 909 South Lincoln Street Indiana University Bloomington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Analysis of avian preen oil samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry · Nest searching, bird banding, blood sample collection, preen oil collection, hormone injections in dark-eyed juncos · Data netting, nest searching, nest monitoring, blood sample collection, preen oil collection from gray catbirds

394

Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 350 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Description of the High Resolution Fly's Eye Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quartz optical fibers to each of the detectors. Some fibers are used to directly illuminate the clusters al., Ap. J., 441, 1995, p 144. D. Bird et al., Ap. J., , , p . J.H.V. Girard et al., A fiber-optic and a ground array was not achieved until 1976 by a group at the Univer- sity of Utah operating optical

395

NRRI NowSpring/Summer 2008 GrowingStrongIndustries~DevelopingNewIdeas~NurturingNaturalResources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,500 mattresses a month to Duluth Goodwill Industries (and growing!) 360 pounds per cubic yard ­ compaction rateNRRI NowSpring/Summer 2008 GrowingStrongIndustries~DevelopingNewIdeas~NurturingNaturalResources 2 The afterlife of mattresses Birds in the riparian zone Pellet industry heats up Watchdogs for change Biology

Netoff, Theoden

396

Reserves Project Breeding information is important  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: It is a bird of dry savannas. In the open Karoo and dry grassland biomes, it is associated with tree-lying regions, moving into parts of the Karoo directly adjacent to grassland areas, i.e. in the eastern Cape sometimes occur together. Habitat: It inhabits the semi-arid Karoo, the drier western grasslands in South

de Villiers, Marienne

397

Reserves Project Breeding information is important  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on their dusty Karoo home patch, they were keen for a change and to try track down some Fynbos species. Pat karoo plains north of the Baviaanskloof. It was one of the best birding days I've ever had with great ­ only Denham's Bustard escaped sightings of Kori and Ludwig's Bustards, and Karoo and Southern Black

de Villiers, Marienne

398

A quantitative precipitation forecast experiment for Puerto Rico M.M. Cartera,*, J.B. Elsnerb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prefer more easterly sites on Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. Scientists have now determined that the birds migrated to Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. The researchers suggest that the information, and future data. The craft, the High Energy Solar Spectro scopic Imager, was placed in Earth orbit last week aboard a Pegasus

Elsner, James B.

399

Tuesday, May 28, 2002 Thermometer in Nanotube Page: 1 http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/12/science/12OBSE.html?pagewanted=print  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prefer more easterly sites on Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. Scientists have now determined that the birds migrated to Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. The researchers suggest that the information, and future data. The craft, the High Energy Solar Spectro scopic Imager, was placed in Earth orbit last week aboard a Pegasus

Rubenstein, Dustin R.

400

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,671 Use of Wetland Systems to Treat Nursery Runoff 10.RD 58-6618-7-216 58,449 Using Local Food Banks 31,212 Assessment of the Sublethal Response of Birds to Oil Exposure 15.RD G10AC00494 16,468 Cannon5430090058 2,484 Climate Change and Tidally Influenced Freshwater Forested Wetlands of the Southeast

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ethics, Place and Environment Vol. 9, No. 1, 2145, March 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been logging and milling by large industrial timber operations and oil and gas extraction. Because believe in animal rights, and duck hunters, who want birds to shoot, can agree on a policy of wetland of the place that now bears their name. After an extended stopover in Louisiana they eventually took up

Monticino, Michael

402

Available Alternative Fuel School Bus Products--2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 4-page Clean Cities fact sheet provides a list of the currently available (and soon to be available) model year 2004 alternative fuel school bus and school bus engine products. It includes information from Blue Bird Corporation, Collins Bus Corporation, Corbeil Bus, Ford Motor Company, General Motors Corporation, Thomas Built Buses, Inc., Clean Air Partners, Cummins Westport, and Deere & Company.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

Briant, James K. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352); Driver, Crystal J. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The National Inventory of Landscapes in Sweden (NILS) is a new, nationwide environmental monitoring programme focused on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aerial photo interpretation as well as field inventories. The programme commenced in full scale during in the form of a reference group. Cooperation Methods for aerial photo interpretation were de- veloped breeding bird survey, NILS provides the survey with biotope data. For further information, contact: Mailing

405

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Synoptic surveys of roosting cranes were conducted at night by using an aerial thermal infrared videoU.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2005-3029 April 2005 Assessing, 2001 and 2002 infrared surveys were 552,000, 488,000, and 486,000 birds, respectively. The highest

406

THE CLOUDSAT MISSION AND THE A-TRAIN A New Dimension of Space-Based Observations of Clouds and Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the recirculation zone within a given layer and the fluid residence time distribution (RTD) within this zone depend volume and its associated RTD are calculated using an analytic two-dimensional potential flow model (Bird in parallel. The RTD of the segregated flow reactor is determined from the fluid streamlines

407

m104.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

etc. * * * 2020 20 TIKHOMIROV 03 SPEC 40.0 - C K 0 S K 0 S K 0 L X 1978 40 241 47 BIRD 89 LASS - 11 K - p K 0 - p K 2 (1980) WIDTH K 2 (1980) WIDTH...

408

Report prepared under the direction of John C. Baker, acting director of the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, and Brian Wilson, Communications Assistant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

certain broiler chickens may have less fat. They then can identify commercial chickens with the same genetics researcher, who has worked on mapping the chicken genome for the past 17 years, was part of the international team that analyzed the sequenced chicken genome in the British science journal Nature. The bird

Liu, Taosheng

409

Effects of age and diet on plasma lipid and glucose concentrations in genetically lean or fat chickens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations in genetically lean (LL) and fat (FL) male chickens. The fat birds always displayed lower glycemiaEffects of age and diet on plasma lipid and glucose concentrations in genetically lean or fat chickens B. LECLERCQ, D. HERMIER M. R. SALICHON Station de Recherches avico%s, I.N.R.A., Nouzilly, 37380

Recanati, Catherine

410

6 References Allen, D. B, B. J. Flatter, and K. Fite. 1996. Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Bruneau area, Owyhee County, Southwestern Idaho. Water Resoources Investigations, U. S. Geological Survey in Southern Owyhee County, Idaho. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Idaho Bureau of Land Management Technical County, Idaho. Idaho Bu American Ornithologists' Union. 1957. Check-list of North American Birds. 5th

411

Larks and Meadowlarks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Larks and Meadowlarks Larks and Meadowlarks Nature Bulletin No. 195-A June 5, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LARKS AND MEADOWLARKS Our common names for many birds are confusing. Our robin is really a thrush Its young have speckled breasts like other thrushes, including the bluebird. The European robin belongs to a different family and is a much smaller bird with a brighter orange-red breast. The English sparrow is not a sparrow. Our native sparrows belong to the Finch family which includes the cardinal, grosbeak, towhee, crossbills, buntings and finches. These misleading common names probably originated from resemblances to birds our early colonists had known in Europe. The Meadowlark is not a lark at all, although it nests on the ground in lark-fashion, but is close kin to the bobolinks, orioles and blackbirds. The Horned lark is the only American member of the lark family, otherwise found in northern Europe, Africa, Asia and India. To that family belongs the poet's bird, the Skylark, of which Shakespeare wrote: "Hark! hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings." The second stanza of Shelley's Ode to a Skylark -- which begins: "Hail to thee, blithe spirit ! " -- is typical.

412

Nancy Rader, Executive Director California Wind Energy Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nancy Rader, Executive Director California Wind Energy Association Improving Methods for Estimating Fatality of Birds and Bats at Wind Energy Facilities California Wind Energy Association Public Webinar Wind Energy Development 2008 CEC Research "Roadmap" on Impact Assessment Methods 2008 CEC PIER RFP 2009

413

Blood meal host preferences of Culex salinarius Coquillett (Diptera : culicidae) in Chambers County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bloodmeal host preferences were assessed for Culex salinarius populations occurring along the upper Gulf Coast region of East Texas. Over a one-year period beginning in September 1991, blood-engorged female Cx. salinarius specimens were collected on a monthly basis from three field sites in Chambers County, TX. The source of blood contained in each specimen was determined using a modified precipitin test. The results were used to calculate seasonal foraging ratios for mosquito populations sampled at each site. No noticeable changes in bloodmeal host preferences occurred for Cx. salinarius populations sampled at the coastal marsh site during the study period. Mammals were the primary sources of bloodmeals for these populations, with most mosquitoes collected having fed on cattle. There was an increase in specimens testing positive for avian blood during winter (Dec.-Feb.) commensurate with the arrival of migratory goose populations in the vicinity. The overall foraging ratio, however, did not change. Culex salinarius populations sampled at the upper marsh site also demonstrated a preference for mammalian blood throughout the year. However, forage ratios indicated these populations varied in the mammals upon which they fed, with a number of specimens having fed on armadillos. Cx. salinarius populations sampled at the up-county site demonstrated greater tendency to select birds as bloodmeal sources. Mosquito specimens at this site tested positive for either passeriiform or ciconiiform birds, with a few specimens testing positive for rabbits and cattle. A preference was shown for ciconiiform birds during the spring (March-May). During the rest of the year, passeriiform birds served more as a source of bloodmeals for Cx. salinarius populations. Forage ratios indicated the use of passeriiform birds was not a function of preference, but rather a result of these birds being abundant at the up-county site. Results of this study substantiate earlier findings that Cx. salinarius females will use both mammals and birds as sources of bloodmeals. Females of this species are generalistic feeders and will utilize hosts that are in greatest abundance or which require the least amount of energy on the part of the mosquito to acquire.

Grieco, John Paul

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Avian Field guide and checklist for Kunsan Air Base, Korea.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Kunsan Air Base (AB). This on-going survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Kunsan AB, and the 8th Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred sixteen bird species representing 34 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Cultural Property Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Six species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's(KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, only ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected because the Eurasian Spoonbill, Peregrine Falcon, and Eurasian Oystercatcher are listed by both agencies. The primary objective of the avian survey at Kunsan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex C.4.a.(1-4) of the 8th Fighter Wing BASH Plan(8FWOPLAN 91-202). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Kunsan AB throughout the year, and from the survey results determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Kunsan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Kunsan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a and also that are favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

Levenson, J. B.; Environmental Assessment

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Avian response to microclimate in canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract - Microclimate may infl uence use of early successional habitat by birds. We assessed the relationships between avian habitat use and microclimate (temperature, light intensity, and relative humidity) in experimentally created canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest on the Savannah River Site, SC. Gaps were 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted from spring through fall, encompassing four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration), in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and simultaneously recorded microclimate variables to determine the influence of microclimate on bird habitat use. Microclimate was strongly affected by net location within canopy gaps in both years. Temperature generally was higher on the west side of gaps, light intensity was greater in gap centers, and relative humidity was higher on the east side of gaps. However, we found few relationships between bird captures and the microclimate variables. Bird captures were inversely correlated with temperature during the breeding and postbreeding periods in 2002 and positively correlated with temperature during spring 2003. Captures were high where humidity was high during post-breeding 2002, and captures were low where humidity was high during spring 2003. We conclude that variations in the local microclimate had minor infl uence on avian habitat use within gaps. Instead, habitat selection in relatively mild regions like the southeastern US is based primarily on vegetation structure, while other factors, including microclimate, are less important.

Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Moorman, Christopher E.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Comparison of avian species diversity and densities on non-mined and reclaimed surface-mined land in east-central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface mining often changes the native landscape and vegetation of an area. Reclamation is used to counter this change, with the goal of restoring the land to its original pre-mined state. The process of reclamation creates early successional-stage lands, such as grasslands, shrublands, and wetlands, attracting new plant and animal species to the area. I compared avian species density (number of individuals/ha), diversity (H'), and richness (number of species/ha) on reclaimed and non-mined lands at TXU's Big Brown Mine in Fairfield, Texas. I also compared my results to those of a previous study conducted 25 years earlier. Avian counts were conducted using a fixedradius point-count method on 240 points placed in four different vegetation types and in four land-age groups (time since being reclaimed). Vegetation was measured both locally, and at a landscape level. Overall bird species density did not exhibit a clear relationship on non-mined versus reclaimed land. Overall bird species diversity was greater on non-mined lands, whereas overall species richness was greater on reclaimed lands. My results demonstrated a lower mean/point bird density and higher mean/point bird diversity than were found 25 years earlier. Different nesting guilds occurred on the reclaimed lands than occurred on the non-mined lands. Results suggested different species were attracted to the several successional stages of reclaimed lands over the nonmined lands, which consisted of climax vegetation. The different successional stages of reclaimed lands increased overall diversity and richness of the landscape as a whole. Five bird species of conservation concern were observed in the study, all of which occurred on reclaimed land. Four of the five species primarily occurred on reclaimed lands. Future land management should include conserving different successional-stage lands to increase overall biotic diversity and richness of mined land, preserving reclaimed habitat for species of concern, and educating future private landowners on the importance of maintaining vegetative and bird species diversity.

Wenzel, Dawn Nicole

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations, ammonia (NH?) concentrations, and ventilation rates were measured in four commercial, tunnel ventilated broiler houses in June through December of 2000 in Brazos County, Texas. Particle size distributions were developed from TSP samplers collected and used to determine the mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples collected. Concentrations of TSP and ammonia measured were multiplied by the ventilation rates measured to obtain emission factors for PM?? and ammonia from tunnel ventilated commercial broiler houses. TSP and NH? concentrations ranged from 7,387 to 11,387 []g/m and 2.02 to 45 ppm, respectively. Ammonia concentration exhibited a correlation with the age of the birds. Mass median diameters (MMD) found using particle size analysis with a Coulter Counter Multisizer were between 24.0 and 26.7 mm aerodynamic equivalent diameter. MMD increased with bird age. The mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples was between 2.72% and 8.40% with a mean of 5.94%. Ventilation rates were measured between 0.58 and 89 m/s. Ammonia emission rates varied from 38 to 2105 g/hr. TSP emission rates and PM?? emission rates ranged from 7.0 to 1673 g/hr 0.58 to 99 g/hr respectively. Emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter increased with the age of the birds. Error and sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of emission rates. Error for ammonia emission rates was 99 g/hr during tunnel ventilation and 6 g/hr during sidewall ventilation. Error for TSP emission rates was 79 g/hr and 11 g/hr for tunnel and sidewall ventilation respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that ventilation rate measurements and measurement of ammonia concentration had the most effect on the emission rates. Emission factors of NH? and PM?? estimated for these buildings were 1.32 0.472 g/bird and 22.8 9.28 g/bird, respectively. These emission factors take into account the variation of PM?? and NH? concentrations and ventilation rates with the age of the birds.

Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)  

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Status and Trends in U.S. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data) Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52925 October 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data) Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52925 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

420

Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2006)  

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Trends in Utility Green Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2006) Lori Bird and Marshall Kaiser Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42287 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42287 October 2007 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2006) Lori Bird and Marshall Kaiser Prepared under Task No. IGST.7330 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

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421

Domestic Chickens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chickens Chickens Nature Bulletin No. 396-A November 21, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation DOMESTIC CHICKENS The domestic chicken belongs to a family of hen-like ground-dwelling birds which includes the quail, grouse, partridge, pheasant, turkey, guineafowl and peafowl. Because of their anatomy and relatively small brains, some scientists think that they, -- rather than the ostrich, emu, cassowary and other flightless kinds -- are the most primitive birds. Chickens, undoubtedly, are the silliest of all domestic animals. There is an old riddle: "Why does a chicken cross the road?" Anyone who has seen a squawking hen try to run or fly just ahead of an automobile, will answer: "No brains ".

422

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Ninth Edition)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Ninth Edition) Lori Bird and Blair Swezey Technical Report NREL/TP-640-40904 November 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Ninth Edition) Lori Bird and Blair Swezey Prepared under Task No. ASG6.1003 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-40904 November 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

423

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owl Predators Owl Predators Name: Mia Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: MN Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: What are the predators of a owl? Replies: Mia: Our largest adult owls have few predators. Smaller owls may be prey of other owls, long-eared owls are sometimes eaten by great horned owls, for example. Ground nesting owls, like short-eared owls, and especially nestlings, may be hunted by many predators, coyotes and other hawks and owls most likely. Nestlings of all birds, including owls may be hunted by other birds, raccoons, snakes and other animals that can climb trees. J. Elliott Hi Mia Predators of owls include: Opossums Racoons Hawks, Eagles and other raptors Other owls House cats Snakes that raid nests Accidents such as falling out of a nest, colliding with a tree, and electric power lines also contribute to owl mortality.

424

Driving Membrane Curvature | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity How to Make a Splash Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Driving Membrane Curvature JUNE 14, 2012 Bookmark and Share Model of conformational change in the HIV gp41 fusion protein induced by cholesterol composition of lipid monolayers. In biological systems, membranes are as important as water. They form the barrier between the inner world, within our cells, where we perform the chemical reactions of life, and the outside environment.

425

Turkeys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. 619 November 26, 1960 No. 619 November 26, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist TURKEYS : WILD AND DOMESTICATED The story of the first Thanksgiving in 1621 and of the wild "Turkies" which the Pilgrims hunted to provide meat for the feast is familiar to every American. Today, although very few of us can claim that we had ancestors on the Mayflower, a lot of us imagine that our Thanksgiving bird is descended from those wild turkeys. This is not quite correct. A century before, in Mexico, the early Spanish adventurers had found Indians raising turkeys around their homes. The Aztec emperor, Montezuma, kept them in his famous zoo, it is said, as food for the other animals. It is not known how long those Mexican birds had been tamed and bred but they are the true ancestors of our only domestic animal with an origin in North America.

426

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (2009 Data)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power Marketing in the Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (2009 Data) Lori Bird and Jenny Sumner Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49403 September 2010 ERRATA SHEET NREL REPORT/PROJECT NUMBER: TP-6A20-49403 TITLE: Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (2009 Data) AUTHOR(S): Lori Bird, Jenny Sumner ORIGINAL PUBLICATION DATE: September 2010 DATE OF CORRECTIONS: April 2011 The following corrections were made to this report: On page 36, reference to 2010 vintage WECC wind was removed. In Table 18, data on 2010 vintage WECC wind was removed. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

427

Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards  

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77 77 May 2009 Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards Patrick Sullivan, Jeffrey Logan, Lori Bird, and Walter Short National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45877 May 2009 Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards Patrick Sullivan, Jeffrey Logan, Lori Bird, and Walter Short Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9C50 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

428

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 14660 of 26,764 results. 51 - 14660 of 26,764 results. Download URTAC Meeting- October 21, 2010 Meeting minutes and Federal Register notice for October 21, 2010 meeting http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/urtac-meeting-october-21-2010 Download Executive Order 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/executive-order-13186-responsibilities-federal-agencies-protect-migratory-birds Download National Policy Assurances to be Incorporated as Award Terms The following are the National Policy Assurances which are incorporated by reference as Award Terms at time of Award. The National Policy Assurances which apply to the award are those in effect on... http://energy.gov/management/downloads/national-policy-assurances-be-incorporated-award-terms

429

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report ; Fifth Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the in the United States: A Status Report Fifth Edition August 2000 * NREL/TP-620-28738 Blair Swezey and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 August 2000 * NREL/TP-620-28738 Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report Fifth Edition Blair Swezey and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. AS65.3010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

430

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

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Implications of Carbon Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. ASG6.1005 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

431

Other Data Source | Data.gov  

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Other Data Source Other Data Source Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Other Data Sources Explore, discover and access a variety of rich spatial and non-spatial data. This page will be frequently updated and enhanced based on feedback from the forums. When you click on the resources below, you will be leaving the Data.gov website. Showing 1 - 21 of 21 results. Avian Knowledge Network The Avian Knowledge Network (AKN) is an international organization of government and non-government institutions focused on understanding the patterns and dynamics of bird populations across the Western Hemisphere. The goal is to educate the public on the dynamics of bird populations, provide interactive decision-making tools for land managers, make available

432

Incorporating Wind Generation in Cap and Trade Programs  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Incorporating Wind Generation in Incorporating Wind Generation in Cap and Trade Programs Joel Bluestein Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. Elizabeth Salerno American Wind Energy Association Lori Bird and Laura Vimmerstedt National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-500-40006 July 2006 Incorporating Wind Generation in Cap and Trade Programs Joel Bluestein Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. Elizabeth Salerno American Wind Energy Association Lori Bird and Laura Vimmerstedt National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. WER6 6006 Technical Report NREL/TP-500-4006 July 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

433

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Implications of Carbon Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. ASG6.1005 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

434

Coops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coops Coops Nature Bulletin No. 42 November 24, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation COOPS In the lakes and ponds of the forest preserves, and along the shores of Lake Michigan, from late September until late November, one may see l'rafts" of black, duck-like birds with small, jet-black heads and pointed, ivory-white beaks. They tend to gang up, hang together, and move in unison like soldiers. Unlike ducks, which glide along, these birds seem to "walk" ,in the water, thrusting their heads forward and back with each paddle-stroke of their feet. They dive quickly and well, but rise from the water with difficulty, assisting their long "take-off" by rapidly spanking the water behind them with their feet. These are coots, commonly known here as "muddiness. .

435

Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2004)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Utility Green Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2004) Lori Bird and Elizabeth Brown Technical Report NREL/TP-620-38800 October 2005 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2004) Lori Bird and Elizabeth Brown Prepared under Task No. ASG5.1003 Technical Report NREL/TP-620-38800 October 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

436

Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

258 258 May 2010 Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector Lori Bird, Caroline Chapman, Jeff Logan, Jenny Sumner, and Walter Short National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-48258 May 2010 Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector Lori Bird, Caroline Chapman, Jeff Logan, Jenny Sumner, and Walter Short Prepared under Task No. SAO9.2038 NOTICE

437

Putting the Pressure on MOFs | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Hearing the Highest Pitches Unveiling the Secrets of Nanoparticle Haloing A Fruit-Fly Protein that Captures Tumor Growth Factors A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Putting the Pressure on MOFs JULY 30, 2008 Bookmark and Share Sometimes, it's not what's on the outside that matters, but what happens inside, in the spaces in between. That's certainly the case with metal-organic framework (MOF) materials, which are crystalline constructs made up of metallic ions connected to organic molecules, put together in

438

NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page  

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Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (11) Apply Africa filter Asia (12) Apply Asia filter Australia and Oceania (10) Apply Australia and Oceania filter Europe (219) Apply Europe filter Global (7) Apply Global filter North America (217) Apply North America filter Technology Land-Based Wind (280) Apply Land-Based Wind filter Marine Energy (58) Apply Marine Energy filter Offshore Wind (161) Apply Offshore Wind filter Power Lines (66) Apply Power Lines filter Towers (23) Apply Towers filter Animal Birds (334) Apply Birds filter Fish (71) Apply Fish filter Invertebrates (44) Apply Invertebrates filter Mammals (185) Apply Mammals filter Reptiles (10) Apply Reptiles filter Publication Year 2013 (92) Apply 2013 filter

439

Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2003)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

33 33 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2003) Lori Bird and Karen Cardinal National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 September 2004 * NREL/TP-620-36833 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2003) Lori Bird and Karen Cardinal Prepared under Task No. ASG4.1003 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

440

Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

158 158 May 2010 Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015 Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates, Inc. Jenny Sumner and Claire Kreycik National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-48158 May 2010 Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015 Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates, Inc. Jenny Sumner and Claire Kreycik National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH FEBRUARY 1999 Final (Revision 0) Department of Energy Babcock & Wilcox of Ohio Mr. Daniel Bird AICP, Planning Manager Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation 720 Mound Road Miamisburg, Ohio 45342-6714 Dear Mr. Bird: The Core Team, consisting of the U.S. Department of Energy Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (DOE-MEMP), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), appreciates your comments on the Work

442

CX-007165: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007165: Categorical Exclusion Determination Prescott-Pinnacle Peak Bird Diversion Equipment Addition CX(s) Applied: B1.20 Date: 12/15/2010 Location(s): Yavapai County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western proposes installing Firefly type bird diversion equipment onto static wires (overhead ground wires) of the Prescott-Pinnacle Peak 230-kilovolt transmission line between structures 144/3 and 145/2. The diverters will be spaced approximately 15 feet apart alternating between the two static lines. The diverters will be installed using a hot stick from a helicopter or by accessing the line using existing access roads and rubber-tired vehicles such as cherry pickers, pickup trucks, crew trucks.

443

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

444

Climate Instability and Public Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

445

Office of Health, Safety and Security | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Read more President Obama Meets with Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Award Finalists and Winners HSS' Josh Silverman joins other 2013 "Sammie Award" Finalists at the White House to meet President Barack Obama. Read more National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers On Friday, October 25th 2013, HSS honored over 150 nuclear weapons program workers at the National Atomic Testing Museum (NATM). Read more Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Deputy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman

446

Middle East and African Partnerships and Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Middle East and African Partnerships and Projects Middle East and African Partnerships and Projects Middle East and African Partnerships and Projects EERE engages bilaterally with individual countries in the Middle East and Africa. Bilateral Partnerships Israel Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation EERE collaborates with the Israeli Ministry of National Infrastructure to conduct jointly-funded research, development, and demonstration projects that aim to successfully commercialize cutting-edge clean energy technologies. The two governments work through the Binational BIRD Foundation, a quasi-governmental entity that was established in the 1970s to stimulate, promote, and support industrial R&D to mutually benefit the United States and Israel. Using funds provided by EERE and Israeli Ministry

447

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 11640 of 29,416 results. 31 - 11640 of 29,416 results. Download Technical Standards, Newsletter-August 1998 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions, August 1998 http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/technical-standards-newsletter-august-1998 Download CX-009005: Categorical Exclusion Determination Henderson Solar Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-009005-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Executive Order 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/executive-order-13186-responsibilities-federal-agencies-protect-migratory-birds Download Audit Report: WR-B-96-02 Audit of Construction of an Environmental, Safety, and Health Analytical

448

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Including Alternative Resources Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55979 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110

449

Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Brief: Status of the Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data) Jenny Heeter, Philip Armstrong, and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-56128 September 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data) Jenny Heeter, Philip Armstrong, and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task Nos. SAO9.3110 and SA12 0324

450

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 1, 2011 July 1, 2011 DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction June 30, 2011 A collage of images. Top, optical images of: blue jay feather, squid, and fossil fish with feather. Bottom: x-ray images showing the distribution of copper (red) in the same organisms. | Photo Courtesy of Gregory Stewart, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds One-hundred million years ago, what did birds look like? Scientists have taken a huge step towards finding the answer, leaving the creative imaginations behind such classics as Jurassic Park, The Land Before Time and Dinotopic to contend with science. June 30, 2011 Obama Administration Announces 14 Initial Partners in the Better Buildings

451

Using Renewable Energy Purchases to Achieve Institutional Carbon Goals: A Review of Current Practices and Considerations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Purchases to Achieve Institutional Carbon Goals: A Review of Current Practices and Considerations Lori Bird and Jenny Sumner Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49938 January 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Using Renewable Energy Purchases to Achieve Institutional Carbon Goals: A Review of Current Practices and Considerations Lori Bird and Jenny Sumner Prepared under Task No. SA09.3102 Technical Report

452

Nesting Habits of Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nesting Habits of Owls Nesting Habits of Owls Nature Bulletin No. 624 January 14, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist NESTING HABITS OF OWLS From all of the information available it appears to us that, amongst the owls, there is greater variation in where and how they nest than in any other group of birds. Two nesting characteristics, however, are common to all owls. The eggs are nearly spherical and white, or off-white, without any markings. Also, a nesting female does not lay one egg per day, as most birds do, but at intervals of two or more days -- sometimes several. In extreme cases there may be a fresh egg, others incubating, and a newly hatched fledgling -- all in the same nest.

453

Session: Offshore wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger.

Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Plate Tectonic Consequences of competing models for the origin and history of the Banda Sea subducted oceanic lithosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Banda Arc, situated west of Irian Jaya and in the easternmost extension of the Sunda subduction zone system, reveals a characteristic bowl-shaped geometry in seismic tomographic images. This indicates that the oceanic lithosphere still remains attached to the surrounding continental margins of northern Australia and the Bird's Head microcontinent. Major controversies exist between authors proposing an allochthonous or autochthonous origin of the Bird's Head block. Either scenario has important implications for plate kinematic models aiming to reconstruct the tectonic evolution of the region and the late Jurassic seaoor spreading geometry of this now subducted Argo-Tanimbar-Seram (ATS) ocean basin. Wider implications affect the tectonic conguration of the Tethyan-Pacic realm, the distribution of plate boundaries as well as the shape and size of continental blocks which have been rifted off the northeastern Gondwana margin during the Late Jurassic and are now accreted to the SE Asia margin. We apply structu...

Heine, Christian; McKay, Hamish; Mller, R Dietmar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Pacific Northwest Laboratory monthly activities report, October 1967  

SciTech Connect

The results of a statistical study of Columbia River temperature trends were released on October 18 at the Sixth WSU Hydraulics Conference. The new John Day reservoir is under study for possible beneficial effects on flow regulation. Measurements of radioactivity in 396 children were completed at Captain Gray elementary school, Pasco, Washington on October 19, 1967. Measurements began at the Emerson elementary school in Pasco on October 24, 1967, following lectures to the teaching staff and to each of the 18 classrooms in grades 1 through 6. Computer programming was started in October to determine the frequency distribution, mean, and median values of the environmental radiation dose values calculated last month from several thousand individual adult diet records. Response or game bird hunter-employees to a request for participation in a survey of game bird kills during the current season has been disappointing in spite of several articles in the project newspapers.

Albaugh, F.W.

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Session: Offshore wind  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interaction of Compliance Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets Lori Bird and Elizabeth Lokey Technical Report NREL/ TP-670-42096 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Technical Report NREL/ TP-670-42096 October 2007 Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets Lori Bird and Elizabeth Lokey Prepared under Task No. IGST.7330 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

459

Program Highlights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us » News & Blog » Program Highlights About Us » News & Blog » Program Highlights Program Highlights December 4, 2013 Program Highlights DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. November 1, 2013 Program Highlights Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches All DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplace MUST complete the new Hazard Communications Standard Training, per 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by DECEMBER 1, 2013. October 31, 2013 HSS' Josh Silverman joins other 2013 "Sammie Award" Finalists at the White House to meet President Barack Obama. Josh is in the back row, fifth from the right.

460

Green Power Network: Featured Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alphabetical Listing Alphabetical Listing Categorical Listing Chronological Listing Featured Reports Featured Reports Selected from from our Library of Green Power Publications Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Feature Report Heeter, J., T. Nicholas, 2013. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2012 Data). NREL Report No. TP-6A20-60210. (PDF 1.2 MB) Heeter, J., 2013. Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) Tracking Systems: Costs & Verification Issues (Presentation). NREL/PR-6A20-60640. (PDF 517 KB) Heeter, J., P. Armstrong, L. Bird, 2012. Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data). NREL/TP-6A20-52925 (PDF 974 KB) Bird, L., A. Reger, and J. Heeter, 2012. Distributed Solar Incentive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bird leila dagher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Made with Renewable Energy: How and Why Companies are Labeling Consumer Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Made with Renewable Energy: Made with Renewable Energy: How and Why Companies are Labeling Consumer Products Deborah Baker Brannan, Jenny Heeter, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53764 March 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Made with Renewable Energy: How and Why Companies are Labeling Consumer Products Deborah Baker Brannan, Jenny Heeter, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53764

462

Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

161 161 February 2009 Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard Jeffrey Logan, Patrick Sullivan, Walter Short, Lori Bird, Ted L. James, and Monisha R. Shah National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45161 February 2009 Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard Jeffrey Logan, Patrick Sullivan, Walter Short, Lori Bird, Ted L. James, and Monisha R. Shah Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9C50 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

463

Microsoft Word - Post_Skidoo_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2012 5, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for purchase of Skidoo Creek, Post Creek, and Bird's Eye View properties Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, contract 55869 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B 1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management. Locations: Skidoo Creek Property Township 23 North, Range 19 West, Section 22 Lake County, MT 112 Acres Post Creek Property Township 19 North, Range 19 West, Section 7 Lake County, MT 5 Acres Bird's Eye View Township 23 North, Range 18

464

BWXTymes, A newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex, December 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex DECEMBER 2005 W H AT ' S I N S I D E Reporting for duty ... back at Y-12 4 Early bird gets the worm 5 Parking at a premium Which way do I go? 5 How to deal with holiday stress Who's been naughty or nice? 6 Y-12 breaks ground The Y-12 National Security Complex broke

465

WIND POWER Impacts on Wildlife and Government Responsibilities for Regulating Development and Protecting Wildlife Why GAO Did This Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has recently experienced dramatic growth in the United States, with further growth expected. However, several wind power-generating facilities have killed migratory birds and bats, prompting concern from wildlife biologists and others about the species affected, and the cumulative effects on species populations. GAO assessed (1) what available studies and experts have reported about the impacts of wind power facilities on wildlife in the United

Protecting Wildlife

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Risk Analysis Framework for Golden Eagle Population Responses to Wind Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of quick snapshot metrics that can serve as reliable diagnostic tools for assessing avian population status has great appeal. In this study, stochastic simulation modeling and tree-structured regression analyses were used to evaluate the reliability of two proposed snapshot metrics in territorial birds: the floater/breeder ratio and the rate of nest occupancy by immature subadults. The demographic model, parameterized with field data from an intensively studied ...

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been estimated that from 100 million to well over 1 billion birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions with human-made structures, including vehicles, buildings and windows, powerlines, communication towers, and wind turbines. Although wind energy is generally considered environmentally friendly (because it generates electricity without emitting air pollutants or greenhouse gases), the potential for avian fatalities has delayed and even significantly contributed to blocking the development of some windplants in the U.S. Given the importance of developing a viable renewable source of energy, the objective of this paper is to put the issue of avian mortality associated with windpower into perspective with other sources of avian collision mortality across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed summary of the mortality data collected at windplants and put avian collision mortality associated with windpower development into perspective with other significant sources of avian collision mortality across the United States. We provide a summary of data collected at many of the U.S. windplants and provide annual bird fatality estimates and projections for all wind turbines in the U.S. For comparison, we also review studies of avian collision mortality from other major human-made structures and report annual bird fatality estimates for these sources. Other sources also significantly contribute to overall avian mortality. For example, the National Audubon Society estimates avian mortality due to house cats at 100 million birds per year. Pesticide use, oil spills, disease, etc., are other significant sources of unintended avian mortality. Due to funding constraints, the scope of this paper is limited to examining only avian mortality resulting from collisions with human-made obstacles.

Wallace P. Erickson, Gregory D. Johnson, M. Dale Strickland, David P. Young, Jr., Karyn J. Sernka, Rhett E. Good

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Mitigation of Animal-Caused Outages For Distribution Lines and Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant number of electric outages throughout North America are caused by animals -- mammals, birds, snakes, etc. These animal-caused outages are increasingly common in both urban and residential areas. By taking a pro-active approach to mitigating outages, utilities will spare the lives of wildlife and address the increasing pressures from environmental groups and concerned utility customers. This document describes a study designed to mitigate animal-caused outages for distribution lines and subs...

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

469

Ratooning Grain Sorghum on the Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum has characteristics that make it able to regenerate the above-ground portion of the plant. These features allow producers to seek a second grain crop within the same growing year by preparing the old plants immediately after the removal of the main crop. This publication discusses important factors to consider when contemplating a ratoon crop, including water stress, grain quality, insect problems, bird problems and marketing.

Livingston, Stephen; Coffman, Cloyce G.

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

Newsfront 13-19 August 2007, Issue 29  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kathmandu l 13-19 August, 2007 l # 29 l Price Rs. 25 l www.newsfront.com.np Inside Maoists targeting media - page 2 Rayamajhi report: Nepali standard of investigation - page 5 nf special correspondent Prime Minister GP Koirala faces a... that he also accompa- nied the former US president, Jimmy Carter to Shivapuri national park. Nepal offers a great opportunity for nature conservation and studies. Like the extinct species of birds and animals, committed conservationists like Kazi are rare...

Ghimire, Yubaraj

471

A small but nonzero cosmological constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent astrophysical observations seem to indicate that the cosmological constant is small but nonzero and positive. The old cosmological constant problem asks why it is so small; we must now ask, in addition, why it is nonzero, and why it is positive. In this essay, we try to kill these three metaphorical birds with one stone. That stone is the unimodular theory of gravity, which is the canonical theory of gravity, except for the way the cosmological constant arises in the theory.

Y. Jack Ng (a; H. Van Dam (b

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A model personal energy meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ficemates and members of the Digital Technology Group have provided a friendly and encouraging atmosphere in which it has been a pleasure to work. Richard Bird developed my interest in Computer Science at Lincoln College, Oxford; without his suggestion... and tuition I would not have been able to contemplate a Ph.D. Sandy and Elisabeth Fraser supported me and broadened my education. I am also grate- ful to my examiners, Adrian Friday and Peter Robinson, whose feedback has markedly improved this dissertation...

Hay, Simon

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

473

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using measured data we demonstrate that there is an amazing correspondence among the statistical properties of spacings between parked cars and the distances between birds perching on a power line. We show that this observation is easily explained by the fact that birds and human use the same mechanism of distance estimation. We give a simple mathematical model of this phenomenon and prove its validity using measured data. Everyone knows that to park a car in the city center is problematic. The amount of the available places is limited and it has to be shared between too many interested parties. Birds face the same problem when a flock tries to perch on an electric line. The common problem (we will call it "the parking problem " in the following text) is to place oneself safely between the two parties limiting the available space from the left and from the right. This leads necessarily to an interaction preventing collisions between the participants and making the parking maneuver not random. It should be therefore not a surprise that the "Random car parking model " introduced by Renyi [1] (see also [2] and [3] for review) does not describe the real parking data correctly [4], [5]. The exact character of the interaction is unknown and hardly describable in the physical terms. It is however clear that it is primarily triggered by the brain and then mediated through the muscles (by pressing the accelerator/brake pedal (cars) or by flopping the wings (birds)). Though the particular locomotive activity is different the basic neural regulatory mechanisms can be similar in both cases. The complex interplay between the individuals

Petr eba

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Avian Vision Perception  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication contains a review of the primary scientific literature on the functions of avian visual perception including photoreceptor function, signal processing, and the role of the neural pathways involved in deciphering and interpreting visual information.BackgroundVision is the primary pathway by which birds assess their environments. Their visual systems are the most complex within vertebrates. Because human vision is not capable of detecting and ...

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

Flu Terms Defined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flu Terms Defined Flu Terms Defined H1N1 Influenza is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. People do not normally get H1N1 flu, but human infections can and do happen. H1N1 flu viruses have been reported to spread from person-to-person, but in the past, this transmission was limited and not sustained beyond three people. Avian flu (AI) is caused by influenza viruses that occur naturally among wild birds. Low pathogenic AI is common in birds and causes few problems. Highly pathogenic H5N1 is deadly to domestic fowl, can be transmitted from birds to humans, and is deadly to humans. There is virtually no human immunity and human vaccine availability is very limited. Pandemic flu is virulent human flu that causes a global outbreak, or pandemic, of serious illness. Because there is little natural immunity, the disease can spread easily from person to person. Currently, there is no pandemic flu.

476

Do Animals Talk?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Animals Talk? Do Animals Talk? Nature Bulletin No. 635 April 1, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DO ANIMALS TALK ? Amateur bird fans are not all bird watchers. Some of us are bird listeners. In the forest preserves and rural regions, the big black noisy crow is a continual challenge. At the first light of dawn an evenly spaced "caw, caw, caw" seems to say "Hello! Is anybody awake?" Soon it is answered by sleepy crow voices. They have food calls, assembly calls, alarm calls, courtship calls and a lot of squabbling over roosting spots as they settle down for the night. The adults are very quiet near the nest but the fledglings make loud gargling sounds as they are fed. The discovery of an owl or cat sets off a sort of mob hysteria. By hiding a microphone among a flock of crows it has been found that they also talk in whispers.

477

Long-billed curlews on the Yakima Training Center: Information for base realignment  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and discusses the results obtained during 1992 from the study of long-billed curlews on the Yakima Training Center (YTC), which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Department of the Army. This study was initiated to provide basic ecological information on YTC long-billed curlews (Numenius americanus). The long-billed curlew is a relatively common spring and summer resident on the YTC. However, other than casual observations, very little is known about the distribution, density, reproductive success, and habitat requirements for this species on the YTC. Until recently the long-billed curlew was a US Fish and Wildlife Service candidate for listing as threatened or endangered; however, on November 21, 1991 it was down-listed to Class IIIc. The Washington Department of Wildlife lists the long-billed curlew as a ``species of special concern.`` Specific objectives of this study were to (1) locate nesting areas, (2) locate brood-rearing areas, (3) evaluate habitat requirements, (4) determine diet, (5) evaluate response to troop activities, (6) evaluate the impact of livestock grazing, (7) estimate the population size, and (8) estimate recruitment rates. Six curlews (four females and two males) were captured and fitted with radio transmitters. These birds were relocated to obtain nesting, habitat use, and feeding information. Road surveys conducted over most of the YTC provided information on the bird`s general distribution, habitat requirements, and nesting and brood-rearing areas.

Hand, K.D.; Cadwell, L.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River: 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors initiated a field study in 1997 to assess the impacts of fish-eating colonial waterbirds (i.e., terns, cormorants, and gulls) on the survival of juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River. Here the authors present results from the 1998 breeding season, the second field season of work on this project. The research objectives in 1998 were to: (1) determine the location, size, nesting chronology, nesting success, and population trajectories of breeding colonies of fish-eating birds in the lower Columbia River; (2) determine diet composition of fish-eating birds, including taxonomic composition and energy content of various prey types; (3) estimate forage fish consumption rates, with special emphasis on juvenile salmonids, by breeding adults and their young; (4) determine the relative vulnerability of different groups of juvenile salmonids to bird predation; (5) identify foraging range, foraging strategies, and habitat utilization by piscivorous waterbirds; and (6) test the feasibility of various alternative methods for managing avian predation on juvenile salmonids and develop recommendations to reduce avian predation, if warranted by the results.

Collis, Ken; Adamany, Stephanie; Roby, Daniel D.; Craig, David P.; Lyons, Donald E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Environmental enchancement using short-rotation tree crops: research results and directions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and perennial grasses used as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber can provide multiple economic and environmental benefits. Site-specific environmental studies are providing information needed to help evaluate the economic and environmental impacts of biomass production at both local and regional scales. Erosion and chemical movement from an annual row crop, switchgrass, and tree crop with and without a groundcover are being compared in the Southeast. Studies of SRWC productivity on the South Carolina coastal plain are comparing surface and subsurface movement of chemicals applied under different fertilization and irrigation regimes, and addressing use of mill and agricultural residues to enhance crop production. Results are helping to assess the effects of biomass crops produced on different principal soil types and to match tree species with appropriate sites to maximize productivity and minimize environmental impacts. Studies are comparing wildlife use of biomass crops to row crops, grasslands, and natural forests. Results to date show that SRWCs support greater bird diversity than row crops, but less than natural forests; switchgrass plantings extend habitat for grasslands birds. Collaboration with an industrial partner on diverse SRWC plantings in the Southeast is addressing the relationship between plantings of different acreage, age, tree species, and landscape context and breeding bird use. Information from wildlife diversity, water, and soil quality studies can be used by the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), researchers, producers, and industry to identify management strategies to maintain productivity While enhancing the environment.

Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Hemicellulolytic organisms in the particle-associated microbiota of the hoatzin crop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) is a South American herbivorous bird, that has an enlarged crop analogous to the rumen, where foregut microbes degrade the otherwise indigestible plant materials, providing energy to the host. The crop harbors an impressive array of microorganisms with potentially novel cellulolytic enzymes. Thie study describes the composition ofthe particle-associated microbiota in the hoatzin crop, combining a survey of 16S rRNA genes in 7 adult birds and metagenome sequencing of two animals. The pyrotag survey demonstrates that Prevotellaceae, are the most abundant and ubiquitous taxa, suggesting that the degradation of hemicellulose is an important activity in the crop. Nonetheless, preliminary results from the metagnome of the particle-associated microbiota of two adult birds show that the crop microbiome contains a high number of genes encoding cellulases (such as GH5) more abundant than those of the termite gut, as well as genes encoding hemicellulases. These preliminary results show that the carbohydate-active enzyme genes in the cropmetagenome could be a source of biochemical catalysts able to deconstruct plant biomass.

Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Malfatti, Stephanie; Garcia-Amado, Maria A.; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Tringe, Susannah

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Development of Piagetian object permanence in a Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors evaluated the ontogenetic performance of a grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) on object permanence tasks designed for human infants. Testing began when the bird was 8 weeks old, prior to fledging and weaning. Because adult grey parrots understand complex invisible displacements (I. M. Pepperberg & F. A. Kozak, 1986), the authors continued weekly testing until the current subject completed all of I. C. Uzgiris and J. Hunt's (1975) Scale 1 tasks. Stage 6 object permanence with respect to these tasks emerged at 22 weeks, after the bird had fledged but before it was completely weaned. Although the parrot progressed more rapidly overall than other species that have been tested ontogenetically, the subject similarly exhibited a behavioral plateau part way through the study. Additional tests, administered at 8 and 12 months as well as to an adult grey parrot, demonstrated, respectively, that these birds have some representation of a hidden object and understand advanced invisible displacements. In children, object permanencethe notion that objects are separate entities that continue to exist when out of sight of the observeris neither innate nor unitary, but develops

Mark R. Willner; Lauren B. Gravitz; Mark R. Willner; Department Of Ecology

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Extensive investigation of reticuloendotheliosis virus in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) is a retrovirus that causes a neoplastic disease in a wide range of avian hosts including chickens, turkeys, and ducks. In 1993, REV was detected in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken (Tympanachus cupido attwateri), a subspecies of Tympanachus cupido. Subsequent infections of this prairie chicken have been identified at captive breeding facilities throughout Texas. The implications of these infections have severely hindered repopulation efforts by these facilities. This study focused on investigating REV infection of captive Attwater'????s prairie chicken in order to better understand the disease affecting these endangered birds. The overall objective was to develop a means of eliminating this threat to the repopulation of the Attwater's prairie chicken. Several aspects of virus infection were investigated. Reagents capable of recognizing prairie chicken IgY and viral gag polypeptides were developed for use in assays for detection of antibody responses and titration of viral concentrations. Sequencing data of genomes collected from isolates of Texas prairie chickens and domestic chickens, as well as three REV prototype viruses, were compared to determine relationships among strains and identify the potential origin of the REV infecting Attwater'????s prairie chicken. Additionally, a flow cytometry technique of segregating the lymphocyte population from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a pan leukocyte monoclonal antibody was developed to more accurately measure changes within lymphocyte populations. This technique combined with intracellular labeling was used to deduce the target cells of REV infection. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was developed for greater sensitivity in detecting infection in birds than the previous method of single amplification PCR. This greater sensitivity results in earlier identification of the virus in infected birds, which allows for earlier removal of infected birds to minimize transmission of the virus throughout the flock. The sensitivity of the nested PCR diagnostic test was determined in a dose response pathogenesis study, which was conducted on hybrid greater/Attwater's prairie chicken to observe the experimental development of disease in these birds. Finally, a vaccine was developed using plasmid DNA with REV encoded genes and tested on naturally infected prairie chickens to determine its efficacy in reducing viral load. Although no reduction in viral load was detected, the vaccine may be effective in providing prophylactic protection in future studies.

Bohls, Ryan Lanier

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Homemade Fly Killer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homemade Fly Killer Homemade Fly Killer Name: Pam Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is a great homemade recipe for killing flies in the yard and house without endangering birds, dogs and cats? (we have many (flies, dogs, cats and birds, that is!!!!) Replies: Your best bet is one of the variants of traps. For example, the hanging strips of fly paper seem to stick a good number of flies. I have yet to see a bird dumb enough to run into and get stuck on one. Some of the funnel like traps (I've seen some for beetles, and yellow jackets) would likely work too if you stuck something attractive to flies inside. What you would do with captured flies, I'm not sure, but you definitely wouldn't want to leave it too long, if you put some real piece of food exposed inside as bait they would lay eggs on it, which would hatch as maggots, etc. There are ways to have the bait protected from any eggs (in a compartment screened off, for example). Then you could dunk the trap in water and leave it until they all died, or under an inverted bucket in a puddle of water with a lit candle, which would consume all the air and eventually choke them. You could just let them starve or dehydrate by leaving them in the trap, although that would take a while. The kids you teach maybe could think of other ways to kill them off without using toxic chemicals. Most of them would either be something mechanical (release into the blades of a high speed fan would be a little messy, but effective), or denial of the basics of life (air, water, food).

484

Audubon and Rafinesque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Audubon and Rafinesque Audubon and Rafinesque Nature Bulletin No. 189-A April 23, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation AUDUBON AND RAFINESQUE John James Audubon, naturalist, ornithologist and great painter of birds, was born April 26, 1785, in what is now Haiti. He was the son of a French naval officer, a wealthy sugar planter with estates in the West Indies, France and Pennsylvania. While very young, Audubon's mother died and he was taken by his father to France where he grew up and was educated. From early boyhood he had a passion for drawing birds, taxidermy, and collecting birds, their nests and their eggs. In 1803 he was sent to his father's estate in eastern Pennsylvania. In 1807, newly married, he and another young man opened a frontier store in Kentucky -- first in Louisville and later in Henderson. For almost 50 years, except for trips to England, Scotland and France in connection with the publication and sale of his book and except for periods in which he painted portraits and taught dancing, fencing and French in order to obtain money, Audubon traveled to observe and paint the wildlife in America. He went down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers in a flatboat to New Orleans; he explored the bayous along the Gulf of Mexico as far as Galveston, Texas, and the Atlantic coast from Key West to Labrador. At the age of 58 he traveled up the Missouri River as far as the buffalo country of western North Dakota.

485

STUDIES ON LARGE AREA SUB-FABRIC BURNS  

SciTech Connect

The detonation of shot one at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954, produced a fallout of radioactive ash upon Rongelap Atoll, Marshall Islands. The distribution of the radioactive ash on the islands and in the plants and animals of the area has been studied and evaluated. During the first expedition to Rongelap Atoll on March 26, 1954, biological samples were collected and measurements made of the radiation contamination. On three additional expeditions extensive collections of material were made for this study, the last on January 25-30, 1955. The decline in radioactivity was measured in 1499 samples of fish, invertebrates, land plants, algae, birds, plankton, soil, and water from the Rongelap area. During this study particular emphasis was placed upon evaluation of the radioactivity in food used by the natives. Coconut milk collected on March 26, 1954, contained 1.03 microcuries per kilogram of wet tissue while the coconut meat had 1.16 mu c/kg. By January 25-30, 1955, the level in coconut milk had declined to 0.041 mu c/kg and the meat to 0.036 mu c/ kg. Fish muscle on March 26, 1954, averaged 2.74 mu c/kg and fish liver 204.0 mu c/kg. The decline to January 25-30 was 0.10 mu c/kg for the muscle and 3.52 mu c/kg for the liver of fish. Somewhat similar declines were found for clam muscle, crab muscle, bird muscle and liver, and for squash, papaya, arrowroot and pandanus. The level of radioactivity was highest in the northern portion of the atoll, except for samples of algae and fish-eating birds, collected during January 1955 from the southern part of the atoll, which had higher levels of radioactivity than samples collected from the northern islands on the same date. This may indicate a translocation of radioactive materials within the lagoon. (auth)

Berkley, K.M.; Pearse, H.E.

1957-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

486

Mapping surface fuels using LIDAR and multispectral data fusion for fire behavior modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fires have become intense and more frequent in the United States. Improving the accuracy of mapping fuel models is essential for fuel management decisions and explicit fire behavior prediction for real-time support of suppression tactics and logistics decisions. This study has two main objectives. The first objective is to develop the use of LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) remote sensing to assess fuel models in East Texas accurately and effectively. More specific goals include: (1) developing LIDAR derived products and the methodology to use them for assessing fuel models; (2) investigating the use of several techniques for data fusion of LIDAR and multispectral imagery for assessing fuel models; (3) investigating the gain in fuels mapping accuracy with LIDAR as opposed to QuickBird imagery alone; and, (4) producing spatially explicit digital fuel maps. The second objective is to model fire behavior using FARSITE (Fire Area Simulator) and to investigate differences in modeling outputs using fuel model maps, which differ in accuracy, in east Texas. Estimates of fuel models were compared with in situ data collected over 62 plots. Supervised image classification methods provided better accuracy (90.10%) with the fusion of airborne LIDAR data and QuickBird data than with QuickBird imagery alone (76.52%). These two fuel model maps obtained from the first objective were used to see the differences in fire growth with fuel model maps of different accuracies. According to our results, LIDAR derived data provides accurate estimates of surface fuel parameters efficiently and accurately over extensive areas of forests. This study demonstrates the importance of using accurate maps of fuel models derived using new LIDAR remote sensing techniques.

Mutlu, Muge

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Materials Energy Materials Advanced Energy Materials Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory A bird's eye view is provided of superconducting and thermoelectric materials research at the Advanced Energy Materials Group*. We study both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of complex and nano-structured materials and develop their application in energy related technologies. Abstract Abstract Abstract are capable of carrying electrical current without loss, and hence offer powerful opportunities for increasing the capacity and efficiency of the power grid. The superconducting materials program at BNL studies the basic relationships between structure and properties of superconductors to provide understanding of fundamental materials science and physics

488

PROHIBITED COMMODITIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROHIBITED PROHIBITED COMMODITIES NOT acceptable for transport The following commodities are NOT acceptable for transport by DHL - UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, including domestic (USA) moves. * Live Animals, Reptiles, Snakes, Birds, Insects (other than those listed below for domestic transit under restricted commodities) * Bullion * Currency * Firearms (Parts†thereof†including†paintball, pellet†guns, air†rifles, etc.) [Except for Domestic exceptions listed below under restricted commodities] * Pornography * Drugs / Narcotics (illegal) * Human remains (including ashes) * Counterfeit or Pirated goods or material Any item(s), the carriage of which is prohibited by any law, regulation or statute of any federal, state or local government to or through which the shipment may be carried.

489

Category:NEPA Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Resources Jump to: navigation, search Category of resources that could be impacted by activities related to geothermal development. Pages in category "NEPA Resources" The following 39 pages are in this category, out of 39 total. A Access and Transportation Air Quality Areas of Critical Environmental Concern B BLM Sensitive Species C Candidate and Special Status Species Cultural Resources E Economic Values Environmental Justice F Fire Resources Fisheries Resources Floodplains G Geology and Minerals I Induced Seismicity Impact I cont. Intentional Destructive Acts Invasive, Nonnative Species L Lands and Realty Lands with Wilderness Characteristics M Migratory Birds N Native American Concerns Noise P Paleontological Resources Prime or Unique Farmlands Public Health and Safety

490

SSRL HEADLINES February 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 February, 2011 8 February, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: DOE Reviews SSRL and Strategic Plan Development Continues Science Highlight - A Complex Relationship between Active Layer and Output Current in Organic Solar Cells Science Highlight - An mRNA Processing Complex with an Unusual Choice of Substrate SSRL Gains New Spectroscopy Capabilities SLAC Team Ensures Safety of SPEAR3 Upgrade Public Lectures: Dino-Bird and Microbes Built with Arsenic Lightsources.org Meeting in Washington, D.C. February Issue of NUFO News Now Online __________________________________________________________________________ 1. From the Director of SSRL: DOE Reviews SSRL and Strategic Plan Development Continues

491

Deletions within COL11A1 in Type 2 stickler syndrome detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak ratios romosomes (far left) may differ depending upon the gender of the DNA e deleted region, are not included in either kit. AB E DC P382 del 39 P382 del 49 P381 del 41-42 P382 del 6-43P381 del 8-42 del Exons 6-43 P381 del 15-25 P382 del 16... , Moran RT, Warman M, Ala-Kokko L: Stickler syndrome. In GeneReviews [internet]. Edited by Pagon RA, Bird TC, Dolan CR, Stephens K. Seattle, WA: University of Washington; 2000. updated 2010. 10. Schouten JP, McElgunn CJ, Waaijer R, Zwijnenburg D, Diepvens...

Vijzelaar, Raymon; Waller, Sarah; Errami, Abdellatif; Donaldson, Alan; Lourenco, Teresa; Rodrigues, Marcia; McConnell, Vivienne; Fincham, Gregory; Snead, Martin; Richards, Allan

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

492

Environmental effects of solar thermal power systems: ecological observations during construction of the Barstow 10 MWe pilot STPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring plan used consists of comparisons of a few meteorological variables and changes in the states of a limited array of indicator species or assemblages of species of plants and animals. Observations inlude aerial photography of the site, saltation meter measurements downwind from the site to measure fluxes of windblown sand, measurements of airborne particulates and atmospheric pollutants, and baseline temperature profiles made at two sites near the heliostat field to measure micro-meteorological patterns. Observations were made of annual plants both in off-field plots and in heliostat field, of shrubs, birds, rodents, reptiles, and sensitive species listed as rare or endangered. (LEW)

Turner, F.B. (ed.) [ed.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Robust signals from a quantum-based magnetic compass sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum-based magnetic compass sensor, mediated through radical pair reactions, has been suggested to underlie the sensory ability of migrating birds to receive directional information from the geomagnetic field. Here we extend the currently available models by considering the effects of slow fluctuations in the nuclear spin environment on the directional signal. We quantitatively evaluate the robustness of signals under fluctuations on a timescale longer than the lifetime of a radical pair, utilizing two models of radical pairs. Our results suggest design principles for building a radical-pair based compass sensor that is both robust and highly directional sensitive.

Maria Procopio; Thorsten Ritz

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

494

Adsorption characteristics of PCBs to resins, whole cells, cell and tissue components, and biomolecules  

SciTech Connect

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been designated hazardous chemicals by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Although PCBs and PCB-containing oils have not been in use since 1977, they persist in the environment. They are known to be absorbed by various aquatic organisms, birds, and mammals. The nature of these affinities is not known. In this study, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) compared the adsorption phenomenon of PCBs on commercial resins, whole bacterial cells, cell and tissue component, and various biomolecules. Adsorption and desorption of PCBs to biomolecules and resins in both aqueous and nonaqueous conditions were examined. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Kelley, R.L.; Conrad, J.; Akin, C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

496

Diet of Nesting Red-Cockaded Woodpecker at Three Locations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors studied diets of nestling red-cockaded woodpeckers for two years on three sites in South Carolina and Georgia. Cameras recorded 33 different types of prey. Wood roaches were the most common, amounting to 50% of the prey. In addition, blueberries and saw fly larvae were collected by birds. Snail shells were also collected. Morista's index of diet overlap ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 for breeding males and females. We conclude that nestling diets are similar across the region.

Hanula, J.L.; Lipcomb, D.; Franzreb, K.E.; Loeb, S.C.

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nocturnal Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nocturnal Animals Nocturnal Animals Nature Bulletin No. 151 April 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation NOCTURNAL ANIMALS When the sun goes down and dusk steals over the land, the animals of the day grow drowsy and seek some sheltered spot to await another dawn. Birds slip quietly to their nests or favorite roosts. The chattering squirrel curls up in his hollow tree or a summer nest of leaves. Butterflies fold their wings and bees creep into their quiet hives. Bats and whip-poor-wills and nighthawks zigzag expertly through the air to feast on flying insects. Then darkness comes. Then the land becomes alive again as the animals of the night take over -- the hunted and the hunters. The cottontail rabbits come out to play and gorge themselves on fresh young clover and tender grass -- welcome food after nibbling all winter on the bark of hawthorn, willow, sumac and wild rose. Millions of mice scurry about. Muskrats emerge from the underwater entrances to their lodges and bank tunnels to swim and splash as they feed on tender shoots of cattails and sedges. Wild ducks and some of the shore birds feed regularly at night.

498

Gulls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulls Gulls Nature Bulletin No. 212-A January 8, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GULLS In Salt Lake City there is a tall granite column topped by a sphere on which, as if alighting, are the gilded bronze figures of two gulls -- the state bird of Utah -- a monument to the great flocks of these birds which, in 1848 saved the Mormon settlers from starvation by consuming hordes of short-winged grasshoppers, the "Mormon cricket", which were devouring their crops. The gull is a master of the air; a symbol for graceful perfection of flight. Riding the winds, gulls frequently cross the Atlantic Ocean, following ships. Its long narrow wings enable it to take advantage of any air current. It can fly forward, hang motionless against the wind, drift backward, bank and veer in any direction, glide in long graceful curves, or dart downward like an arrow. Usually, although there may be hundreds in the air, they appear to fly as individuals each intent on its own business of finding food, averting collisions by narrow margins or scrambling and fighting for some tidbit. Gulls float upon water and can swim well, but rarely dive for food. When they rise, with beating wings and backward kicks of their webbed feet, the legs and feet dangle for a few seconds and then are tucked back beneath the body and tail -- like retractable landing-gear.

499

Summer Warblers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summer Warblers Summer Warblers Nature Bulletin No. 191-A May 8, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SUMMER WARBLERS The swarms of warblers that appear in May -- colorful, ceaselessly active, and bursting with song -- tarry only briefly and pass on toward their northern nesting grounds. In autumn they appear again -- so quietly and so soberly dressed they seem to be different birds -- tarry briefly and pass on. Among those that migrate through the Chicago region, there are only four kinds of which enough remain and nest so that they may be called common summer residents: the American Redstart, the Yellow Warbler, the Yellow-throat and the Oven-bird. The redstarts, from their winter homes in the West Indies, Central America and northern South America, scatter over the United States east of the Great Plains, and Canada from British Columbia to Newfoundland. It is one of the most abundant, colorful and butterfly- like of all warblers. The adult male is black with a white belly and a striking pattern of orange-red on wings and tail. On the females and young males the black is replaced by grayish olive-green and the orange-red by lemon yellow. Rarely quiet, constantly flitting about, the redstart has a peculiar habit of repeatedly drooping its wings and spreading out its long tail fanwise.

500

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Receptor Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print Wednesday, 25 July 2007 00:00 To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public health worldwide. Of the three influenza pandemics of the last century, the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) pandemics involved avian-human reassortments. The origin of the 1918 influenza virus (H1N1), which killed about 50 million people worldwide, is unknown. Although a number of viral factors can determine the host range restriction and pathogenicity of influenza A viruses, recent evidence suggests that hemagglutinin (HA), the principal antigen on the viral surface, is a critical factor for efficient human-to-human transmission. Researchers have now solved the HA structure to 2.9 Å at the ALS and analyzed its specificity to human receptors.