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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA (Amazon) LBA (Amazon) The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) Overview [LBA Logo] The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is an international research initiative conducted from 1995-2005 and led by Brazil. The LBA Project encompasses several scientific disciplines, or components. The LBA-ECO component focuses on the question: "How do tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in Amazonia?" The Amazon rain forest or Amazonia, is the largest remaining expanse of tropical rain forest on Earth, harboring approximately one-third of all Earth's species. Although the rain forest's area is so large that it

2

Biosphere reserves in action: Case studies of the American experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly 20 years, biosphere reserves have offered a unique framework for building the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for conservation and sustainable use of ecosystems. The 12 case studies in this volume chronicle many of the cooperative efforts to implement the biosphere reserve concept in the United States. Considered together, these efforts involve more than 20 types of protected areas, and the participation of all levels of government, and many private organizations, academic institutions, citizens groups, and individuals. Biosphere reserves are multi-purpose areas that are nominated by the national committee of the Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) and designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to serve as demonstration areas for cooperation in building harmonious relationships between human activities and the conservation of ecosystems and biological diversity. Each biosphere reserve exemplifies the characteristic ecosystems of one of the worlds biogeographical regions. It is a land or coas%arine area involving human communities as integral components and including resources managed for objectives ranging from complete protection to intensive, yet sustainable development. A biosphere reserve is envisioned as a regional ''landscape for learning'' in which monitoring, research, education, and training are encouraged to support sustainable conservation of natural and managed ecosystems. It is a framework for regional cooperation involving government decisionmakers, scientists, resource managers, private organizations and local people (i.e., the biosphere reserve ''stakeholders''). Finally, each biosphere reserve is part of a global network for sharing information and experience to help address complex problems of conservation and development. The 12 case studies presented in this report represent only a few of the possible evolutions of a biosphere reserve in its efforts to reach out to the local and regional community. As you have read, some have had great success, while others consider their successes almost negligible. All document tremendous effort from many people to improve the communication among landowners, land managers, scientists, and any others interested in the health and well-being of the natural and human environment of the biosphere reserve.

None

1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Long-Term Variability in a Coupled Atmosphere–Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully coupled atmosphere–biosphere model, version 3 of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3) and the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS), is used to illustrate how vegetation dynamics may be capable of producing long-term variability in the ...

Christine Delire; Jonathan A. Foley; Starley Thompson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Evaluating the Carbon Cycle of a Coupled Atmosphere-Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

We investigate how well a coupled biosphere-atmosphere model, CCM3-IBIS, can simulate the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere and the carbon cycling through it. The simulated climate is compared to observations, while the vegetation cover and the carbon cycle are compared to an offline version of the biosphere model IBIS forced with observed climatic variables. The simulated climate presents some local biases that strongly affect the vegetation (e.g., a misrepresentation of the African monsoon). Compared to the offline model, the coupled model simulates well the globally averaged carbon fluxes and vegetation pools. The zonal mean carbon fluxes and the zonal mean seasonal cycle are also well represented except between 0{sup o} and 20{sup o}N due to the misrepresentation of the African monsoon. These results suggest that, despite regional biases in climate and ecosystem simulations, this coupled atmosphere-biosphere model can be used to explore geographic and temporal variations in the global carbon cycle.

Delire, C; Foley, J A; Thompson, S

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

5

A Coupled Biosphere–Atmosphere Climate Model Suitable for Studies of Climatic Change Due to Land Surface Alterations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A biosphere model based on BATS (Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) is coupled to a primitive equation global statistical–dynamical model in order to study the climatic impact due to land surface alterations. The fraction of the earth’s ...

Mário Adelmo Varejão-Silva; Sergio H. Franchito; Vadlamudi Brahmananda Rao

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sensitivity of the Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) to the Inclusion of Variable Soil Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The soils data of Wilson and Henderson-Sellers have been incorporated into the land-surface parameterization scheme of the NCAR Community Climate Model after Dickinson. A stand-alone version of this land-surface scheme, termed the Biosphere-...

M. F. Wilson; A. Henderson-Sellers; R. E. Dickinson; P. J. Kennedy

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Estimating the Seasonal Carbon Source-Sink Geography of a Natural, Steady-State Terrestrial Biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal dynamics of biospheric-carbon sources and sinks represents a needed input to global atmospheric CO2 studies and models. For the terrestrial biosphere, initial monthly estimates of overall metabolism and net biosphere-atmosphere ...

Elgene O. Box

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A Global Climatology of Albedo, Roughness Length and Stomatal Resistance for Atmospheric General Circulation Models as Represented by the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Components of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) of Sellers et al. were used to generate global monthly fields of surface albedo (0.4–4.0 ?m), roughness length and minimum surface (stomatal) resistance.

J. L. Dorman; P. J. Sellers

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Sensitivity Properties of a Biosphere Model Based on BATS and a Statistical-Dynamical Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A biosphere model based on the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) and the Saltzman-Vernekar (SV) statistical-dynamical climate model is developed. Some equations of BATS are adopted either intact or with modifications, some are ...

Taiping Zhang

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Boundary layer turbulence is an important process that is parameterized in most atmospheric numerical models. Turbulence redistributes energy and mass within the boundary layer. Many different characteristics can impact the character of turbulence in the boundary layer, including different surface types, horizontal wind speed and direction, and the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. However, there have been few studies that have

11

EAQUATE: An International Experiment For Hyperspectral Atmospheric Sounding Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international experiment called the European Aqua Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) was held in September 2004 in Italy and the United Kingdom to validate Aqua satellite Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance measurements and derived ...

J. P. Taylor; S. Newman; W. L. Smith; V. Cuomo; F. Romano; G. Pappalardo; G. Pavese; L. Mona; A. Amodeo; A. M. Larar; D. K. Zhou; C. Serio; P. Di Girolamo; F. Esposito; G. Grieco; D. Summa; R. Restieri; G. Masiello; T. Maestri; R. Rizzi; P. Antonelli; S. Mango; G. Pisani

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

GAPEX: A Ground-Based Atmospheric Profiling Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the week 29 October–4 November 1988, a Ground-based Atmospheric Profiling Experiment (GAPEX) was conducted at Denver Stapleton International Airport. The objective of GAPEX was to acquire and analyze atomspheric-temperature and moisture-...

W. L. Smith; H. E. Rvercomb; H. B. Howell; H. M. Woolf; R. O. Knuteson; R. G. Decker; M. J. Lynch; E. R. Westwater; R. G. Strauch; K. P. Moran; B. Stankov; M. J. Falls; J. Jordan; M. Jacobsen; W. F. Dabberdt; R. McBeth; G. Albright; C. Paneitz; G. Wright; P. T. May; M. T. Decker

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Biosphere Process Model Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

14

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

15

Evaluation of the Town Energy Balance Model in Cold and Snowy Conditions during the Montreal Urban Snow Experiment 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Montreal Urban Snow Experiment (MUSE) 2005 database, surface radiation and energy exchanges are simulated in offline mode with the Town Energy Balance (TEB) and the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) ...

A. Lemonsu; S. Bélair; J. Mailhot; S. Leroyer

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Simple Biosphere Model (SIB) for Use within General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple but realistic biosphere model has been developed for calculating the transfer of energy, mass and momentum between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface of the earth. The model is designed for use in atmospheric general circulation ...

P. J. Sellers; Y. Mintz; Y. C. Sud; A. Dalcher

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Damage of Land Biosphere due to Intense Warming by 1000-Fold Rapid Increase in Atmospheric Methane: Estimation with a Climate–Carbon Cycle Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decadal-time-scale responses of climate and the global carbon cycle to warming associated with rapid increases in atmospheric methane from a massive methane release from marine sedimentary methane hydrates are investigated with a coupled climate–...

Atsushi Obata; Kiyotaka Shibata

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

GLACE: The Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment. Part I: Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) is a model intercomparison study focusing on a typically neglected yet critical element of numerical weather and climate modeling: land–atmosphere coupling strength, or the degree to which ...

Randal D. Koster; Y. C. Sud; Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Gordon Bonan; Keith W. Oleson; Edmond Chan; Diana Verseghy; Peter Cox; Harvey Davies; Eva Kowalczyk; C. T. Gordon; Shinjiro Kanae; David Lawrence; Ping Liu; David Mocko; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Ken Mitchell; Sergey Malyshev; Bryant McAvaney; Taikan Oki; Tomohito Yamada; Andrew Pitman; Christopher M. Taylor; Ratko Vasic; Yongkang Xue

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

TOGA COARE: The Coupled Ocean—Atmosphere Response Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite significant progress in the Tropical Ocean—Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program, a number of major hurdles remain before the primary objective, prediction of the variability of the coupled ocean—atmosphere system on time scales of months to ...

Peter J. Webster; Roger Lukas

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Field Experiment for Measurement of the Radiative Characteristics of a Hazy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two-and three-dimensional solutions to the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. A field experiment was conducted to test this theory. in the experiment the upward radiance was measured above ...

Y. J. Kaufman; T. W. Brakke; E. Eloranta

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Atmospheric Science Experiments Applicable to Space Shuttle Spacelab Missions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present lack of a lower atmosphere research satellite program for the 1980s has prompted consideration of the Space Shuttle/Spacelab system as a means of flying sensor complements geared toward specific research problems, as well as continued ...

F. R. Robertson; S. J. Goodman; G. S. Wilson; H. J. Christian Jr.; G. H. Fichtl; W. W. Vaughan

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

CO2-Induced Changes in Atmospheric Angular Momentum in CMIP2 Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of atmospheric angular momentum to a gradual doubling of CO2 is studied using 16 model experiments participating in the second phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP2). The relative angular momentum associated with ...

Jouni Räisänen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Atmospheric Dispersion from Elevated Sources in an Urban Area: Comparison between Tracer Experiments and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion experiments were carried out in the Copenhagen area under neutral and unstable conditions. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released without buoyancy from a tower at a height of 115 m and then collected at ground-level ...

Sven-Erik Gryning; Erik Lyck

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Numerical Experiments on Consistent Horizontal and Vertical Resolution for Atmospheric Models and Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple numerical experiments are performed in order to determine the effects of inconsistent combinations of horizontal and vertical resolution in both atmospheric models and observing systems. In both cases, we find that inconsistent spatial ...

Michael S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Richard S. Lindzen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSES) was conducted to assess the potential impact of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) instrument on a 5-day forecast using the Florida State University (FSU) primitive equation ...

G. D. Rohaly; T. N. Krishnamurti

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Experience with atmospheric fluidized bed gasification of switchgrass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Switchgrass was gasified in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor rated at 800 kW (2.75 MMBtu/hr) thermal input and operating at atmospheric pressure. A combustible gas with higher heating value varying between 4.2--5.9 MJ/Nm{sup 3} (114--160 Btu/scf) was produced. Carbon conversion was approximately 85%. Difficulties in feeding high moisture switchgrass inhibited smooth reactor operation. Several feed systems for switchgrass were tried with varying degrees of success. The results of gasification trials using switchgrass as fuel are described.

Smeenk, J.; Brown, R.C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Center for Coal and the Environment

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Development of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STACEE is a proposed atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for ground-based gamma-ray astrophysics between 25 and 500 GeV. The telescope will make use of the large solar mirrors (heliostats) available at a solar research facility to achieve an energy threshold lower than any existing ground-based instrument. This paper describes the development of STACEE, including an overview of the complete instrument design and a discussion of results from recent prototype tests at the large solar heliostat field of Sandia National Laboratories.

Rene A. Ong; the STACEE Collaboration

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Soil Moisture–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX): Background, Hydrometeorological Conditions, and Preliminary Findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soil Moisture–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) was conducted in conjunction with the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02) during June and July 2002 near Ames, Iowa—a corn and soybean production region. The primary objective of SMEX02 ...

William P. Kustas; Jerry L. Hatfield; John H. Prueger

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Course Objectives | Physical Geography addresses the dynamics of major Earth systems--Atmosphere (weather, climate and climate change), Biosphere (plant communities), Lithosphere (geology, soils, and landforms), Hydrosphere (oceans, lakes, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achievement and Access Center coordinates accommodations and services for all students who are eligible. 3 Insolation & Global Radiation Chp. 4 Global Temperature Patterns Chp. 5 Atmospheric Pressure, Wind

Peterson, Blake R.

31

CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is joint effort between the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation. It couples state-of-art atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, land/vegetation/ ecological/ and major glaciers into a unified system or components can be run independently. (see https://www2.ucar.edu/for-staff/update/community-earth-system-model) CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere PI Name: Warren Washington PI Email: wmw@ucar.edu Institution: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 102.8 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Earth Science Researchers at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

32

Scaling Water and Energy Fluxes in Climate Systems: Three Land-Atmospheric Modeling Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of small-scale heterogeneity in land-surface characteristics on the large-scale fluxes of water and energy in the land-atmosphere system have become a central focus of many of the climatology research experiments. The acquisition of ...

Eric F. Wood; Venkataraman Lakshmi

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Prototype Test Results of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are currently no experiments, either satellite or ground-based, that are sensitive to astrophysical gamma-rays at energies between 20 and 250 GeV. We are developing the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) to explore this energy range. STACEE will use heliostat mirrors at a solar research facility to collect Cherenkov light from extensive air showers produced by high energy gamma-rays. Here we report on the results of prototype test work at the solar facility of Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM). The work demonstrates that the facility is suitable for use as an astrophysical observatory. In addition, using a full scale prototype of part of STACEE, we detected atmospheric Cherenkov radiation at energies lower than any other ground-based experiment to date.

STACEE Collaboration

1997-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

Testing the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) Using Point Micrometeorological and Biophysical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simple Biosphere model (SiB) of Sellers et al. (1986) was designed for use within General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the earth's atmosphere. The main objective of SiB is to provide a biophysically realistic description of those processes ...

P. J. Sellers; J. L. Dorman

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth’s radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show retrievals of the aerosol properties from spectrally resolved solar measurements, the simulated and observed radiative fluxes at the surface, and outline factors that control the magnitude and variability of aerosol and radiative properties [8].

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While fossil fuel emissions are calculated with relatively high precision, understanding the fate of those emissions with respect to sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems requires data and methods that can reduce uncertainties in the diagnosis of land-based CO2 sinks. The wide range in the land surface flux estimates is related to a number of factors, but most generally because of the different methodologies used to develop estimates of carbon stocks and flux, and the uncertainties inherent in each approach. The alternative approaches to estimating continental scale carbon fluxes that we explored here can be broadly classified as applying a top-down or bottom-up perspective. Top-down approaches calculate land-atmosphere carbon fluxes based on atmospheric budgets and inverse modeling. Bottom-up approaches rely primarily on measurements of carbon stock changes (the inventory approach) or on spatially distributed simulations of carbon stocks and/or fluxes using process-based modeling (the forward modelapproach).

Hayes, D. J.; Turner, D. P.; Stinson, Graham; McGuire, A. David; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Heath, L.; deJong, B.; McConkey, Brian; Birdsey, Richard A.; Kurz, Werner; Jacobson, Andy; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Pan, Y.; Post, W. M.; Cook, R. B.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

Climatology of the Low-Level Jet at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique dataset obtained with combinations of minisodars and 915-MHz wind profilers at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Kansas was used to examine the detailed characteristics of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ). In ...

Jie Song; Ke Liao; Richard L. Coulter; Barry M. Lesht

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sea Level Changes under Increasing Atmospheric CO2 in a Transient Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere GCM Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change resulting from the enhanced greenhouse effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations is expected to bring about global and local changes in sea level. A global rise in sea level would result from thermal expansion of seawater ...

J. M. Gregory

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Implementation of a Two-Way Interactive Atmospheric and Ecological Model and Its Application to the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and ecosystem (CENTURY) modeling system has been developed to study regional-scale two-way interactions between the atmosphere and biosphere. Both atmospheric forcings and ecological ...

Lixin Lu; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Glen E. Liston; William J. Parton; Dennis Ojima; Melannie Hartman

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Study of Persistence in the Land–Atmosphere System Using a General Circulation Model and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistence in the land–atmosphere system simulated with the National Center for Atmosphere Research Community Climate Model Version 2 (CCM2) coupled with the Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) is examined. BATS simulates various ...

Yongqiang Liu; Roni Avissar

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Study of Persistence in the Land–Atmosphere System with a Fourth-Order Analytical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a companion paper, Y. Liu and R. Avissar analyzed the features of persistence in the land–atmosphere system simulated with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model Version 2 coupled with the Biosphere–Atmosphere ...

Yongqiang Liu; Roni Avissar

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Interface or Air–Sea Flux Component of the TOGA Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment and Its Impact on Subsequent Air–Sea Interaction Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface or air–sea flux component of the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) research program and its subsequent impact on studies of air–sea interaction are described. The ...

Robert A. Weller; Frank Bradley; Roger Lukas

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

Severinghaus, J.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Interactions between Vegetation and Climate: Radiative and Physiological Effects of Doubled Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and physiological effects of doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on climate are investigated using a coupled biosphere–atmosphere model. Five 30-yr climate simulations, designed to assess the radiative and physiological effects ...

L. Bounoua; G. J. Collatz; P. J. Sellers; D. A. Randall; D. A. Dazlich; S. O. Los; J. A. Berry; I. Fung; C. J. Tucker; C. B. Field; T. G. Jensen

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

International Geosphere/Biosphere Program, 1984  

SciTech Connect

The present status of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Program (IGBP) is discussed. The IGBP will contribute to the understanding of the Earth as a system, and could deal with problems such as acid rain and the CO/sub 2/ greenhouse effect. The IGBP will be an international and interdisciplinary study of the Earth as a system and the man induced and natural changes in that system. In the U.S. it will involve several Federal agencies and universities.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis is one of 10 technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) (i.e., the biosphere model). It documents development of agricultural and environmental input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters.

K. Rasmuson; K. Rautenstrauch

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003). Some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available at the time this report is issued. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003), describes the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis report is to define values for biosphere model parameters that are related to the dietary, lifestyle, and dosimetric characteristics of the receptor. The biosphere model, consistent with the licensing rule at 10 CFR Part 63, uses a hypothetical person called the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) to represent the potentially exposed population. The parameters that define the RMEI are based on the behaviors and characteristics of the Amargosa Valley population, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.312. Amargosa Valley is the community, located in the direction of the projected groundwater flow path, where most of the farming in the area occurs. The parameter values developed in this report support the biosphere model and are reflected in the TSPA through the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003). This analysis supports the treatment of fourteen features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: MO0303SEPFEPS2.000) and addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003). The treatment of these FEPs in the biosphere model is described in the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003, Section 6.2). The parameters developed in this report and the related FEPs are listed in Table 1-1.

M.A. Wasiolek; K.R. Rautenstrauch

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Axisymmetric Hurricane in a Dry Atmosphere: Theoretical Framework and Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the possible existence of hurricanes in an atmosphere without water vapor and analyzes the dynamic and thermodynamic structures of simulated hurricane-like storms in moist and dry environments. It is first shown that the “...

Agnieszka A. Mrowiec; Stephen T. Garner; Olivier M. Pauluis

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) Simulation Experiment for a Severe Storm Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GOES satellites launched in the 1980's are carrying an instrument called the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS), which is designed to provide temperature and moisture profile-sounding capability for mesoscale weather systems. As a controlled ...

Dennis Chesters; Louis W. Uccellini; Anthony Mostek

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Coupled Air–Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments in Atmospheric Sensitivity to Marine Roughness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled air–sea numerical model comprising a mesoscale atmospheric model, a marine circulation model, and a surface wave model is presented. The coupled model is tested through simulations of an event of frontal passage through the Lake Erie ...

Jordan G. Powers; Mark T. Stoelinga

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The ONSAM Experiment: Remote Sensing Techniques for Vertical Sounding of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ONSala Atmospheric Measurement program was carried out in May 1983 in order to test the performance of new remote sensing equipment, compared with radiosondes launched for this particular program. A temperature profiling radiometer and a ...

J. Askne; G. Elgered; H. Nordius; G. Skoog; E. Winberg; A. Ha?ga?rd; E. Andersson; N. Gustafsson; J. Svensson; I. Carlsson

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Soil Moisture Memory in AGCM Simulations: Analysis of Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture memory is a key aspect of land–atmosphere interaction and has major implications for seasonal forecasting. Because of a severe lack of soil moisture observations on most continents, existing analyses of global-scale soil moisture ...

Sonia I. Seneviratne; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Eva Kowalczyk; David Lawrence; Ping Liu; David Mocko; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Keith W. Oleson; Diana Verseghy

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A General Circulation Experiment with a Coupled Atmosphere, Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the construction and results of a comprehensive, three-dimensional general circulation model (GCM) of the earth's climate. The model, developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), links separate existing ...

Warren M. Washington; Albert J. Semtner Jr.; Gerald A. Meehl; David J. Knight; Thomas A. Mayer

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Temporal Variations of Land Surface Microwave Emissivities over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface microwave emissivities are important geophysical parameters for atmospheric, hydrological, and biospheric studies. This study estimates land surface microwave emissivity using an atmospheric microwave radiative transfer model and a ...

Bing Lin; Patrick Minnis

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of a series of technical reports that document the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report is one of the five biosphere reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model, as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. Figure 1-1 is a graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN. This figure shows relationships among the products (i.e., scientific analyses and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The purpose of this analysis report is to define values for biosphere model parameters that are related to the dietary, lifestyle, and dosimetric characteristics of the receptor. The biosphere model, consistent with the licensing rule at 10 CFR Part 63 [DIRS 156605], uses a hypothetical person called the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) to represent the potentially exposed population. The parameters that define the RMEI are based on the behaviors and characteristics of the residents of the unincorporated town of Amargosa Valley, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.312 [DIRS 156605]. The output of this report is used as direct input in the two analyses identified in Figure 1-1 that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios. The parameter values developed in this report are reflected in the TSPA through the BDCFs. The analysis was performed in accordance with AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses'', and the technical work plan (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]).

M. Wasiolek; K. Rautenstrauch

2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

56

Foliar Lead Uptake by Lettuce Exposed to Atmospheric Fallouts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foliar Lead Uptake by Lettuce Exposed to Atmospheric Fallouts G A ¨E L L E U Z U , S O P H I E S O) exposed to the atmospheric fallouts of a lead-recycling plant were studied. After43daysofexposure area, they can strongly impact the biosphere (7, 8). At the global scale, fallouts of atmospheric PM

Mailhes, Corinne

57

Midwinter Suppression of Northern Hemisphere Storm Track Activity in the Real Atmosphere and in GCM Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the North Pacific and the North Atlantic storm track activity is investigated on the basis of daily National Meteorological Center (now known as NCEP) upper-air analyses (1946–89) and of data from the ECHAM3 T42 atmospheric ...

M. Christoph; U. Ulbrich; P. Speth

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

Kildea, J; Ball, J; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Jarvis, A; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Surface Meteorology and Air-Sea Fluxes in the Western Equatorial Pacific Warm Pool during the TOGA Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) was to achieve significantly more accurate and complete descriptions of the surface meteorology and air-sea fluxes in the western equatorial warm pool region. Time series of ...

R. A. Weller; S. P. Anderson

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of a series of technical reports that document the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report is one of the five biosphere reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model, as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. Figure 1-1 is a graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN. This figure shows relationships among the products (i.e., scientific analyses and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172782]). The purpose of this analysis report is to define values for biosphere model parameters that are related to the dietary, lifestyle, and dosimetric characteristics of the receptor. The biosphere model, consistent with the licensing rule at 10 CFR Part 63 [DIRS 173164], uses a hypothetical person called the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) to represent the potentially exposed population. The parameters that define the RMEI are based on the behaviors and characteristics of the residents of the unincorporated town of Amargosa Valley, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.312 [DIRS 173164]. The output of this report is used as direct input in the two analyses identified in Figure 1-1 that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios. The parameter values developed in this report are reflected in the TSPA through the BDCFs. The analysis was performed in accordance with LP-SIII.9Q-BSC, ''Scientific Analyses'', and the technical work plan (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172782]). The scope of the revision was to develop dosimetric input parameters for the biosphere model that are consistent with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 72 (ICRP 1996 [DIRS 152446]). The quantities developed previously (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169671]), which reflect the ICRP Publication 30 dosimetric methods (ICRP 30) (ICRP 1979 [DIRS 110386]; ICRP 1980 [DIRS 110351]; ICRP 1981 [DIRS 110352]) were not changed and were retained in this report.

M.A. Wasiolek

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Biosphere Modeling and Dose Assessment for Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a biosphere model appropriate for use in calculating doses to hypothetical individuals living in the far future in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Doses are assumed to arise from potential releases from a spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal facility located beneath Yucca Mountain. The model provides guidance on approaches to dealing with the biosphere appropriate for site suitability and licensing assessments.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Quality of Mobile Air Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure Observations from the 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment (DTE10) took place from 28 January to 29 March 2010 in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area for the purposes of collecting and evaluating mobile data from vehicles. To examine the quality of ...

Amanda R. S. Anderson; Michael Chapman; Sheldon D. Drobot; Alemu Tadesse; Brice Lambi; Gerry Wiener; Paul Pisano

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Experiment plan for characterization of the properties of molten rock at atmospheric and elevated pressures: Magma Energy Research Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of the properties of molten rock (magma) is of importance to the Magma Energy Research Project of Sandia Laboratories. Facilities have been set up at Sandia to study the physical properties, chemistry, and corrosive nature of magma to 1600/sup 0/C and from atmospheric pressure to 4 kbar (400 MPa). Experiments at atmospheric pressure are being done in the presence of multicomponent gas mixtures to control the chemical activities of oxygen and sulfur. The high-pressure apparatus includes cold-seal small-volume pressure vessels (to 1100/sup 0/C and 1 kbar) and a large (750 cm/sup 3/ sample volume), internally heated pressure vessel (to 1600/sup 0/C and 4 kbar). The large vessel contains a number of penetrations for electrical leads and pressure lines, and is linked to a computer for data acquisition and control of experiments. Water and other dissolved volatiles (CO/sub 2/, CO, SO/sub 2/, S/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S, HCl, HF) have significant effects on all the properties of magma, and these effects will be studied in the high-pressure apparatus. Phase equilibria, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and materials compatibility will be the first properties to be examined under pressure. This report includes a review of the nature and chemical basis for the effects of dissolved volatiles on these properties of magma. 70 references, 10 figures.

Modreski, P.J.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Revised Land Surface Parameterization (SiB2) for Atmospheric GCMS. Part I: Model Formulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation of a revised land surface parameterization for use within atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) is presented. The model (SiB2) incorporates several significant improvements over the first version of the Simple Biosphere ...

P.J. Sellers; D.A. Randall; G.J. Collatz; J.A. Berry; C.B. Field; D.A. Dazlich; C. Zhang; G.D. Collelo; L. Bounoua

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosols at the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several techniques developed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment for measuring aerosol vertical optical depth, aerosol horizontal attenuation length, and aerosol phase function. The techniques are based on measurements of side-scattered light generated by a steerable ultraviolet laser and collected by an optical detector designed to measure fluorescence light from cosmic-ray air showers. We also present a technique to cross-check the aerosol optical depth measurement using air showers observed in stereo. These methods can be used by future air fluorescence experiments.

The HiRes Collaboration

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Simulation of Containment Atmosphere Mixing and Stratification Experiment in the ThAI Facility with a CFD Code  

SciTech Connect

The CFD code CFX4.4 was used to simulate an experiment in the ThAI facility, which was designed for investigation of thermal-hydraulic processes during a severe accident inside a Light Water Reactor containment. In the considered experiment, air was initially present in the vessel, and helium and steam were injected during different phases of the experiment at various mass flow rates and at different locations. The main purpose of the proposed work was to assess the capabilities of the CFD code to reproduce the atmosphere structure with a three-dimensional model, coupled with condensation models proposed by the authors. A three-dimensional model of the ThAI vessel for the CFX4.4 code was developed. The flow in the simulation domain was modeled as single-phase. Steam condensation on vessel walls was modeled as a sink of mass and energy using a correlation that was originally developed for an integral approach. A simple model of bulk phase change was also included. Calculated time-dependent variables together with temperature and volume fraction distributions at the end of different experiment phases are compared to experimental results. (authors)

Babic, Miroslav; Kljenak, Ivo; Mavko, Borut [Reactor Engineering Division, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Feasibility of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) in atmospheric source-receptor experiments  

SciTech Connect

A brief description of the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) system, which includes the tracers and the release equipment, the air samplers and the analyzers, is presented along with details on the research needs to provide a viable system for MATEX-scenario experiments. The present family of 2 viable PFTs needs to be increased to 5 to 6. Given the present precision of the analysis system, a one year long tracer experiment consisting of 4 hour releases every 60 hours from 5 different sites would require nearly 150 metric tons of PFTs at a cost of $15,000,000. Shortcomings in the programmable sampler include the pump, the sampling sequence control flexibility, data storage and retrieval, and the lack of remote communication capability; sampler adsorbent studies are also needed. The analytical system, including the catalyst processing bed, the chromatography column resolution, and the linearity of the detector, is in need of significant improvement. A higher resolution analysis system could significantly reduce analysis time but, more importantly, reduce tracer requirements more than 10-fold, for a cost savings potential of more than $13,000,000. A model is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of tracer material balances. Assessment of earlier long-range tracer experiments indicates the need for possibly 400 ground sampling sites requiring $8 to $14 million worth of samplers for a one-year tracer experiment. As many as six aircraft would be needed to conduct airborne model validation and material balance studies for each tracer plume.

Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the study’s results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by radionuclide releases) of waste disposal facilities and decommissioning sites.

Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

Grula, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modeling Global and Regional Net Primary Production under Elevated Atmospheric CO2: On a Potential Source of Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial ecosystem models are built, among several reasons, to explore how the Earth’s biosphere responds to climate change and to the projected continual increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration. Many of these models adopt the Farquhar et ...

Mustapha El Maayar; Navin Ramankutty; Christopher J. Kucharik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Influence of the Inclusion of Soil Freezing on Simulations by a Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactions between the soil, biosphere, and atmosphere (ISBA) land surface parameterization scheme has been modified to include soil ice. The liquid water equivalent volumetric ice content is modeled using two reservoirs within the soil: a ...

A. Boone; V. Masson; T. Meyers; J. Noilhan

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

74

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) Pilot Experiment at NYC" - Michael Reynolds, BNL 17:30 "EML Pilot Studies for the Urban Atmospheric Observatory" - Hsi-Na (Sam) Lee, EML 17:40 "A...

75

The Mean Climate of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) in Forced SST and Fully Coupled Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), was released as part of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4). The finite volume (FV) dynamical core is now the default because of its superior transport and conservation ...

Richard B. Neale; Jadwiga Richter; Sungsu Park; Peter H. Lauritzen; Stephen J. Vavrus; Philip J. Rasch; Minghua Zhang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not been preceded by the evolution of nitrogen fixation, and if these organisms had not also acquired the ability to fix nitrogen at the beginning of or very early in their history. The evolution of nitrogen fixation also appears to have been a precondition for the evolution of (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosynthesis. Given that some form of chlorophyll is obligatory for true photosynthesis, and its light absorption and chemical properties make it a "universal pigment," it may be predicted that the evolution of nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis are also closely linked on other Earth- like planets.

John W. Grula

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Assessing community capacity for ecosystem management : Clayoquot Sound and Redberry Lake biosphere reserves .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biosphere reserves are regions that are internationally recognized for their ecological significance and work towards ecosystem management. The concept of community capacity, as developed in… (more)

Mendis, Sharmalene Ruwanthi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

On the Climatology and Trend of the Atmospheric Heat Source over the Tibetan Plateau: An Experiments-Supported Revisit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heating over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) enhances the Asian summer monsoon. This study presents a state-of-the-art estimate of the heating components and their total over the TP, with the aid of high-accuracy experimental data, an ...

Kun Yang; Xiaofeng Guo; Jie He; Jun Qin; Toshio Koike

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Characteristics of Drought and Persistent Wet Spells over the United States in the Atmosphere–Land–Ocean Coupled Model Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmosphere–land–ocean coupled model simulations are examined to diagnose the ability of models to simulate drought and persistent wet spells over the United States. A total of seven models are selected for this study. They are three versions of ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Lindsey N. Long; Jae-Kyung E. Schemm

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ARM tropical pacific experiment (ATPEX): Role of cloud, water vapor and convection feedbacks in the coupled ocean/atmosphere system  

SciTech Connect

We have initiated studies that include radiation model validation, improved treatment of the three-dimensional structure of cloud-radiation interactions, and sensitivity runs that will unravel the role of cloud-convection-radiation interactions in the Pacific Sear Surface Temperatures and the overlying Walker and Hadley circulation. The research program is divided into three phases: (1) radiation, (2) cloud parameterization issues; (3) feedback and ocean-atmosphere interactions.

Ramanathan, V.; Barnett, T.P.

1992-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV - 1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

83

The mean climate of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) in forced SST and fully coupled experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4) was released as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) and is described. The finite volume dynamical core available in CAM3 is now the default due to its superior transport and conservation properties. Deep convection parameterization changes include a dilute plume calculation of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the introduction of a formulation for Convective Momentum Transport (CMT). For the cloud fraction an additional calculation is performed following macrophysical state updates that provides improved thermodynamic condistancy. A freeze-drying modification is further made to the cloud fraction calculation in very dry environments, such as arctic Winter, where cloud fractionand cloud water estimates were often inconsistant in CAM3. In CAM4 the finite volume dynamical core leads to a degradation in the excessive trade-wind simulation, but with an accompanying reduction in zonal stresses at higher latitudes. Plume dilution leads to a moister deep tropics alleviating much of the mid-tropospheric dry biases and reduces the persistant precipitation biases over the Arabian peninsular and the southern Indian ocean during the Indian Monsoon. CMT reduces much of the excessive trade-wind biases in eastern ocean basins. The freeze drying modification alleviates much of the high latitude, winter-time excessive cloud bias and improves the associated surface cloud-related energy budget, but the updated cloud macrophysical calculation generally leads to reduced cloud fraction and cloud forcing away from high latitudes. Although there are marginal improvements in time-averaged, large-scale hydrology there are signficant improvements in regional climate features such as the generation of tropical and propagation of stationary waves from the Pacific into mid-latitudes and in the seasonal frequency of Northern Hemisphere blocking events. A 1? versus 2? horizontal resolution of the finite volume 24 dynamical core exhibits signficiant improvements in model climate. Improvements in the fully coupled mean climate between CAM3 and CAM4 are also much more signficant than in forced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) simulations. Furthermore, improvements in the transient characteristics ofthe model climate, documented elsewhere, are substantial.

Neale, Richard; Richter, Jadwiga; Park, Sungsu; Lauritzen, P. H.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhang, Minghua

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

NEW ATLAS9 AND MARCS MODEL ATMOSPHERE GRIDS FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new grid of model photospheres for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey of stellar populations of the Galaxy, calculated using the ATLAS9 and MARCS codes. New opacity distribution functions were generated to calculate ATLAS9 model photospheres. MARCS models were calculated based on opacity sampling techniques. The metallicity ([M/H]) spans from -5 to 1.5 for ATLAS and -2.5 to 0.5 for MARCS models. There are three main differences with respect to previous ATLAS9 model grids: a new corrected H{sub 2}O line list, a wide range of carbon ([C/M]) and {alpha} element [{alpha}/M] variations, and solar reference abundances from Asplund et al. The added range of varying carbon and {alpha}-element abundances also extends the previously calculated MARCS model grids. Altogether, 1980 chemical compositions were used for the ATLAS9 grid and 175 for the MARCS grid. Over 808,000 ATLAS9 models were computed spanning temperatures from 3500 K to 30,000 K and log g from 0 to 5, where larger temperatures only have high gravities. The MARCS models span from 3500 K to 5500 K, and log g from 0 to 5. All model atmospheres are publicly available online.

Meszaros, Sz.; Allende Prieto, C.; De Vicente, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Astronomy and Space Physics, Box 515, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Castelli, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Garcia Perez, A. E.; Majewski, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Plez, B. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Schiavon, R. [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Shetrone, M. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Modeling the Biosphere–Atmosphere System: The Impact of the Subgrid Variability in Rainfall Interception  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subgrid variability in rainfall distribution has been widely recognized as an important factor to include in the representation of land surface hydrology within climate models. In this paper, using West Africa as a case study, the impact of the ...

Guiling Wang; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Surface water and atmospheric underway carbon data obtained during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean survey cruises (R/V Knorr, December 1998--January 1996)  

SciTech Connect

This data documentation presents the results of the surface water and atmospheric underway measurements of mole fraction of carbon dioxide (xCO{sub 2}), sea surface salinity, and sea surface temperature, obtained during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) Indian Ocean survey cruises (December 1994--January 1996). Discrete and underway carbon measurements were made by members of the CO{sub 2} survey team. The survey team is a part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study supported by the US Department of Energy to make carbon-related measurements on the WOCE global survey cruises. Approximately 200,000 surface seawater and 50,000 marine air xCO{sub 2} measurements were recorded.

Kozyr, A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center; Allison, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the coexistence of multiple ...

Jonathan M. Winter; Jeremy S. Pal; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

89

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

90

Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment data  

SciTech Connect

Cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single column version of NCAR CAM3. For comparisons, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations were compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool- International Cloud Experiment by US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) content is similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and extends 2 km further downward, which are closer to observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction in total condensate on temperature from the new scheme is also closer to available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is in general larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the TOA OLR in addition to cloud water path. The deep convection process affects both TOA OLR and surface downward longwave radiation. The over-frequently-triggered deep convention process in the model is not the only mechanism for the excess middle and high level clouds. Further evaluation especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data is needed.

Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; McFarlane, Sally A.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

92

A Spontaneously Generated Tropical Atmospheric General Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of idealized atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments are presented. These experiments examine whether and how atmospheric deep moist convection, in the absence of meridional gradients in external forcing, interacts with ...

Ben P. Kirtman; Edwin K. Schneider

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research Atmospheric Science and Climate Research EVS research, combined with portable, high-performance climate and weather applications, offers a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. In an ever-changing, dynamic climate, we measure, model, and analyze atmospheric processes that are vital to understanding our planet. Our measurement capabilities range from remote sensing and surface meteorology instruments to instrumentation designed to quantify the land-atmosphere exchange of energy, water, and greenhouse gases. Modeling capabilities begin with regional-scale climate, air quality, and aerosol modeling and extend to global chemical transport models, general circulation models of the atmosphere, models of the biosphere, and coupled Earth system models.

94

The Ocean Response to Low-Frequency Interannual Atmospheric Variability in the Mediterranean Sea. Part I: Sensitivity Experiments and Energy Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a general circulation model is used in order to investigate the interannual response of the Mediterranean Basin to low-frequency interannual variability in atmospheric forcing for the period 1980–88. The model incorporates a ...

G. Korres; N. Pinardi; A. Lascaratos

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of a Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System with Observations from the 1980 Great Plains Mesoscale Tracer Field Experiment. Part I: Datasets and Meteorological Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado State University mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) numerical modeling system, which consists of a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model coupled to a mesoscale Lagrangian particle dispersion model, has been used to simulate ...

Michael D. Moran; Roger A. Pielke

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part I: Model Experiments and Transient Thermal Response in the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to understand the dynamical mechanisms driving the changes in the general circulation of the atmosphere due to increased carbon dioxide (CO2) by looking into the transient step-by-step adjustment of the circulation. The transient ...

Yutian Wu; Richard Seager; Mingfang Ting; Naomi Naik; Tiffany A. Shaw

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Predicting Generalized Ecosystem Groups with the NCAR CCM: First Steps towards an Interactive Biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canopy-plus-soil “big-leaf” models of the land surface now exist and are being incorporated in global climate models. These big-leaf models could be the basis for the incorporation of an interactive land biosphere into global models. However, ...

A. Henderson-Sellers

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Free Air C02 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Oak Ridge FACE Site and Experiment on CO2 Enrichment of Sweetgum  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The facility was established with support from the ORNL Director's R&D Fund and the Biological and Environmental Research program of the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Additional support was provided by the Terrestrial Ecology and Global Change (TECO) program through the National Science Foundation. This project was part of the CO2 research network fostered by the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Results from the experiment contributed to the Terrestrial Ecosystem Response to Atmospheric and Climatic Change (TERACC) project, a 5-year initiative integrating experimental data and global change modeling. Data from the ORNL FACE experiment are being used in an model benchmarking activity at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. [Copied from http://face.ornl.gov/goals.html

100

Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this revision of ''Evaluation of the Applicability of Biosphere-Related Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs)'' (BSC 2001) is to document the screening analysis of biosphere-related primary FEPs, as identified in ''The Development of Information Catalogued in REV00 of the YMP FEP Database'' (Freeze et al. 2001), in accordance with the requirements of the final U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR Part 63. This database is referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) FEP Database throughout this document. Those biosphere-related primary FEPs that are screened as applicable will be used to develop the conceptual model portion of the biosphere model, which will in turn be used to develop the mathematical model portion of the biosphere model. As part of this revision, any reference to the screening guidance or criteria provided either by Dyer (1999) or by the proposed NRC regulations at 64 FR 8640 has been removed. The title of this revision has been changed to more accurately reflect the purpose of the analyses. In addition, this revision will address Item Numbers 19, 20, 21, 25, and 26 from Attachment 2 of ''U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission/U.S. Department of Energy Technical Exchange and Management Meeting on Total System Performance Assessment and Integration (August 6 through 10, 2001)'' (Reamer 2001). This Scientific Analysis Report (SAR) does not support the current revision to the YMP FEP Database (Freeze et al. 2001). Subsequent to the release of the YMP FEP Database (Freeze et al. 2001), a series of reviews was conducted on both the FEP processes used to support Total System Performance Assessment for Site Recommendation and to develop the YMP FEP Database. In response to observations and comments from these reviews, particularly the NRC/DOE TSPA Technical Exchange in August 2001 (Reamer 2001), several Key Technical Issue (KTI) Agreements were developed. ''The Enhanced Plan for Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) at Yucca Mountain'' (BSC 2002a), herein referred to as the Enhanced FEP Plan, was developed to directly address KTI Agreement TSPAI 2.05, and to generally address other KTI Agreements and issues (BSC 2002a, pp. 16 to 18). The Enhanced FEP Plan addresses the regulatory requirements of 10 CFR Part 63, identifies and implements specific enhancements, and supports the License Application (BSC 2002a, p. 2). This SAR is not intended to implement any of the enhancements identified in the Enhanced FEP Plan, although it does consider the intent of the Enhanced FEP Plan to simplify the screening analysis. This SAR is one of nine technical reports containing the documentation for the biosphere model being developed, its input parameters, and the application of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). Figure 1 shows the anticipated interrelationship between these nine technical reports and the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), commonly referred to as the biosphere model. The biosphere model belongs to the series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application. Specifically, the biosphere model provides the performance assessment with the capability to perform dose assessment.

J. J. Tappen

2003-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Rainfall and Radiative Heating Rates from TOGA COARE Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heat and moisture budgets are used to determine rainfall and radiative heating rates over the western Pacific warm pool during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Results are ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Model Estimates of the Land and Ocean Contributions to Biospheric Carbon and Water Fluxes Using MODIS Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land and ocean are often treated separately in modeling studies despite their close links through the carbon, water, and energy cycles. However, biospheric models, particularly when used in conjunction with recent satellite datasets, provide a new,...

Paul B. Alton; Per E. Bodin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ARM tropical pacific experiment (ATPEX): Role of cloud, water vapor and convection feedbacks in the coupled ocean/atmosphere system. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

We have initiated studies that include radiation model validation, improved treatment of the three-dimensional structure of cloud-radiation interactions, and sensitivity runs that will unravel the role of cloud-convection-radiation interactions in the Pacific Sear Surface Temperatures and the overlying Walker and Hadley circulation. The research program is divided into three phases: (1) radiation, (2) cloud parameterization issues; (3) feedback and ocean-atmosphere interactions.

Ramanathan, V.; Barnett, T.P.

1992-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models  

SciTech Connect

In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed studies of radionuclide cleanup in various modern types of municipal water treatment facilities such as advanced filtration or reverse-osmosis processes may be performed without development of any new or costly experimental facilities.

Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Investigating Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Byron Meadows - NASALangley Research Center May 14, 1991 Demonstrations of weather forecasting tools and techniques for experiments in the atmosphere and of lasers used to...

106

Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Hydrogen Storage in Materials: Theory and Experiment. Presentation Title, Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory and ...

107

Incorporation of crop phenology in Simple Biosphere Model (SiBcrop) to improve land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from croplands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and partitioning by grain corn in Manitoba. Proc.of 47 th Annual Manitoba Society of Soil Science Meeting.

Lokupitiya, Erandathie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Incorporation of crop phenology in Simple Biosphere Model (SiBcrop) to improve land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from croplands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for integrated field crop management. Cornell Universityactivity within the crop canopy. Aust. J. agric. Res. , 23,Assessing uncertainties in crop model simulations using

Lokupitiya, Erandathie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Wind Tunnel and Theoretical Study of the Melting Behavior of Atmospheric Ice Particles. IV: Experiment and Theory for Snow Flakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment in the Mainz vertical Cloud Tunnel is described in which natural and laboratory-made aggregates of snow crystals (snow flakes) were melted under free fall conditions in the vertical air stream of the tunnel, which was allowed to ...

S. K. Mitra; O. Vohl; M. Ahr; H. R. Pruppacher

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Model Archive Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Synthesis Book Now Available in Portuguese The edited compilation of synthesis papers on the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), Amazonia and Global...

111

Wrinkles in the rare biosphere: Pyrosequencing errors can lead to artificial inflation of diversity estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Massively parallel pyrosequencing of the small subunit (16S) ribosomal RNA gene has revealed that the extent of rare microbial populations in several environments, the 'rare biosphere', is orders of magnitude higher than previously thought. One important caveat with this method is that sequencing error could artificially inflate diversity estimates. Although the per-base error of 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing has been shown to be as good as or lower than Sanger sequencing, no direct assessments of pyrosequencing errors on diversity estimates have been reported. Using only Escherichia coli MG1655 as a reference template, we find that 16S rDNA diversity is grossly overestimated unless relatively stringent read quality filtering and low clustering thresholds are applied. In particular, the common practice of removing reads with unresolved bases and anomalous read lengths is insufficient to ensure accurate estimates of microbial diversity. Furthermore, common and reproducible homopolymer length errors can result in relatively abundant spurious phylotypes further confounding data interpretation. We suggest that stringent quality-based trimming of 16S pyrotags and clustering thresholds no greater than 97% identity should be used to avoid overestimates of the rare biosphere.

Kunin, Victor; Engelbrektson, Anna; Ochman, Howard; Hugenholtz, Philip

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Simulated Climatology of Spectrally Decomposed Atmospheric Infrared Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation experiment is conducted to inquire into the mean climate state and likely trends in atmospheric infrared radiation spectra. Upwelling and downwelling spectra at five vertical levels from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) ...

Yi Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Interannual Variability of Land-Atmosphere Coupling Strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies in the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) established a framework to estimate the extent to which anomalies in the land surface state (e.g., soil moisture) can affect rainfall generation and other atmospheric ...

Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer

114

Experiments with Wind to Produce Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nat EXPERIMENTS WITH WIND TO PRODUCE ENERGY Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, weatherclimatology, aerodynamics, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy...

115

Climate Change and the Middle Atmosphere. Part I: The Doubled CO2 Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of doubled atmospheric CO2 on the climate of the middle atmosphere is investigated using the GISS global climate/middle atmosphere model. In the standard experiment, the CO2 concentration is doubled both in the stratosphere and ...

D. Rind; R. Suozzo; N. K. Balachandran; M. J. Prather

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Multiscale Variability of the Atmospheric Mixed Layer over the Western Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sounding data from Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) have provided a first opportunity to document the variability of the atmospheric mixed layer over the western Pacific warm pool on ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski; Jennifer A. Cotturone

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Overwater Atmospheric Diffusion: Measurements and Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of ten atmospheric tracer experiments provided 62 hours of overwater atmospheric dispersion data. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released as the tracer gas at a height of 13 m from a ship positioned about 7 km off the central California ...

Walter F. Dabberdt

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Calibrating the Simple Biosphere Model for Amazonian Tropical Forest Using Field and Remote Sensing Data. Part I: Average Calibration with Field Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the operation and calibration of the simple biosphere model (SiB) of Sellers et al. using micrometeorological and hydrological measurements taken in and above tropical forest in the central Amazon basin. The paper provides:

Piers J. Sellers; W. James Shuttleworth; Jeff L. Dorman; Amnon Dalcher; John M. Roberts

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Do Global Models Properly Represent the Feedback between Land and Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment/Climate Variability and Predictability (GEWEX/CLIVAR) Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) has provided an estimate of the global distribution of land–atmosphere coupling strength during ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14 C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14 C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solid phase evolution in the Biosphere 2 hillslope experiment as predicted by modeling of hydrologic and geochemical fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of America, Washington D.C. , 463-483, 1995. Flint, A.L. , and Flint, L. E. : Particle Density, in: Methods ofthe pycnometer method (Flint and Flint, 2002). The solid

Dontsova, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Examination on SK atmospheric neutrino experiment by the computer experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine neutrino events occurring inside the SuperKamiokande (SK) detector and those occurring outside the same detector using computer simulations. We analyze the zenith angle distribution of Fully Contained Events and show the method for the determination of the incident neutrino by the SK group is unreliable. The analysis of the neutrino events occurring outside the detector shows these events agree with the Monte Carlo simulation without oscillation.

A Misaki; E Konishi; N Takahashi; Y Minorikawa; V I Galkin; M Ishiwata; I Nakamura; M Kato

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

124

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp 1992.07.11 - 1993.02.28 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability Final data available. For data sets, see below. Summary IOP completed. Description The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) was conducted to better understand the structure of the coupled system of the warm pool of the western Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of participants from dozens of countries took part in this experiment from November 1, 1992 through February 28, 1993. Campaign Data Sets

125

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Principal Modes of Atmospheric Variability in Model Atmospheres with and without Anomalous Sea Surface Temperature Forcing in the Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal modes of low-frequency atmospheric variability and the influence of sea surface temperature anomalies on such modes are investigated by examining the output from two general circulation model experiments. In the first experiment (the “...

In-Sik Kang; Ngar-Cheung Lau

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Pierre Auger Atmosphere-Monitoring Lidar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluorescence-detection techniques of cosmic-ray air-shower experiments require precise knowledge of atmospheric properties to reconstruct air-shower energies. Up to now, the atmosphere in desert-like areas was assumed to be stable enough so that occasional calibration of atmospheric attenuation would suffice to reconstruct shower profiles. However, serious difficulties have been reported in recent fluorescence-detector experiments causing systematic errors in cosmic ray spectra at extreme energies. Therefore, a scanning backscatter lidar system has been constructed for the Pierre Auger Observatory in Malargue, Argentina, where on-line atmospheric monitoring will be performed. One lidar system is already deployed at the Los Leones fluorescence detector site and the second one is currently (April 2003) under construction at the Coihueco site. Next to the established ones, a novel analysis method with assumption on horizontal invariance, using multi-angle measurements is shown to unambiguously measure optical depth, as well as absorption and backscatter coefficient.

A. Filipcic; M. Horvat; D. Veberic; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik; M. Chiosso; R. Mussa; G. Sequeiros; M. A. Mostafa; M. D. Roberts

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ecological patterns of the small mammal communities at El Cielo Biosphere Reserve, Tamaulipas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scarce knowledge of Neotropical small mammal communities prevents experimental inquiry on the mechanisms structuring these communities. In this study, I examined patterns of local assembly of the small mammal communities on the eastern slopes of El Cielo Biosphere Reserve (ECBR) in Tamaulipas, Mexico, at two spatial scales. At the landscape level I tested patterns of species co-occurrences between four sites with a null model. At the local level I addressed floor microhabitat use, vertical structure use and temporal partitioning. I studied these niche axes at two adjoining forest types, Tropical Subdeciduous Forest (TSDF) and Cloud Forest (CF), that had different structural complexity. Total trapping effort consisted of 19,712 trapnights distributed over three years. In 1,365 capture events I recorded 789 individuals representing 14 species. Abundant species, mostly Peromyscus species that are of intermediate body size, co-occurred less often than expected by chance, whereas rare species, mainly Reithrodontomys species of small size, occurred at random over study sites. This pattern suggests that species interactions might be responsible for this non-random structure. Both the TSDF and CF had striking differences in both microhabitat use and temporal partitioning. In the TSDF common species (>8 individuals) organized along a microhabitat gradient from grassy/open areas to closed forest areas. Temporal partitioning for the whole community was less than expected by chance with use of an ad hoc null model. Species from ecotone/open areas avoided use of middle portions of the night whereas the single forest species concentrated activity in this period. So, it is plausible that predator avoidance strategies might have higher impact on temporal partitioning as compared to competitive interactions. In high contrast the CF community was codominated by two Peromyscus species that overlapped heavily in both their microhabitat use and diel activity patterns. Ecological separation of these two species probably occurs along a niche axis not considered in my study or might be facilitated by their body mass difference. Overall, I provide the first account of community patterns for small mammals at ECBR. These patterns can provide the basis for experimental manipulations to ascertain mechanisms responsible for structure at these communities.

Castro-Arellano, Ivan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

131

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO{sub 2} produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO{sub 2} uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO{sub 2} uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO{sub 2} fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years.

Peng, T. H.; Post, W. M.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Dale, V. H.; Farrell, M. P.

1987-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Impact of Land Surface and Atmospheric Initialization on Seasonal Forecasts with CCSM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Series of forecast experiments for two seasons investigate the impact of specifying realistic initial states of the land in conjunction with the observed states of the ocean and atmosphere while using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (...

Daniel A. Paolino; James L. Kinter III; Ben P. Kirtman; Dughong Min; David M. Straus

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Revisiting GLACE: Understanding the Role of the Land Surface in Land–Atmosphere Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) established a method for quantifying and comparing the influence of soil moisture on the atmosphere in AGCMs. The models included in the GLACE intercomparison displayed a wide range in the ...

Ruth E. Comer; Martin J. Best

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Effect of Ocean Dynamics and Orography on Atmospheric Storm Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of atmospheric storm tracks by ocean dynamics, orography, and their interaction is investigated using idealized experiments with a simplified coupled atmosphere–ocean climate model. The study focuses on the quasi–steady state for the ...

Chris Wilson; Bablu Sinha; Richard G. Williams

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Interannual to Decadal Predictability in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The predictability of the coupled ocean–atmosphere climate system on interannual to decadal timescales has been studied by means of ensemble forecast experiments with a global coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model. Over most parts of ...

A. Grötzner; M. Latif; A. Timmermann; R. Voss

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Spatial Variability of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure over the Eastern Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in the atmospheric boundary layer structure over the eastern equatorial Pacific are analyzed using 916 soundings collected during the First Global Atmospheric Research Program Global Experiment. Unstable boundary layer structures are ...

Bingfan Yin; Bruce A. Albrecht

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Heating Structures of the TRMM Field Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating profiles calculated from sounding networks and other observations during three Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns [the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX), TRMM Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (...

Courtney Schumacher; Minghua H. Zhang; Paul E. Ciesielski

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhäsalmi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

M. Sajjad Athar; M. Honda; T. Kajita; K. Kasahara; S. Midorikawa

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

An Interdisciplinary Field Study of the Energy and Water Fluxes in the Atmospheric-Biosphere System over Semiarid Rangelands: Description and Some Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arid and semiarid rangelands comprise a significant portion of the earth's land surface. Yet little is known about the effects of temporal and spatial changes in surface soil moisture on the hydrologic cycle, energy balance, and the feedbacks to ...

W. P. Kustas; T. J. Jackson; T. J. Schmugge; R. Parry; D. C. Goodrich; S. A. Amer; L. B. Bach; T. O. Keefer; M. A. Weltz; M. S. Moran; T. R. Clarke; P. J. Pinter Jr.; H. Claassen; A. C. Riggs; D. I. Stannard; L. E. Hipps; E. Swiatek; J. H. Blanford; A. M. Shutko; P. C. Doraiswamy; C. S. T. Daughtry; E. M. Perry; W. D. Nichols; R. T. Pinker; A. R. Huete; J. Qi; J. D. van Leeuwen; K. S. Humes; J. Washburne; A. Chehbouni; A. Vidal; D. I. Gellman; W. E. Clements; T. A. Grant; P. Dubois; J. van Zyl

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Biosphere-atmosphere interactions over semi-arid regions : modeling the role of mineral aerosols and irrigation in the regional climate system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation describes the role of land surface processes in shaping semi-arid climates, namely those of Southwest Asia and Northwest Africa. The interactions between dust emissions, irrigation, and climate processes ...

Marcella, Marc Pace

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Variability in Springtime Thaw in the Terrestrial High Latitudes: Monitoring a Major Control on the Biospheric Assimilation of Atmospheric CO2 with Spaceborne Microwave Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented from the satellite microwave remote sensing record that the timing of seasonal thawing and subsequent initiation of the growing season in early spring has advanced by approximately 8 days from 1988 to 2001 for the pan-Arctic ...

Kyle C. McDonald; John S. Kimball; Eni Njoku; Reiner Zimmermann; Maosheng Zhao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Exchanges of Atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2 with the Terrestrial Biosphere and Oceans from 1978 to 2000. I. Global Aspects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon and oxygen and correction factors for mass-spectrometric analysis of carbon dioxide,2 with climatic factors Fig. 2. Locations of carbon dioxide

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nonhydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM) for global cloud resolving simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of ultra-high resolution atmospheric global circulation model is developed. The new model is designed to perform ''cloud resolving simulations'' by directly calculating deep convection and meso-scale circulations, which play key roles not ... Keywords: Aqua-planet experiments, Atmospheric general circulation models, Cloud clusters, Cloud resolving model, Icosahedral grids, Nonhydrostatic model

M. Satoh; T. Matsuno; H. Tomita; H. Miura; T. Nasuno; S. Iga

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX) is a multi-institutional, all-India coordinated program to study the atmospheric boundary-layer processes in the monsoon trough (MT) area of northern India. The experiment is being organized ...

Malti Goel; H. N. Srivastava

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Simulation of Atmospheric Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral atmospheric circulation model is time-integrated for approximately 18 years. The model has a global computational domain and realistic geography and topography. The model undergoes an annual cycle as daily values of seasonally varying ...

Syukuro Manabe; Douglas G. Hahn

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Atmospheric Laser Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly ...

Kenneth W. Fischer*Michael R. Witiw; Jeffrey A. Baars+; T. R. Oke

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Atmospheric Available Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total potential energy of the atmosphere is the sum of its internal and gravitational energies. The portion of this total energy available to be converted into kinetic energy is determined relative to an isothermal, hydrostatic, equilibrium ...

Peter R. Bannon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dynamics of Atmospheric Teleconnections during the Northern Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the mechanisms of northern summertime teleconnections are investigated using a barotropic model. In a series of numerical experiments we study the atmospheric response over the eastern Pacific-North America to an idealized local ...

K-M. Lau; L. Peno

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Modeling Bulk Atmospheric Drainage Flow in a Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most simulations of bulk valley-drainage flows depend heavily on parameterizations. The 1984 Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) field experiment in Brush Creek Valley, Colorado, provided an unprecedented density of measurements in a ...

Ronald J. Dobosy

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Laboratory Simulation of Atmospheric Motions in the Vicinity of Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments concerned with surface cooling, were conducted to simulate the surface wind patterns and the free atmosphere general circulation in the vicinity of Antarctica. The principal dynamical similarity parameter is shown to be ROT/...

Rui-Rong Chen; Don L. Boyer; Lijun Tao

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Equatorial Atmospheric Waves and Their Association to Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equatorial wave systems and their relationships with convective activity are analyzed in the western and central Pacific regions during the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) intensive observation periods. The study uses ...

P. Pires; J-L. Redelsperger; J-P. Lafore

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Moist Benchmark Calculation for Atmospheric General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A benchmark calculation is designed to compare the climate and climate sensitivity of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). The experimental setup basically follows that of the aquaplanet experiment (APE) proposed by Neale and Hoskins, ...

Myong-In Lee; Max J. Suarez; In-Sik Kang; Isaac M. Held; Daehyun Kim

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Local Dynamics of Baroclinic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper investigates the processes that drive the spatiotemporal evolution of baroclinic transient waves in the Martian atmosphere by a simulation experiment with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Mars General Circulation Model (...

Michael J. Kavulich Jr.; Istvan Szunyogh; Gyorgyi Gyarmati; R. John Wilson

156

The Dispersion of Atmospheric Tracers in Nocturnal Drainage Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a series of perfluorocarbon tracer experiments that were carried out in the Brush Creek Valley in western Colorado under the auspices of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. The results ...

Paul H. Gudiksen; Donald L. Shearer

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Automated Sequential Syringe Sampler for Atmospheric Tracer Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of an improved sampler for the automatic collection of air samples during atmospheric halogenated tracer experiments is described. In this approach, each sample is collected in a small volume (20 to 150 ml) syringe using a rack and ...

Joseph P. Krasnec; David E. Demaray; Brian Lamb; Richard Benner

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Reflectivity of the Atmosphere-Inhomogeneous Surfaces System: Laboratory Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two- and three-dimensional solutions of the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. Such solutions have not been verified experimentally. A laboratory experiment simulates such a system to test ...

Yuri Mekler; Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Radiative Heating and Cooling Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the limitations to the accurate calculation of radiative heating and cooling rates in the stratosphere and mesosphere has been the lack of accurate data on the atmospheric temperature and composition. Data from the LIMS experiment on ...

John C. Gille; Lawrence V. Lyjak

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases catalog of databases and reports  

SciTech Connect

Data products and reports made available by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) provide coverage in a number of areas relevant to the greenhouse effect and global climate change. Such areas include records of the concentration of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. Currently, in its eighth revision, this catalog provides information about the data products and reports available through CDIAC.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Estimating the Overall Impact of A Change in Agricultural Practices on Atmospheric CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Overall Impact of A Change the Overall Impact of A Change In Agricultural Practices on Atmospheric CO 2 T.O. West (westto@ornl.gov; 865-574-7322) G. Marland (marlandgh@ornl.gov; 865-241-4850) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 Introduction One option for sequestering carbon in the terrestrial biosphere is to increase the carbon (C) stocks in agricultural soils. There is now an extensive literature on the amount of C that has been lost from soils as a consequence of humans disturbing natural ecosystems, and of the amount of C that might be returned to soils with improved management practices. Improvements in management practices could include efficient use of fertilizers and irrigation water, use of crop rotations, and changing from conventional tillage (CT) to conservation tillage

162

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

163

Energy Spectra, Altitude Profiles and Charge Ratios of Atmospheric Muons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of air shower muons made during atmospheric ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+ / mu- is presented as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c. The differential mu- momentum spectra are presented between 0.3 and about 50 GeV/c at atmospheric depths between 13 and 960 g/cm^2. We compare our measurements with other recent data and with Monte Carlo calculations of the same type as those used in predicting atmospheric neutrino fluxes. We find that our measured mu- fluxes are smaller than the predictions by as much as 70% at shallow atmospheric depths, by about 20% at the depth of shower maximum, and are in good agreement with the predictions at greater depths. We explore the consequences of this on the question of atmospheric neutrino production.

S. Coutu; J. J. Beatty; M. A. DuVernois; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; A. Labrador; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; C. Chaput; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; S. L. Nutter; G. A. deNolfo

2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

Johnson, Robert E., E-mail: rej@virginia.ed [Engineering Physics, Thornton Hall B102, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

166

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

167

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

168

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

169

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

170

How Much Do Different Land Models Matter for Climate Simulation? Part II: A Decomposed View of the Land–Atmosphere Coupling Strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) built a framework to estimate the strength of the land–atmosphere interaction across many weather and climate models. Within this framework, GLACE-type experiments are performed with a single ...

Jiangfeng Wei; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Zhichang Guo

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Precomputed atmospheric scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new and accurate method to render the atmosphere in real time from any viewpoint from ground level to outer space, while taking Rayleigh and Mie multiple scattering into account. Our method reproduces many effects of the scattering of light, ...

Eric Bruneton; Fabrice Neyret

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Evaluating Surface Water Cycle Simulated by the Australian Community Land Surface Model (CABLE) across Different Spatial and Temporal Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrestrial water cycle in the Australian Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) model has been evaluated across a range of temporal and spatial domains. A series of offline experiments were conducted using the forcing data from ...

Huqiang Zhang; Bernard Pak; Ying Ping Wang; Xinyao Zhou; Yongqiang Zhang; Liang Zhang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set associated with the Pre-LBA data compilation component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in...

174

ORNL DAAC: Amazon Data Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiance Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia...

175

Diurnal Cycle of Shallow and Deep Convection for a Tropical Land and an Ocean Environment and Its Relationship to Synoptic Wind Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of shallow and deep convection during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (TRMM/LBA) and the Eastern Pacific Investigation of Climate Processes in the Coupled Ocean–...

L. Gustavo Pereira; Steven A. Rutledge

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Improving Simulations of Convective Systems from TRMM LBA: Easterly and Westerly Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model is used to simulate two convective events observed during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere (TRMM LBA) experiment in Brazil. These two events epitomized the type of ...

S. Lang; W-K. Tao; J. Simpson; R. Cifelli; S. Rutledge; W. Olson; J. Halverson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

An Ensemble Study of Wet Season Convection in Southwest Amazonia: Kinematics and Implications for Diabatic Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-Doppler radar data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Large Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (TRMM-LBA) field campaign are used to determine characteristic kinematic and reflectivity vertical structures associated ...

Robert Cifelli; Lawrence Carey; Walter A. Petersen; Steven A. Rutledge

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Amazonian Deforestation: Impact of Global Warming on the Energy Balance and Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled biosphere–atmosphere statistical–dynamical model is used to study the relative roles of the impact of the land change caused by tropical deforestation and global warming on energy balance and climate. Three experiments were made: 1) ...

E. C. Moraes; Sergio H. Franchito; V. Brahmananda Rao

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Aerosols in Amazonia: Natural biogenic particles and large scale biomass burning impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a long term (20 years) research effort aimed at the understanding of the functioning of the Amazonian ecosystem. In particular

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Transient Climate Change in the CSIRO Coupled Model with Dynamic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CSIRO coupled model has been used in a “transient” greenhouse experiment. This model contains atmospheric, oceanic, comprehensive sea-ice (dynamic/thermodynamic plus leads), and biospheric submodels. The model control run (over 100 years long)...

Hal B. Gordon; Siobhan P. O’Farrell

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Influence of Radiosonde “Age” on TRMM Field Campaign Soundings Humidity Correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundreds of Vaisala sondes with an RS80-H Humicap thin-film capacitor humidity sensor were launched during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns (1999) Large Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere (LBA) experiment held in Brazil and ...

Biswadev Roy; Jeffrey B. Halverson; Junhong Wang

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ORNL DAAC: Amazon Data Release, Sept. 15, 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amazon Data Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of 19 spatial data sets associated with the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). The data sets...

183

Factors Determining the Impact of Aerosols on Surface Precipitation from Clouds: An Attempt at Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation of the dynamics and the microphysics of clouds observed during the Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia—Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall, and Climate (LBA–SMOCC) campaign, as well as extremely continental and ...

A. P. Khain; N. BenMoshe; A. Pokrovsky

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

185

Interhemispheric Asymmetry in the Transient Response of a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model to a CO2 Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments are carried out using a general circulation model of a coupled ocean-atmosphere system with idealized geography, exploring the transient response of climate to a rapid increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The ...

K. Bryan; S. Manabe; M. J. Spelman

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Beyond Thermal Interaction between Ocean and Atmosphere: On the Extratropical Climate Variability due to the Wind-Induced SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prescribing sea surface temperature (SST) for the atmospheric general circulation models (GCM) may not lead to underestimation of the coupled variability. In this study, a set of SST-driven atmospheric GCM experiments, starting from slightly ...

Dong Eun Lee; Zhengyu Liu; Yun Liu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Role of the Tibetan Plateau on the Annual Variation of Mean Atmospheric Circulation and Storm-Track Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reexamines how the Tibetan Plateau (TP) modulates the annual variation of atmospheric circulation and storm-track activity based on the Meteorological Research Institute's atmosphere–ocean coupled model experiments with a progressive TP ...

Sun-Seon Lee; June-Yi Lee; Kyung-Ja Ha; Bin Wang; Akio Kitoh; Yoshiyuki Kajikawa; Manabu Abe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hydrostatic Adjustment in Nonisothermal Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author examines hydrostatic adjustment due to heating in two nonisothermal atmospheres. In the first case both the temperature and lapse rate decrease with height; in the second case the atmosphere consists of a troposphere with constant ...

Dean G. Duffy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Efficient rendering of atmospheric phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rendering of atmospheric bodies involves modeling the complex interaction of light throughout the highly scattering medium of water and air particles. Scattering by these particles creates many well-known atmospheric optical phenomena including rainbows, ...

Kirk Riley; David S. Ebert; Martin Kraus; Jerry Tessendorf; Charles Hansen

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

191

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Atmospheric Mercury Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary and analysis of research findings on utility and environmental mercury from 1997 to 2003. The update categorizes and describes recent work on mercury in utility-burned coal and its route through power plants, the measures for its control, and its fate in the environment following emissions from utility stacks. This fate includes atmospheric chemistry and transport, deposition to land and water surfaces, aquatic cycling, the dynamics of mercury in freshwater fish food webs, and th...

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

196

Atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attenuation of solar radiation by the atmosphere between the heliostat and receiver of a Central Receiver solar energy system has been computed for a number of atmospheric conditions and tower-heliostat distances. The most important atmospheric variable is found to be the atmospheric aerosol content. No dependence of atmospheric water vapor is found and only a weak dependence on solar zenith angle. For a 500 m heliostat-tower distance two to four percent reductions are expected under typical desert conditions (50 to 120 km visibility). The reduction is approximately linear with heliostat-tower distance. A representative value of the attenuation coefficient is 0.051 km/sup -1/.

Randall, C.M.

1977-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

197

Old-field Community, Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation  

SciTech Connect

We are in the process of finishing a number of laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse projects, analyzing data, and writing papers. The projects reported addressed these subjects: How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground plant biomass and community structure; Effects of multiple climate changes factors on plant community composition and diversity: what did we learn from a 5-year open-top chamber experiment using constructed old-field communities; Do atmospheric and climatic change factors interact to alter woody seedling emergence, establishment and productivity; Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature in importance as a control on soil carbon dynamics; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground root and fungal biomass; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter soil microarthropod and microbial communities; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground microbial function; Linking root litter diversity and microbial functioning at a micro scale under current and projected CO{sub 2} concentrations; Multifactor climate change effects on soil ecosystem functioning depend on concurrent changes in plant community composition; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground insect populations; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter festuca endophyte infection; How do climate and atmospheric changes soil carbon stabilization.

Aimee Classen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos High School L Al NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Presented at the PPPL Colloquium Sept. 17, 2008 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA LA-UR-08-06284 Outline of this talk *A discussion of ball lightning reports in nature *How can ball plasmas be made in the laboratory? *Detailed experiments on long lived free floating *Detailed experiments on long-lived free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas C i f l b b ll l i h "b ll *Comparison of laboratory ball plasmas with "ball lightning" *Summary U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA

199

Mixing rules for and effects of other hydrogen isotopes and of isotopic swamping on tritium recovery and loss to biosphere from fusion reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient recovery of bred and unburnt tritium from fusion reactors, and control of its migration within reactors and of its escape into the biosphere are essential for self-sufficient fuel cycles and for public, plant personnel, and environmental protection. Tritium in fusion reactors will be mixed with unburnt deuterium and protium introduced by (n,p) reactions and diffusion into coolant loops from steam cycles. Rational design for tritium recovery and escape prevention must acknowledge this fact. Consequences of isotopic admixture are explored, mixing rules for projected fusion reactor dilute-solution conditions are developed, and a rule of thumb regarding their effects on tritium recovery methods is formulated.

Pendergrass, J.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

PNNL: FCSD: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change: Programs &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs & Facilities Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and ARM Climate Research Facility ARM Aerial Facility Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) is a coordinated international project, composed of an observational field campaign and a research program, focused on the investigation of atmospheric rotors and closely related phenomena in complex ...

Vanda Grubiši?; James D. Doyle; Joachim Kuettner; Richard Dirks; Stephen A. Cohn; Laura L. Pan; Stephen Mobbs; Ronald B. Smith; C. David Whiteman; Stanley Czyzyk; Simon Vosper; Martin Weissmann; Samuel Haimov; Stephan F. J. De Wekker; Fotini Katopodes Chow

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted from 27 September through 22 October 2004 over the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The ...

J. Verlinde; J. Y. Harrington; V. T. Yannuzzi; A. Avramov; S. Greenberg; S. J. Richardson; C. P. Bahrmann; G. M. McFarquhar; G. Zhang; N. Johnson; M. R. Poellot; J. H. Mather; D. D. Turner; E. W. Eloranta; D. C. Tobin; R. Holz; B. D. Zak; M. D. Ivey; A. J. Prenni; P. J. DeMott; J. S. Daniel; G. L. Kok; K. Sassen; D. Spangenberg; P. Minnis; T. P. Tooman; M. Shupe; A. J. Heymsfield; R. Schofield

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Performance of the STACEE Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is located at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The field of solar tracking mirrors (heliostats) around a central receiver tower is used to direct Cherenkov light from atmospheric showers onto secondary mirrors on the tower, which in turn image the light onto cameras of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE Collaboration has previously reported a detection of the Crab Nebula with approximately 7 standard deviation significance, using 32 heliostats (STACEE-32). This result demonstrates both the viability of the technique and the suitability of the site. We are in the process of completing an upgrade to 48 heliostats (STACEE-48) en route to an eventual configuration using 64 heliostats (STACEE-64) in early 2001. In this paper, we summarize the results obtained on the sensitivity of STACEE-32 and our expectations for STACEE-48 and STACEE-64.

STACEE Collaboration; D. A. Williams; D. Bhattacharya; L. M. Boone; M. C. Chantell; Z. Conner; C. E. Covault; M. Dragovan; P. Fortin; D. Gingrich; D. T. Gregorich; D. S. Hanna; G. Mohanty; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; S. Oser; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; T. O. Tumer; F. Vincent; J. A. Zweerink

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

205

Morning Transition Tracer Experiments in a Deep Narrow Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three sulfur hexafluoride atmospheric tracer experiments were conducted during the post-sunrise temperature inversion breakup period in the deep, narrow Brush Creek Valley of Colorado. Experiments were conducted under clear, undisturbed weather ...

C. David Whiteman

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Atmospheric Corrosion Test Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 27   Some marine-atmospheric corrosion test sites around the world...Zealand Phia Marine 0.2 0.12 15.8 2.4 � � � � Greece Rafina Marine 0.2 0.12 13.6 1.0 � � � � Rhodes Marine 0.2 0.12 14.3 1.5 � � � � Netherlands Schagen Marine 2.4 1.5 17.0 2.0 � � � � Spain Almeria � 0.035 0.022 22.4 1.6 � � � � Cartagena � 0.050 0.031 5.2 1.9 � � � � La Coruña � 0.160 0.1 26.2 1.4...

207

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH On the parameterization of ice and water substance mixing ratio fields were only strongly altered by turning off the ice phase of these schemes includes ice processes. But in mid- latitudes and also in tropics the ice phase is an important

Moelders, Nicole

208

Atmosphere Response Time Scales Estimated from AOGCM Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global-mean surface air temperature response of the climate system to a specific radiative forcing shows characteristic time scales. Identifying these time scales and their corresponding amplitudes (climate sensitivity) allows one to ...

D. J. L. Olivié; G. P. Peters; D. Saint-Martin

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Session Papers Quality Measurement Experiments Within the Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperatures to total water vapor and total liquid water in the column directly overhead, are derived from model-calculated brightness temperatures. The instrument uses a...

210

WRF Model Experiments on the Antarctic Atmosphere in Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard and polar versions 3.1.1 of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, both initialized by the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40), were run in Antarctica for July 1998. Four different boundary layer–surface layer–radiation scheme ...

Esa-Matti Tastula; Timo Vihma

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Atmospheric Signatures of Super-Earths: How to Distinguish Between Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Poor Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extrasolar super-Earths (1-10 M$_{\\earth}$) are likely to exist with a wide range of atmospheres. Some super-Earths may be able to retain massive hydrogen-rich atmospheres. Others might never accumulate hydrogen or experience significant escape of lightweight elements, resulting in atmospheres more like those of the terrestrial planets in our Solar System. We examine how an observer could differentiate between hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-poor atmospheres by modeling super-Earth emission and transmission spectra, and we find that discrimination is possible by observing the transmission spectrum alone. An Earth-like atmosphere, composed of mostly heavy elements and molecules, will have a very weak transmission signal due to its small atmospheric scale height (since the scale height is inversely proportional to molecular weight). On the other hand, a large hydrogen-rich atmosphere reveals a relatively large transmission signal. The super Earth emission spectrum can additionally contrain the atmospheric composition and temperature structure. Super-Earths with massive hydrogen atmospheres will reveal strong spectral features due to water, whereas those that have lost most of their hydrogen (and have no liquid ocean) will be marked by CO$_2$ features and a lack of H$_2$O. We apply our study specifically to the low-mass planet orbiting an M star, Gl 581c ($M sin i$ = 5 M$_{\\earth}$), although our conclusions are relevant for super-Earths in general. The ability to distinguish hydrogen-rich atmospheres might be essential for interpreting mass and radius observations of planets in the transition between rocky super-Earths and Neptune-like planets.

E. Miller-Ricci; D. Sasselov; S. Seager

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

212

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

213

Response of the Wintertime Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Circulation to Current and Projected Arctic Sea Ice Decline: A Numerical Study with CAM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wintertime Northern Hemisphere (NH) atmospheric circulation response to current (2007–12) and projected (2080–99) Arctic sea ice decline is examined with the latest version of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM5). The numerical experiments ...

Yannick Peings; Gudrun Magnusdottir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

216

Bubble Convection Experiments with a Semi-implicit Formulation of the Euler Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric models based on the Euler equations exist and are used occasionally to carry out numerical experiments. Such a model is used here to simulate the motion of warm bubbles in a dry isentropic atmosphere. For the time integration, this ...

André Robert

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Energy Source for the Coastal-Trapped Waves in the Australian Coastal Experiment Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sea level on the southern Australian coast is examined for the source of the coastal-trapped wave energy observed during the Australian Coastal Experiment. Sea level, adjusted for atmospheric pressure, and atmospheric pressure are observed to ...

John A. Church; Howard J. Freeland

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion Guidebook -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current operating experience shows that atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) boilers meet high environmental standards and are commercially viable and economically attractive. To make the best business decision, power producers need to fully evaluate the technology as a power generation option. The content of this AFBC Guidebook allows readers to become quickly informed about all aspects of the technology.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

An Indirect Effect of Ice Nuclei on Atmospheric Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with observed large-scale forcing is used to study how ice nuclei (IN) affect the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In all the numerical experiments carried out, the cloud ice ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Minghua Zhang; Arthur Y. Hou; Shaocheng Xie; Stephen Lang; Xiaowen Li; David O’C. Starr; Xiaofan Li; Joanne Simpson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Von Kármán's Constant in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow: Reevaluated  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment has been carried out with the specific objective in mind to determine the value of von Kármán's constant in atmospheric boundary layer flow, and also to investigate its possible dependence on the surface Rossby number Ro0. Data ...

Ulf Högström

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Baiu rainband termination in atmospheric and atmosphere-ocean models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baiu rainband is a summer rainband stretching from eastern China through Japan towards the Northwest Pacific. The climatological termination of the Baiu rainband is investigated using Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis (JRA25), a stand-alone atmospheric ...

Akira Kuwano-Yoshida; Bunmei Taguchi; Shang-Ping Xie

222

Krypton-85 in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement results are presented on 85Kr content in the atmosphere over the European part of Russia in 1971-1995 based on the analysis of the commercial krypton, which is separated from air by industrial plants. Our results are by 15 per cent lower then 85Kr activites observed over West Europe. According our prediction by 2030 85Kr content in the atmosphere over Europe will amount to 1,5-3 Bq in m3 air. Average 85Kr release to the atmosphere from regeneration of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is estimated, some 180 TBq per a ton SNF. It is advisable to recommence monitoring of 85Kr content within Russia.

A. T. Korsakov; E. G. Tertyshnik

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

Krypton-85 in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement results are presented on 85Kr content in the atmosphere over the European part of Russia in 1971-1995 based on the analysis of the commercial krypton, which is separated from air by industrial plants. Our results are by 15 per cent lower then 85Kr activites observed over West Europe. According our prediction by 2030 85Kr content in the atmosphere over Europe will amount to 1,5-3 Bq in m3 air. Average 85Kr release to the atmosphere from regeneration of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is estimated, some 180 TBq per a ton SNF. It is advisable to recommence monitoring of 85Kr content within Russia.

Korsakov, A T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mountain Forces and the Atmospheric Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although mountains are generally thought to exert forces on the atmosphere, the related transfers of energy between earth and atmosphere are not represented in standard energy equations of the atmosphere. It is shown that the axial rotation of the ...

Joseph Egger

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Relations between Northward Ocean and Atmosphere Energy Transports in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Third Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere General Circulation Model (HadCM3) is used to analyze the relation between northward energy transports in the ocean and atmosphere at centennial time scales. In a transient water-hosing experiment, ...

Michael Vellinga; Peili Wu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Glossary Term - Composition of the Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Earth's Atmosphere Source: Definition of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere (1976) CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th Edition Gas Formula Abundance percent by volume...

227

A Computational Thermodynamic Analysis of Atmospheric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2001 ... The vacuum atmosphere is typically 0.1 atm. However, the vacuum atmosphere creates two major problems: air leakage and batch operation to ...

228

The Workshop in Atmospheric Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A workshop on the subject of atmospheric predictability was held during 23-25 April 2001 at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. Of primary concern was the nature of forecast uncertainty due to initial conditionuncertainty of ...

Ronald M. Errico; Rolf Langland; David P. Baumhefner

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Precursors to atmospheric blocking events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric blocking events disturb synoptic-scale features from their normal eastward progression, causing anomalous weather conditions for the duration of the blocking event. The essence of blocking can be captured by ...

Marino, Garrett P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Automated Measurements of Atmospheric Visibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using a solid-state, linear-array imaging device coupled with computerized scene analysis and display to measure daytime atmospheric visibility is described. Computer software is implemented for routine conversion of observed ...

W. Viezee; W. E. Evans

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Navy's Operational Atmospheric Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January of 1988, significant upgrades were made to the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS). Among these improvements was the implementation of a multivariate optimum interpolation analysis scheme. Since that time, ...

James S. Goerss; Patricia A. Phoebus

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Stochastic Simulation of Atmospheric Trajectories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are presented for generating an ensemble of synthetic atmospheric trajectories. These include methods for a set of independent trajectories, and methods for a correlated set of sequential trajectories. The models incorporate first-order ...

Mitchell J. Small; Perry J. Samson

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Atmospheric Water Vapor over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinese radiosonde data from 1970 to 1990 are relatively homogeneous in time and are used to examine the climatology, trends, and variability of China’s atmospheric water vapor content. The climatological distribution of precipitable water (PW) ...

Panmao Zhai; Robert E. Eskridge

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Diurnal Tide in the Equatorial Middle Atmosphere as Seen in LIMS Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of day-night temperature differences in the middle atmosphere determined by the Nimbus 7 LIMS experiment is described. Day-night differences maximize at and are approximately symmetric about the equator. Successive centers of ...

Matthew H. Hitchman; Conway B. Leovy

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Structure of the Lower Atmosphere over the Northern California Coast during Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of the lower atmosphere over the northern California coastal ocean upwelling area was studied during the Shelf Mixed Layer Experiment in the winter of 1989. Surface data were collected at seven automated coastal stations and six ...

C. E. Dorman; A. G. Enriquez; C. A. Friehe

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Climate Change and the Middle Atmosphere. Part III: The Doubled CO2 Climate Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the troposphere–stratosphere system to doubled atmospheric CO2 is investigated in a series of experiments in which sea surface temperatures are allowed to adjust to radiation imbalances. The Goddard Institute for Space Studies (...

D. Rind; D. Shindell; P. Lonergan; N. K. Balachandran

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Orographic Influences on the Distribution and Generation of Atmospheric Variability in a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of large-scale mountains on atmospheric variability is studied in a series of GCM experiments in which a single mountain is varied in height from 0 to 4 km. High-frequency (? 30 days) variability are ...

Jin-Yi Yu; Dennis L. Hartmann

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Tropical Convection and the Energy Balance at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data are used in conjunction with a radiative transfer model to estimate the effect of various cloud types on the top-of-atmosphere radiation ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; Leslie A. Moy; Qiang Fu

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Mount Kenya Global Atmosphere Watch Station (MKN): Installation and Meteorological Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The meteorological conditions at the Mount Kenya (station identifier MKN) tropical Global Atmosphere Watch Programme station are described. Like other stations in mountainous terrain, the site experiences thermally induced wind systems that ...

Stephan Henne; Wolfgang Junkermann; Josiah M. Kariuki; John Aseyo; Jörg Klausen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Response of the Antarctic Oscillation to Increasing and Stabilized Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent results from greenhouse warming experiments, most of which follow the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) IS92a scenario, have shown that under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) exhibits ...

Wenju Cai; Peter H. Whetton; David J. Karoly

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radar Observations of Humidity Variability in and above the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Humidity variability at the top of the marine atmospheric boundary layer and in the overlying free troposphere was examined using data collected during the marine stratocumulus phase of the First Regional Experiment (FIRE) of the International ...

Allen B. White; C. W. Fairall; Dennis W. Thomson

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A One-Dimensional Interactive Soil-Atmosphere Model for Testing Formulations of Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model representing a soil-atmosphere column in a GCM is developed for off-line testing of GCM soil hydrology parameterizations. Repeating three representative GCM sensitivity experiments with this one-dimensional model demonstrates that, to ...

Randal D. Koster; Peter S. Eagleson

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Radiative Effects of Airborne Dust on Regional Energy Budgets at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of dust on the radiative energy budget at the top of the atmosphere were investigated using model calculations and measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Estimates of the dust optical depth were made from ...

Steven A. Ackerman; Hyosang Chung

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Accuracy of Estimates of Atmospheric Large-Scale Energy Flux Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A short review of atmospheric energy transport studies is given, and the importance of the Global Weather Experiment for such studies is emphasized. The accuracy of energy flux (divergence) estimates is then discussed, comparing results obtained ...

Eero Holopainen; Carl Fortelius

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Localization of Deep Water Formation: Role of Atmospheric Moisture Transport and Geometrical Constraints on Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice aquaplanet experiments is described in which topological constraints on ocean circulation are introduced to study the role of ocean circulation on the mean climate of the coupled system. It is imagined ...

David Ferreira; John Marshall; Jean-Michel Campin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

An Observational Study of Atmospheric Bore Formation from Colliding Density Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from east-central Florida during the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment are used to investigate the factors that influence atmospheric bore formation from colliding density currents. Ten cases involving ...

David E. Kingsmill; N. Andrew Crook

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Intermittency and the Organization of Turbulence in the Near-Neutral Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft data from the JASIN Experiment have been used to examine the role that intermittency plays in turbulent transfer in the near-neutral marine atmospheric boundary layer. Conditional sampling, using the time-varying dissipation rate as an ...

William J. Shaw; Joost A. Businger

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evolution of the Zonal Mean State in the Equatorial Middle Atmosphere during October 1978-May 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the zonal mean state in the equatorial middle atmosphere is investigated with the use of daily mapped temperatures derived from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment. These quasi-global, high vertical ...

Matthew H. Hitchman; Conway B. Leovy

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Atmospheric Boundary Layer above the Agulhas Current during Alongcurrent Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the marine atmospheric boundary layer to the strong sea surface temperature (SST) gradient across the warm Agulhas Current was studied in the Agulhas Current Air–Sea Exchange Experiment, south of Port Alfred, South Africa. ...

M. Rouault; A. M. Lee-Thorp; J. R. E. Lutjeharms

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Historical Research in the Atmospheric Sciences: The Value of Literature Reviews, Libraries, and Librarians  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author's experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying ...

David M. Schultz

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Global Climate and Ocean Circulation on an Aquaplanet Ocean–Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low-resolution coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) is used to study the characteristics of the large-scale ocean circulation and its climatic impacts in a series of global coupled aquaplanet experiments. Three ...

Robin S. Smith; Clotilde Dubois; Jochem Marotzke

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Acoustic Sounder Observations of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer from the Top of a Steep Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a series of experiments utilizing an acoustic sounder located at the top of a 1026 m mountain are presented which show some interesting features of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer.

D. N. Asimakopoulos; D. G. Deligiorgi; D. P. Lalas

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Comparison of Tropical Ocean–Atmosphere Fluxes with the NCAR Community Climate Model CCM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of the marine boundary layer produced by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3) are compared with observations from two experiments in the central and western equatorial ...

William D. Collins; Junyi Wang; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Guang J. Zhang; Daniel I. Cooper; William E. Eichinger

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions cease, will atmospheric CO2 concentration continue to increase?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that overall ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

255

Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group  

SciTech Connect

The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very large scale water Cerenkov detector, or a magnetized detector with flavor and antiflavor sensitivity. Additional priorities are nuclear physics measurements which will reduce the uncertainties in the predictions of the Standard Solar Model, and similar supporting measurements for atmospheric neutrinos (cosmic ray fluxes, magnetic fields, etc.). We note as well that the detectors for both solar and atmospheric neutrino measurements can serve as multipurpose detectors, with capabilities of discovering dark matter, relic supernova neutrinos, proton decay, or as targets for long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments.

Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

258

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

259

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

260

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

TRIO experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Quality Assurance in Atmospheric Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a number of best practices associated with the use of numerical models of the atmosphere and is motivated by the rapid growth in the number of model users, who have a range of scientific and technical preparations. An underlying ...

Thomas T. Warner

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geomagnetic Effects on Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic effects distort the zenith angle distribution of sub--GeV and few--GeV atmospheric neutrinos, breaking the up--down symmetry that would be present in the absence of neutrino oscillations and without a geomagnetic field. The geomagnetic effects also produce a characteristic azimuthal dependence of the $\

Paolo Lipari; T. K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

A Fast Line-by-Line Method for Atmospheric Absorption Computations: The Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally fast line-by-line method for the determination of atmospheric absorption is described. This method is based on the creation of an Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas (4A) covering all possible plausible atmospheric ...

N. A. Scott; A. Chedin

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

High-energy atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known hadronic models, SIBYLL 2.1 and QGSJET-II. The atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy range $10-10^7$ GeV was computed within the 1D approach to solve nuclear cascade equations in the atmosphere, which takes into account non-scaling behavior of the inclusive cross-sections for the particle production, the rise of total inelastic hadron-nucleus cross-sections and nonpower-law character of the primary cosmic ray spectrum. This approach was recently tested in the atmospheric muon flux calculations [1]. The results of the neutrino flux calculations are compared with the Frejus, AMANDA-II and IceCube measurement data.

S. I. Sinegovsky; A. A. Kochanov; T. S. Sinegovskaya

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Approved Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle 31OCT97 Exp Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 666 Clark Magnetic Rotation in 104Sn 5 667 Janssens Unsafe COULEX of the 240Pu Nucleus 3 670 Smith Exotic Structures in very...

267

Influences of the Kuroshio/Oyashio Extensions on Air–Sea Heat Exchanges and Storm-Track Activity as Revealed in Regional Atmospheric Model Simulations for the 2003/04 Cold Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influences of oceanic fronts in the Kuroshio and Oyashio Extension (KOE) region on the overlying atmosphere are investigated by comparing a pair of atmospheric regional model hindcast experiments for the 2003/04 cold season, one with the observed ...

Bunmei Taguchi; Hisashi Nakamura; Masami Nonaka; Shang-Ping Xie

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Atmospheric sciences division. Annual report, fiscal year 1981  

SciTech Connect

The research activities of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the Department of Energy and Environment for FY 1981 are presented. Facilities and major items of equipment are described. Research programs are summarized in three categories, modeling, field and laboratory experiments and data management and analysis. Each program is also described individually with title, principal investigator, sponsor and funding levels for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Future plans are summarized. Publications for FY 1981 are listed with abstracts. A list of personnel is included.

Raynor, G.S. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined atmospheric chemistry-meteorology experiment, the Dynamics and Chemistry of the Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS), was carried out during the summer of 1985 over the eastern Pacific Ocean using the NCAR Electra aircraft. The objectives ...

D. H. Lenschow; I. R. Paluch; A. R. Bandy; R. Pearson Jr.; S. R. Kawa; C. J. Weaver; B. J. Huebert; J. G. Kay; D. C. Thornton; A. R. Driedger III

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Use of Wind Profilers in a Mesoscale Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During May and June of 1985, an experiment to study mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) was carried out in central Kansas and Oklahoma, using many of the latest measurement technologies in the atmospheric sciences. Among these were three 50-MHz ...

John A. Augustine; Edward J. Zipser

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Generation of Turbulence by Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard current criterion for the generation of turbulence by atmospheric gravity waves and for the associated limitation on wave growth is based upon the standard criterion for static instability of the unperturbed atmosphere, namely, that ...

Colin O. Hines

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

AMIP: The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) is an international effort to determine the systematic climate errors of atmospheric models under realistic conditions, and calls for the simulation of the climate of the decade 1979–1988 using ...

W. Lawrence Gates

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Retrieval of atmospheric properties of extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method to retrieve molecular abundances and temperature profiles from exoplanet atmosphere photometry and spectroscopy. Our method allows us to run millions of 1-D atmosphere models in order to cover the ...

Nikku, Madhusudhan, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Interannual Variation of Global Atmospheric Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative atmospheric angular momentum (RAM) integrated over the globe is an explicit variable representing the state of the atmospheric general circulation. After removing the annual, semiannual, and higher-frequency components, the filtered ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Joseph J. Tribbia; Ming-Cheng Yen

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Statistics Education in the Atmospheric Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of atmospheric sciences data and models are heavily dependent upon statistical and probabilistic reasoning. Statistical methods have played an important role in establishing physical relationships of atmosphere-ocean-land interactions ...

Timothy J. Brown; L. Mark Berliner; Daniel S. Wilks; Michael B. Richman; Christopher K. Wilke

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Atmospheric Control on the Thermohaline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to elucidate the role of atmospheric and oceanic processes in setting a vigorous ocean overturning circulation in the North Atlantic but not in the North Pacific, a comparison of the observed atmospheric circulation and net surface ...

Arnaud Czaja

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Promise of GPS in Atmospheric Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for active measurement of the Earth's atmosphere. Microwave radio signals transmitted by GPS satellites are delayed (refracted) by the atmosphere as they ...

Steven Businger; Steven R. Chiswell; Michael Bevis; Jingping Duan; Richard A. Anthes; Christian Rocken; Randolph H. Ware; Michael Exner; T. VanHove; Fredrick S. Solheim

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Testing and Evaluating Atmospheric Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model validation is a crucial process that underpins model development and gives confidence to the results from running models. This article discusses a range of techniques for validating atmosphere models given that the atmosphere is chaotic and incompletely ...

Vicky Pope; Terry Davies

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

280

Dynamical Processes of Equatorial Atmospheric Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical processes that drive intraseasonal equatorial atmospheric angular momentum (EAAM) fluctuations are examined with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) reanalysis data. ...

Steven B. Feldstein

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

VALDRIFT—A Valley Atmospheric Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VALDRIFT (valley drift) is a valley atmospheric transport, diffusion, and deposition model. The model is phenomenological—that is, the dominant meteorological processes governing the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in ...

K. Jerry Allwine; Xindi Bian; C. David Whiteman; Harold W. Thistle

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Atmospheric Turbidity in the Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis is presented of 800 measurements of atmospheric monochromatic aerosol optical depth made poleward of 65° latitude. The atmosphere of the southern polar region appears to be uncontaminated but is charged with a background aerosol having ...

Glenn E. Shaw

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Advanced Atmospheric Modeling for Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport and diffusion models are an important part of emergency response systems for industrial facilities that have the potential to release significant quantities of toxic or radioactive material into the atmosphere. An advanced ...

Jerome D. Fast; B. Lance O'steen; Robert P. Addis

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical  

SciTech Connect

A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

INHIBITION OF METHANE ATMOSPHERIC FLAMES BY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... atmospheric pressure was studied. The burner temperature was maintained at 65 “C by using a thermostat. The volumetric velocity ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

North Carolina Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Carolina Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

287

Detecting atmospheric rivers in large climate datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme precipitation events on the western coast of North America are often traced to an unusual weather phenomenon known as atmospheric rivers. Although these storms may provide a significant fraction of the total water to the highly managed western ... Keywords: atmospheric rivers, automatic detection of atmospheric rivers, connected component labeling, extreme climate events

Surendra Byna; Prabhat; Michael F. Wehner; Kesheng John Wu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Atmospheric Profiles at the Southern Pierre Auger Observatory and their Relevance to Air Shower Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of atmospheric conditions on altitude and time have to be known at the site of an air shower experiment for accurate reconstruction of extensive air showers and their simulations. The height-profile of atmospheric depth is of particular interest as it enters directly into the reconstruction of longitudinal shower development and of the primary energy and mass of cosmic rays. For the southern part of the Auger Observatory, the atmosphere has been investigated in a number of campaigns with meteorological radio soundings and with continuous measurements of ground-based weather stations. Focussing on atmospheric depth and temperature profiles, temporal variations are described and monthly profiles are developed. Uncertainties of the monthly atmospheres that are currently applied in the Auger reconstruction are discussed.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; D. Gora; P. Homola; H. Klages; J. Pekala; M. Risse; M. Unger; B. Wilczynska; H. Wilczynski; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

289

A new measurement of the altitude dependence of the atmospheric muon intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of atmospheric muons made during an ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+/mu- as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c is presented. The differential mu- intensities in the 0.3-50 GeV/c range and for atmospheric depths between 4-960 g/cm^2 are also presented. We compare these results with other measurements and model predictions. We find that our charge ratio is ~1.1 for all atmospheric depths and is consistent, within errors, with other measurements and the model predictions. We find that our measured mu- intensities are also consistent with other measurements, and with the model predictions, except at shallow atmospheric depths.

J. J. Beatty; S. Coutu; S. A. Minnick; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; S. P. McKee; M. Schubnell; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; A. W. Labrador; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; M. A. DuVernois; S. L. Nutter

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

New measurement of the altitude dependence of the atmospheric muon intensity  

SciTech Connect

We present a new measurement of atmospheric muons made during an ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio {mu}{sup +}/{mu}{sup -} as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c is presented. The differential {mu}{sup -} intensities in the 0.3-50 GeV/c range and for atmospheric depths between 4-960 g/cm{sup 2} are also presented. We compare these results with other measurements and model predictions. We find that our charge ratio is {approx}1.1 for all atmospheric depths and is consistent, within errors, with other measurements and the model predictions. We find that our measured {mu}{sup -} intensities are also consistent with other measurements, and with the model predictions, except at shallow atmospheric depths.

Beatty, J.J.; Coutu, S.; Minnick, S.A.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bower, C.R.; Musser, J.A.; McKee, S.P.; Schubnell, M.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.D.; Labrador, A.W.; Mueller, D.; Swordy, S.P.; DuVernois, M.A.; Nutter, S.L. [Departments of Physics and of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 104 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Physics, Swain Hall West, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Department of Physics, Randall Laboratory, University of Michigan, 500 E. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 (United States); Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, 933 E. 56th Street, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); School of Physics and Astronomy, 16 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Department of Physics and Geology, SC 147, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, Kentucky 41099 (United States)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fluorescence emission induced by extensive air showers in dependence on atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged particles of extensive air showers (EAS), mainly electrons and positrons, initiate the emission of fluorescence light in the Earth's atmosphere. This light provides a calorimetric measurement of the energy of cosmic rays. For reconstructing the primary energy from an observed light track of an EAS, the fluorescence yield in air has to be known in dependence on atmospheric conditions, like air temperature, pressure, and humidity. Several experiments on fluorescence emission have published various sets of data covering different parts of the dependence of the fluorescence yield on atmospheric conditions. Using a compilation of published measurements, a calculation of the fluorescence yield in dependence on altitude is presented. The fluorescence calculation is applied to simulated air showers and different atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence of the atmospheric conditions on the reconstructed shower parameters.

Keilhauer, Bianca

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effects of diurnal variation on a tropical coupling system: a 2-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere modeling study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of diurnal variation on tropical atmospheric and oceanic variability are investigated with a two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model. The experiment with a time-invariant solar zenith angle is compared to the control ... Keywords: diurnal variation, tropical coupling system

Shouting Gao; Yushu Zhou

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Large Scale Atmospheric Chemistry Simulations for 2001: An Analysis of Ozone and Other Species in Central Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A key atmospheric gas is ozone. Ozone in the stratosphere is beneficial to the biosphere because it absorbs a significant fraction of the sun's shorter wavelength ultraviolet radiation. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant (respiratory irritant in humans and acts to damage crops, vegetation, and many materials). It affects the Earths energy balance by absorbing both incoming solar radiation and outgoing long wave radiation. An important part of the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere involves ozone, through a photolysis pathway that leads to the hydroxyl radical (OH). Since reaction with OH is a major sink of many atmospheric species, its concentration controls the distributions of many radiatively important species. Ozone in the troposphere arises from both in-situ photochemical production and transport from the stratosphere. Within the troposphere, ozone is formed in-situ when carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) react in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NO, = NO + NO2) and sunlight. The photochemistry of the stratosphere differs significantly from that in the troposphere. Within the stratosphere, ozone formation is initiated by the photolysis of 02. Stratospheric ozone may be destroyed via catalytic reactions with NO, H (hydrogen), OH, CI (chlorine) and Br (bromine), or photolysis. In the past, attempts to simulate the observed distributions of ozone (and other important gases) have focused on either the stratosphere or the troposphere. Stratospheric models either employed simplified parameterizations to represent tropospheric chemical and physical processes, or assumed the troposphere behaved as a boundary condition. Likewise, tropospheric models used simplified stratospheric chemistry and transport.

Atherton, C; Bergmann, D; Cameron-Smith, P; Connell, P; Molenkamp, C; Rotman, D; Tannahil, J

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

294

Reactor-based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of neutrino oscillation searches employing nuclear reactors as sources is reviewed. This technique, a direct continuation of the experiments that proved the existence of neutrinos, is today an essential tool in investigating the indications of oscillations found in studying neutrinos produced in the sun and in the earth's atmosphere. The low-energy of the reactor \

Carlo Bemporad; Giorgio Gratta; Petr Vogel

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Comprehensive Habit Diagram for Atmospheric Ice Crystals: Confirmation from the Laboratory, AIRS II, and Other Field Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent laboratory experiments and in situ observations have produced results in broad agreement with respect to ice crystal habits in the atmosphere. These studies reveal that the ice crystal habit at ?20°C is platelike, extending to ?40°C, and ...

Matthew P. Bailey; John Hallett

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part I: Macrophysical and Synoptic Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A uniquely extensive high cloud dataset has been collected from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing in support of the First (ISCCP) International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment extended time ...

Kenneth Sassen; James R. Campbell

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Remotely Sensing the Earth’s Atmosphere Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)—The GPS/MET Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Positioning System/Meteorology (GPS/MET) project is an active satellite-to-satellite remote sensing experiment using the radio occultation technique. Due to the atmospheric index of refraction and gradient of the index of refraction, ...

Derek D. Feng; Benjamin M. Herman

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Comparisons of empirical localization techniques for serial ensemble Kalman filters in a simple atmospheric general circulation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two techniques for estimating good localization functions for serial ensemble Kalman filters are compared in observing system simulation experiments (OSSE) conducted with the dynamical core of an atmospheric general circulation model. The first ...

Lili Lei; Jeffrey L. Anderson

300

The Boreal Ecosystem–Atmosphere Study (BOREAS): An Overview and Early Results from the 1994 Field Year  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) is large-scale international field experiment that has the goal of improving our understanding of the exchanges of radiative energy, heat water, CO2, and trace gases between the boreal forest and the ...

Piers Sellers; Forrest Hall; K. Jon Ranson; Hank Margolis; Bob Kelly; Dennis Baldocchi; Gerry den Hartog; Josef Cihlar; Michael G. Ryan; Barry Goodison; Patrick Crill; Dennis Lettenmaier; Diane E. Wickland

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Influence of Atmospheric Noise and Uncertainty in Ocean Initial Conditions on the Limit of Predictability in a Coupled GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of atmospheric stochastic forcing and uncertainty in initial conditions on the limit of predictability of the NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) is quantified based on comparisons of idealized identical twin prediction experiments ...

Cristiana Stan; Ben P. Kirtman

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

303

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

304

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

305

Description, calibration and sensitivity analysis of the local ecosystem submodel of a global model of carbon and nitrogen cycling and the water balance in the terrestrial biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a geographically-distributed ecosystem model for the carbon, nitrogen, and water dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere TERRA. The local ecosystem model of TERRA consists of coupled, modified versions of TEM and DAYTRANS. The ecosystem model in each grid cell calculates water fluxes of evaporation, transpiration, and runoff; carbon fluxes of gross primary productivity, litterfall, and plant and soil respiration; and nitrogen fluxes of vegetation uptake, litterfall, mineralization, immobilization, and system loss. The state variables are soil water content; carbon in live vegetation; carbon in soil; nitrogen in live vegetation; organic nitrogen in soil and fitter; available inorganic nitrogen aggregating nitrites, nitrates, and ammonia; and a variable for allocation. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics are calibrated to specific sites in 17 vegetation types. Eight parameters are determined during calibration for each of the 17 vegetation types. At calibration, the annual average values of carbon in vegetation C, show site differences that derive from the vegetation-type specific parameters and intersite variation in climate and soils. From calibration, we recover the average C{sub v} of forests, woodlands, savannas, grasslands, shrublands, and tundra that were used to develop the model initially. The timing of the phases of the annual variation is driven by temperature and light in the high latitude and moist temperate zones. The dry temperate zones are driven by temperature, precipitation, and light. In the tropics, precipitation is the key variable in annual variation. The seasonal responses are even more clearly demonstrated in net primary production and show the same controlling factors.

Kercher, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

SANE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A{sub {parallel}} and A{sub 80} and extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and spin structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p}. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia ({sup 14}NH{sub 3}) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q{sup 2} region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV{sup 2} and between Bjorken x of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. This talk will address the progress of the analysis designed to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Preliminary results will be presented.

H. Baghdasaryan, SANE Collaboration

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Acoustic Waves in the Turbulent Atmosphere: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of atmospheric acoustics and its role in atmospheric research and in development of modern methods of ground-based remote sensing of the atmosphere are outlined. A historical overview of investigations of the effect of atmospheric ...

M. A. Kallistratova

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

High-energy atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Atmospheric Condensation Potential of Windows in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In hot, humid climates, the internal surfaces of windows in air-conditioned buildings are in contact with relatively colder air. Meanwhile, the external surfaces are exposed to hot humid atmospheric air. This hygro-thermal condition may cause frequent atmospheric condensation on external surfaces of windows when their surface temperature drops below the dew point temperature of the hot humid air. To date, external surface condensation on windows has been given relatively much less importance than their internal surface condensation. In addition, the thermal analysis of windows in hot humid climates has always been performed in the absence of condensation. Under moderate air temperature and humidity conditions, such practice is acceplable. However, when windows experience atmospheric condensation on their external surfaces, the effect of condensation on window energy loss needs to be examined. In this paper, the external condensation process is analyzed and the atmospheric water vapor mass condensation rate has been obtained by utilizing a simplified transient uni-dimensional finite difference model. The results show that this model has enhanced the assessment of the potential for atmospheric condensation on windows in hot, humid climates and in predicting the amount of condensation expected, as well as the associated energy loss for given thermal and moisture conditions. The numerical computation of the model is able to account for condensation and its impact on the temperature gradient across the window. Thermal analysis of both single and insulated double-glazed windows under condensation conditions is presented. The work also includes the computational procedure used and the results or a case study demonstrating the model's capabilities.

El Diasty, R.; Budaiwi, I.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

312

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

313

Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a non-technical review of the problems associated with atmospheric carbon dioxide and the resulting greenhouse effect. (TEM)

Firestine, M.W. (ed.)

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of substrates and then further process into optoelectronic materials using rapid thermal processing. You can read more on the rationale for developing this platform and its capabilities. Contact Maikel van Hest for more details on these capabilities. The Atmospheric Processing platform will allow deposition in any sequence and is applicable to activities in all Technology Roadmaps, which include

315

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

FOAM:The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models Performance User Resources Publications History Developer's Page FOAM The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model cup2.jpeg (48474 bytes) Image made by Johan Kellum with Vis5D...

318

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

319

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility...

320

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

322

Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Former ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd)a New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 14. Refinery Sales During 2005

323

Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

Stephen C. Piper; Ralph F. Keeling

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

324

High-energy cosmic ray muons in the Earth's atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the calculations of the atmospheric muon fluxes at energies 10-10{sup 7} GeV based on a numerical-analytical method for solving the hadron-nucleus cascade equations. It allows the non-power-law behavior of the primary cosmic ray (PCR) spectrum, the violation of Feynman scaling, and the growth of the total inelastic cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions with increasing energy to be taken into account. The calculations have been performed for a wide class of hadron-nucleus interaction models using directly the PCR measurements made in the ATIC-2 and GAMMA experiments and the parameterizations of the primary spectrum based on a set of experiments. We study the dependence of atmospheric muon flux characteristics on the hadronic interaction model and the influence of uncertainties in the PCR spectrum and composition on the muon flux at sea level. Comparison of the calculated muon energy spectra at sea level with the data from a large number of experiments shows that the cross sections for hadron-nucleus interactions introduce the greatest uncertainty in the energy region that does not include the knee in the primary spectrum.

Kochanov, A. A., E-mail: kochanov@iszf.irk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation); Sinegovskaya, T. S. [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation)] [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation); Sinegovsky, S. I., E-mail: sinegovsky@api.isu.ru [Irkutsk State University (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Internal Versus SST-Forced Atmospheric Variability as Simulated by an Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of atmospheric flow is analyzed by separating it into an internal part due to atmospheric dynamics only and an external (or forced) part due to the variability of sea surface temperature forcing. The two modes of variability are ...

Ali Harzallah; Robert Sadourny

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Transient Response of a Global Ocean-Atmosphere Model to a Doubling of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient response of climate to an instantaneous increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has been investigated by a general circulation model of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system with global geography and annual ...

Syukuro Manabe; Kirk Bryan; Michael J. Spelman

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane and 13C12C, Flask Air Samples Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999) data Data Investigators Paul Quay and...

328

Response of the Middle Atmosphere to CO2 Doubling: Results from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) has been used to examine the middle atmosphere response to CO2 doubling. The radiative-photochemical response induced by doubling CO2 alone and the response produced by changes in prescribed SSTs are ...

V. I. Fomichev; A. I. Jonsson; J. de Grandpré; S. R. Beagley; C. McLandress; K. Semeniuk; T. G. Shepherd

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A phenomenological outlook on three-flavor atmospheric neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent observations of atmospheric nu events from the Super-Kamiokande experiment are compatible with three-flavor neutrino oscillations, occurring dominantly in the nu_munu_tau channel and subdominantly in the nu_munu_e channel. We present an updated analysis of the three-flavor mass-mixing parameters consistent with the present phenomenology, including the latest 45 kTy data sample from Super-Kamiokande. A comparison with our previous results, based on 33 kTy data, shows that the oscillation evidence is strengthened, and that the neutrino mass-mixing parameters are constrained in smaller ranges.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; G. Scioscia

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione Discovery could mean ingredients for life are abundant on icy space bodies. March 5, 2012 Curiosity rover bears three LANL technologies Inside Titan: This artist's concept shows a possible scenario for the internal structure of Titan, as suggested by data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Scientists have been trying to determine what is under Titan's organic-rich atmosphere and icy crust. Data from the radio science experiment make the strongest case yet for a global subsurface ocean, sitting above a subsurface layer of high-pressure ice and a water-infused silicate core. Image credit: A. Tavani Get Expertise

331

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Reference Alloy Waste Form Fabrication and Initiation of Reducing Atmosphere and Reductive Additives Study on Alloy Waste Form Fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the fabrication of two reference alloy waste forms, RAW-1(Re) and RAW-(Tc) using an optimized loading and heating method. The composition of the alloy materials was based on a generalized formulation to process various proposed feed streams resulting from the processing of used fuel. Waste elements are introduced into molten steel during alloy fabrication and, upon solidification, become incorporated into durable iron-based intermetallic phases of the alloy waste form. The first alloy ingot contained surrogate (non-radioactive), transition-metal fission products with rhenium acting as a surrogate for technetium. The second alloy ingot contained the same components as the first ingot, but included radioactive Tc-99 instead of rhenium. Understanding technetium behavior in the waste form is of particular importance due the longevity of Tc-99 and its mobility in the biosphere in the oxide form. RAW-1(Re) and RAW-1(Tc) are currently being used as test specimens in the comprehensive testing program investigating the corrosion and radionuclide release mechanisms of the representative alloy waste form. Also described in this report is the experimental plan to study the effects of reducing atmospheres and reducing additives to the alloy material during fabrication in an attempt to maximize the oxide content of waste streams that can be accommodated in the alloy waste form. Activities described in the experimental plan will be performed in FY12. The first aspect of the experimental plan is to study oxide formation on the alloy by introducing O2 impurities in the melt cover gas or from added oxide impurities in the feed materials. Reducing atmospheres will then be introduced to the melt cover gas in an attempt to minimize oxide formation during alloy fabrication. The second phase of the experimental plan is to investigate melting parameters associated with alloy fabrication to allow the separation of slag and alloy components of the melt.

S.M. Frank; T.P. O'Holleran; P.A. Hahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Human effects on the global atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

This review considers whether human activities can significantly change important functions of the global atmosphere by altering the amount or distribution of certain trace species. It deals with three specific topics: stratopheric ozone, the role of species other than carbon dioxide on the greenhouse effect, and certain recently recognized atmospheric consequences of a large scale nuclear war. 64 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

Johnston, H.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Measurements of Atmospheric Nanoparticles (1875–1980)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmosphere contains a large variety of particles, ranging in size from near molecular (~1 nm) to larger than 10,000 nm. The total number concentration N of particles is dominated by nanoparticles ? 100 nm in diameter. Discovery of atmospheric ...

Volker Mohnen; George M. Hidy

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Earth's early atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Ideas about atmospheric composition and climate on the early Earth have evolved considerably over the last 30 years, but many uncertainties still remain. It is generally agreed that the atmosphere contained little or no free oxygen initially and that oxygen concentrations increased markely near 2.0 billion years ago, but the precise timing of and reasons for its rise remain unexplained. Likewise, it is usually conceded that the atmospheric greenhouse effect must have been higher in the past to offset reduced solar luminosity, but the levels of atmospheric carbon cioxide and other greenhouse gases required remain speculative. A better understanding of past atmospheric evolution is important to understanding the evolution of life and to predicting whether Earth-like planets might exist elsewhere in the galaxy.

Kasting, J.F. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

337

Modeling land-surface/atmosphere dynamics for CHAMMP  

SciTech Connect

Project progress is described on a DOE CHAMP project to model the land-surface/atmosphere coupling in a heterogeneous environment. This work is a collaboration between scientists at Iowa State University and the University of New Hampshire. Work has proceeded in two areas: baseline model coupling and data base development for model validation. The core model elements (land model, atmosphere model) have been ported to the Principal Investigator's computing system and baseline coupling has commenced. The initial target data base is the set of observations from the FIFE field campaign, which is in the process of being acquired. For the remainder of the project period, additional data from the region surrounding the FIFE site and from other field campaigns will be acquired to determine how to best extrapolate results from the initial target region to the rest of the globe. In addition, variants of the coupled model will be used to perform experiments examining resolution requirements and coupling strategies for land-atmosphere coupling in a heterogeneous environment.

Gutowski, W.J. Jr.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Experience Report for WOPR  

SciTech Connect

One of the purposes of the SQA effort at LLNL is to attempt to determine the 'goodness' of the research codes used for various scientific applications. Typically these are two and three dimensional multi-physics simulation and modeling codes. These legacy research codes are used for applciations such as atmospheric dispersion modeling and analysis and prediction of the performance of engineered systems. These codes are continually subjected to automated regression test suites consisting of verified and validated expected results. Code is managed in repositories. Experience level of developers is high in the knowledge domain, platforms, and languages used. Code size of the multi-physics code used in this study was 578,242 lines excluding comment and blank lines or 5538.7 function points. Languages were 70% C++, 20% C, and 10% Fortran. The code has 130 users and a development team of 14 and an embedded SQE. The code has achieved 100% prime feature test coverage, 73.6% functional test coverage, and 71.5% statement test coverage. The average cyclomatic complexity of the code was 6.25. The codes have evolved over 10 years. Research codes are challenging because there is a desire to balance agility with discipline as well as compliance with DOE standards. Agility is important to allow experimentation with new algorithms and addition of the latest physics features. Discipline is important to increase the quality of the codes. Automation of processes and defect prevention/detection are deployed throughout the software development process. Since resarch codes are a small segment of the software industry, not much information exists in terms of reliability studies on these types of codes. This paper describes attempts to determine the goodness of these research codes. Goodness defined as both correctness of the codes and their fault densities. Correctness is determined by user interviews, peer review; feature based automated testing, and coverage measurement. This paper focuses on the fault density aspect of goodness and reliability of the codes in particular. The approach taken was to use multiple fault density prediction methods and compare results to actual experimentation and other industry studies on fault density. As a result of the predictions and experiments our confidence in the prediction methods was increased and our confidence in the goodness of the code from a fault density perspective was given more context. A large unintended benefit of these experiments was to find defects hidden for years in the codes when using the Monte Carlo reliability testing results to develop heuristic based bug driven tests.

Pope, G

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Influence of Forests on Atmospheric Heating during the Snowmelt Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heating during the snowmelt season has been studied by means of data analysis and numerical model experiments. As a result of the data analysis, it was shown that in some examples the daytime air temperature rose above 0°C, even if ...

Takeshi Yamazaki

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Divergence and Clouds along California in June 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have performed a numerical experiment using Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) with a horizontal resolution of 9 km to simulate hourly atmospheric dynamics and thermodynamics along the U.S. California coast for all of June 1996. The MM5 results ...

Darko Kora?in; Clive E. Dorman

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sensitivity of the Arctic Climate to Leads in a Coupled Atmosphere-Mixed Layer Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic sea ice code in a coupled atmosphere-mixed layer ocean GCM has been altered to allow the presence of open water within an ice pack (leads) and a prescribed turbulent oceanic heat flux at the ice bottom. Two experiments with the ...

Stephen J. Vavrus

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

GPS/STORM—GPS Sensing of Atmospheric Water Vapor for Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric water vapor was measured with six Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for 1 month at sites in Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma. During the time of the experiment from 7 May to 2 June 1993, the area experienced severe weather. The ...

Christian Rocken; Teresa Van Hove; James Johnson; Fred Solheim; Randolph Ware; Mike Bevis; Steve Chiswell; Steve Businger

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mean Climate and Variability of the Atmosphere and Ocean on an Aquaplanet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments are described that pertain to the climate of a coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice system in the absence of land, driven by modern-day orbital and CO2 forcing. Millennial time-scale simulations yield a mean state in which ice caps ...

John Marshall; David Ferreira; J-M. Campin; Daniel Enderton

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Intercomparison of Nocturnal Lower-Atmospheric Structure Observed with Lidar and Sodar Techniques at Pune, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coordinated experiments to study the nocturnal lower atmosphere were conducted on selected nights during April?August 1991 using an argon ion lidar and a Doppler sodar at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (18°32?N, 73°51?E, 559 m ...

P. C. S. Devara; P. Ernest Raj; B. S. Murthy; G. Pandithurai; S. Sharma; K. G. Vernekar

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Highly enriched multiply-labeled stable isotopic compounds as atmospheric tracers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds multiply-labeled with stable isotopes and highly enriched in these isotopes are readily capable of detection in tracer experiments involving high dilutions. Thus, for example, /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ provides a useful tracer for following atmospheric pol lution produced as a result of fossil fuel burning. (Official Gazette)

Goldblatt, M.; McInteer, B.B.

1974-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Experiment to Characterize Tropical Cloud Systems  

SciTech Connect

A major experiment to study tropical convective cloud systems and their impacts will take place around Darwin, Northern Australia in early 2006. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) is a collaboration including the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) and ARM-UAV programs, NASA centers, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, and universities in the USA, Australia, Japan, the UK, and Canada. TWP-ICE will be preceded in November/December 2004 by a collaborating European aircraft campaign involving the EU SCOUT-O3 and UK NERC ACTIVE projects. Detailed atmospheric measurements will be made in the Darwin area through the whole Austral summer, giving unprecedented coverage through the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods.

May, Peter T.; Mather, Jim H.; Jakob, Christian

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Lake Baikal neutrino experiment: selected results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the present status of the lake Baikal Neutrino Experiment and present selected physical results gained with the consequetive stages of the stepwise increasing detector: from NT-36 to NT-96. Results cover atmospheric muons, neutrino events, very high energy neutrinos, search for neutrino events from WIMP annihilation, search for magnetic monopoles and environmental studies. We also describe an air Cherenkov array developed for the study of angular resolution of NT-200.

BAIKAL Collaboration; V. Balkanov

2000-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Synoptic Reorganization of Atmospheric Flow during the Last Glacial Maximum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled global atmosphere–ocean model of intermediate complexity is used to study the influence of glacial boundary conditions on the atmospheric circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum in a systematical manner. A web of atmospheric ...

Flávio Justino; Axel Timmermann; Ute Merkel; Enio P. Souza

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The NCAR Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) facility developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will support observational research on the structure of the atmospheric surface layer. ASTER will provide state-...

J. A. Businger; W. F. Dabberdt; A. C. Delany; T. W. Horst; C. L. Martin; S. P. Oncley; S. R. Semmer

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Estimating the Meridional Energy Transports in the Atmosphere and Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The poleward energy transports in the atmosphere–ocean system are estimated for the annual mean and the four seasons based on satellite measurements of the net radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, atmospheric transports of energy at ...

B. C. Carissimo; A. H. Oort; T. H. Vonder Haar

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Biogenic Hydrocarbons in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this ...

J. D. Fuentes; L. Gu; M. Lerdau; R. Atkinson; D. Baldocchi; J. W. Bottenheim; P. Ciccioli; B. Lamb; C. Geron; A. Guenther; T. D. Sharkey; W. Stockwell

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Vacillations in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a 35-year integration of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Both ocean and atmosphere are two-level, nonlinear primitive equations models. The global atmospheric model is forced by a steady, zonally symmetric Newtonian ...

Paul S. Schopf; Max J. Suarez

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formulation to include prognostic atmospheric layers in offline surface schemes is derived from atmospheric equations. Whereas multilayer schemes developed previously need a complex coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme ...

Valéry Masson; Yann Seity

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Homoclinic Dynamics: A Scenario for Atmospheric Ultralow-Frequency Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a link will be established between atmospheric ultralow-frequency variability (ULFV) and the occurrence of homoclinic dynamics in models of large-scale atmospheric flow. It is known that uncoupled atmosphere models possess ...

Daan T. Crommelin

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

357

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program DOESC-ARM...

358

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this room ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH -RECEIVED •I.AWSSKCEDIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTMass and Composition of Aerosol as a Function of Time,

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part II: Atmospheric Transient Adjustment and Its Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical mechanisms underlying the transient circulation adjustment in the extratropical atmosphere after the instantaneous doubling of carbon dioxide are investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere ...

Yutian Wu; Richard Seager; Tiffany A. Shaw; Mingfang Ting; Naomi Naik

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

362

Atmospheric considerations for central receiver power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of the effects of atmospheric attenuation, turbulent scattering, and the use of cooling towers on the performance of solar thermal central receiver power plants.

Henderson, R.G.; Pitter, R.L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Spectral Preconditioners for Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The elliptic problems in semi-implicit nonhydrostatic atmospheric models are difficult. Typically, they are poorly conditioned, nonseparable, contain cross-derivative terms, and are often nonsymmetric. Here, the resulting linear system is solved ...

Stephen J. Thomas; Joshua P. Hacker; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz; Roland B. Stull

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Toward a Fully Lagrangian Atmospheric Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved treatment of advection is essential for atmospheric transport and chemistry models. Eulerian treatments are generally plagued with instabilities, unrealistic negative constituent values, diffusion, and dispersion errors. A higher-...

Jahrul M. Alam; John C. Lin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Filtering of Gravity Modes in Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of gravity modes in atmospheric model predictions is assessed quantitatively by comparing integrations with a normal mode initialized primitive equation model and its corresponding pseudogeostrophic form to document some generally ...

F. Baer; J. J. Tribbia

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Stochastic Dynamics of the Midlatitude Atmospheric Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The innate tendency of the background straining field of the midlatitude atmospheric jet to preferentially amplify a subset of disturbances produces a characteristic response to stochastic perturbation whether the perturbations are internally ...

Brian F. Farrell; Peteros J. Ioannou

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Removal of Atmospheric Effects prom AVHRR Albedos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on numerical simulations, coefficients are determined to be used in a linear relationship between clear-sky planetary albedo and surface albedo. Thew coefficients are given as functions of solar zenith angle and atmospheric parameters for ...

Peter Koepke

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Exploring Atmospheric Aerosols by Twilight Photometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instrument twilight photometer was designed, developed, and installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India (18°43?N, 73°51?E), to monitor the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols. The instrument, based ...

B. Padma Kumari; S. H. Kulkarni; D. B. Jadhav; A. L. Londhe; H. K. Trimbake

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Carbon Dioxide Variability and Atmospheric Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly values of the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) formed the basis for an investigation of concentration fluctuations on daily to monthly time scales. In agreement with earlier studies we found no ...

James C. Sadler; Colin S. Ramage; Arnold M. Hori

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Potential Vorticity in a Moist Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential vorticity principle for a nonhydrostatic, moist, precipitating atmosphere is derived. An appropriate generalization of the well-known (dry) Ertel potential vorticity is found to be P = ??1(2? + × u)?·???, where ? is the total ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Scott A. Hausman; Matthew Garcia; Katsuyuki V. Ooyama; Hung-Chi Kuo

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nonlinear Atmospheric Adjustment to Thermal Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear, numerical model of a compressible atmosphere is used to simulate the hydrostatic and geostrophic adjustment to a localized prescribed heating applied over five minutes with a size characteristic of an isolated, deep, cumulus cloud. ...

Paul F. Fanelli; Peter R. Bannon

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Effect of Nonlinearity on Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear limit of two-dimensional gravity waves in an incompressible, inviscid and stably stratified atmosphere is studied. The three-wave resonant interaction theory indicates an energy cascade from a vertically propagating wave (...

Mostafa M. Ibrahim

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Shear Excitation of Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unstable Velocity shears are a Common source of vertically propagating gravity waves in the atmosphere. However, the growth rates of unstable modes predicted by linear theory cannot always amount for their observed importance.

David C. Fritts

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dynamic Stabilization of Atmospheric Single Column Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single column models (SCMs) provide an economical framework for assessing the sensitivity of atmospheric temperature and humidity to natural and imposed perturbations, and also for developing improved representations of diabatic processes in ...

John W. Bergman; Prashant D. Sardeshmukh

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Intraseasonal Variability in a Dry Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long integration of a primitive equation dry atmospheric model with time-independent forcing under boreal winter conditions is analyzed. A variety of techniques such as time filtering, space–time spectral analysis, and lag regressions are used ...

Hai Lin; Gilbert Brunet; Jacques Derome

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Atmospheric Mesoscale Dispersion Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mesoscale dispersion modeling system (MDMS) described herein is under development as a simulation tool to investigate atmospheric flow and pollution dispersion over complex terrain for domains up to several hundred kilometers. The system ...

Marek Uliasz

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Atmospheric Entropy. Part I: Climate Dissipation Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric entropy and its association with climate dissipation are investigated. The balance equation for entropy is derived through the mean and transient thermal and moisture equations. The entropy production contains the internal and external ...

Jiangnan Li; Petr Chylek

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Atmospheric Turbidity over Central North Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some 8500 observations of atmospheric turbidity, taken at Raleigh, North Carolina from July 1969 to July 1975 are analyzed for within-day and day-to-day variations and their dependence on meteorological parameters. The annual average turbidity of ...

James T. Peterson; Edwin C. Flowers; Guillermo J. Berri; Cheryl L. Reynolds; John H. Rudisill

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Meteorological Tracer Techniques for Parameterizing Atmospheric Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tracer materials have been used in atmospheric dispersion studies for decades, basic information about meteorological tracer techniques is scattered among a number of different sources. This paper attempts to pull together this ...

Warren B. Johnson

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Linear Baroclinic Instability in the Martian Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear baroclinic instability of zonal-mean flows like those in the wintertime Martian atmosphere under both relatively nondusty and highly dusty conditions is examined using a spherical quasi-geostrophic model. The basic states are idealized,...

Jeffrey R. Barnes

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

State-Space Modeling for Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different aspect concerning the state-space modeling for atmospheric pollution are dealt with separately in this paper: (i) the treatment of the advection-diffusion equation and (ii) the use of time series analysis.

E. Hernández; F. Martín; F. Valero

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Resonant Planetary Waves in a Spherical Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global model of planetary wave propagation in a spherical atmosphere is used to examine the spectrum of free or resonant planetary waves of the solstitial stratosphere. These free modes are located by forcing the model with a weak periodic ...

Mark R. Schoeberl; John H. E. Clark

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Flywheel Effect in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the requirement of geostrophic balance, mechanical inertia can affect the thermal response of the atmosphere to transient heating. We examine some very simple linear models of this “flywheel effect,” and discuss their possible ...

Roelof K. Snieder; Stephen B. Fels

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Atmosphere–Ocean Modeling Exploiting Fluid Isomorphisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical isomorphisms between the hydrostatic equations that govern the evolution of a compressible atmosphere and an incompressible ocean are described and exploited to guide the design of a hydrodynamical kernel for simulation of either ...

John Marshall; Alistair Adcroft; Jean-Michel Campin; Chris Hill; Andy White

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Basic Meteorological Observations for Schools: Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article addresses measurement of atmospheric surface pressure using economical instruments. It is intended to provide members of the Society with a ready reference to respond to inquiries from earth and physical science teachers at the ...

John T. Snow; Michelle E. Akridge; Shawn B. Harley

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development is described of a Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS)—the result of a cooperative project to collect global weather observations taken near the ocean's surface since 1854, primarily from merchant ships, into a compact and ...

Scott D. Woodruff; Ralph J. Slutz; Roy L. Jenne; Peter M. Steurer

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Ballistic Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence on munition target scatter are determined from numerical simulations of ballistic trajectories through many realizations of realistic simulated turbulent wind fields. A technique is evaluated for correcting ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Charles Clough; Michael Padovani; Kelly Fling; Ward Boughers; W. Scott Walton

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Mars Atmosphere Pressure Periodicities from Viking Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first martian year of pressure data taken by the Viking landers on Mars is subjected to power spectrum analysis. The analysis suggests that strong periodicities are present in the martian atmosphere, especially at the high-latitude (48°N) ...

R. D. Sharman; J. A. Ryan

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Profiling atmospheric aerosols | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a number of instruments that use low power lasers (the instrument is called Micropulse Lidar, MPL) to measure the turbidity of the atmosphere above the ground. For the first time,...

390

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

www.biogeosciences.net/7/121/2010/ © Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From biota to chemistry and climate: towards a comprehensive description of trace gas exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere

A. Arneth; S. Sitch; A. Bondeau; K. Butterbach-bahl; P. Foster; N. Gedney; N. De Noblet-ducoudré; I. C. Prentice; K. Thonicke; R. Wania; S. Zaehle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Quantum light in the turbulent atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonclassical properties of light propagating through the turbulent atmosphere are studied. We demonstrate by numerical simulation that the probability distribution of the transmission coefficient, which characterizes the effects of the atmosphere on the quantum state of light, can be reconstructed by homodyne detection. Nonclassical photon-statistics and, more generally, nonclassical Glauber-Sudarshan functions appear to be more robust against turbulence for weak light fields rather than for bright ones.

A. A. Semenov; W. Vogel

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Land Surface Heterogeneity in the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97). Part I: Comparing Modeled Surface Flux Maps with Surface-Flux Tower and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface heterogeneity over an area of 71 km × 74 km in the lower Walnut River watershed, Kansas, was investigated using models and measurements from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) field experiment. As an ...

Fei Chen; David N. Yates; Haruyasu Nagai; Margaret A. LeMone; Kyoko Ikeda; Robert L. Grossman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Atmospheric Response to a Thermohaline Circulation Collapse: Scaling Relations for the Hadley Circulation and the Response in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the tropical atmosphere to a collapse of the thermohaline circulation (THC) is investigated by comparing two 5-member ensemble runs with a coupled climate model (CCM), the difference being that in one ensemble a hosing experiment ...

Sybren S. Drijfhout

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Impact of Initial Soil Moisture Anomalies on Subsequent Precipitation over North America in the Coupled Land–Atmosphere Model CAM3–CLM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the impact of anomalous soil moisture conditions on subsequent precipitation over North America, a series of numerical experiments is performed using a modified version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 and the Community ...

Yeonjoo Kim; Guiling Wang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Delineating the Eddy–Zonal Flow Interaction in the Atmospheric Circulation Response to Climate Forcing: Uniform SST Warming in an Idealized Aquaplanet Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms of the atmospheric response to climate forcing are analyzed using an example of uniform SST warming in an idealized aquaplanet model. A 200-member ensemble of experiments is conducted with an instantaneous uniform SST warming. The ...

Gang Chen; Jian Lu; Lantao Sun

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mechanisms of Low Cloud–Climate Feedback in Idealized Single-Column Simulations with the Community Atmospheric Model, Version 3 (CAM3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the physical mechanism of low cloud feedback in the Community Atmospheric Model, version 3 (CAM3) through idealized single-column model (SCM) experiments over the subtropical eastern oceans. Negative cloud feedback is ...

Minghua Zhang; Christopher Bretherton

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

Howcroft, Caius L.F.; /Cambridge U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Nature Bulletin No. 554-A February 15, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF OUR ATMOSPHERE In Bulletin No. 542-A we described the atmosphere that surrounds the earth, held there by the pull of gravity, including the canopy of air immediately above us. That canopy is responsible for our weather and climates, shields us from the killing rays of the sun, and furnishes substances necessary for all life: oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Astronomers believe that none of the other planets -- excepting Mars, perhaps -- has an atmosphere anything like ours. The principal elements, free nitrogen (78 percent) and free oxygen (21 percent), apparently are rare in the universe. On the other hand, the earth's atmosphere contains only traces of free hydrogen and helium -- the two lightest gases -- whereas they are by far the most common elements elsewhere in the universe.

400

UPPER ATMOSPHERE RE-ENTRY STUDY HIGH ALTITUDE BURNUP. VOLUME II  

SciTech Connect

Methods of determining the fate of radioactive fuels in space power units burned up on re-entry into the earth's atmosphere are reviewed. Particulate characteristics experiments were derived from an analytical study on the ablation of Dlutonium fuel. This study revealed that the particulate size distribution resulting on re-entry burnup is a function of: the fuel form in use and the material velocity and atmospheric density at the time the fuel is exposed. The particulate fate experiments were derived essentially from studies of the effects of thermal and turbulent diffusion, and wind and gravity dispersion on the particulate cloud. The experiments recommended are described. (M.C.G.)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The CERES/ARM/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) for the Retrieval of Radiative Fluxes with Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES/...

Thomas P. Charlock; Timothy L. Alberta

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Virtual Towers Using Coherent Doppler Lidar during the Joint Urban 2003 Dispersion Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) atmospheric field experiment in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, of July 2003, lidar teams from Arizona State University and the Army Research Laboratory collaborated to perform intersecting range–height indicator ...

R. Calhoun; R. Heap; M. Princevac; R. Newsom; H. Fernando; D. Ligon

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Supporting Meteorological Field Experiment Missions and Postmission Analysis with Satellite Digital Data and Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric and oceanographic field experiments are an important part of research programs aimed at enhancing observational analyses of meteorological and oceanic phenomena, validating new datasets, and/or supporting hypotheses. The Bulletin of the ...

Jeffrey Hawkins; Christopher Velden

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Summer Drought in Northern Midlatitudes in a Time-Dependent CO2 Climate Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent climate-change experiment with a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model has been used to study changes in the occurrence of drought in summer in southern Europe and central North America. In both regions, ...

J. M. Gregory; J. F. B. Mitchell; A. J. Brady

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Solar Tides as Revealed by Measurements of Mesosphere Temperature by the MLS Experiment on UARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperatures between 25 and 86 km measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are analyzed to delineate diurnal, semidiurnal, and terdiurnal tidal structures and stationary planetary ...

Jeffrey M. Forbes; Dong Wu

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

3D atmospheric modeling based on MODTRAN4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All the factors of atmospheric environment that influence the transmission of infrared radiation were analyzed in detail in the paper. Taking horizontally varying atmospheric property into consideration, a 3D model of atmospheric transmission of infrared ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, infrared radiation, model, path radiation, ratio of atmospheric transmission, simulation, single scatter solar radiation

Ge Li; Zhifeng Lu; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

408

Guam Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

409

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

410

Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data Management System  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The FACE projects were part of the CO2 research network fostered by the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Results from the experiment contribute to the Terrestrial Ecosystem Response to Atmospheric and Climatic Change (TERACC) project, a 5-year initiative integrating experimental data and global change modeling.

411

LBA–ESECAFLOR Artificially Induced Drought in Caxiuanã Reserve, Eastern Amazonia: Soil Properties and Litter Spider Fauna  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is presented of soil properties and litter fauna of an experimental site in the Caxiuanã forest, eastern Amazonia, as a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). This study’s main scientific goal ...

Maria de Lourdes Pinheiro Ruivo; José Augusto Pereira Barreiros; Alexandre Bragio Bonaldo; Rosecélia Moreira da Silva; Leonardo Deane Abreu Sá; Elessandra Laura Nogueira Lopes

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Perfromance analysis of the Parallel Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient execution of parallel applications requires insight into how the parallel system features impact the performance of the application. Significant experimental analysis and the development of performance models enhance the understanding of such an impact. Deep understanding of an application’s major kernels and their design leads to a better understanding of the application’s performance, and hence, leads to development of better performance models. The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the latest in a series of global atmospheric models developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) as a community tool for NCAR and the university research community. This work focuses on analyzing CAM and understanding the impact of different architectures on this application. In the analysis of CAM, kernel coupling, which quantifies the interaction between adjacent and chains of kernels in an application, is used. All experiments are conducted on four parallel platforms: NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center) Seaborg, SDSC (San Diego Supercomputer Center) DataStar P655, DataStar P690 and PSC (Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center) Lemieux. Experimental results indicate that kernel coupling gave an insight into many of the application characteristics. One important characteristic of CAM is that its performance is heavily dependent on a parallel platform memory hierarchy; different cache sizes and different cache policies had the major effect on CAM’s performance. Also, coupling values showed that although CAM’s kernels share many data structures, most of the coupling values are still destructive (i.e., interfering with each other so as to adversely affect performance). The kernel coupling results helps developers in pointing out the bottlenecks in memory usage in CAM. The results obtained from processor partitioning are significant in helping CAM users in choosing the right platform to run CAM.

Shawky Sharkawi, Sameh Sherif

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Release of ethanol to the atmosphere during use of consumer cleaning products  

SciTech Connect

Liquid laundry and hand dish washing detergents contain volatile organic compounds, including ethanol, that may be liberated during use and contribute to photochemical air pollution. In this study, the release of ethanol to the atmosphere during simulated household use of liquid detergents was measured. Three replicate experiments, plus a blank, were conducted in a 20-m{sup 3} environmental chamber for each of four conditions: typical dish washing (DT), high-release dish washing (DH), typical laundry (LT), and high-release laundry (LH). Average amounts of ethanol transferred to the atmosphere per use (and the fraction of ethanol used so liberated) were 32 mg (0.038) for DT, 100 mg (0.049) for DH, 18 mg (0.002) for LT, and 110 mg (0.011) for LH. Thus, a large fraction of the ethanol added to wash solutions with liquid detergents is discharged to the sewer rather than transferred to the atmosphere during use.

Wooley, J.; Nazaroff, W.W. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA)); Hodgson, A.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

415

EXPERIMENTS MODEL PK-101  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Quizzes 3 Introduction to Basic Components 4 Experiment #1: The Light Bulb 8 More About Resistors 10 Detector 17 Introduction to Capacitors 18 Experiment #8: Slow Light Bulb 20 Experiment #9: Small Dominates Light Bulbs 26 Introduction to Transistors 27 Experiment #14: The Electronic Switch 28 Experiment #15

Kachroo, Pushkin

416

Analysis of Radiosonde and Ground-Based Remotely Sensed PWV Data from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 9 March–9 April 2004, the North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment was conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s (ARM) “Great White” field site near Barrow, Alaska. The major goals of the experiment ...

V. Mattioli; E. R. Westwater; D. Cimini; J. C. Liljegren; B. M. Lesht; S. I. Gutman; F. J. Schmidlin

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

418

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

419

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

420

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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421

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

422

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

423

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Combined potential of future long-baseline and reactor experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the determination of neutrino oscillation parameters by experiments within the next ten years. The potential of conventional beam experiments (MINOS, ICARUS, OPERA), superbeam experiments (T2K, NOvA), and reactor experiments (D-CHOOZ) to improve the precision on the ``atmospheric'' parameters $\\Delta m^2_{31}$, $\\theta_{23}$, as well as the sensitivity to $\\theta_{13}$ are discussed. Further, we comment on the possibility to determine the leptonic CP-phase and the neutrino mass hierarchy if $\\theta_{13}$ turns out to be large.

P. Huber; M. Lindner; M. Rolinec; T. Schwetz; W. Winter

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

425

Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect

In December 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established a Center of Excellence (Hyperspectral-Multispectral Algorithm Research Center, HyMARC) for promoting the research and development of algorithms to exploit spectral imagery. This center is located at the DOE Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, and is operated for the DOE by Bechtel Nevada. This paper presents the results to date of a research project begun at the center during 1998 to investigate the correction of hyperspectral data for atmospheric aerosols. Results of a project conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology to define, implement, and test procedures for absolute calibration and correction of hyperspectral data to absolute units of high spectral resolution imagery will be presented. Hybrid techniques for atmospheric correction using image or spectral scene data coupled through radiative propagation models will be specifically addressed. Results of this effort to analyze HYDICE sensor data will be included. Preliminary results based on studying the performance of standard routines, such as Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption and Nonlinear Least Squares Spectral Fit, in retrieving reflectance spectra show overall reflectance retrieval errors of approximately one to two reflectance units in the 0.4- to 2.5-micron-wavelength region (outside of the absorption features). These results are based on HYDICE sensor data collected from the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site during overflights conducted in July of 1997. Results of an upgrade made in the model-based atmospheric correction techniques, which take advantage of updates made to the moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance model (MODTRAN 4.0) software, will also be presented. Data will be shown to demonstrate how the reflectance retrieval in the shorter wavelengths of the blue-green region will be improved because of enhanced modeling of multiple scattering effects.

R. J. Pollina

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Routine Releases from LLNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95% confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Groups of the International Atomic Energy Agency's programs, Biosphere Modeling and Assessment and Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

Peterson, S R

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Relesed to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Chronic Releases from LLNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95th percentile confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Biosphere Modeling and Assessment Programme. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

Peterson, S

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

429

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

430

Atmospheric Pressure Low Current Plasma for Syngas Production from Alcohol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract – Atmospheric pressure low current arc discharge between graphite electrodes with conical geometry in liquid ethanol/water mixture was investigated. Syngas production was demonstrated over large experimental conditions. In this paper we focus on discharge aspects. It is shown from pictures that the behavior of low current arc discharge with consumable electrodes represents non-stationary plasma. The energetic properties of plasmas can be used to carry out many applications, particularly in discharge based systems. Recently, research interest focuses on the Non Thermal Plasma (NTP) treatment of hydrocarbons, alcohol, or biomass aimed to improve the yield of synthetic gas (syngas: H2+CO) production at low cost [1, 4]. Experiments were performed on a plasma reactor consisting of two graphite electrodes with conical shape

Ahmed Khacef; Khadija Arabi; Olivier Aubry; Jean Marie Cormier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Operating Experience and Risk Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in ultra super-critical (USC) pulverized coal (PC) and atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) plants provide the base line competition for the newer clean coal technologies (CCTs). Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) are examples of CCTs now accumulating commercial experience.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

432

Operating Experience and Risk Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies -- 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in ultra-supercritical (USC) pulverized coal (PC) and atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) plants provide the baseline competition for the newer clean coal technologies (CCTs). Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) are examples of CCTs now accumulating commercial experience.

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

433

A comparison of the Monte Carlo and the flux gradient method for atmospheric diffusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to model the dispersal of atmospheric pollutants in the planetary boundary layer, various methods of parameterizing turbulent diffusion have been employed. The purpose of this paper is to use a three-dimensional particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model to compare the Markov chain (Monte Carlo) method of statistical particle diffusion with the deterministic flux gradient (K-theory) method. The two methods are heavily used in the study of atmospheric diffusion under complex conditions, with the Monte Carlo method gaining in popularity partly because of its more direct application of turbulence parameters. The basis of comparison is a data set from night-time drainage flow tracer experiments performed by the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program at the Geysers geothermal region in northern California. The Atmospheric Diffusion Particle-In-Cell (ADPIC) model used is the main model in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory emergency response program: Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC). As a particle model, it can simulate diffusion in both the flux gradient and Monte Carlo modes. 9 refs., 6 figs.

Lange, R.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A comparison of atmospheric transport considerations in eastern and western oil shale operations  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric transport represents one of the critically important pathways for the distribution of pollutants from any oil shale operation. Our experience in studying eastern and western shale resources and operation suggest many common features regarding the atmospheric domain, but also many significant differences. Any issue of atmospheric transport and dispersion can be broken down into major elements: source factors which include the spatial and temporal distribution of pollutant sources as well as their chemical and physical characteristics, boundary conditions which include the character of the underlying surface as a lower boundary and the large scale meteorological circulations as an ''upper'' boundary; and meteorological structure is the resulting wind, temperature, moisture, and turbulence environment in the volume of air occupied by emitted material in an atmosphere subjected to the boundary conditions described above. For purposes of planning an industry, we want to be able to reliably model the atmospheric structure on a variety of time and space scales and the subsequent distribution of pollutants. This paper discusses differences in modeling concepts and results in the separate environments of eastern and western oil shale resources. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Barr, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Potential Impact of Atmospheric Releases at Russian Far East Nuclear Submarine Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ''Assessment of the Impact of Russian Nuclear Fleet Operations on Far Eastern Coastal Regions'' is being performed as part of the Radiation Safety of the Biosphere Project (RAD) of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) of Laxenburg, Austria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive unclassified analysis of the potential impact of accidents at the Russian Far East nuclear submarine sites near Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk. We have defined the situation there based upon available information and studies commissioned by RAD in collaboration with Russian research institutes including Russian Research Center-''Kurchatov Institute'', Institute of Northern Environmental Problems and Lazurit Central Design Bureau. Further, in our original work, some in collaboration with the staff of the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, we have calculated the nuclide trajectories from these sites in the atmospheric boundary layer, less than 1.5 kilometers high, and determined their probability of crossing any of the nearby countries as well as Asiatic Russia. We have further determined the concentrations in each of these crossings as well as the total, dry and wet depositions of nuclides on these areas. Finally, we have calculated the doses to the Japanese Island population from typical winter airflow patterns (those most likely to cross the Islands in the minimum times), strong north winds, weak north winds and cyclonic winds for conditions similar to the Chazhma Bay criticality accident (fresh fuel) and for a criticality accident for the same type of reactor with fuel being withdrawn (spent fuel). The maximum individual committed dosages were less than 2 x 10-7 and 2 x 10-3 mSv, respectively. The long-term external doses by radionuclides deposited on the ground and the internal doses by consumption of foods were not evaluated as it is believed that such doses can be avoided by social controls. In other calculations taking these longer term doses into account and determining the sum of the maximum individual committed dosages (SMICD), we found for each of the surrounding countries to be less than 1 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv. For releases from the Petropavlovsk sites the (SMICD) for each of the surrounding countries is less than 0.3 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv.

Parker, F.; Mahura, A.; Compton, K.; Brown, K.; Takano, M.; Novikov, V.; Soerensen, J. H.; Baklanov, A.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

436

Operating Experience Summaries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operating Experience Summaries The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information...

437

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments S. Bottone and S. Moore Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction Quality Measurement Experiments (QME) are a special class of Value-Added Products (VAP). QMEs add value to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program datastreams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of incoming data based on internal consistency checks, comparisons between independent similar measurements, or comparisons between measurements and modeled results. Like any datastream, QME datastreams need to be checked for data quality. For each QME, we analyze a representative sample of files from the ARM data archive to determine 'typical' values of the QME variables. We then design outlier tests, specific to each variable, to be applied to

438

Neutrino Oscillation Experiments at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper I give an overview of the status of neutrino oscillation experiments performed using nuclear reactors as sources of neutrinos. I review the present generation of experiments (Chooz and Palo Verde) with baselines of about 1 km as well as the next generation that will search for oscillations with a baseline of about 100 km. While the present detectors provide essential input towards the understanding of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, in the future, the KamLAND reactor experiment represents our best opportunity to study very small mass neutrino mixing in laboratory conditions. In addition KamLAND with its very large fiducial mass and low energy threshold, will also be sensitive to a broad range of different physics.

Giorgio Gratta

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

Influence of 21st century atmospheric and sea surface temperature forcing on West African climate  

SciTech Connect

he persistence of extended drought events throughout West Africa during the 20th century has motivated a substantial effort to understand the mechanisms driving African climate variability, as well as the possible response to elevated greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. We use an ensemble of global climate model experiments to examine the relative roles of future direct atmospheric radiative forcing and SST forcing in shaping potential future changes in boreal summer precipitation over West Africa. We find that projected increases in precipitation throughout the Western Sahel result primarily from direct atmospheric radiative forcing. The changes in atmospheric forcing generate a slight northward displacement and weakening of the African easterly jet (AEJ), a strengthening of westward monsoon flow onto West Africa and an intensification of the tropical easterly jet (TEJ). Alternatively, we find that the projected decreases in precipitation over much of the Guinea Coast region are caused by SST changes that are induced by the atmospheric radiative forcing. The changes in SSTs generate a weakening of the monsoon westerlies and the TEJ, as well as a decrease in low-level convergence and resultant rising air throughout the mid levels of the troposphere. Our experiments suggest a potential shift in the regional moisture balance of West Africa should global radiative forcing continue to increase, highlighting the importance of climate system feedbacks in shaping the response of regional-scale climate to global-scale changes in radiative forcing.

Skinner, Chris B [Stanford University; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Experiments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Physics News Image Bank Fermilab in the News Quantum Diaries In this Section: Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Experiments at the Cosmic Frontier How...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Atmospheric Gravity Waves and Aircraft Turbulence Encounters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe aircraft turbulence-atmospheric gravity wave events which occurred during a 2-day period over the Continental Divide. The waves are observed by two microbarograph networks an each side of the divide and last for several hours at a ...

A. J. Bedard Jr.; F. Canavero; F. Einaudi

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Heat Budget of Tropical Ocean and Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat budget estimates for the global tropics are derived from recent calculations of the oceanic heat budget and satellite measurements of net radiation at the top of the atmosphere. Annual mean heat export from the zone 30°N–30°S amounts to 101 ...

Stefan Hastenrath

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Temperature stratification of the atmosphere of Arcturus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief overview of the results of the investigations of the red giant star Arcturus is given. One-dimensional LTE modeling of the atmospheres of Arcturus and the Sun as a star is carried out on the basis of synthesis of the extended wings of the H and K Ca II lines. It is found that the local continuum in this spectral region is underestimated by an average of 12% in the atlases of Arcturus. The average deficit in UV absorption amounts to 43% for Arcturus whereas it is 9% for the Sun. For Arcturus the correction factor to the continuum opacity at the wavelengths of 390.0, 392.5, 395.0, 398.0, and 400.0 nm equals 2.20, 1.90, 1.70, 1.55, and 1.45. The model atmosphere of Arcturus obtained from the best-fit of the wings of the H and K Ca II lines corresponds to the model atmosphere with the fundamental parameters T_eff = 4286 K, log g = 1.66, and [Fe/H]=-0.52 derived by Ramirez and Allende Prieto (2011). The temperature stratification of Arcturus' atmosphere is presented in tabular form. To obtain more accurate...

Sheminova, V A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Atmospheric Heat Engines on Earth and Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The character of the Earth's atmospheric heat engine depends, inter alia, on the relatively tight linkage between surface fluxes of energy and of H20. On Mars, on the other hand, H2O-based latent heat fluxes are only a trivial fraction of total ...

J. R. Philip

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Analysis methods for Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three different analysis techniques for Atmospheric Imaging System are presented. The classical Hillas parameters based technique is shown to be robust and efficient, but more elaborate techniques can improve the sensitivity of the analysis. A comparison of the different analysis techniques shows that they use different information for gamma-hadron separation, and that it is possible to combine their qualities.

Mathieu de Naurois

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

446

Profiling Atmospheric Water Vapor by Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended Kaiman-Bucy filter ...

J. R. Wang; J. L. King; T. T. Wilheit; G. Szejwach; L. H. Gesell; R. A. Nieman; D. S. Niver; B. M. Krupp; J. A. Gagliano

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Baroclinic Modons as Prototypes for Atmospheric Blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-layer quasi-geostrophic channel model on a ?-plane is used to investigate the properties of dipole eddies which may be relevant models for atmospheric blocking. It is shown that quasi-stationary equivalent barotropic dipole eddies, similar ...

K. Haines

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Accuracy of Atmospheric Energy Budgets from Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Issues relevant to achieving an accuracy of better than 10 W m?2 on 250-km scales for monthly means in the atmospheric energy balance are explored from the standpoint of the formulation and computational procedures using the National Centers for ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; David P. Stepaniak; Julie M. Caron

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Mathematics of Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gaussian plume model is a standard approach for studying the transport of airborne contaminants due to turbulent diffusion and advection by the wind. This paper reviews the assumptions underlying the model, its derivation from the advection-diffusion ... Keywords: Gaussian plume solution, advection-diffusion equation, atmospheric dispersion, contaminant transport, inverse problem, linear least squares

John M. Stockie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction The shape of the diurnal cycle of atmospheric downwelling radiation is an important climatic feature of cloud-radiation interactions and atmospheric properties. Adequate characterization of this diurnal cycle is critical for accurate determination of monthly and seasonal radiation budgets from a limited data sampling. This is especially important for establishing the optimal sampling and temporal interpolation schemes employed in satellite radiation budget missions, such as Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB), and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System

451

Seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect: The role of changes in atmospheric temperatures and humidities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of the factors which control the seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect, based on satellite observations and radiative transfer simulations. The satellite observations include the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and the total column moisture content derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager. The simulations were performed with the SAMSON system described in an earlier paper, using atmospheric temperatures and humidities from operational analyses produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. At low latitudes, the magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is dominated by the strong thermodynamic link between the total column moisture content of the atmosphere and sea surface temperatures, with minimal seasonal variations. In contrast, at middle to high latitudes there are strong seasonal variations, the clear-sky greenhouse effect being largest in winter and smallest in summer. These variations cannot be explained by the seasonal cycle in the total column moisture content, as this is largest in summer and smallest in winter. The variations are controlled instead by the seasonal changes in atmospheric temperatures. The colder atmosphere in winter enhances the temperature differential between the atmosphere and the sea surface, leading to a larger greenhouse effect despite the lower moisture contents. The magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is thus controlled by atmospheric humidity at low latitudes, but by atmospheric temperature at middle and high latitudes. These controls are illustrated by results from sensitivity experiments with SAMSON and are interpreted in terms of a simple model.

Webb, M.J.; Slingo, A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stephens, G.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Atmosphere Feedbacks during ENSO in a Coupled GCM with a Modified Atmospheric Convection Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The too diverse representation of ENSO in a coupled GCM limits one’s ability to describe future change of its properties. Several studies pointed to the key role of atmosphere feedbacks in contributing to this diversity. These feedbacks are ...

Eric Guilyardi; Pascale Braconnot; Fei-Fei Jin; Seon Tae Kim; Michel Kolasinski; Tim Li; Ionela Musat

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Atmospheric Energetics in the Wavelet Domain. Part II: Time-Averaged Observed Atmospheric Blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelet energetics (WE) is a useful generalization of traditional wavenumber energetics, for analyzing atmospheric dynamics. WE is doubly indexed by wavenumber band j and location k. The interpretation is that 2 to the jth power is proportional ...

Aimé Fournier

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Characteristics of Atmospheric Transport Using Three Numerical Formulations for Atmospheric Dynamics in a Single GCM Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of a number of important archetypical tracer problems to the numerical method used to solve the equations of tracer transport and atmospheric dynamics. The tracers' scenarios were constructed to exercise the ...

Philip J. Rasch; Danielle B. Coleman; Natalie Mahowald; David L. Williamson; Shian-Jiann Lin; Byron A. Boville; Peter Hess

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Dust Accelerator Facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA Lunar Institute's Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies has recently completed the construction of a new experimental facility to study hypervelocity dust impacts. The installation includes a 3 MV Pelletron, accelerating small particles in the size range of 0.1 to few microns to velocities in the range of 1 to 100 km/s. Here we report the capabilities of our facility, and the results of our first experiments.

Horanyi, M.; Colette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Robertson, S.; Shu, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X. [NASA Lunar Science Institute Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

456

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

457

Production of SNG from shale oil by catalytic gasification in a steam-hydrogen atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results from experiments performed at the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to produce a substitute natural gas (SNG) from shale oil via catalytic gasification in a steam-hydrogen atmosphere. Also contained is a comparison of the yields of SNG obtained with those from previous experiments performed at LETC in which shale oil was catalytically gasified in a pure hydrogen atmosphere. The maximum yield of gas obtained in the Stream-hydrogen experiments corresponded to 75 wt % of the feed carbon being recovered as gas. This maximum yield was obtained at the highest temperature (1300/sup 0/F (978/sup 0/K)) and hydrogen partial pressure (900 psig (6205 kPa)) tested, while the gas yield for gasification in a pure hydrogen atmosphere was 86 wt % of feed carbon at similar operating conditions. The reduced yield was attributed to poisoning of the cobalt-molybdate catalyst employed by carbon monoxide generated in small amounts from the reaction of steam with carbon and/or hydrocarons in the gasification reactor.

Stagner, M.J.; Barker, L.K.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Solar power tower development: Recent experiences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent experiences with the 10 MW{sub e} Solar Two and the 2.5 MW{sub t} TSA (Technology Program Solar Air Receiver) demonstration plants are reported. The heat transfer fluids used in these solar power towers are molten-nitrate salt and atmospheric air, respectively. Lessons learned and suggested technology improvements for next-generation plants are categorized according to subsystem. The next steps to be taken in the commercialization process for each these new power plant technologies is also presented.

Tyner, C.; Kolb, G.; Prairie, M. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Numerical Study of the Effects of Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence on Wind Turbine Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Although the atmospheric sciences community has been studying the effects of atmospheric stability and surface roughness on the planetary boundary layer for some time, their effects on wind turbine dynamics have not been well studied. In this study, we performed numerical experiments to explore some of the effects of atmospheric stability and surface roughness on wind turbine dynamics. We used large-eddy simulation to create atmospheric winds and compute the wind turbine flows, and we modeled the wind turbines as revolving and flexible actuator lines coupled to a wind turbine structural and system dynamic model. We examined the structural moments about the wind turbine blade, low-speed shaft, and nacelle; power production; and wake evolution when large 5-MW turbines are subjected to winds generated from low- and high-surface roughness levels representative of offshore and onshore conditions, respectively, and also neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. In addition, we placed a second turbine 7 rotor diameters downwind of the first one so that we could explore wake effects under these different conditions. The results show that the turbulent structures generated within the atmospheric boundary layer wind simulations cause isolated loading events at least as significant as when a turbine is waked by an upwind turbine. The root-mean-square (RMS) turbine loads are consistently larger when the surface roughness is higher. The RMS blade-root out-of-plane bending moment and low-speed shaft torque are higher when the atmospheric boundary layer is unstable as compared with when it is neutral. However, the RMS yaw moments are either equal or reduced in the unstable case as compared with the neutral case. For a given surface roughness, the ratio of power produced by the downwind turbine relative to that of the upwind turbine is 15-20% higher when the conditions are unstable as compared with neutral. For a given atmospheric stability, this power ratio is 10% higher with the onshore roughness value versus the offshore one. The main conclusion is that various coherent turbulent structures that form under different levels of atmospheric stability and surface roughness have important effects on wind turbine structural response, power production, and wake evolution.

Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P. J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2004 North Slope of Alaska 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater, M. A. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. J. Gasiewski, T. Uttal, and D. A. Hazen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini Remote Sensing Division, CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Land–Atmosphere Coupling Strength in the Global Forecast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational coupled land–atmosphere forecast model from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is evaluated for the strength and characteristics of its coupling in the water cycle between land and atmosphere. Following the ...

Li Zhang; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Jiangfeng Wei; Zhichang Guo; Cheng-Hsuan Lu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Atmospheric Response to the Gulf Stream: Seasonal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric response to the Gulf Stream front in sea surface temperature is investigated using high-resolution data from satellite observations and operational analysis and forecast. Two types of atmospheric response are observed with ...

Shoshiro Minobe; Masato Miyashita; Akira Kuwano-Yoshida; Hiroki Tokinaga; Shang-Ping Xie

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Adaptive Multilevel Modeling of Land-Atmosphere Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive multilevel methods allow full coupling of atmospheric and land surface hydrological models by preserving consistency between the large-scale (atmospheric) and the regional (land) components. The methodology was investigated for three ...

Ana Paula Barros

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Virtually Dry Snowball Earth Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hadley cell of a virtually dry snowball Earth atmosphere under equinox insolation is studied in a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. In contrast to the Hadley cell of modern Earth, momentum transport by dry convection, which ...

Aiko Voigt; Isaac M. Held; Jochem Marotzke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Evolution Dynamics of Tropical Ocean-Atmosphere Annual Cycle Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of ocean-atmosphere annual cycle variability is extracted from the revised Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set SSTs, surface winds, and the latent heat (LH) and net shortwave (SW) surface fluxes using the covariance-based ...

Sumant Nigam; Yi Chao

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Thermodynamic Foundation for Modeling the Moist Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With advances in numerical modeling of the atmosphere, we have experienced that the return to the first principles of physics often enables a model to cope more easily with the complexities of the real atmosphere. The return to the primitive ...

Katsuyuki V. Ooyama

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Systematic Metastable Atmospheric Regime Identification in an AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the authors apply a recently developed clustering method for the systematic identification of metastable atmospheric regimes in high-dimensional datasets generated by atmospheric models. The novelty of this approach is that it ...

Christian Franzke; Illia Horenko; Andrew J. Majda; Rupert Klein

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Time–Space Distribution of Long-Range Atmospheric Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global three-dimensional structure of long-range (one month to one season) atmospheric predictability was investigated with a general circulation model. The main focus was to ascertain the role of atmospheric initial conditions for such ...

Thomas Reichler; John O. Roads

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Title On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012...

470

The Dry-Entropy Budget of a Moist Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The entropy budget has been a popular starting point for theories of the work, or dissipation, performed by moist atmospheres. For a dry atmosphere, the entropy budget provides a theory for the dissipation in terms of the imposed diabatic heat ...

David M. Romps

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Predictability Associated with Nonlinear Regimes in an Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric regimes are midlatitude flow patterns that persist for periods of time exceeding a few days. Here, the authors analyzed the output of an idealized atmospheric model (QG3) to examine the relationship between regimes and predictability.

John M. Peters; Sergey Kravtsov; Nicholas T. Schwartz

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Acoustic Tomographic Monitoring of the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic tomography is proposed as a method for monitoring near-surface atmospheric temperature and wind velocity fields. Basic issues relating to the feasibility and implementation of atmospheric tomography are discussed. Among these issues are ...

D. Keith Wilson; Dennis W. Thomson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Destabilization of the Thermohaline Circulation by Atmospheric Eddy Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple proem models have been developed to investigate the role of atmosphere-ocean feedbacks in the stability of the current mode of the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic. A positive feedback between the meridional atmospheric ...

Mototaka Nakamura; Peter H. Stone; Jochem Marotzke

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Estimates of Meridional Atmosphere and Ocean Heat Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New estimates of the poleward energy transport based on atmospheric reanalyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Julie M. Caron

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Structure of the Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate water vapor transport in an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium, a simplified dynamical convection model (DCM) was constructed that explicitly models moist convection and longwave radiation in a gray atmosphere. In the ...

Yoshiharu Iwasa; Yutaka Abe; Hiroshi Tanaka

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Atmospheric Solar Heating Rate in the Water Vapor Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmosphere is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Atmospheric Icing Climatologies of Two New England Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric icing climatologies of two New England mountaintops with different elevations are compared: Mount Mansfield in northern Vermont and Mount Washington in New Hampshire. Atmospheric icing, as measured with Rosemount ice detectors, is ...

Charles C. Ryerson

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Estimating Intensity of Atmospheric Ice Accretion on Stationary Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of various atmospheric parameters in determining atmospheric ice accretion intensity on structures near the ground is examined theoretically, with an emphasis on glaze formation. Methods are presented for calculating the icing rate on ...

Lasse Makkonen

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Direct Atmospheric Forcing of Geostrophic Eddies. Part II: Coherence Maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of stochastic atmospheric forcing of quasigeostrophic eddies is applied to calculate coherence maps, that is, the coherence between the oceanic response at one location and the atmospheric forcing at another location as a function of ...

Angelika Lippert; Peter Müller

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Variational Objective Analysis for Atmospheric Field Programs: A Model Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the variational objective analysis (VOA) for producing realistic diagnoses of atmospheric field program data. Simulations from the Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere ...

D. E. Waliser; J. A. Ridout; S. Xie; M. Zhang

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Coupled Atmosphere–Biophysics–Hydrology Models for Environmental Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation and implementation of LEAF-2, the Land Ecosystem–Atmosphere Feedback model, which comprises the representation of land–surface processes in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), is described. LEAF-2 is a prognostic ...

Robert L. Walko; Larry E. Band; Jill Baron; Timothy G. F. Kittel; Richard Lammers; Tsengdar J. Lee; Dennis Ojima; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Chris Taylor; Christina Tague; Craig J. Tremback; Pier Luigi Vidale

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Implications of the Hydrostatic Assumption on Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The validity of the hydrostatic approximation is examined for use in predicting the dynamics of topographically generated atmospheric gravity waves (lee waves) propagating in an atmosphere with realistic wind shear. To isolate nonhydrostatic ...

Teddie L. Keller

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer. Part I: Instrument Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer has been developed to measure the atmospheric downwelling infrared radiance spectrum at the earth's surface with high absolute accuracy. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) ...

R. O. Knuteson; H. E. Revercomb; F. A. Best; N. C. Ciganovich; R. G. Dedecker; T. P. Dirkx; S. C. Ellington; W. F. Feltz; R. K. Garcia; H. B. Howell; W. L. Smith; J. F. Short; D. C. Tobin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvénic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

485

Accuracy of Atmospheric Angular Momentum Estimates from Operational Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern, high resolution atmospheric and geodetic data are finding increasing use in geophysical studies of the angular momentum balance of the earth-atmosphere system. Such studies require knowledge of the level of uncertainty associated with ...

Richard D. Rosen; Dayid A. Salstein; Alvin J. Miller; Klaus Arpe

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Multiscale Low-Frequency Circulation Modes in the Global Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, fundamental multiscale circulation modes in the global atmosphere are identified with the objective of providing better understanding of atmospheric low-frequency variabilities over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. With ...

K-M. Lau; P-J. Sheu; I-S. Kang

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Global Thermohaline Circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with Interactive Atmospheric Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid coupled ocean–atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean ...

Xiaoli Wang; Peter H. Stone; Jochem Marotzke

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Review of literature on catalytic recombination of hydrogen--oxygen. [Removal of hydrogen from containment atmosphere following LWR blowdown  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are reported of a literature search for information concerning the heterogeneous, gas phase, catalytic hydrogen-oxygen recombination. Laboratory scale experiments to test the performance of specific metal oxide catalysts under conditions simulating the atmosphere within a nuclear reactor containment vessel following a loss-of-coolant blowdown accident are suggested.

Homsy, R.V.; Glatron, C.A.

1968-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

489

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

490

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Velocity June 5-6, 2012 Jeremy Rishel Bruce Napier Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses: GENII Today's Presentation.... Will provide a high-level overview of the GENII codes. Will cover basic aspects of GENII's acute atmospheric transport model. Will review the GENII deposition model that is used to estimate the deposition velocity used in plume depletion. 2 GENII Development History 1988 - GENII V1 released ICRP-26/30/48 dosimetry 1990 - GENII V1.485 stabilized Current DOE Toolbox Version 1992 - GENII-S stochastic version 2004 - GENII V2 ICRP-72 age-dependent dosimetry Federal Guidance Report 13 risk factors

491

Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA NOAA About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder houses the Earth System Research Lab, which supports a "reforecasting" project. The initiative involves running several decades of historical

492

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

493

Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework that describes the atmospheric evolution of OA and is constrained and motivated by new, high time resolution, experimental characterizations of their composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA-precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of large amounts of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) mass that has comparable concentrations to sulfate aerosol over the Northern Hemisphere. Our new model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in the atmosphere and the laboratory and can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Zhang, Qi; Kroll, Jesse H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, Allison; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Robinson, A. L.; Duplissy, J.; Smith, J. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Lanz, V. A.; Hueglin, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Tian, J.; Laaksonen, A.; Raatikainen, T.; Rautiainen, J.; Vaattovaara, P.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Dunlea, E. J.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, Paul I.; Bower, K.; Kondo, Yutaka; Schneider, J.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Salcedo, D.; Cottrell, L.; Griffin, Robert; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Shimono, A.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Dzepina, K.; Kimmel, Joel; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, Scott C.; Trimborn, Achim; Williams, L. R.; Wood, Ezra C.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

494

Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

495

Transient phenomena in the solar atmosphere and solar wind  

SciTech Connect

Observations of transient disturbances in the solar atmosphere are reviewed with emphasis on coronal mass ejection events. (JFP)

Gosling, J.T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2011 Calendar Day

497

Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2009 Calendar Day

498

Year/PAD District Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation Vacuum Cracking Thermal Catalytic Cracking Fresh Recycled Catalytic Hydro- Cracking Catalytic Reforming Desulfurization...

499

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)