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1

The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA (Amazon) LBA (Amazon) The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) Overview [LBA Logo] The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is an international research initiative conducted from 1995-2005 and led by Brazil. The LBA Project encompasses several scientific disciplines, or components. The LBA-ECO component focuses on the question: "How do tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in Amazonia?" The Amazon rain forest or Amazonia, is the largest remaining expanse of tropical rain forest on Earth, harboring approximately one-third of all Earth's species. Although the rain forest's area is so large that it

2

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions of Agriculture Forest Service coordinator. 1997. Atmospheric and biospheric interactions of gases and energy in the Pacific region century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past

Standiford, Richard B.

3

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from a global 3D land.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since

Selin, Noelle Eckley

4

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from global modeling Noelle Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since industrialization Major anthropogenic

Selin, Noelle Eckley

5

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from Global Modeling Noelle #12;MERCURY IN THE ENVIRONMENT: OUTLINE 1. Deposition to the United States results from a mix of local and global sources, depending on the location 2. Historical and present releases of mercury will continue

Selin, Noelle Eckley

6

Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on atmospheric exchange of heat and moisture. Our CONTROL simulation had a mean global net primary production Global energy balance 1 Introduction The biosphere is inarguably an integral component of the Earth's global climate system, playing an important role in the global cycles of carbon, water and energy

Cowling, Sharon A.

7

Potential changes in atmospheric chemistry in the decades ahead: Climate and biosphere interactions and feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry is a challenging area of research where much knowledge is needed if we are to continue to survive as a species. This paper outlines research needs in the decades ahead in this key area of scientific endeavor. Highlighted are areas of research that are likely to lead to climatic and biospheric impacts and have been given little attention in the past. In particular, the possible organic transformation chemistries that may lead to chemical and physical changes in tropospheric cloud chemistries are highlighted and emphasized as an area where research is needed in the future. 22 refs.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Eddy-covariance observations of the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Kesselmeier, J. : Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) uptake byM. : Leaf uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in a tropicalMorikawa, H. : Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide gas is a plant

Min, Kyung-Eun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Global Climatology of Albedo, Roughness Length and Stomatal Resistance for Atmospheric General Circulation Models as Represented by the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Components of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) of Sellers et al. were used to generate global monthly fields of surface albedo (0.4–4.0 ?m), roughness length and minimum surface (stomatal) resistance.

J. L. Dorman; P. J. Sellers

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biosphere Model Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

D.W. Wu; A.J. Smith

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169671]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis''. The objective of this analysis was to develop the BDCFs for the volcanic ash exposure scenario and the dose factors for calculating inhalation doses during volcanic eruption (eruption phase of the volcanic event). For the volcanic ash exposure scenario, the mode of radionuclide release into the biosphere is a volcanic eruption through the repository with the resulting entrainment of contaminated waste in the tephra and the subsequent atmospheric transport and dispersion of contaminated material in the biosphere. The biosphere process model for this scenario uses the surface deposition of contaminated ash as the source of radionuclides in the biosphere. The initial atmospheric transport and dispersion of the ash as well as its subsequent redistribution by fluvial and aeolian processes are not addressed within the biosphere model. These processes influence the value of the source term that is calculated elsewhere and then combined with the BDCFs in the TSPA model to calculate expected dose to the receptor. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163958]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Boundary layer turbulence is an important process that is parameterized in most atmospheric numerical models. Turbulence redistributes energy and mass within the boundary layer. Many different characteristics can impact the character of turbulence in the boundary layer, including different surface types, horizontal wind speed and direction, and the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. However, there have been few studies that have

13

A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rise-R.495 A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and Dose Models S. P. Nielsen* S Roskilde, Denmark May 1986 #12;RIS�-R-495 DOUBLE TRACER EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT Pollution Laboratory, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark Abstract. Two tracers

14

Biosphere Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models  

SciTech Connect

The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis is one of 10 reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception.

K. Rautenstrauch

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

18

Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the physical attributes of airborne particulate matter, such as the airborne concentrations of particles and their sizes. The conditions of receptor exposure (duration of exposure in various microenvironments), breathing rates, and dosimetry of inhaled particulates are discussed in more detail in ''Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]).

M. Wasiolek

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Expression of Interest: The Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron tagging in Gadolinium-doped water may play a significant role in reducing backgrounds from atmospheric neutrinos in next generation proton-decay searches using megaton-scale Water Cherenkov detectors. Similar techniques might also be useful in the detection of supernova neutrinos. Accurate determination of neutron tagging efficiencies will require a detailed understanding of the number of neutrons produced by neutrino interactions in water as a function of momentum transferred. We propose the Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE), designed to measure the neutron yield of atmospheric neutrino interactions in gadolinium-doped water. An innovative aspect of the ANNIE design is the use of precision timing to localize interaction vertices in the small fiducial volume of the detector. We propose to achieve this by using early production of LAPPDs (Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors). This experiment will be a first application of these devices demonstrating their feasibility for Wate...

Anghel, I; Bergevin, M; Davies, G; Di Lodovico, F; Elagin, A; Frisch, H; Hill, R; Jocher, G; Katori, T; Learned, J; Northrop, R; Pilcher, C; Ramberg, E; Sanchez, M C; Smy, M; Sobel, H; Svoboda, R; Usman, S; Vagins, M; Varner, G; Wagner, R; Wetstein, M; Winslow, L; Yeh, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Expression of Interest: The Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron tagging in Gadolinium-doped water may play a significant role in reducing backgrounds from atmospheric neutrinos in next generation proton-decay searches using megaton-scale Water Cherenkov detectors. Similar techniques might also be useful in the detection of supernova neutrinos. Accurate determination of neutron tagging efficiencies will require a detailed understanding of the number of neutrons produced by neutrino interactions in water as a function of momentum transferred. We propose the Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE), designed to measure the neutron yield of atmospheric neutrino interactions in gadolinium-doped water. An innovative aspect of the ANNIE design is the use of precision timing to localize interaction vertices in the small fiducial volume of the detector. We propose to achieve this by using early production of LAPPDs (Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors). This experiment will be a first application of these devices demonstrating their feasibility for Water Cherenkov neutrino detectors.

I. Anghel; J. F. Beacom; M. Bergevin; G. Davies; F. Di Lodovico; A. Elagin; H. Frisch; R. Hill; G. Jocher; T. Katori; J. Learned; R. Northrop; C. Pilcher; E. Ramberg; M. C. Sanchez; M. Smy; H. Sobel; R. Svoboda; S. Usman; M. Vagins; G. Varner; R. Wagner; M. Wetstein; L. Winslow; M. Yeh

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Soil-related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003 [163602]). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. ''The Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters needed to evaluate doses from pathways associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation and ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in resuspended particulate matter in the atmosphere. The analysis was performed in accordance with the technical work plan for the biosphere modeling and expert support (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis revises the previous one titled ''Evaluate Soil/Radionuclide Removal by Erosion and Leaching'' (CRWMS M&O 2001 [152517]). In REV 00 of this report, the data generated were fixed (i.e., taking no account of uncertainty and variability) values. This revision incorporates uncertainty and variability into the values for the bulk density, elemental partition coefficients, average annual loss of soil from erosion, resuspension enhancement factor, and field capacity water content.

A. J. Smith

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

A Hyperventilating Biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ecosystems. Graven et al. show that the CO 2 amplitude trend is not well simulated by the current generation of global Earth system models. These models include the life cycles of ecosystems, with photosynthetic uptake sensitive to atmospheric CO 2...

Inez Fung

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

23

Organic and Elemental Carbon Measurements during ACE-Asia Suggest a Longer Atmospheric Lifetime for Elemental Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additional measurements made aboard the ship and used in this analysis include concentrations of SO2 and total particle number (27), O3 (28), CO (29), and radon (30). ... This research is a contribution to the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program (IGBP) and is part of the IGAC Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE). ...

H.-J. Lim; B. J. Turpin; L. M. Russell; T. S. Bates

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Atmospheric Analyses Datasets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the 20-km horizontal grid version of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC20) atmospheric analyses datasets, which are available as part of the Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (...

Glen E. Liston; Daniel L. Birkenheuer; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Donald W. Cline; Kelly Elder

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Effective Mass Matrix for Light Neutrinos Consistent with Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an effective mass matrix for light neutrinos which is consistent with the mixing pattern indicated by solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. Two scenarios for the mass eigenvalues are discussed and the connection with double beta decay is noted.

S. P. Rosen; Waikwok Kwong

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

Session Papers Quality Measurement Experiments Within the Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rundecks to an HP9000 model 735 where the model calculations are actually performed. Upon completion, the output files are transferred back to the Experiment Center and ingested...

27

Development of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STACEE is a proposed atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for ground-based gamma-ray astrophysics between 25 and 500 GeV. The telescope will make use of the large solar mirrors (heliostats) available at a solar research facility to achieve an energy threshold lower than any existing ground-based instrument. This paper describes the development of STACEE, including an overview of the complete instrument design and a discussion of results from recent prototype tests at the large solar heliostat field of Sandia National Laboratories.

Ong, R A

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Development of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STACEE is a proposed atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for ground-based gamma-ray astrophysics between 25 and 500 GeV. The telescope will make use of the large solar mirrors (heliostats) available at a solar research facility to achieve an energy threshold lower than any existing ground-based instrument. This paper describes the development of STACEE, including an overview of the complete instrument design and a discussion of results from recent prototype tests at the large solar heliostat field of Sandia National Laboratories.

Rene A. Ong; the STACEE Collaboration

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)  

SciTech Connect

The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Testing the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) Using Point Micrometeorological and Biophysical Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Simple Biosphere model (SiB) of Sellers et al. (1986) was designed for use within General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the earth's atmosphere. The main objective of SiB is to provide a biophysically realistic description of those processes ...

P. J. Sellers; J. L. Dorman

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

he predominantly green color of the biosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T he predominantly green color of the biosphere attests to the essential role of photosynthesis to organic matter such as car- bohydrates. This capability is, however, not limited to plants. Certain

32

CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is joint effort between the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation. It couples state-of-art atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, land/vegetation/ ecological/ and major glaciers into a unified system or components can be run independently. (see https://www2.ucar.edu/for-staff/update/community-earth-system-model) CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere PI Name: Warren Washington PI Email: wmw@ucar.edu Institution: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 102.8 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Earth Science Researchers at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

33

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standard. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states considered in the TSPA-LA as well as conversion factors for evaluating compliance with the groundwater protection standard. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 164403]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standards. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1-1). The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states (present day, monsoon, and glacial transition) considered in the TSPA-LA, as well as conversion factors for compliance evaluation with the groundwater protection standards. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides.

M.A. Wasiolek

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Prototype Test Results of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are currently no experiments, either satellite or ground-based, that are sensitive to astrophysical gamma-rays at energies between 20 and 250 GeV. We are developing the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) to explore this energy range. STACEE will use heliostat mirrors at a solar research facility to collect Cherenkov light from extensive air showers produced by high energy gamma-rays. Here we report on the results of prototype test work at the solar facility of Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM). The work demonstrates that the facility is suitable for use as an astrophysical observatory. In addition, using a full scale prototype of part of STACEE, we detected atmospheric Cherenkov radiation at energies lower than any other ground-based experiment to date.

STACEE Collaboration

1997-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

Recent AGN Observations by the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground?based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for the detection of very high energy gamma rays from Galactic and extra?galactic sources. By utilizing the large collection area provided by the solar mirrors of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque New Mexico STACEE achieves a low energy threshold around 100 GeV for the detection of gamma rays. We briefly describe the STACEE detector and detail recent observations of Active Galactic Nuclei.

J. Kildea; A. Alabiso; D. A. Bramel; J. Carson; C. E. Covault; D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; A. Jarvis; T. Lindner; R. Mukherjee; C. Mueller; R. A. Ong; R. A. Scalzo; D. A. Williams; J. Zweerink

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Global Change and the Terrestrial Biosphere (449th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect

Since the Industrial Revolution, the increased use of fossil fuels has resulted in a dramatic and unprecedented rise in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Most scientists agree that increasing levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have raised Earth's temperature and, without a reduction in emissions, will continue to do so. Terrestrial ecosystems sustain life on Earth through the production of food, fuel, fiber, clean air, and naturally purified water. But how will agriculture and ecosystems be affected by global change? Rogers will describe the impact of projected climate change on the terrestrial biosphere and explain why plants are not just passive respondents to global change, but play an important role in determining the rate of change.

Rogers, Alistair (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department) [Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric diffusion experiments Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric experiment recherche Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

40

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...1978012175 air atmosphere biosphere carbon...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth, which...synchronization rate of 16 khz and the picture...the interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Recommended integrated monitoring system for pollutants on US national parks designated as biosphere reserves. [Biosphere reserves  

SciTech Connect

Biosphere reserves have been established worldwide as part of the United Nations' Man and the Biosphere Program. A portion of this program involves the development of an inexpensive pollutant monitoring system that can be used in a variety of biosphere reserves and that can produce data that are comparable between reserves. This report discusses the design of a pollutant monitoring system that has been successfully used in the United States and provides detailed instructions for its application and use. Mathematical models were applied to help determine the optimum monitoring system design. The modeling technique is briefly described, and results are shown using lead as an example. Analytical procedures were chosen for sample analyses because of their ability to detect suspected pollutants and for their cost effectiveness. Multielemental analytical techniques were used whenever possible, and multiorganic analytical techniques were used when available. Samples of air, water, soil, vegetation, and forest litter were collected. The sampling design is discussed, including the layout of sampling blocks, subsampling, sample handling, and sample preservation. Detailed instructions are provided for obtaining samples and operating the necessary equipment. Finally, the maintenance of field log books and the timing of sample collections are discussed, and conclusions regarding the use of an integrated pollutant monitoring system for biosphere reserves are presented. 27 references, 25 figures.

Wiersma, G.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

COURSE NUMBER COURSE TITLE, PROFESSOR MAC 503, Introduction to Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professors F. Millero and E. Atlas COURSE GOALS: Introduction to Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry. The course/Circulation/Transport 16. Trace Gas Exchanges and Biogeochemical Cycles;Biosphere-Atmosphere Exchanges 17. Biogeochem (cont

Miami, University of

44

Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003). Some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available at the time this report is issued. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003), describes the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis report is to define values for biosphere model parameters that are related to the dietary, lifestyle, and dosimetric characteristics of the receptor. The biosphere model, consistent with the licensing rule at 10 CFR Part 63, uses a hypothetical person called the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) to represent the potentially exposed population. The parameters that define the RMEI are based on the behaviors and characteristics of the Amargosa Valley population, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.312. Amargosa Valley is the community, located in the direction of the projected groundwater flow path, where most of the farming in the area occurs. The parameter values developed in this report support the biosphere model and are reflected in the TSPA through the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003). This analysis supports the treatment of fourteen features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: MO0303SEPFEPS2.000) and addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003). The treatment of these FEPs in the biosphere model is described in the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003, Section 6.2). The parameters developed in this report and the related FEPs are listed in Table 1-1.

M.A. Wasiolek; K.R. Rautenstrauch

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Resolving parameter degeneracies in long-baseline experiments by atmospheric neutrino data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we show that the physics reach of a long-baseline (LBL) neutrino oscillation experiment based on a superbeam and a megaton water Cherenkov detector can be significantly increased if the LBL data are combined with data from atmospheric neutrinos (ATM) provided by the same detector. ATM data are sensitive to the octant of ?23 and to the type of the neutrino mass hierarchy, mainly through three-flavor effects in e-like events. This allows to resolve the so-called ?23- and sign(?m312)-parameter degeneracies in LBL data. As a consequence it becomes possible to distinguish the normal from the inverted neutrino mass ordering at 2? C.L. from a combined LBL+ATM analysis if sin?22?13?0.02. The potential to identify the true values of sin?22?13 and the CP-phase ?CP is significantly increased through the lifting of the degeneracies. These claims are supported by a detailed simulation of the T2K (phase II) LBL experiment combined with a full three-flavor analysis of ATM data in the HyperKamiokande detector.

Patrick Huber; Michele Maltoni; Thomas Schwetz

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of a series of technical reports that document the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report is one of the five biosphere reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model, as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. Figure 1-1 is a graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN. This figure shows relationships among the products (i.e., scientific analyses and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The purpose of this analysis report is to define values for biosphere model parameters that are related to the dietary, lifestyle, and dosimetric characteristics of the receptor. The biosphere model, consistent with the licensing rule at 10 CFR Part 63 [DIRS 156605], uses a hypothetical person called the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) to represent the potentially exposed population. The parameters that define the RMEI are based on the behaviors and characteristics of the residents of the unincorporated town of Amargosa Valley, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.312 [DIRS 156605]. The output of this report is used as direct input in the two analyses identified in Figure 1-1 that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios. The parameter values developed in this report are reflected in the TSPA through the BDCFs. The analysis was performed in accordance with AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses'', and the technical work plan (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]).

M. Wasiolek; K. Rautenstrauch

2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

47

Disruptive Event Biosphere Doser Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to, and the results of, development of radionuclide-, exposure scenario-, and ash thickness-specific Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postulated postclosure extrusive igneous event (volcanic eruption) at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations were done for seventeen radionuclides. The selection of radionuclides included those that may be significant dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, as well as radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure. The approach documented in this report takes into account human exposure during three different phases at the time of, and after, volcanic eruption. Calculations of disruptive event BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. The pathway analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. BDCFs for volcanic eruption, when combined with the concentration of radioactivity deposited by eruption on the soil surface, allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculation of radioactivity deposition is outside the scope of this report and so is the transport of contaminated ash from the volcano to the location of the receptor. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), in which doses are calculated to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

M. Wasiolek

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

Wasiolek, Maryla A.

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric chemistry experiment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Sc) (Ns) 18 Cloud Physics and Atmospheric ... Source: Collection: Geosciences 2 Curriculum Vitae Hiroshi Tanimoto, Ph.D. Summary: : National Institute for Environmental Studies,...

50

NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS USING MESONH/FOREFIRE COUPLED ATMOSPHERIC-FIRE MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model inputting the wind fields and outputting heat and vapour fluxes to the atmospheric model. Fore mesh. Another originality of the approach is the fire rate of spread model that integrates wind effect of has been developed to add locale atmosphere interaction to the family of fire area simulators

Boyer, Edmond

51

Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). Some documents in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available when this report is issued. This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA), but access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develops input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes the conceptual model, the mathematical model, and the input parameters. The purpose of this analysis is to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis develops values of parameters associated with many features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: M00303SEPFEPS2.000 [162452]), which are addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003 [160699]). The treatment of these FEPs is described in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). Parameter values developed in this report, and the related FEPs, are listed in Table 1-1. The relationship between the parameters and FEPs was based on a comparison of the parameter definition and the FEP descriptions as presented in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). The parameter values developed in this report support the biosphere model and are reflected in the TSPA through the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). Biosphere modeling focuses on radionuclides screened for the TSPA-LA (BSC 2002 [160059]). The same list of radionuclides is used in this analysis (Section 6.1.4). The analysis considers two human exposure scenarios (groundwater and volcanic ash) and climate change (Section 6.1.5). This analysis combines and revises two previous reports, ''Transfer Coefficient Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [152435]) and ''Environmental Transport Parameter Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 2001 [152434]), because the new ERMYN biosphere model requires a redefined set of input parameters. The scope of this analysis includes providing a technical basis for the selection of radionuclide- and element-specific biosphere parameters (except for Kd) that are important for calculating BDCFs based on the available radionuclide inventory abstraction data. The environmental transport parameter values were developed specifically for use in the biosphere model and may not be appropriate for other applications.

M. A. Wasiolek

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report is one of a series of technical reports that document the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report is one of the five biosphere reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model, as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. Figure 1-1 is a graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN. This figure shows relationships among the products (i.e., scientific analyses and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172782]). The purpose of this analysis report is to define values for biosphere model parameters that are related to the dietary, lifestyle, and dosimetric characteristics of the receptor. The biosphere model, consistent with the licensing rule at 10 CFR Part 63 [DIRS 173164], uses a hypothetical person called the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) to represent the potentially exposed population. The parameters that define the RMEI are based on the behaviors and characteristics of the residents of the unincorporated town of Amargosa Valley, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.312 [DIRS 173164]. The output of this report is used as direct input in the two analyses identified in Figure 1-1 that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios. The parameter values developed in this report are reflected in the TSPA through the BDCFs. The analysis was performed in accordance with LP-SIII.9Q-BSC, ''Scientific Analyses'', and the technical work plan (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172782]). The scope of the revision was to develop dosimetric input parameters for the biosphere model that are consistent with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 72 (ICRP 1996 [DIRS 152446]). The quantities developed previously (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169671]), which reflect the ICRP Publication 30 dosimetric methods (ICRP 30) (ICRP 1979 [DIRS 110386]; ICRP 1980 [DIRS 110351]; ICRP 1981 [DIRS 110352]) were not changed and were retained in this report.

M.A. Wasiolek

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

Polarization of the Atmosphere as a Foreground for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We quantify the level of polarization of the atmosphere due to Zeeman splitting of oxygen in the Earth's magnetic field and compare it to the level of polarization expected from the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The analysis focuses on the effect at mid-latitudes and at large angular scales. We find that from stratospheric balloon borne platforms and for observations near 100 GHz the atmospheric linear and circular polarized intensities is about 10^{-12} and 100 x 10^{-9} K, respectively, making the atmosphere a negligible source of foreground. From the ground the linear and circular polarized intensities are about 10^{-9} and 100 x 10^{-6} K, making the atmosphere a potential source of foreground for the CMB E (B) mode signal if there is even a 1% (0.01%) conversion of circular to linear polarization in the instrument.

Shaul Hanany; Philip Rosenkranz

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Soil Moisture Memory in AGCM Simulations: Analysis of Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil moisture memory is a key aspect of land–atmosphere interaction and has major implications for seasonal forecasting. Because of a severe lack of soil moisture observations on most continents, existing analyses of global-scale soil moisture ...

Sonia I. Seneviratne; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Eva Kowalczyk; David Lawrence; Ping Liu; David Mocko; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Keith W. Oleson; Diana Verseghy

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure was defined as AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses''. This analysis revises the previous version with the same name (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161239]), which was itself a revision of one titled ''Evaluate Soil/Radionuclide Removal by Erosion and Leaching'' (CRWMS M&O 2001 [DIRS 152517]). In Revision 00 of this report, the data generated were fixed values (i.e., taking no account of uncertainty and variability). Revision 01 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161239]) incorporated uncertainty and variability into the values for the bulk density, elemental partition coefficients, average annual loss of soil from erosion, resuspension enhancement factor, and field capacity water content. The current revision of this document improves the transparency and traceability of the products without changing the details of the analysis. This analysis report supports the treatment of six of the features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the Yucca Mountain reference biosphere (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). The use of the more recent FEP list in DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760] represents a deviation from the detail provided in the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]), which referenced a previous version of the FEP list. The parameters developed in this report support treatment of these six FEPs addressed in the biosphere model that are listed in Table 1-1. Inclusion and treatment of FEPs in the biosphere model is described in the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460], Section 6.2).

A. J. Smith

2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

56

Analyses of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) multiple data sets for studying cloud absorption Z. Li and A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service, Environment Canada from aircraft observations was 37% of the incoming solar irradiance, almost twice that of model

Li, Zhanqing

57

Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

J. Kildea; J. Zweerink; J. Ball; J. E. Carson; C. E. Covault; D. D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; A. Jarvis; T. Lindner; C. Mueller; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; D. A. Williams

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

Kildea, J; Ball, J; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Jarvis, A; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Biosphere dose conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report presents importance and sensitivity analysis for the environmental radiation model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN). ERMYN is a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis concerns the output of the model, biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater, and the volcanic ash exposure scenarios. It identifies important processes and parameters that influence the BDCF values and distributions, enhances understanding of the relative importance of the physical and environmental processes on the outcome of the biosphere model, includes a detailed pathway analysis for key radionuclides, and evaluates the appropriateness of selected parameter values that are not site-specific or have large uncertainty.

M. Wasiolek

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

Grula, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Technical Report: Influence of an enhanced use of biomass for energy on the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of different strategies of 'biomass for energy' was modelled by means of a global carbon cycle model in order to compute the annual atmospheric CO2 concentration until the year 2100. A 'Combined Energy and Biosphere Model' was developed on the basis of the Osnabrück Biosphere Model (OBM).

Gilbert Ahamer

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

63

High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 1200\\unit{m^2} has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma-like events from the Crab, with a significance of $+6.75\\sigma$ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was E_{th}) = (2.2 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{-10}\\unit{photons cm^{-2} s^{-1}}. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies.

STACEE Collaboration; S. Oser; D. Bhattacharya; L. M. Boone; M. C. Chantell; Z. Conner; C. E. Covault; M. Dragovan; P. Fortin; D. T. Gregorich; D. S. Hanna; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; T. O. Tumer; D. A. Williams; J. A. Zweerink

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cash Advance, New Approach Aim to Relaunch Biosphere 2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Biosphere 2. On 1 July, the real estate development company that owned the 16-hectare...property and surrounding ranch to a real estate development company. The research equipment...seems a much more robust, more sustainable and achievable operating model...

Erik Stokstad

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric Chemistry of the Tropical Brazilian Partner Organizations National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA)1 The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere by the atmospheric oxidation of trace gases to low volatility compounds (Chen et al. 2009). These products can

67

Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of biosphere features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded'', is given for each FEP along with the corresponding technical basis for the excluded FEPs and the descriptions of how the included FEPs were incorporated in the biosphere model. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report concern characteristics of the reference biosphere, the receptor, and the environmental transport and receptor exposure pathways for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios considered in biosphere modeling. This revision provides the summary of the implementation of included FEPs in TSPA-LA, (i.e., how the FEP is included); for excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report is one of the 10 documents constituting the biosphere model documentation suite. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' describes in detail the biosphere conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters and their development. Outputs from these six reports are used in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis and Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' to generate the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs), which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' analyzes the output of these two BDCF reports.

M. Wasiolek; P. Rogers

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not been preceded by the evolution of nitrogen fixation, and if these organisms had not also acquired the ability to fix nitrogen at the beginning of or very early in their history. The evolution of nitrogen fixation also appears to have been a precondition for the evolution of (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosynthesis. Given that some form of chlorophyll is obligatory for true photosynthesis, and its light absorption and chemical properties make it a "universal pigment," it may be predicted that the evolution of nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis are also closely linked on other Earth- like planets.

John W. Grula

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

QUANTIFYING ORGANIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENT EDDY MOTION USING NONLINEAR TIME SERIES ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the exchange rates of mass and energy between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. Around the world measurements of carbon and energy exchange between the vegetation and the atmosphere (Kaiser, 1998). It has layer (ASL). Within the ASL, the flow statistics are typically one-dimensional and well described

Katul, Gabriel

70

Environmental sensor network for a pervasive learning space in a Finnish biosphere reserve  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heroes of Koskenniska is a game-based pervasive learning space that combines mobile and sensor technologies to raise environmental and cultural awareness in a Finnish Biosphere Reserve. An environmental sensor network (ESN) is used to gather and process ... Keywords: biosphere reserve, environmental awareness, environmental sensor network, pervasive learning, wireless sensor network

Teemu H. Laine; Anna Gimbitskaya; Erkki Sutinen; Jinchul Choi; Kitak Yong; Chaewoo Lee

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Research Unit on Biosphere -Aerosol -Cloud -Climate Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-222. Seinfeld J., 1986: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics of Air Pollution. Jonh Wiley and sons. New York, USA that dry deposition and surface exchange processes require a better description in atmospheric chemistry.R. and Lenschow D.H., 1983) in the modelling. Finlayson-Pitts B.J. and Pitts J.N., 1986: Atmospheric Chemistry

72

Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere  

SciTech Connect

Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on “Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface” was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundation’s Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ocean Currents and Their Role in the Biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article discusses the role of the ocean currents in the climate system and the mechanisms how changes in the ocean currents can affect climate and biosphere. Special attention is paid to the Atlantic thermohaline circulation which is generally believed to be the most sensitive component of the ocean circulation. Modeling results and paleoclimate evidences of the past instability of the Atlantic thermohaline circulations is discussed. It is shown that the rapid reorganizations of the ocean currents which occurred many times during the glacial age had a global-scale impact on climate. It is also shown that both terrestrial and marine ecosystems were strongly affected by changes in the ocean circulation. A possibility of the rapid reorganization of the ocean circulation in the future in response to anthropogenic global warming and its potential impact on climate, natural ecosystems, agriculture, and fishery is discussed based on numerous modeling results.

A. Ganopolski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

On the Propagation of Sound in the Free Atmosphere and the Acoustic Efficiency of Fog-Signal Machinery: An Account of Experiments Carried out at Father Point, Quebec, September, 1913  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Free Atmosphere and the Acoustic Efficiency of Fog-Signal Machinery: An Account of Experiments Carried out at Father Point, Quebec, September, 1913 Louis Vessot King The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...

1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ecological patterns of the small mammal communities at El Cielo Biosphere Reserve, Tamaulipas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cielo Biosphere Reserve (ECBR) in Tamaulipas, Mexico, at two spatial scales. At the landscape level I tested patterns of species co-occurrences between four sites with a null model. At the local level I addressed floor microhabitat use, vertical...

Castro-Arellano, Ivan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Eddy-covariance observations of the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the mean of vertical wind speed and concentration.observed between vertical wind speed and temperature sincethe cospectral density of vertical wind speed and NO X as

Min, Kyung-Eun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Carbon in the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere in the 21st century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rather than brake global warming. Keywords: climate change...and is a fingerprint of global human activity, a consequence of the combustion of coal, oil and gas that drives...dioxide increase is driving global warming, but there are other...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Carbon in the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere in the 21st century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CO2 and forest biomass, coupled with...from fossil-fuel combustion and land-use...consequence of the combustion of coal, oil and...and build their biomass, and ultimately...fossil-fuel or biomass combustion (nitrogen oxides...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Atmospheric Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

competencies Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced...

80

The mean climate of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) in forced SST and fully coupled experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4) was released as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) and is described. The finite volume dynamical core available in CAM3 is now the default due to its superior transport and conservation properties. Deep convection parameterization changes include a dilute plume calculation of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the introduction of a formulation for Convective Momentum Transport (CMT). For the cloud fraction an additional calculation is performed following macrophysical state updates that provides improved thermodynamic condistancy. A freeze-drying modification is further made to the cloud fraction calculation in very dry environments, such as arctic Winter, where cloud fractionand cloud water estimates were often inconsistant in CAM3. In CAM4 the finite volume dynamical core leads to a degradation in the excessive trade-wind simulation, but with an accompanying reduction in zonal stresses at higher latitudes. Plume dilution leads to a moister deep tropics alleviating much of the mid-tropospheric dry biases and reduces the persistant precipitation biases over the Arabian peninsular and the southern Indian ocean during the Indian Monsoon. CMT reduces much of the excessive trade-wind biases in eastern ocean basins. The freeze drying modification alleviates much of the high latitude, winter-time excessive cloud bias and improves the associated surface cloud-related energy budget, but the updated cloud macrophysical calculation generally leads to reduced cloud fraction and cloud forcing away from high latitudes. Although there are marginal improvements in time-averaged, large-scale hydrology there are signficant improvements in regional climate features such as the generation of tropical and propagation of stationary waves from the Pacific into mid-latitudes and in the seasonal frequency of Northern Hemisphere blocking events. A 1? versus 2? horizontal resolution of the finite volume 24 dynamical core exhibits signficiant improvements in model climate. Improvements in the fully coupled mean climate between CAM3 and CAM4 are also much more signficant than in forced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) simulations. Furthermore, improvements in the transient characteristics ofthe model climate, documented elsewhere, are substantial.

Neale, Richard; Richter, Jadwiga; Park, Sungsu; Lauritzen, P. H.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhang, Minghua

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

82

Research Unit on Biosphere -Aerosol -Cloud -Climate Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nitrogen fluxes from deep- water entrainment and it seems that higher values can be expected from of the Kattegat Strait. For shorter time- scales like one-year the deep-water entrainement flux is around 30 mg N conducted in the framework of the MEAD (Marine Effects of Atmospheric Deposition) project. METHODS

83

Toward elimination of discrepancies between theory and experiment: The rate constant of the atmospheric conversion of SO3 to H2SO4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...accompanying the atmospheric clouds [especially...result in a recovery of surface waters (11, 12...understanding of the recovery process...good cloud condensation nuclei...mechanism of the atmospheric hydration...length of the water bridge...

Thomas Loerting; Klaus R. Liedl

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

85

Smoke plumes from Kuwaiti oil fires as atmospheric experiment of opportunity: An early look. Final report, Mar-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect

This document sets in context the smoke plume phenomenology associated with the large number of oil fires lit by the Iraqi military in Kuwait in February 1991, and which are probably the worst man-made air pollution event in human history. Based on the simple phenomenology given here, and considered an unfortunate 'experiment of opportunity', the question is raised of what actions should be taken, and what one can hope to learn from these events. From the standpoint of SDIO, most of the basic physical elements of the fire and smoke phenomenology appear to be understood although there are some new effects and the initial quantitative predictions of the experts appear to differ significantly from the results of the detailed measurements. Many observations have been made. They require analysis followed by review and publication before being incorporated in the DoD integrated phenomenology models. This document represents an early look at the smoke plumes before most of the observations have been analyzed, reviewed, and published; its main function is to raise questions that should be addressed more carefully later.

Bauer, E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The lifetime of excess atmospheric carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution human activity has significantly altered biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. The uncertainties of future climate change rests partly on issues of physical-climate system dynamics and their representation in general circulation models. However understanding the carbon cycle is a key to comprehending the changing terrestrial biosphere and to developing a reasonable range of future concentrations of greenhouse gases. The authors look at correction of model uncertainties in the examination of the lifetime of carbon dioxide. The two difficulties analysed are as follows: (1) most model-derived estimates of the relaxation of the concentration of CO2 reveal a function which is not always well approximated by weighted sums of exponentials; (2) the function c(t) is quite sensitive to assumptions about the terrestrial biosphere and the relaxation experiment. 51 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Moore, B. III; Braswell, B.H. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change on trace gases and the biosphere  

SciTech Connect

This proposal seeks multi-agency funding to conduct an international, multidisciplinary 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change to take place from August 7 through 21, 1988, on the topic: Trace Gases and the Biosphere. The institute, to be held in Snowmass, Colorado, is envisioned as a pilot version of a continuing series of institutes on Global Change (IGC). This proposal seeks support for the 1988 pilot institute only. The concept and structure for the continuing series, and the definition of the 1988 pilot institute, were developed at an intensive and multidisciplinary Summer Institute Planning Meeting in Boulder, Colorado, on August 24--25, 1987. The theme for the 1988 PIGC, Trace Gases and the Biosphere, will focus a concerted, high-level multidisciplinary effort on a scientific problem central to the Global Change Program. Dramatic year-to-year increases in the global concentrations of radiatively-active trace gases such as methane and carbon dioxide are now well documented. The predicted climatic effects of these changes lend special urgency to efforts to study the biospheric sources and sinks of these gases and to clarify their interactions and role in the geosphere-biosphere system.

Eddy, J.A.; Moore, B. III

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

89

AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

Haak, Hein

90

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research Atmospheric Science and Climate Research EVS research, combined with portable, high-performance climate and weather applications, offers a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. In an ever-changing, dynamic climate, we measure, model, and analyze atmospheric processes that are vital to understanding our planet. Our measurement capabilities range from remote sensing and surface meteorology instruments to instrumentation designed to quantify the land-atmosphere exchange of energy, water, and greenhouse gases. Modeling capabilities begin with regional-scale climate, air quality, and aerosol modeling and extend to global chemical transport models, general circulation models of the atmosphere, models of the biosphere, and coupled Earth system models.

91

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 12331240 www.elsevier.com/locate/jastp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and of the transfer of solar energy to the troposphere and biosphere. Perhaps the least understood element of this comJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 1233­1240 www thunderstorm currents over one of the three main thunderstorm active regions: Africa, Asia/Oceania, and America

Michigan, University of

92

Musical Atmospherics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE characteristics of audio musical atmospherics which are obtained when an ... musical atmospherics which are obtained when an audio amplifier is placed in a long line or aerial have been discussed from time to ...

T. L. ECKERSLEY

1935-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models  

SciTech Connect

In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed studies of radionuclide cleanup in various modern types of municipal water treatment facilities such as advanced filtration or reverse-osmosis processes may be performed without development of any new or costly experimental facilities.

Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

98

THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

Hoffman, Forrest M.

99

Atmospheric tritium  

SciTech Connect

Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

Niyogi, Dev

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Soil organisms are the catalysts that link elemen-tal exchange among the lithosphere,biosphere,and at-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,biosphere,and at- mosphere. Understanding the rates of these exchanges, and the sequestration of elements within in carbon (C) compounds.Soil C is derived largely from plant photosynthesis and allocated to the soil either ) is oxidized and broken down to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and water (H2 O), releasing ATP (adenosine triphosphate

Soatto, Stefano

102

Lead particles in the Great Smoky Mountains biosphere reserve. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

Remote air monitoring using 0.45-micrometer Millipore filters at eight remote sites in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park has shown that lead particulates are contributing to the contamination of this designated biosphere reserve. Analytical results of these filters by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, x-ray fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy showed that lead air concentrations varied frm a high of 141.ng/cu m to a low of 18.9 ng/cu m. The spherical shape of the lead particulates indicates that the moieties were formed by high temperature processes, such as by internal combustion engines. Also, the small particulate size may indicate long range transport and subsequent deposition from urban and/or industrialized areas.

Wiersma, G.B.; Frank, C.W.; Brown, K.W.; Davidson, C.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Experiments with Wind to Produce Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nat EXPERIMENTS WITH WIND TO PRODUCE ENERGY Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, weatherclimatology, aerodynamics, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy...

105

Oxygen-18 of O2 Records the Impact of Abrupt Climate Change on the Terrestrial Biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...not preserve reliable atmospheric methane records...continuing to produce deep water. The implication of...O and 18 O/ 16 O of atmospheric O 2 (abstr.)., Proceedings...g., from humid, water-saturated biomes...Education Foundation, and recovery of the Siple Dome...

Jeffrey P. Severinghaus; Ross Beaudette; Melissa A. Headly; Kendrick Taylor; Edward J. Brook

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Progress Report describes the work performed and summarizes some of the key observations to date on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report describes activities undertaken to collect samples of soils from three regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and perform analyses to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Section 3 summarizes information gathered regarding agricultural practices and common and unusual crops grown in each of these three areas. Section 4 describes progress in studying radionuclide uptake in several representative crops from the three soil types in controlled laboratory conditions. Section 5 describes a range of international coordination activities undertaken by Project staff in order to support the underlying data needs of the Project. Section 6 provides a very brief summary of the status of the GENII Version 2 computer program, which is a “client” of the types of data being generated by the Project, and for which the Project will be providing training to the US NRC staff in the coming Fiscal Year. Several appendices provide additional supporting information.

Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Fellows, Robert J.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

107

What we can learn from atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics potential of future measurements of atmospheric neutrinos is explored. Observation of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ driven sub-dominant effects and $\\theta_{13}$ driven large matter effects in atmospheric neutrinos can be used to study the deviation of $\\theta_{23}$ from maximality and its octant. Neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined extremely well due to the large matter effects. New physics can be constrained both in standard atmospheric neutrino experiments as well as in future neutrino telescopes.

Sandhya Choubey

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

108

Developing Model Constraints on Northern Extra-Tropical Carbon Cycling Based on measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to perform CO2 data syntheses and modeling activities to address two central questions: 1) how much has the seasonal cycle in atmospheric CO2 at northern high latitudes changed since the 1960s, and 2) how well do prognostic biospheric models represent these changes. This project also supported the continuation of the Scripps time series of CO2 isotopes and concentration at ten baseline stations distributed globally.

Keeling, Ralph [UCSD-SIO

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Refined correlations between atmospheric and rapid polar motion excitations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......experiments, the atmospheric or geodetic excitation...a random number generator, and is regenerated...1990. Global water storage and polar...C.R., 1993. Atmospheric excitation computations...polar motion by atmospheric angular momentum...Global surface water-induced Rosen......

T. C. Stieglitz; S. R. Dickman

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp 1992.07.11 - 1993.02.28 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability Final data available. For data sets, see below. Summary IOP completed. Description The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) was conducted to better understand the structure of the coupled system of the warm pool of the western Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of participants from dozens of countries took part in this experiment from November 1, 1992 through February 28, 1993. Campaign Data Sets

112

CIRES/CSD Research Associate Atmospheric/Physical Research Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to address atmospheric problems of contemporary interest. A background in atmospheric science is not required or field environment. Experience with optics and optical sensors is highly desirable. Experience by contacting the ADA Coordinator at hr-ada@colorado.edu. The University of Colorado Boulder conducts background

Colorado at Boulder, University of

113

Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

Crawford, T.V.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

8, 10691088, 2008 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the atmosphere (Molina et al., 1974; Farman et al., 1985) has led to an interna- tional effort to replace

Boyer, Edmond

116

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with *the plasma frethe progress...explorcreated an even larger number of...the upper atmosphere and ionosphere...the upper atmosphere. For this...ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...field is large, the horizontal...resolved. The atmospheric gravity waves...simul-taneously at a large number of...two regions plasma drifts separated...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DATA, JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND TERRESTRIAL...IN NEAR-EARTH PLASMA, SPACE SCIENCE...INVESTIGATION OF WHISTLING ATMOSPHERICS, PHILOSOPHICAL...TRANSPOLAR EXOSPHERIC PLASMA .1. PLASMASPHERE...dynamics of the upper atmosphere. For this purpose...the ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

119

Variability in Springtime Thaw in the Terrestrial High Latitudes: Monitoring a Major Control on the Biospheric Assimilation of Atmospheric CO2 with Spaceborne Microwave Remote Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence is presented from the satellite microwave remote sensing record that the timing of seasonal thawing and subsequent initiation of the growing season in early spring has advanced by approximately 8 days from 1988 to 2001 for the pan-Arctic ...

Kyle C. McDonald; John S. Kimball; Eni Njoku; Reiner Zimmermann; Maosheng Zhao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO{sub 2} produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO{sub 2} uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO{sub 2} uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO{sub 2} fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years.

Peng, T. H.; Post, W. M.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Dale, V. H.; Farrell, M. P.

1987-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

122

Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"  

SciTech Connect

In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

Fung, Inez

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

125

The Biosphere: Anthropogenic Impact Biosphere: World's Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Invasive, Exotic Species #12;Addressing Trade-offs Map Domestication Effects onto Holdren's "3 Pillars Conditions: Sustainability Interdependent, Non-trivial; Address at Different Scales Quantify "Condition:" Multi-attribute; Then Integrate Three: "Preference Axioms" #12;Addressing Trade-offs In

Caraco, Thomas

126

Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases  

SciTech Connect

Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Conference on Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE half-yearly Conference of representatives of local authorities and other organisations co-operating with the Department of Scientific ... of atmospheric pollution was held in the offices of the Department on May 25. The Conference received from Dr. G. M. B. Dobson, chairman of the Atmospheric Pollution ...

1936-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Method for Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in Bacteriological Incubators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Method for Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in...Method for Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in...experience with water-jacket incubators...that the area of water used be the maximum...does not create condensation. For culturing...was made of the recovery of Mycobacterium...

Alfred G. Karslon; Patrick E. Caskey

1969-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

130

Search for Non-Standard Interactions by atmospheric neutrino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of neutral current Non-Standard Interactions in propagation on atmospheric neutrino experiments such as Super-Kamiokande and Hyper-Kamiokande. With the ansatz where the parameters which have strong constraints from other experiments are neglected, we show how these experiments put constraints on the remaining parameters of the Non-Standard Interactions.

Shinya Fukasawa

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

Atmospheric Physics and Earth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...has been used by atmospheric modelers as a vertical...Ackerman, in Atmospheric Physics from Spacelab...shut-tle allows recovery of the film, we...dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. To avoid water condensation on the optical...

M. HERSÉ

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Landfall and Inland Penetration of a Flood-Producing Atmospheric River in Arizona. Part II: Sensitivity of Modeled Precipitation to Terrain Height and Atmospheric River Orientation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This manuscript documents numerical modeling experiments based on a January 2010 atmospheric river (AR) event that caused extreme precipitation in Arizona. The control experiment (CNTL), using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with ...

Mimi Hughes; Kelly M. Mahoney; Paul J. Neiman; Benjamin J. Moore; Michael Alexander; F. Martin Ralph

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Estimating the Overall Impact of A Change in Agricultural Practices on Atmospheric CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Overall Impact of A Change the Overall Impact of A Change In Agricultural Practices on Atmospheric CO 2 T.O. West (westto@ornl.gov; 865-574-7322) G. Marland (marlandgh@ornl.gov; 865-241-4850) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 Introduction One option for sequestering carbon in the terrestrial biosphere is to increase the carbon (C) stocks in agricultural soils. There is now an extensive literature on the amount of C that has been lost from soils as a consequence of humans disturbing natural ecosystems, and of the amount of C that might be returned to soils with improved management practices. Improvements in management practices could include efficient use of fertilizers and irrigation water, use of crop rotations, and changing from conventional tillage (CT) to conservation tillage

135

The atmosphere of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations of Venus take a special position in planetary researches. It was just the atmosphere of Venus where first measurements in situ were carried out by means of the equipment delivered by a space pr...

V. I. Moroz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Atmospheric Dynamics of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres has come of age in the last decade, as astronomical techniques now allow for albedos, chemical abundances, temperature profiles and maps, rotation periods and even wind speeds to be measured. Atmospheric dynamics sets the background state of density, temperature and velocity that determines or influences the spectral and temporal appearance of an exoplanetary atmosphere. Hot exoplanets are most amenable to these characterization techniques; in the present review, we focus on highly-irradiated, large exoplanets (the "hot Jupiters"), as astronomical data begin to confront theoretical questions. We summarize the basic atmospheric quantities inferred from the astronomical observations. We review the state of the art by addressing a series of current questions and look towards the future by considering a separate set of exploratory questions. Attaining the next level of understanding will require a concerted effort of constructing multi-faceted, multi-wavelength dat...

Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

138

Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico, D.F., 04510 (Mexico)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

140

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

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Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

142

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

143

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

144

Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown Dwarfs are the coolest class of stellar objects known to date. Our present perception is that Brown Dwarfs follow the principles of star formation, and that Brown Dwarfs share many characteristics with planets. Being the darkest and lowest mass stars known makes Brown Dwarfs also the coolest stars known. This has profound implication for their spectral fingerprints. Brown Dwarfs cover a range of effective temperatures which cause brown dwarfs atmospheres to be a sequence that gradually changes from a M-dwarf-like spectrum into a planet-like spectrum. This further implies that below an effective temperature of atmospheres of objects marking the boundary between M-Dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Recent developments have sparked the interest in plasma processes in such very cool atmospheres: sporadic and quiescent radio emission has been observed in combination with decaying Xray-activity indicators across the fully convective boundary.

Helling, Christiane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Calculation of low-energy atmospheric muon flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of a three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of the low-energy atmospheric muon flux. They agree with the experiments by Allkofer et al. at sea level, but the agreement with the experiments by Conversi at a high altitude is not good, particularly at a very high altitude.

Haeshim Lee and Sidney A. Bludman

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The deep, hot biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the water-based drilling fluid. Later a pump...in several other oil drilling operations, and micro...Later, when oil-based drilling fluid had been in use...phenomenon that occurred on a large scale and that was a...4000 m in the Gravberg borehole, Siljan Ring, Central...

T Gold

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure (bars) N2 82%; Ar 12%; CH4 6%CO2 96.5%; N2 3.5%Atmospheric composition 26177Orbital inclination (1992) orbiter ­ Winds from cloud-tracking and probe drifts ­ IR temperatures, solar-fixed tides, polar-Huygens mission (from 2005) ­ Doppler wind descent profile ­ IR temperature and composition maps ­ Visible, IR

Read, Peter L.

148

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

149

ATMOSPHERIC ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud hydrometeors (water drops, ice particles, and, particularlyATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259 Simulations of drop fall turbulence. The model permits us to generate different realizations of the random velocity field component

Mark, Pinsky

150

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

152

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The changing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Old-field Community, Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation  

SciTech Connect

We are in the process of finishing a number of laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse projects, analyzing data, and writing papers. The projects reported addressed these subjects: How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground plant biomass and community structure; Effects of multiple climate changes factors on plant community composition and diversity: what did we learn from a 5-year open-top chamber experiment using constructed old-field communities; Do atmospheric and climatic change factors interact to alter woody seedling emergence, establishment and productivity; Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature in importance as a control on soil carbon dynamics; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground root and fungal biomass; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter soil microarthropod and microbial communities; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground microbial function; Linking root litter diversity and microbial functioning at a micro scale under current and projected CO{sub 2} concentrations; Multifactor climate change effects on soil ecosystem functioning depend on concurrent changes in plant community composition; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground insect populations; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter festuca endophyte infection; How do climate and atmospheric changes soil carbon stabilization.

Aimee Classen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

157

Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos High School L Al NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Presented at the PPPL Colloquium Sept. 17, 2008 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA LA-UR-08-06284 Outline of this talk *A discussion of ball lightning reports in nature *How can ball plasmas be made in the laboratory? *Detailed experiments on long lived free floating *Detailed experiments on long-lived free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas C i f l b b ll l i h "b ll *Comparison of laboratory ball plasmas with "ball lightning" *Summary U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA

158

The atmospheric reactivity of. alpha. -methyltetrahydrofuran  

SciTech Connect

Biomass-derived {alpha}-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) has been proposed as an automotive fuel additive. Since MTHF is a volatile organic compound, the environmental impact of evaporation to the atmosphere needs to be considered. The major loss process of MTHF in the atmosphere is expected to occur via reaction with hydroxyl radical; hence we have conducted a study of the kinetics of the reaction OH + MTHF {yields} products using both absolute (flash photolysis resonance fluorescence) and relative rate techniques. The absolute rate experiments were performed over the temperature range 240-400 K at total pressures of 35 Torr (4.7 kPa) argon; the relative rate experiments were conducted at 295 K in 740 Torr (99 kPa) synthetic air. The results from both techniques were in good agreement and yield k{sub 1} = (2.52 {plus minus} 0.74) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp-((650 {plus minus} 80)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, with k{sub 1} (298 K) = 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1}. The implications of these results for the atmospheric chemistry of MTHF are discussed.

Wallington, T.J.; Siegl, W.O. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (USA)); Liu, Renzhang; Zhang, Zhengyu; Huie, R.E.; Kurylo, M.J. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

160

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos ... In the positive ion mode, protonated water hydrates (H3O+(H2O)n) generated by the corona discharge in the chamber diluent air were responsible for the protonation of analytes, and the ions that were mass analyzed were mainly protonated molecules ([M + H]+) and their protonated homo- and heterodimers. ... Methyl nitrite, 2-propyl nitrite and N2O5 were prepared and stored as described previously,(8, 10) and O3 in O2 diluent was generated using a Welsbach T-408 ozone generator. ...

Sara M. Aschmann; Ernesto C. Tuazon; William D. Long; Roger Atkinson

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

163

ARM - Evolution of the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides clues as to the composition of the early atmosphere. Volcanic emissions include nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and trace gases such as argon. Although oxygen,...

164

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

165

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

Johnson, Robert E.

166

Ignition Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Experiments The goal of many NIF experiments is to create a self-sustaining "burn" of fusion fuel (the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium) that produces as much or...

167

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

168

Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jets on enzyme solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to study the wide scope of structural information of biomolecules in the presence of biocompatible cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets (CAPJ), we used circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence experi...

Pankaj Attri; Pannuru Venkatesu; Nagendra Kaushik…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mount Kenya Global Atmosphere Watch Station (MKN): Installation and Meteorological Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The meteorological conditions at the Mount Kenya (station identifier MKN) tropical Global Atmosphere Watch Programme station are described. Like other stations in mountainous terrain, the site experiences thermally induced wind systems that ...

Stephan Henne; Wolfgang Junkermann; Josiah M. Kariuki; John Aseyo; Jörg Klausen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

If Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions Cease, Will Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Continue to Increase?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that the overall ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Historical Research in the Atmospheric Sciences: The Value of Literature Reviews, Libraries, and Librarians  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author's experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying ...

David M. Schultz

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The second Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM: model description, spinup and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?This study describes a new coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) developed for studies of climate change and results from a hindcast experiment. The model includes various physical and te...

T. C. Johns; R. E. Carnell; J. F. Crossley; J. M. Gregory…

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Analysis of possible future atmospheric retention of fossil fuel CO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates the likely rates and the potential range of future CO/sub 2/ emissions, combined with knowledge of the global cycle of carbon, to estimate a possible range of future atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations through the year 2075. Historic fossil fuel usage to the present, growing at a rate of 4.5% per year until 1973 and at a slower rate of 1.9% after 1973, was combined with three scenarios of projected emissions growth ranging from approximately 0.2 to 2.8% per year to provide annual CO/sub 2/ emissions data for two different carbon cycle models. The emissions scenarios were constructed using an energy-economic model and by varying key parameters within the bounds of currently expected future values. The extreme values for CO/sub 2/ emissions in the year 2075 are 6.8 x 10/sup 15/ and 91 x 10/sup 15/ g C year/sup -1/. Carbon cycle model simulations used a range of year - 1800 preindustrial atmospheric concentrations of 245 to 292 ppM CO/sub 2/ and three scenarios of bioshere conversion as additional atmospheric CO/sub 2/ source terms. These simulations yield a range of possible atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations in year 2075 of approximately 500 to 1500 ppM, with a median of about 700 ppM. The time at which atmospheric CO/sub 2/ would potentially double from the preindustrial level ranges from year 2025 to >2075. The practical, programmatic value of this forecast exercise is that it forces quantitative definition of the assumptions, and the uncertainties therein, which form the basis of our understanding of the natural biogeochemical cycle of carbon and both historic and future human influences on the dynamics of the global cycle. Assumptions about the possible range of future atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels provide a basis on which to evaluate the implications of these changes on climate and the biosphere. 44 references, 17 figures, 21 tables.

Edmonds, J.A.; Reilly, J.; Trabalka, J.R.; Reichle, D.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

COLLOQUIUM: The Fate of the Land Carbon Sink | Princeton Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton University Models of the global terrestrial biosphere in current Earth system models (climate models with coupled atmosphere, ocean and biosphere) uniformly predict...

175

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Review article reached the International Reviews in Physical Chemistry most read list NULL...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic canada experience Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- the first continuous measuring... experiment on humanity's life- support system. Pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were... of the programme in 2001, a...

177

Digestion Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blank in Bulletin] BULLETIN NO. 291 FEBRUARY, 1922 DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS This is the sixth bulletin in a series whose object is to ascertain the Aceding value of Texas feeding stuffs by means of digestion experiments. Previous bulletins... The productive values and the values for digestible protein in t Bulletin have been calculated from the results of digestion esperiine? with sheep. The method of conducting the experiments is described Bulletins Nos. 147 and 166 of this Station. The production...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... preliminary work. The absence of levels of a higher order suggests that the contribution of radon from this source does not represent a significant addition to the total atmospheric level. ... Domestic 0.70

W. ANDERSON; R. C. TURNER

1956-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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181

Doubling of atmospheric methane supported  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric methane over the past 27,000 years was measured by analyzing air trapped in glacial ice in Greenland and Antarctica. Atmospheric concentrations were stable over that period until about 200 years b.p. In the last 200 years they have more than doubled. This change in concentration is correlated with the increase in human population; the implications for climate modification are discussed. 1 figure, 3 references.

Kerr, R.A.

1984-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group  

SciTech Connect

The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very large scale water Cerenkov detector, or a magnetized detector with flavor and antiflavor sensitivity. Additional priorities are nuclear physics measurements which will reduce the uncertainties in the predictions of the Standard Solar Model, and similar supporting measurements for atmospheric neutrinos (cosmic ray fluxes, magnetic fields, etc.). We note as well that the detectors for both solar and atmospheric neutrino measurements can serve as multipurpose detectors, with capabilities of discovering dark matter, relic supernova neutrinos, proton decay, or as targets for long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments.

Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

Sawyer, Patrick

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine

185

Hydronuclear experiments  

SciTech Connect

Hydronuclear experiments, a method for assessing some aspects of nuclear weapon safety, were conducted at Los Alamos during the 1958 to 1961 moratorium on nuclear testing. The experiments resulted in subcritical multiplying assemblies or a very slight degree of supercriticality and, in some cases, involved a slight, but insignificant, fission energy release. These experiments helped to identify so-called one-point safety problems associated with some of the nuclear weapons systems of that time. The need for remedial action was demonstrated, although some of the necessary design changes could not be made until after the resumption of weapons testing at the end of 1961.

Thorn, R.N.; Westervelt, D.R.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

187

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

188

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

189

Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

Venot, Olivia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

191

SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

Russell, Lynn

192

Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery Linked Environments for Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unidata Program Center #12;Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery The Team: 9 institutions and 105 MethodologyTraditional NWP Methodology STATIC OBSERVATIONS Radar Data Mobile Mesonets Surface Observations Satellites The Process is Entirely Prescheduled and Serial; It Does NOT Respond to the Weather! The Process

193

Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17431758 Impact of urban heat island on regional atmospheric pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and spatial distribution of atmospheric pollutants over the Paris region. One anticyclonic episode from Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Regional atmospheric pollution; Urban area micrometeorology are large sources of atmospheric pollutants. Their spatial distribution and their temporal evolution can

Ribes, Aurélien

194

Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HICKS, B.B., A SIMULATION OF THE EDDY ACCUMULATION...CLOSURES IN 2ND-ORDER MODELING, JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC...Their advantag-es are rapid response, linear output...the measurement and modeling of surface fluxes are...the appli-cation of automated conditional sampling...

W. F. Dabberdt; D. H. Lenschow; T. W. Horst; P. R. Zimmerman; S. P. Oncley; A. C. Delany

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook followed a Code of Honor, which is stated in this very simple verse: An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal that knowledge for the benefit of society. Our most fundamental mission is to help students at all levels, from

196

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect

The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

Simulation of Coal Ash Particle Deposition Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of Coal Ash Particle Deposition Experiments† ... Ichikawa et al.(7) measured deposition behavior for ash particles from ashing tests for a series of five coals, using a nominally 1 m tall × 60 mm diameter ash-heating tube that was fitted with a cooled, temperature-controlled particle impact probe oriented at a 30° angle to the atmospheric pressure air flow. ...

Weiguo Ai; John M. Kuhlman

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Emplacing experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose that understandings of the role of space and place in everyday life are of value to designing the environment of Role Playing Games (RPGs). We compare aspects of space and place in spatial experiences while moving through terrains in physical ... Keywords: place, space, video games

David Browning; Steven Stanley; Michael Fryer; Nicola J Bidwell

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Atmospheric Monitoring with a LIDAR and an Infra-red Camera at Black Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density, the US atmospheric standard model is used so far, and a radio sonde data is also used COLLABORATION 1 Department of Physics, Kinki University 2 Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University 3 for cosmic rays experiment. The aims of atmospheric moni- toring are to calibrate observed energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

202

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

203

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

204

Lifetimes and time scales in atmospheric chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as for years with extensive forest fires. Moving beyond atmospheric chemistry, extension of this approach to Earth system models could yield surprises. The coupling across different components of the chemistry-climate system, such as atmospheric...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A Model-Based Decomposition of the Sea Ice–Atmosphere Feedback over the Barents Sea during Winter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feedback between Barents Sea ice and the winter atmosphere was studied in a modeling framework by decomposing it into two sequential boundary forcing experiments. The Community Ice Code (CICE) model was initialized with anomalously high sea ...

Jessica Liptak; Courtenay Strong

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composites using atmospheric plasma treatment. J. Appl.of polymer surfaces: atmospheric plasma versus vacuum plasmaA. Morgan, The effect of atmospheric plasma treatment on the

Williams, Thomas Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

Paul H. Wine

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

Model Atmospheres for Low Field Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute model atmospheres and emergent spectra for low field (Bsolar abundance and iron atmospheres. We compare our results to high field magnetic atmospheres, available only for hydrogen. An application to apparently thermal flux from the low field millisecond pulsar PSR J0437--4715 shows that H atmospheres fit substantially better than Fe models. We comment on extension to high fields and the implication of these results for neutron star luminosities and radii.

Mohan Rajagopal; Roger Romani

1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

209

On the energy content of the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of the content of sensible heat, potential energy, and latent heat in the atmosphere between...

Stefan L. Hastenrath

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radar Measurement of the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Upper Atmosphere James C. G...two decades large radars have...of the upper atmosphere. These radars...ionospheric plasma, all as functions...ionospheric plasma by detection...is wasted. Atmospheric radar scientists...305 m and an area of 73,000...frequency of 430 MHz. The radar...

James C. G. Walker

1979-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RADIATIVE-TRANSFER DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC WATER-VAPOR - GLOBAL...giving rise to atmospheric mo-tions that...heat release by condensation as moist air...and because the atmospheric motions that...to thE1tfrof water in a leaky bucket...

J. Hansen; D. Johnson; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; P. Lee; D. Rind; G. Russell

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Instrumental Requirements for Global Atmospheric Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC CH2O, O3, AND NO2...AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC OH, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL...HYDROGEN-CHLORIDE AND WATER AT ANTARCTIC STRATOSPHERIC...TOON, O.B., CONDENSATION OF HNO3 AND HCL IN...requirements for global atmospheric chemistry. | The field...

D. L. Albritton; F. C. Fehsenfeld; A. F. Tuck

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Space plasma influences on the Earth's atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 129 0.2 0.6 1.0...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 131 the size and the...satellites probing the space-plasma and atmospheric environments, they provide...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

Ward, Bess

217

Ch4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than red light. #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum 8% 47% 45% 100% solar radiation #12;Blue Sky, Red;Energy Pathways #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Atmosphere or performing any work. #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Transmission

Pan, Feifei

218

Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

Smith, Arthur P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 ­ 10:50, 212B ACRC) 491-8587 Teaching Assistant: Lauren Potter Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 11 Lepotter, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical composition; 2) Explain the chemical

220

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry Monday and Wednesday, 9 ­ 9:50, 212B ACRC Instructor: Prof) Understand quantitatively how emissions, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical to Atmospheric Chemistry, D.J. Jacob Princeton University Press, 1999 PDF versions of the chapters can

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 5- (DRAFT) Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants Guy Landrieu INERIS Institut, Stuttgart : Germany (1995)" #12;INERIS: Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants (DRAFT may 1995) Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants Summary 1 Introduction 2 Background 3 Harmfulness

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Atmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmospheric chemistry/air quality, boundary layer and air pollution meteorology, regional/global climatology MODELING OF MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS AT URBAN AND REGIONAL SCALES Our atmosphere is a complex systemAtmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS) (http

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

224

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

226

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

227

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

228

ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY ESTIMATION USING SATELLITE PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current atmospheric density models are not capable enough to accurately model the atmospheric density, which varies continuously in the upper atmosphere mainly due to the changes in solar and geomagnetic activity. Inaccurate atmospheric modeling...

Arudra, Anoop Kumar

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Atmospheric pressure plasma processing with microstructure electrodes and microplanar reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure plasmas can be generated, if the distance between the plasma generating electrodes is in the range of 100 ?m, and radio-frequencies of 13.56 or 27.12 \\{MHz\\} are applied. Such small dimensioned plasmas are only of interest for industrial plasma applications if larger areas can be processed. It will be shown that both with microstructure electrodes as with microplanar-reactor, plasma processing can be carried out for typical substrate dimensions of 100 mm and more using helium or neon for plasma generation. First experiments of plasma surface treatment of polymers and of thin film deposition on silicon will be presented. With mixtures of some percentage C2H2 in atmospheric pressure helium, diamond-like carbon films with deposition rates between 1–10 ?m/min can be deposited.

H. Schlemm; D. Roth

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Heterogeneous Oxidation of Carbonyl Sulfide on Atmospheric Particles and Alumina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The specifications of gases used in this experiment are as follows without further purification:? OCS (2%, OCS/N2, Scott Specialty Gases Inc.), O2 (99.99% purity, Beijing AP BEIFEN Gases Inc.), H2 (99.999% purity, GCD-300B high purity hydrogen generator, China Bchp Analytical Technology Co. Ltd.). ... To confirm our assignment about the surface SO42- species, 1.0 g of preoxidized Al2O3 sample after exposure to a flow of 500 ppm OCS + 95% O2 at 298 K for 2 h was analyzed by ion chromatography (DIONEX, CA); 2.43 mg/L SO42- can be detected (sample stirred with 100 mL deionized water, and then filtered through a 0.45-?m filter). ... Since the real atmospheric particle sample has relatively high surface area (4.8 m2/g), its influence on the conversion of OCS in atmosphere is not neglectable. ...

Hong He; Junfeng Liu; Yujing Mu; Yunbo Yu; Meixue Chen

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect

A {gamma}-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250 C at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region there between. A jet of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, G.S.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

DeSalvo, Riccardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High-energy cosmic ray muons in the Earth's atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

We present the calculations of the atmospheric muon fluxes at energies 10-10{sup 7} GeV based on a numerical-analytical method for solving the hadron-nucleus cascade equations. It allows the non-power-law behavior of the primary cosmic ray (PCR) spectrum, the violation of Feynman scaling, and the growth of the total inelastic cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions with increasing energy to be taken into account. The calculations have been performed for a wide class of hadron-nucleus interaction models using directly the PCR measurements made in the ATIC-2 and GAMMA experiments and the parameterizations of the primary spectrum based on a set of experiments. We study the dependence of atmospheric muon flux characteristics on the hadronic interaction model and the influence of uncertainties in the PCR spectrum and composition on the muon flux at sea level. Comparison of the calculated muon energy spectra at sea level with the data from a large number of experiments shows that the cross sections for hadron-nucleus interactions introduce the greatest uncertainty in the energy region that does not include the knee in the primary spectrum.

Kochanov, A. A., E-mail: kochanov@iszf.irk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation); Sinegovskaya, T. S. [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation)] [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation); Sinegovsky, S. I., E-mail: sinegovsky@api.isu.ru [Irkutsk State University (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A calibrated laser pulse propagating through the atmosphere produces a flash of Rayleigh scattered light with an intensity that can be calculated very accurately when atmospheric conditions are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper we present the absolute calibration system being constructed and tested for the VERITAS project.

N. Shepherd; J. H. Buckley; O. Celik; J. Holder; S. LeBohec; H. Manseri; F. Pizlo; M. Roberts

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

Belgian Stratosphere Balloon Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE most difficult part of the planning of a large stratospheric balloon is how to control the rate of descent in the upper atmosphere. If a ...

M. COSYNS

1937-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of substrates and then further process into optoelectronic materials using rapid thermal processing. You can read more on the rationale for developing this platform and its capabilities. Contact Maikel van Hest for more details on these capabilities. The Atmospheric Processing platform will allow deposition in any sequence and is applicable to activities in all Technology Roadmaps, which include

237

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

238

Atmospheric Pressure Discharges: Traveling Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave sustained, atmospheric pressure plasmas are finding an increasing number of applications ... interest in the developing and investigating of appropriate plasma sources [1, 2].

Z. Zakrzewski; M. Moisan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

240

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Atmosphere to Electrons Program Overview Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation provides an introduction to the Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) initiative, including objectives, program areas, and a general timeline of activities.

243

Reference Alloy Waste Form Fabrication and Initiation of Reducing Atmosphere and Reductive Additives Study on Alloy Waste Form Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the fabrication of two reference alloy waste forms, RAW-1(Re) and RAW-(Tc) using an optimized loading and heating method. The composition of the alloy materials was based on a generalized formulation to process various proposed feed streams resulting from the processing of used fuel. Waste elements are introduced into molten steel during alloy fabrication and, upon solidification, become incorporated into durable iron-based intermetallic phases of the alloy waste form. The first alloy ingot contained surrogate (non-radioactive), transition-metal fission products with rhenium acting as a surrogate for technetium. The second alloy ingot contained the same components as the first ingot, but included radioactive Tc-99 instead of rhenium. Understanding technetium behavior in the waste form is of particular importance due the longevity of Tc-99 and its mobility in the biosphere in the oxide form. RAW-1(Re) and RAW-1(Tc) are currently being used as test specimens in the comprehensive testing program investigating the corrosion and radionuclide release mechanisms of the representative alloy waste form. Also described in this report is the experimental plan to study the effects of reducing atmospheres and reducing additives to the alloy material during fabrication in an attempt to maximize the oxide content of waste streams that can be accommodated in the alloy waste form. Activities described in the experimental plan will be performed in FY12. The first aspect of the experimental plan is to study oxide formation on the alloy by introducing O2 impurities in the melt cover gas or from added oxide impurities in the feed materials. Reducing atmospheres will then be introduced to the melt cover gas in an attempt to minimize oxide formation during alloy fabrication. The second phase of the experimental plan is to investigate melting parameters associated with alloy fabrication to allow the separation of slag and alloy components of the melt.

S.M. Frank; T.P. O'Holleran; P.A. Hahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione Discovery could mean ingredients for life are abundant on icy space bodies. March 5, 2012 Curiosity rover bears three LANL technologies Inside Titan: This artist's concept shows a possible scenario for the internal structure of Titan, as suggested by data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Scientists have been trying to determine what is under Titan's organic-rich atmosphere and icy crust. Data from the radio science experiment make the strongest case yet for a global subsurface ocean, sitting above a subsurface layer of high-pressure ice and a water-infused silicate core. Image credit: A. Tavani Get Expertise

245

Plasma sterilization using glow discharge at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent development of atmospheric pressure glow discharge was compared with the performance of an apparatus used in the first APG experiment, in terms of sterilization of newly classified biological indicator: Bacillus atrophaeus, former Bacillus subtilis var. niger and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Stabilization was attained by controlling the experimental conditions, at low frequency: 100 kHz and Radio Frequency: 13.56 MHz, water vapor/He dilution. Large volume of meta-stable atomic helium is responsible for the result that aids generation of hydroxyl radicals.

Tetsuya Akitsu; Hiroshi Ohkawa; Masao Tsuji; Hideo Kimura; Masuhiro Kogoma

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

Zhuang, Qianlai

247

Evaluation of very long baseline interferometry atmospheric modeling improvements  

SciTech Connect

We determine the improvement in baseline length precision and accuracy using new atmospheric delay mapping functions and MTT by analyzing the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project research and development (R&D) experiments and the International Radio Interferometric Surveying (IRIS) A experiments. These mapping functions reduce baseline length scatter by about 20% below that using the CfA2.2 dry and Chao wet mapping functions. With the newer mapping functions, average station vertical scatter inferred from observed length precision (given by length repeatabilites) is 11.4 mm for the 1987-1990 monthly R&D series of experiments and 5.6 mm for the 3-week-long extended research and development experiment (ERDE) series. The inferred monthly R&D station vertical scatter is reduced by 2 mm or by 7 mm is a root-sum-square (rss) sense. Length repeatabilities are optimum when observations below a 7-8 deg elevation cutoff are removed from the geodetic solution. Analyses of IRIS-A data from 1984 through 1991 and the monthly R&D experiments both yielded a nonatmospheric unmodeled station vertical error or about 8 mm. In addition, analysis of the IRIS-A exeriments revealed systematic effects in the evolution of some baseline length measurements. The length rate of change has an apparent acceleration, and the length evolution has a quasi-annual signature. We show that the origin of these effects is unlikely to be related to atmospheric modeling errors. Rates of change of the transatlantic Westford-Wettzell and Richmond-Wettzell baseline lengths calculated from 1988 through 1991 agree with the NUVEL-1 plate motion model (Argus and Gordon, 1991) to within 1 mm/yr.

Macmillan, D.S.; Ma, C. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Relative role of changes in CO? and climate to equilibrium responses of net primary production and carbon storage of the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a partial factorial model experiment, we used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) to assess the relative roles of changes in CO2, temperature, precipitation and cloudiness in equilibrium responses of ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

249

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate June 2013. [1] Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating). Here we used a process-based biogeochemistry model to quantify soil consumption during the 20th and 21

250

Atmospheric Science The Earth's atmosphere, a layered sphere of gas extending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

division study the composition, structure, chemical, and physical processes of the Earth's atmosphere. The division's four interrelated groups focus on satellite, airborne, and ground-based observations processes such as atmospheric dynamics, chemistry, and radiation on Earth and other planets. Our atmospheric

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

251

ARCADE - Atmospheric Research for Climate and Astroparticle DEtection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of the optical properties of the atmosphere in the near UV, in particular the tropospheric aerosol stratification, clouds optical depth and spatial distribution are common in the field of atmospheric physics, due to aerosol effect on climate, and also in cosmic rays physics, for a correct reconstruction of energy and longitudinal development of showers. The goal of the ARCADE project is the comparison of the aerosol attenuation measurements obtained with the typical techniques used in cosmic ray experiments (side-scattering measurement, elastic LIDAR and Raman LIDAR) in order to assess the systematic errors affecting each method providing simultaneous observations of the same air mass with different techniques. For this purpose we projected a LIDAR that is now under construction: it will use a 355 nm Nd:YAG laser and will collect the elastic and the N2 Raman back-scattered light. For the side-scattering measurement we will use the Atmospheric Monitoring Telescope, a facility owned by the ...

Buscemi, M; Cilmo, M; Coco, M; Ferrarese, S; Guarino, F; Tonachini, A S; Valore, L; Wiencke, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Calibrations of filter radiometers for determination of atmospheric optical depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric optical depths are determined by relating ground-based measurements of direct solar radiation to the extraterrestrial value, I0, that a filter radiometer would read outside the atmosphere. Usually I0 is determined by the Langley extrapolation technique from a high-altitude site, where clear and highly stable atmospheric conditions may be found. Alternatively, I0 can be measured in situ from a stratospheric balloon experiment. We have employed both methods and found agreement to better than 1 %. Filter radiometers tend to change over time, especially when used operationally outdoors. Absolute calibrations in the laboratory are used to monitor the radiometric stability of filter radiometers at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD/WRC, Switzerland). A spectral calibration facility based on a calibrated trap detector from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) is used to relate the filter radiometer to an accurate and long-term traceable standard. An FEL-lamp-based standard, previously used for several years, was compared with the new trap standard via a filter radiometer at four wavelengths between 368 nm and 862 nm and revealed a systematic difference of the order of 5 %. The link between radiometric and I0 calibration is the value of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum at the filter radiometer wavelengths which can be determined from these two calibrations and compared with published values.

Ch Wehrli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

High resolution properties of the marine atmospheric boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) participated in the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) by fielding a water-vapor Raman lidar on board the Research Vessel Vickers. The lidar measured water vapor concentration from the surface to lower tropospheric altitudes in order to support the CEPEX goal of evaluating a hypothesis regarding feedback mechanisms for global circulation models. This report describes some of the features observed within the marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the lower troposphere. Data was collected continuously 24 hours per day over the equatorial Pacific from March 8th to March 2 1st of 1993 while in route between Guadalcanal and Christmas Island (the transect was at approximately 2{degree} south latitude). The lidar collected vertical transects of water vapor concentration up to 10 km during night operations and 4 km in the day. The vertical lidar profiles of water vapor were produced by summing the data over a period up to 600 seconds. The water-vapor Raman lidar measured the properties of the marine ABL as well as the lower and mid-troposphere. From the lidar water vapor profiles, ``images`` of water vapor concentration versus altitude and date or sea surface temperature will be produced along with other products such as latent heat fluxes. The Raman water vapor lidar data will be used to better understand the role of transport and exchange at the ocean-atmosphere interface and throughout the marine atmosphere.

Cooper, D.; Cottingame, W.; Eichinger, W.; Forman, P.; Lebeda, C.; Poling, D.; Thorton, R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

Wood, Robert (VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington); Bretherton, Christopher (GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington); Huebert, Barry (SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii); Mechoso, Roberto C. (VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA); Weller, Robert (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

255

Super-Kamiokande Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......16N created inside the water tank through the reaction...the so called `DT- generator` using the reaction...between the solar and atmospheric neutrinos show the predictions...respectively. Solar and atmospheric neutrino signal are...RSN. 72 Y. Suzuki water Cherenkov detector......

Yoichiro Suzuki

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radio Frequency Signals in Jupiter's Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IMAGE OF A LARGE UPWARD ELECTRICAL-DISCHARGE...RINNERT K , HDB ATMOSPHERIC ELEC 27 ( 1995...MEASUREMENTS OF THE RF CHARACTERISTICS...JUPITER PLASMA-WAVE OBSERVATIONS...OBSERVATIONS OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC OPTICAL FLASHES...Solar and thermal radiation...relatively large at the beginning...and about non-radiative...sensitive area of 6...

L. J. Lanzerotti; K. Rinnert; G. Dehmel; F. O. Gliem; E. P. Krider; M. A. Uman; J. Bach

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth...interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies of 500 Mhz, this amounts...chang-ing the atmospheric carbon dioxide...in the polar areas. Although...The shaded area indicates the...per-missible atmospheric CO2 level might...emission rates are largest between 2000...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 8629EEC7C72DEEE5.1256/qj.05.87 Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation By S. POLAVARAPU1,2, T. G. SHEPHERD2 Data assimilation is employed at operational weather forecast centres to combine measurements and model

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

260

Atmospheric muon background in the ANTARES detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evaluation of the background due to atmospheric muons in the ANTARES high energy neutrino telescope is presented. Two different codes for atmospheric shower simulation have been used. Results from comparisons between these codes at sea level and detector level are presented. The first results on the capability of ANTARES to reject this class of background are given.

S. Cecchini; E. Korolkova; A. Margiotta; L. Thompson

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... MEASUREMENTS of the radon content of the atmosphere were made so long ago as 1905 by Eve1-2 in ... whole seemed to support the original suggestion of Elster and Geitel6 in 1903 that the radon in the atmosphere arises mainly from the soil. These workers noted that the highest ...

W. ANDERSON; W. V. MAYNEORD; R. C. TURNER

1954-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland Research Applications Laboratory National Center for Atmospheric Research 2007-08 Program on Risk Analysis, Extreme Events and Decision Theory, opening workshop 16-19 September, North Carolina #12;Extremes · Interest in making inferences about large, rare, extreme phenomena

Gilleland, Eric

263

THE DOE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE PROGRAM Highlights from the 2008 Science Team Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmospheric CO2 that would result in a given increase in global mean surface temperature. · Uncertainty Aerosol Experiment­MEXico City (MAX-MEX) ­ 2006. Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) ­ OK in global chemical transport models and global climate models. Summary. DOE workshop on "grand challenges

Schwartz, Stephen E.

264

A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

Hoerst, S. M. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Brown, M. E., E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

Export of Asian pollution during two cold front episodes of the TRACE-P experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Asian outflow by fragmenting the pollution plume. INDEX TERMS: 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Atmospheric Dynamics: Mesoscale meteorology; KEYWORDS: warm conveyor belt, TRACE-P, pollution Citation: MariExport of Asian pollution during two cold front episodes of the TRACE-P experiment C. Mari

Palmer, Paul

266

Geothermal heating enhances atmospheric asymmetries on synchronously rotating planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth-like planets within the liquid water habitable zone of M type stars may evolve into synchronous rotators. On these planets, the sub-stellar hemisphere experiences perpetual daylight while the opposing anti-stellar hemisphere experiences perpetual darkness. Because the night-side hemisphere has no direct source of energy, the air over this side of the planet is prone to freeze out and deposit on the surface, which could result in atmospheric collapse. However, general circulation models (GCMs) have shown that atmospheric dynamics can counteract this problem and provide sufficient energy transport to the anti-stellar side. Here we use an idealized GCM to consider the impact of geothermal heating on the habitability of synchronously rotating planets. Geothermal heating may be expected due to tidal interactions with the host star, and the effects of geothermal heating provide additional habitable surface area and may help to induce melting of ice on the anti-stellar hemisphere. We also explore the persisten...

Haqq-Misra, Jacob

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

An Airborne Study of an Atmospheric River over the Subtropical Pacific during WISPAR: Dropsonde Budget-Box Diagnostics and Precipitation Impacts in Hawaii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) experiment was carried out in January–March 2011 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center as a demonstration for utilizing unmanned aerial ...

Paul J. Neiman; Gary A. Wick; Benjamin J. Moore; F. Martin Ralph; J. Ryan Spackman; Bill Ward

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part 1: Control Climate and Flux Adjustment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres V. A. Sreckovic 1 Lj...applicable for the helium plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres described in Koester...study of DB white dwarf atmosphere plasma properties, helium plasmas......

V. A. Sreckovic; Lj. M. Ignjatovic; A. A. Mihajlov; M. S. Dimitrijevic

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

270

Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted so as to characterize atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic (pollution) and natural (sea saltAtomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy

Shapira, Yoram

271

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut; 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 3210 Mathematical: atmospheric pollution, tropospheric ozone, urban pollution peaks, adjoint modeling, sensitivity Citation

Menut, Laurent

272

Radon in atmospheric studies: a review  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of the isotopes of radon in space and time, their physical characteristics, and their behavior in the dynamics of the atmosphere have presented challenges for many decades. /sup 220/Rn, /sup 222/Rn and their daughters furnish a unique set of tracers for the study of transport and mixing processes in the atmosphere. Appropriate applications of turbulent diffusion theory yield general agreement with measured profiles. Diurnal and seasonal variations follow patterns set by consideration of atmospheric stability. /sup 222/Rn has been used successfully in recent studies of nocturnal drainage winds and cumulus convection. Good results have been obtained using /sup 222/Rn and its long-lived /sup 210/Pb daughter as tracers in the study of continent-to-ocean and ocean-to-continent air mass trajectories, /sup 220/Rn (thoron) because of its short half-life of only 55 seconds has been used to measure turbulent diffusion within the first few meters of the earth's surface and to study the influence of meteorological variables on the rate of exhalation from the ground. Radon daughters attach readily to atmospheric particulate matter which makes it possible to study these aerosols with respect to size spectra, attachment characteristics, removal by gravitation and precipitation, and residence times in the troposphere. The importance of ionization by radon and its daughters in the lower atmosphere and its effect on atmospheric electrical parameters is well known. Knowledge of the mobility and other characteristics of radon daughter ions has led to applications in the study of atmospheric electrical environments under fair weather and thunderstorm conditions and in the formation of condensation nuclei. The availability of increasingly sophisticated analytical tools and atmospheric measurement systems can be expected to add much to our understanding of radon and its daughters as trace components of the atmospheric environment in the years ahead.

Wilkening, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector  

SciTech Connect

The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.

IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

274

Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmosphere Model Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model CCSM-sprabhat.png Global warming will likely change the statistics of tropical cyclones and hurricanes. In this...

275

Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

276

Intense and Highly Energetic Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Arrays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis documents the efforts taken to produce highly ionized and concentrated atmospheric pressure plasma using an arrayed atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system. The… (more)

Furmanski, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

278

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

279

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national economies; Recognizing that significant interrelated, atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial global, terrestrial and atmospheric ecosystem studies should focus on the structure and processes of the environment

280

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Impact of Varying Atmospheric Profiles on Extensive Air Shower Observation: Fluorescence Light Emission and Energy Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several experiments measure the fluorescence light produced by extensive air showers in the atmosphere. This light is converted into a longitudinal shower profile from which information on the primary energy and composition is derived. The fluorescence yield, as the conversion factor between light profile measured by EAS experiments and physical interpretation of showers, has been measured in several laboratory experiments. The results, however, differ considerably. In this article, a model calculation of the fluorescence emission from relevant band systems of nitrogen in dependence on wavelength and atmospheric conditions is presented. Different calculations are compared to each other in combination with varying input parameters. The predictions are compared with measurements and the altitude-dependence of the fluorescence yield is discussed in detail.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

Muon decays in the Earth's atmosphere, differential aging and the paradox of the twins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observation of the decay of muons produced in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions provides a graphic illustration of the counter-intuitive space-time predictions of special relativity theory. Muons at rest in the atmosphere, decaying simultaneously, are subject to a universal time-dilatation effect when viewed from a moving frame and so are also observed to decay simultaneously in all such frames. The analysis of this example reveals the underlying physics of the differential aging effect in Langevin's travelling-twin thought experiment.

J. H. Field

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Multiply Scattering Effect on the Energy Measurement of UHE Cosmic Rays using Atmospheric Fluorescence Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Point sources in the atmosphere are surrounded by aureole because of atmospheric scattering. The properties of the time-dependent aureole radiance are calculated by use of a Monte Carlo approach and an iterative method. Since the aureole is particularly important in the ultraviolet, which is the region the Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic ray experiment using the air fluorescence technique like Fly's Eye or High-Resolution-Fly's-Eye(HiRes) are set in. The effect of the multiply scatteing on the energy measurement is studied.

Xingzhi Zhang

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

285

Airborne Particles in Outdoor Air: Atmospheric Dust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For industrial products, in addition to the harmful effect like usual particles, the particular harmful effect of atmospheric dust especially metal particles is very large. For example, the light metal element...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) represents an innovative approach...2, and dust cycles together with the energy and momentum budgets. The mission concept is based on a constellation of satel...

E. R. Kursinski; W. Folkner; C. Zuffada…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Uraninite and Fullerene in Atmospheric Particulates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incineration, uranium mining, and atmospheric testing of nuclearweapons-burning power plants typically contain very small amounts of uranium ( concentrations, the form of the uranium has been unknown. Using a variety of advanced electron microscopy

Utsunomiya, Satoshi

288

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens ... (22) Plasma II is more effective than Plasma I with the ability to develop homogeneous plasmas and eliminate boundary-layer air effects. ...

Sudheer Jinka; Uday Turaga; Vinitkumar Singh; Rachel L. Behrens; Cenk Gumeci; Carol Korzeniewski; Todd Anderson; Rory Wolf; Seshadri Ramkumar

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

289

Adaptive control for Mars atmospheric flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landing accuracy requirements for a manned space vehicle make it necessary to ?y a controlled entry trajectory rather than a more robust ballistic entry trajectory used for some robotic missions. The large variations in Mars atmospheric properties make a...

Restrepo, Carolina Isabel

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Ballistic Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence on munition target scatter are determined from numerical simulations of ballistic trajectories through many realizations of realistic simulated turbulent wind fields. A technique is evaluated for correcting ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Charles Clough; Michael Padovani; Kelly Fling; Ward Boughers; W. Scott Walton

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Balanced Atmospheric Response to Squall Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a Squall line propagates through the atmosphere, it not only excite transient gravity–inertia wave motion but also produces more permanent modifications to the large-scale balanced flow. Here we calculate this balanced response using the is ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Scott R. Fulton; Rolf F. A. Herttenstein

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric levels. Measurements in the free troposphere (FT) are particularly useful, because trace gas and particle

Honrath, Richard E.

294

Synopsis of Atmospheric Research under MAGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cold regions present a challenge to atmospheric and hydrologic research. Their low temperatures test the endurance of field workers and their instruments; their distance from large urban centers raises the cos...

Ming-ko Woo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

296

Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion  

SciTech Connect

In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Trace analysis of atmospheric organic bases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of atmospheric organic bases were investigated; the study included (1) the analysis of submarine charcoal filter bed samples for nitrogen bases and (2) the use of metallic tetraphenylporphines (TPP) as specific adsorbents for atmospheric... gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The isolation procedure provided acceptable reproducibi lity in the determination of trace amounts of nitrogen bases in the submarine environment. Several metallic TPP adsorbents were...

Clark, Dwayne C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Nature Bulletin No. 554-A February 15, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF OUR ATMOSPHERE In Bulletin No. 542-A we described the atmosphere that surrounds the earth, held there by the pull of gravity, including the canopy of air immediately above us. That canopy is responsible for our weather and climates, shields us from the killing rays of the sun, and furnishes substances necessary for all life: oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Astronomers believe that none of the other planets -- excepting Mars, perhaps -- has an atmosphere anything like ours. The principal elements, free nitrogen (78 percent) and free oxygen (21 percent), apparently are rare in the universe. On the other hand, the earth's atmosphere contains only traces of free hydrogen and helium -- the two lightest gases -- whereas they are by far the most common elements elsewhere in the universe.

299

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments S. Bottone and S. Moore Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction Quality Measurement Experiments (QME) are a special class of Value-Added Products (VAP). QMEs add value to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program datastreams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of incoming data based on internal consistency checks, comparisons between independent similar measurements, or comparisons between measurements and modeled results. Like any datastream, QME datastreams need to be checked for data quality. For each QME, we analyze a representative sample of files from the ARM data archive to determine 'typical' values of the QME variables. We then design outlier tests, specific to each variable, to be applied to

300

Neutrino Oscillation Experiments at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper I give an overview of the status of neutrino oscillation experiments performed using nuclear reactors as sources of neutrinos. I review the present generation of experiments (Chooz and Palo Verde) with baselines of about 1 km as well as the next generation that will search for oscillations with a baseline of about 100 km. While the present detectors provide essential input towards the understanding of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, in the future, the KamLAND reactor experiment represents our best opportunity to study very small mass neutrino mixing in laboratory conditions. In addition KamLAND with its very large fiducial mass and low energy threshold, will also be sensitive to a broad range of different physics.

Giorgio Gratta

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Atmospheric chemistry impacts and feedbacks on the global carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prediction. Issues to be addressed include the quantification of the impact of the atmospheric oxidation and the oxidative state of the atmosphere. The end goal is to create a model that can quantitatively predict is required to: Predict 3-D atmospheric CO2 production as a function of the CCSM3 atmospheric chemistry module

302

MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Upper-Ocean Currents How the atmosphere-ocean-land system/Salinity/Mass/Momentum Conservations #12; How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? It is the sun that sustains all living beings on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

303

Data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Networks  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) is a nationwide network of sites collecting data on the chemistry of precipitation for monitoring of geographical and temporal long-term trends. The precipitation at each station is collected weekly according to strict clean-handling procedures. It is then sent to the Central Analytical Laboratory where it is analyzed for hydrogen (acidity as pH), sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, and base cations (such as calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium). The network is a cooperative effort between many different groups, including the State Agricultural Experiment Stations, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and numerous other governmental and private entities. DOE is one of these cooperating agencies, though it plays a smaller funding role than some of the other federal sources. Since 1978, the NADP/NTN has grown from 22 stations to over 250 sites spanning the continental United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program has also expanded its sampling to two additional networks: 1) the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN), currently with over 90 sites, was formed in 1995 to collect weekly samples of precipitation which are analyzed by Frontier Geosciences for total mercury, and 2) the Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN), formed for the purpose of studying precipitation chemistry trends with greater temporal resolution than the NTN. [taken from the NADP History and Overview page at http://nadp.sws.uiuc.edu/nadpoverview.asp] Data from these networks are freely available in via customized search interfaces linked to interactive maps of the stations in the three networks. Animated Isopleth maps in Flash and PowerPoint are also available to display concentrations and depositions various substances such as sulfate, nitrate, etc. (Specialized Interface)

304

Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the mass of Jupiter and R its radius. Assuming this is all converted to thermal energy, give a crudePhysics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES PLA.1 for discounting the less popular of these? Show that the energy liberated during the collapse of a sphere of mass

Read, Peter L.

305

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Experimental studies on atmospheric Stirling engine NAS-2  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric hot air Stirling engine NAS-1 and 2 have a simple flat rubber sheet diaphragm as their power piston, and they have been experimentally studied at Nihon University for several years continuously, with the target of to get more than 100 watts shaft power by atmospheric air with simple construction and cheap material. The first NAS-1 was intended to be a solar heated engine using television glass and wood for cheap cost, but it failed by thermal break of glass, so the improved NAS-2 is changed to be heated by gas burner, using metallic materials in all parts except rubber power piston. Other than this rubber sheet diaphragm, NAS-2 has many features as using James Watt crank mechanism, high finny copper tube for conventional commercial heat exchanger, and two kinds of hot gas heaters, etc. About the rubber sheet for the power piston, the thickness of the sheet was changed from 2 mm to 6 mm gradually to known what thickness is best, and it is found that about 5 mm is best for this engine. After trying many improvements on this engine, NAS-2 has produced about 130 watt shaft power with indicated power of 350 watt at 1994. In this paper detail of many features, history, results and experiments of these NAS engines are reported.

Watanabe, Hiroichi [Nihon Univ., Koriyama (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Isshiki, Naotsugu [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Ohtomo, Michihiro [Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Sendai (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

308

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

309

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

310

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

311

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

312

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

313

Detection of an Extrasolar Planet Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report high precision spectrophotometric observations of four planetary transits of HD 209458, in the region of the sodium resonance doublet at 589.3 nm. We find that the photometric dimming during transit in a bandpass centered on the sodium feature is deeper by (2.32 +/- 0.57) x 10^{-4} relative to simultaneous observations of the transit in adjacent bands. We interpret this additional dimming as absorption from sodium in the planetary atmosphere, as recently predicted from several theoretical modeling efforts. Our model for a cloudless planetary atmosphere with a solar abundance of sodium in atomic form predicts more sodium absorption than we observe. There are several possibilities that may account for this reduced amplitude, including reaction of atomic sodium into molecular gases and/or condensates, photoionization of sodium by the stellar flux, a low primordial abundance of sodium, or the presence of clouds high in the atmosphere.

David Charbonneau; Timothy M. Brown; Robert W. Noyes; Ronald L. Gilliland

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction The shape of the diurnal cycle of atmospheric downwelling radiation is an important climatic feature of cloud-radiation interactions and atmospheric properties. Adequate characterization of this diurnal cycle is critical for accurate determination of monthly and seasonal radiation budgets from a limited data sampling. This is especially important for establishing the optimal sampling and temporal interpolation schemes employed in satellite radiation budget missions, such as Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB), and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System

315

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

316

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

317

A sun glint heliostat for atmospheric spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple arrangement based upon sun glint the brilliant image of the sun behind a convex reflecting surface is used to produce a nearly stationary image of the sun. Using a telescopemirror this image is directed into a spectrometer and is spectrally analyzed for the purpose of remote sensing of trace species in our atmosphere. Typical data using a reflecting sphere are reported and discussed qualitatively in relation to the atmospheric absorbers between the sun and detector. The over?all uses of the system are described and some cautions concerning its limitations are discussed. Alternate geometries and possible variations of the system are described.

A. E. S. Green; R. A. Sutherland; G. Ganguli

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750.degree. C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5-3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2004 North Slope of Alaska 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater, M. A. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. J. Gasiewski, T. Uttal, and D. A. Hazen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini Remote Sensing Division, CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

320

Internal solitary waves in the Coastal Mixing and Optics 1996 experiment: Multimodal structure and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and resuspension D. J. Bogucki Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami in sediment resuspension during the Coastal Mixing and Optics 1996 (CMO 96) experiment are reported. The largest resuspension events observed in the experiment can be related to retarded flow under the wave

Kurapov, Alexander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Transfer Experiment/TIM Frequently Asked Questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TCTE Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Transfer Experiment/TIM Frequently Asked Questions What is the purpose of the TCTE mission? The Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Transfer Experiment (TCTE to monitor changes in solar irradiance at the top of the Earth's atmosphere. TCTE will launch as one of five

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

322

The Dust Accelerator Facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Lunar Institute's Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies has recently completed the construction of a new experimental facility to study hypervelocity dust impacts. The installation includes a 3 MV Pelletron, accelerating small particles in the size range of 0.1 to few microns to velocities in the range of 1 to 100 km/s. Here we report the capabilities of our facility, and the results of our first experiments.

Horanyi, M.; Colette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Robertson, S.; Shu, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X. [NASA Lunar Science Institute Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Celestial Mechanics Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...at-mosphere. The facilities and methods for col-lecting particulate material from 100-to 300-year-old ice at Camp Century, Greenland, have been described (5). In our work, columns containing ca-tion-exchange or mixed cationand anion-exchange...

J. D. Anderson; G. E. Pease; L. Efron; R. C. Tausworthe

1967-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;2 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Contents 3 Heavy Snowfall regulations designed to elimi- nate human-caused haze in Big Bend and 155 other National Parks), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), among others. In support of BRAVO, NPS and CIRA scientists

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

325

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas Alexander Fridman · Microdischarge Interaction and Structuring in Dielectric Barrier Discharges · Kinetics of Blood Coagulation in Plasma · Surface Wound wire Area of DBD plasma region: ~104cm2 #12;7 Microdischarge Patterning (2D) R22 R23 R24 R26 R27 R28

Kaganovich, Igor

326

Sputtering and heating of Titan's upper atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Although, the plasma energy deposition...viable, but the plasma heating is inadequate...be true: another non-thermal process must be active...composition of the ambient plasma near Titan's orbit...used to test the atmospheric loss rate. Prior...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of solar composition studies. The first column labeled "radial" describes the overall structure of the workTHE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN Sterrekundig Instituut, Postbus 80 000, NL­3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract. This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low

Rutten, Rob

328

Atmospheric chemistry of gaseous diethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of diethyl sulfate (DES) has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants (in cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DES with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by FTIR spectroscopy and are <3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and {le}2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}23}, respectively. The reactivity of DES toward OH radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from {ge}1 day with respect to reaction with water to >12 years with respect to ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DES within an urban air parcel is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmospheric species studied. No evidence has been found for the formation of DES or related compounds during the ozonolysis of olefins in the presence of SO{sub 2} and ethanol.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is no10 isotopic fractionation between the liquid phase and the generated moist "air". The water11., A microdrop generator for the calibration of.... 1. Introduction1 2 Water vapor is a key element in the globalAMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

330

Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 May 1971 research-article Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer...semi-empirical laws for the variation of mean wind speed with height and for the statistical...provide some useful ordering of the mean wind profile characteristics in relation to...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

TETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, starting with the Greek and Roman cultures3'4.The cumulative deposition from anthropogenicsourcesin preTETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric lead contamination detected in Swedish lake sediments for pre-industrial atmospherictrace-metalcontaminationt''it is commonlyassumed that air pollution

Short, Daniel

332

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professor; Recipient, Teaching Innovation Prize; Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year Allison Mission to Comet 67P / Churyumov- Gerasimenko · Solar and Heliospheric Physics Group · STEREO Mission,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann

Eustice, Ryan

333

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Research areas Atmospheric Science/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved

Eustice, Ryan

334

1 - Solubility of Atmospheric Gases in Freshwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents tabular information on the standard air saturation concentration (moist air at 1 atm) for oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gas in terms of ?mol/kg, mg/L, and mL/L; and in terms of Bunsen coefficients L real gas/(L atm); mg real gas/(L mmHg); and mg real gas/(L kPa) for 0–40°C and freshwater conditions. Because the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is changing, solubility information is provided for 2010 (390 ?atm) and for 2030 (440 ?atm) based on projected atmospheric values. Tabular information is also provided to allow computation of standard air saturation concentrations of carbon dioxide gas directly as a function of atmospheric mole fraction. Conversion factors are presented to convert these concentrations to other commonly used units. Equations and tabular information are provided to compute air saturation concentration for moist air at local barometric pressure for the four atmospheric gases. Because of the importance of dissolved oxygen in biological processes, the air solubility concentration is also presented as a function of elevation for both metric and English elevations. Equations and tabular information are provided to allow conversion of concentrations in mg/L to partial pressures in mmHg. Sample problems are included for representative examples. Keywords gas solubility, freshwater, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, standard air solubility, air solubility, Bunsen coefficients, partial pressures

John Colt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

Pierce, Stephen

336

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

Barth, Jack

337

Nonlinear waves in the solar atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the intended application to solar physics deserves great effort...waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Figure 1 A typical...distance from the base of the solar atmosphere. The quantity is...The (a), (b) and (c) panels correspond to z=0, z=z...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

White Dwarf Spectra and Atmosphere Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the spectral classification of white dwarfs and some of the physical processes important for their understanding. In the major part of this paper we discuss the input physics and computational methods for one of the most widely used stellar atmosphere codes for white dwarfs.

Detlev Koester

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ch.6 Atmospheric and Oceanic Circulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference in air pressure. #12;Measure Air Pressure-- Mercury Barometer ·Seal the glass tube at one end of latitude. Meridional flows Zonal flows #12;Learning Objective Two: Air Pressure #12;Air Pressure Atmospheric pressure is the force per unit area exerted against a surface by the weight of air above

Pan, Feifei

340

Stereographic displays of atmospheric model data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system has been developed to display color stereographic time-lapsed sequences of outputs of three-dimensional atmospheric models. Contour lines and wind vectors derived from a model can be overlaid on a geostationary satellite image or displayed with ... Keywords: Computer graphics, Meteorology, Modeling display, Stereography

Mary desJardins; A. Frederick Hasler

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Magnetic Field in the Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication provides an overview of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere with the focus lying on the corona. The solar magnetic field couples the solar interior with the visible surface of the Sun and with its atmosphere. It is also responsible for all solar activity in its numerous manifestations. Thus, dynamic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and flares are magnetically driven. In addition, the field also plays a crucial role in heating the solar chromosphere and corona as well as in accelerating the solar wind. Our main emphasis is the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere so that photospheric and chromospheric magnetic structures are mainly discussed where relevant for higher solar layers. Also, the discussion of the solar atmosphere and activity is limited to those topics of direct relevance to the magnetic field. After giving a brief overview about the solar magnetic field in general and its global structure, we discuss in more detail the magnetic field in active regions, the quie...

Wiegelmann, Thomas; Solanki, Sami K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

COR Summary of Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Effective January 1, 2012 CORs who are applying for certification must demonstrate past contracting, acquisition, procurement, program/project management, and general business experience. This experience is based on a set of competencies. Some of the competencies are listed below to use as a reference when you are documenting your previous experience. Use this template to document your experience. Experience should be supported by a written confirmation from the cognizant Contracting Officer/Contract Specialist showing the contract number, title and date(s) to which the experience applied. Once you have completed this document, please forward it and its supporting statement(s) to your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) as part of your application for COR certification.

343

Indoor atmospheric corrosion of conventional weathering steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One year indoor atmospheric corrosion examinations have been carried out on two conventional weathering steels for a year, at two test sites, Tocumen and Sherman Breakwater in Panama. They are environmentally cla...

Juan A. Jaén; Josefina Iglesias; Olga Adames

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Representing El Niño in Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere GCMs: The Dominant Role of the Atmospheric Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic modular approach to investigate the respective roles of the ocean and atmosphere in setting El Niño characteristics in coupled general circulation models is presented. Several state-of-the-art coupled models sharing either the same ...

E. Guilyardi; S. Gualdi; J. Slingo; A. Navarra; P. Delecluse; J. Cole; G. Madec; M. Roberts; M. Latif; L. Terray

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Experiment Hazard Class 2 - Cryogenic Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Cryogenic Systems 2 - Cryogenic Systems Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of cryogenic systems. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements General requirements The use of detectors/alarms, warning signs, and adequate ventilation are recommended for areas where release of a cryogen can result in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere. Cryogenic systems and vessels are always insulated to reduce heat exchange and are labeled with the common name of the cryogen. Cryogenic systems are pressure protected and equipment are insptected and maintained. The use of flammable cryogens requires technical consultation. Initial consultation may be obtained from the divisional ESH Coordinator. A written emergency evacuation response plan must be available

346

BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H?-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface ...

Seager, Sara

347

Faculty-Led Study Abroad in Atmospheric Science Education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For several years the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee's Atmospheric Science group has offered the faculty-led study abroad program Mexico: Air Pollution and Ancient Cultures. In this course, open to both atmospheric science majors and nonmajors as well ...

Jonathan D. W. Kahl; Julia G. Cerón

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Trends and inferred emissions of atmospheric high molecular weight perfluorocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric observations and atmospheric observation-based global emission estimates are presented for the five high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C 4 F 1 0 ), dodecafluoropentane (C5 F1 2 ), ...

Ivy, Diane Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Muon diagnostics of the Earth’s atmosphere and magnetosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of distant monitoring of the Earth’s magnetosphere and atmosphere is described, which is based on the close correlation between the modulations in the flux of atmospheric muons detected at the Earth’s su...

N. S. Barbashina; V. V. Borog…

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvénic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

351

Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Virtually Dry Snowball Earth Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hadley cell of a virtually dry snowball Earth atmosphere under equinox insolation is studied in a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. In contrast to the Hadley cell of modern Earth, momentum transport by dry convection, which ...

Aiko Voigt; Isaac M. Held; Jochem Marotzke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

354

Surface Nanostructuring of Polysulfone Membranes by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization (APPIGP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large substrates. Various atmospheric plasma sources arePolymerization The atmospheric plasma source used in thisby Remote Atmospheric- Pressure Plasma. Ieee Transactions on

Kim, Soo Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sensitive multi-photon nonlinear laser spectroscopic methods for isotope analysis in atmospheric and environmental applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements in atmospheric pressure plasma. However, nonean atmospheric radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma (atmospheric atomizer. Also, the inductively coupled plasma

Lyons, Wendy Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric physics Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: atmospheric physics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:cpac.pku.edu.cn Summary: Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:...

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol size Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for about ten percent of all aerosols in the atmosphere. We... , can actually absorb solar energy and warm the atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosols are very important... by...

358

Dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma has been derived. The result can be...

S. S. De; Bithika Ghosh; Manasi Mal; B. Ghosh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The nature of moss and lower atmospheric seismology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TR (i.e. thermal interface between...perform lower atmospheric seismology...chromospheric plasma upwards at...despite the atmospheric seeing deformations...EUV-emitting plasma in its vicinity...tunnel some non-propagating...examples of lower atmospheric seismology...in the solar plasma. Figure 1...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nonequilibrium atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation and growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mexico City area are shown...inorganic atmospheric aerosols...2005 ) A large organic aerosol source...photochemical and thermal studies of...Characteristic Group Frequencies—Tables and...particle thermal speed...phase-equilibrium in the atmospheric system: Aerosol...Support, Non-U.S...Determination by plasma-based...implications for atmospheric chemistry...2002) A thermal disso-ciation...

Véronique Perraud; Emily A. Bruns; Michael J. Ezell; Stanley N. Johnson; Yong Yu; M. Lizabeth Alexander; Alla Zelenyuk; Dan Imre; Wayne L. Chang; Donald Dabdub; James F. Pankow; Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

New consideration of atmospheric refraction in laser ranging data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......atmosphere near the Earth. Atmospheric refraction increases...function based on the generator function method proposed...incorporated with the generator function theory and...which P is the total atmospheric pressure in millibars...partial pressure of water vapour in millibars......

Haojian Yan; Guangli Wang

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER management decisions? II--WATERWATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere,Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems resource issues. #12;I-WATER: Vision and Goals ¤ I-WATER will provide a new generation of Ph.D. students

363

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7 Be concentrations Ilya G. Usoskin,1; published 21 March 2009. [1] Variations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in the global atmosphere the variations in the 7 Be concentration in the atmosphere for the period from 1 January to 28 February 2005

364

Numerical Analysis of Flow Characteristics of An Atmospheric Plasma Torch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Analysis of Flow Characteristics of An Atmospheric Plasma Torch You-Jae Kim, J.-G. HanCheon-dong, Suwon 440-746, KOREA Abstract The atmospheric plasma is regarded as an effective method for surface mathematical models used for simulating plasma characteristics inside an atmospheric plasma torch is carried

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University 104 CEOAS Admin Bldg Announcement College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Posting 0012926 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, Earth Systems History The College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS) at Oregon State University

366

Radon-222 Daughter Concentrations in Uranium Mine Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... undertaken to measure the concentrations of 210Pb and 210Po in uranium mine atmospheres at various radon daughter concentration levels, and to determine the amount of 210Pb in the mine atmosphere ... atmosphere relative to that which would be produced from the decay of the short-lived radon daughters deposited in the lungs. Radium-226 was also measured in air so as ...

RICHARD L. BLANCHARD

1969-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3 Contents Abstract 2 1 Introduction 6 1.1 Problem background

Learned, John

368

Singular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are presented for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001. The singular valuesSingular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models Wenyuan Liao and Adrian Sandu for atmospheric chemical transport models. The distinguishing feature of these models is the presence of stiff

Sandu, Adrian

369

AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley-Interscience, 2006AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols Tuesdays 9-9:50 AM, 212B ACRC Wednesdays, Lab, 1-4 PM, ACB 10 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 19 491

370

Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

Sandu, Adrian

371

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

372

European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to the Eastern Mediterranean during of European pollution are observed in the atmosphere (74 ( 13%). On the other hand, when the Persian Trough). This study demonstrates that atmospheric pollution over the East Mediterranean region during the summer

Einat, Aharonov

373

Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA NOAA About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder houses the Earth System Research Lab, which supports a "reforecasting" project. The initiative involves running several decades of historical

374

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

375

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

376

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Velocity June 5-6, 2012 Jeremy Rishel Bruce Napier Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses: GENII Today's Presentation.... Will provide a high-level overview of the GENII codes. Will cover basic aspects of GENII's acute atmospheric transport model. Will review the GENII deposition model that is used to estimate the deposition velocity used in plume depletion. 2 GENII Development History 1988 - GENII V1 released ICRP-26/30/48 dosimetry 1990 - GENII V1.485 stabilized Current DOE Toolbox Version 1992 - GENII-S stochastic version 2004 - GENII V2 ICRP-72 age-dependent dosimetry Federal Guidance Report 13 risk factors

377

Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models  

SciTech Connect

Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

Rotman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a breakthrough in the studies of thermal radiation of neutron stars. Observations with modern space telescopes have provided a wealth of valuable information. Being correctly interpreted, this information can elucidate physics of superdense matter in the interiors of these stars. The theory of formation of thermal spectra of neutron stars is based on the physics of plasmas and radiative processes in stellar photospheres. It provides the framework for interpretation of observational data and for extracting neutron-star parameters from these data. This paper presents a review of the current state of the theory of surface layers of neutron stars and radiative processes in these layers, with the main focus on the neutron stars that possess strong magnetic fields. In addition to the conventional deep (semi-infinite) atmospheres, radiative condensed surfaces of neutron stars and "thin" (finite) atmospheres are also considered.

Potekhin, A Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coastal Atmospheric Circulation around an Idealized Cape during Wind-Driven Upwelling Studied from a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study analyzes atmospheric circulation around an idealized coastal cape during summertime upwelling-favorable wind conditions simulated by a mesoscale coupled ocean–atmosphere model. The domain resembles an eastern ocean boundary with a ...

Natalie Perlin; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Response of a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: Sensitivity to the Rate of Increase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled ocean–atmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant ...

Ronald J. Stouffer; Syukuro Manabe

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

382

Atmosphere to Electrons Initiative Takes Shape  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since DOE launched its Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative last July, the A2e executive committee has been developing a comprehensive approach for working with multiple stakeholders (industry, national laboratories, international experts, and universities) over the next 5- to 7 years. In February, they held an external merit review to lay the groundwork for an A2e multi-year strategic research plan.

383

Thomson scattering measurements in atmospheric plasma jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron temperature and electron density in a dc plasma jet at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using Thomson laser scattering. Measurements performed at various scattering angles have revealed effects that are not accounted for by the standard scattering theory. Differences between the predicted and experimental results suggest that higher order corrections to the theory may be required, and that corrections to the form of the spectral density function may play an important role.

G. Gregori; J. Schein; P. Schwendinger; U. Kortshagen; J. Heberlein; E. Pfender

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Infrasound records from U.S. atmospheric tests  

SciTech Connect

The United States conducted over 100 atmospheric nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1962. Some of the earliest tests caused unexpected damage, primarily broken glass and cracked plaster, in Las Vegas and other surrounding communities. To address this problem, Sandia initiated a program to monitor and predict the pressure waves around NTS. Infrasound recording systems were developed, then field for all tests beginning with Operation Buster in October 1951. Investigators soon discovered that near-surface temperature inversions and wind profiles caused the damaging pressures in Las Vegas. A typical test was recorded at about a dozen stations from the Control Point on NTS to as far away as Pasadena, CA. In addition, some tests in the South Pacific were monitored, as well as numerous chemical explosions. Strip charts recorded signals in the frequency band from 0.05 to 30 Hz, and the paper tapes were achieved at Sandia in the early 1970s. The NTS events ranged in yield from below 1 ton to 74 kilotons; source altitudes varied from near ground level (including some cratering experiments) to as high as 11 km. The resulting data contain a wealth of information on the source function, yield scaling and regional propagation of infrasound signals from atmospheric explosions. The renewed interest in infrasonic monitoring for CTBT verification has prompted the authors to exhume some of the archived records. The authors plan to digitize the signals from several tests and evaluate their applicability to CTBT issues. In addition, they will collect any existing parametric measurements for these records (arrival times, amplitudes, etc.). All data will be converted to CSS database format and made available to the research community. If appropriate, the resulting information could also be included in the Knowledge Base under development for CTBT monitoring.

Chael, E.P.; Lohr, R.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Atmospheric and combustion chemistry of dimethyl ether  

SciTech Connect

It has been demonstrated that dimethyl ether (DME) is an ideal diesel fuel alternative. DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, combines good fuel properties with low exhaust emissions and low combustion noise. Large scale production of this fuel can take place using a single step catalytic process converting CH{sub 4} to DME. The fate of DME in the atmosphere has previously been studied. The atmospheric degradation is initiated by the reaction with hydroxyl radicals, which is also a common feature of combustion processes. Spectrokinetic investigations and product analysis were used to demonstrate that the intermediate oxy radical, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}O, exhibits a novel reaction pathway of hydrogen atom ejection. The application of tandem mass spectrometry to chemi-ions based on supersonic molecular beam sampling has recently been demonstrated. The highly reactive ionic intermediates are sampled directly from the flame and identified by collision activation mass spectrometry and ion-molecule reactions. The mass spectrum reflects the distribution of the intermediates in the flame. The atmospheric degradation of DME as well as the unique fuel properties of a oxygen containing compound will be discussed.

Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.; Larsen, E.; Sehested, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lightning, atmospheric electricity and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Temperature records indicate that a global warming of 0.5{minus}0.7{degrees}C has occurred over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). Whether this trend is a result of increased trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere, or simply a result of natural variability; is still not known. These temperature trends are derived from thousands of observations worldwide. However, these observations are concentrated largely over continental areas, and then mainly in the northern hemisphere`s populated regions. This northern hemisphere continental bias results in large uncertainties in estimates of global temperature trends. Due to the increasing evidence that the present buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may result in an additional global warming of 1-5{degrees}C by the year 2050 (IPCC, 1990), it is increasingly important to find afternative methods to monitor fluctuations in global surface temperatures. As shown by two recent studies (Williams, 1992; Price, 1993), the global atmospheric electric circuit may provide a promising afternative for monitoring future climate change.

Price, C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

IONIZATION OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANET ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

Many extrasolar planets orbit close in and are subject to intense ionizing radiation from their host stars. Therefore, we expect them to have strong, and extended, ionospheres. Ionospheres are important because they modulate escape in the upper atmosphere and can modify circulation, as well as leave their signatures, in the lower atmosphere. In this paper, we evaluate the vertical location Z{sub I} and extent D{sub I} of the EUV ionization peak layer. We find that Z{sub I{approx}}1-10 nbar-for a wide range of orbital distances (a = 0.047-1 AU) from the host star-and D{sub I}/H{sub p{approx}}>15, where H{sub p} is the pressure scale height. At Z{sub I}, the plasma frequency is {approx}80-450 MHz, depending on a. We also study global ion transport, and its dependence on a, using a three-dimensional thermosphere-ionosphere model. On tidally synchronized planets with weak intrinsic magnetic fields, our model shows only a small, but discernible, difference in electron density from the dayside to the nightside ({approx}9 x 10{sup 13} m{sup -3} to {approx}2 x 10{sup 12} m{sup -3}, respectively) at Z{sub I}. On asynchronous planets, the distribution is essentially uniform. These results have consequences for hydrodynamic modeling of the atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets.

Koskinen, Tommi T. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ (United States); Cho, James Y-K. [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Achilleos, Nicholas; Aylward, Alan D., E-mail: tommi@lpl.arizona.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Absorption of infra-red radiation by atmospheric molecular cluster-ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protonated water clusters are a common species of atmospheric molecular cluster-ion, produced by cosmic rays throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. Under clear-sky conditions or periods of increased atmospheric ionisation, such as solar proton events, the IR absorption by atmospheric ions may affect climate through the radiative balance. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry in a long path cell, of path length 545m, has been used to detect IR absorption by corona-generated positive molecular cluster-ions. The column concentration of ions in the laboratory spectroscopy experiment was estimated to be ~10^13 m-2; the column concentration of protonated atmospheric ions estimated using a simple model is ~10^14 m-2. Two regions of absorption, at 12.3 and 9.1 um are associated with enhanced ion concentrations. After filtering of the measured spectra to compensate for spurious signals from neutral water vapour and residual carbon dioxide, the strongest absorption region is at 9.5 to 8.8 um (1050 to 1140 cm-1)...

Aplin, K L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Atmospheric Water Vapor Pressure over Land Surfaces: A Generic Algorithm with Data Input Limited to Air Temperature, Precipitation and Geographic Location  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lack of information for surface water vapor pressure (WVP) represents a major impediment to model-assisted ecosystem analysis for understanding plant-environment interactions or for projecting biospheric re...

X. Yin

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation/Meteorology (ASI/MET) Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which is driven by solar heating during the day...lower albedo and greater thermal inertia of the surface...the plane of the lander solar panels. Temperatures...lower albedo and greater thermal inertia of the surface...the plane of the lander solar panels. Temperatures...

J. T. Schofield; J. R. Barnes; D. Crisp; R. M. Haberle; S. Larsen; J. A. Magalhães; J. R. Murphy; A. Seiff; G. Wilson

1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric tracer experiments Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Summary: for incorporating Lagrangian tracer positions into a model of flows (such as ocean currents). Such models... are important in understanding the behaviour of...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric dispersion experiment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- WIND DISPERSAL IN FRESHWATER WETLANDS: KNOWLEDGE FOR CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION - 271 Applied... , dispersal by wind is often overlooked because dispersal by water is ......

395

Impact of aerosols present in Titan's atmosphere on the CASSINI radar experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of interest for Titan: liquid methane, liquid mixture of methane-ethane, water ice and light hydrocarbon ices. This chemistry results in the production of a great diversity of hydrocarbons and nitriles in the stratosphere-visible-NIR wavelengths. It is also possible that lighter hydrocarbons or nitriles diffuse downwards and condense

Boyer, Edmond

396

Photochemistry in Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres III: Photochemistry and Thermochemistry in Thick Atmospheres on Super Earths and Mini Neptunes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some super Earths and mini Neptunes will likely have thick atmospheres that are not H2-dominated. We have developed a photochemistry-thermochemistry kinetic-transport model for exploring the compositions of thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes, applicable for both H2-dominated atmospheres and non-H2-dominated atmospheres. Using this model to study thick atmospheres for wide ranges of temperatures and elemental abundances, we classify them into hydrogen-rich atmospheres, water-rich atmospheres, oxygen-rich atmospheres, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres. We find that carbon has to be in the form of CO2 rather than CH4 or CO in a H2-depleted water-dominated thick atmosphere, and that the preferred loss of light elements from an oxygen-poor carbon-rich atmosphere leads to formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (C2H2 and C2H4). We apply our self-consistent atmosphere models to compute spectra and diagnostic features for known transiting low-mass exoplanets GJ 1214 b, HD 97658 b, and 55 Cnc e. For GJ 1...

Hu, Renyu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY. A & M COLLEGE, CAMPUS I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 469 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE... of seven years experiments with fertilizers on cotton at Troup, Nacogdoches, Angleton, College Station, Beeville, Tem- ple, and Denton, Texas, are reported in this Bulletin. The Kirvin fine sandy loam at Troup and the Nacogdoches and Ruston fine sandy...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO 101 January, 1908. ish Potato Fertilizer Experiments - Postoffice, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors... was sc Be Irish Potato Fl nents W. S. Hotchkiss and E. J. Kyle. e fertilizer work with the Irish potato at Troupe was first planned fall of 1902. The results which were gotten upon harvesting the the spring of 1903 were so opposed, especially...

Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Simple Eclipse Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the experiment above cited may be produced in one of three ways: first, by roughening the surface of the pin's head; secondly, by dust on the edges of ...

W. G. ROYAL-DAWSON

1912-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

400

CASL Test Stand Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Test Stand Experience Stephen Hess, EPRI Heather Feldman, EPRI Brenden Mervin, EPRI Martin Pytel, EPRI Rose Montgomery, TVA Bill Bird, TVA Fausto Franceschini,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Operating Experience Committee Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the ability to learn from experience are attributes consistently evident in High Reliability Organizations. These organizations are learning organizations, which have...

402

Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are also important. However, few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier...

403

Atmospheric MUons from PArametric formulas: a fast GEnerator for neutrino telescopes (MUPAGE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutrino telescopes will open, in the next years, new opportunities in observational high energy astrophysics. For these experiments, atmospheric muons from primary cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere play an important role, because they provide the most abundant source of events for calibration and test. On the other side, they represent the major background source. In this paper a fast Monte Carlo generator (called MUPAGE) of bundles of atmospheric muons for underwater/ice neutrino telescopes is presented. MUPAGE is based on parametric formulas [APP25(2006)1] obtained from a full Monte Carlo simulation of cosmic ray showers generating muons in bundle, which are propagated down to 5 km w.e. It produces the event kinematics on the surface of a user-defined virtual cylinder, surrounding the detector. The multiplicity of the muons in the bundle, the muon spatial distribution and energy spectrum are simulated according to a specific model of primary cosmic ray flux, with constraints from measurements of the muon flux with underground experiments. As an example of the application, the result of the generation of events on a cylindrical surface of 3 km^2 at a depth of 2450 m of water is presented.

G. Carminati; A. Margiotta; M. Spurio

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

MODELLING THE OVERLAND TRANSPORT OF LEAD DEPOSITED FROM THE ATMOSPHERE IN THE ELBE CATCHMENT OVER FOUR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unknown. Despite decreasing atmospheric pollution, soil and freshwater systems still indicate high lead on minimizing atmospheric emissions, but also on minimizing soil erosion. Keywords: atmospheric pollution, direct atmospheric deposition, direct runoff, Elbe catchment, erosion, soil pollution, lead, long

Costa-Cabral, Mariza

405

The DITE Tokamak Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...April 1981 research-article The DITE Tokamak Experiment J. W. M. Paul W. H. M...magnetic containment of hot plasma in the tokamak toroidal configuration, and plasma heating...these concepts in the Divertor Injection Tokamak Experiment (DITE) at Culham Laboratory...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Practical Experiments in Statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An simple and inexpensive experiment in radioactive decay that can be applied to any field that requires a knowledge of statistics; the primary goal is to familiarize students with probability distributions. ... A Didactic Experience of Statistical Analysis for the Determination of Glycine in a Nonaqueous Medium Using ANOVA and a Computer Program ...

Craig A. Stone; Lorin D. Mumaw

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Conference: Synergy Between Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kaxiras (Harvard) Synopsis ­ Society's ceaseless demand for clean, renewable energy resources on rapidly developing areas of nanoscale computation, will hold a conference on energy research, experimentAn NNIN/C Conference: Synergy Between Experiment and Computation in Energy ­ Looking to 2030. Yu

Heller, Eric

408

COR Summary of Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Effective January 1, 2012, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) added a requirement for past COR experience to qualify for FAC-COR Level II (journeyman level) and III (senior/expert level). At least 1 year of COR experience is required to qualify for Level II; 2 years for Level III. OFPP strongly advises that applicants for Level III have prior experience at Level II. Applicants with no prior experience as an appointed COR must demonstrate proficiency in the specific competencies listed below for the same time period, validated by a cognizant Contracting Officer or Contract Specialist by signature below or an accompanying e-mail. Submit this form to your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) as part of your application

409

Discrimination of nuclear explosions against civilian sources based on atmospheric xenon isotopic activity ratios  

SciTech Connect

A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will be used to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of nuclear explosions, empirical data for both test and reactor releases as well as observations by measurement stations of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) are used to provide a proof of concept for the isotopic ratio based method for source discrimination.

Kalinowski, Martin B.; Axelssson, A.; Bean, Marc; Blanchard, X.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Brachet, G.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Peters, Jana; Pistner, Christoph; Raith, Maria; Ringbom, Anders; Saey, P. R.; Schlosser, C.; Stocki, Trevor J.; Taffary, T.; Ungar, R. Kurt

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Commonness and rarity in the marine biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...models predict fish diversity patterns in Mississippi-Missouri basin . Nature 453 ( 7192 ): 220 – 222 . 21 Rosindell J Cornell SJ Hubbell SP Etienne...the manuscript. K.E.E. acknowledges The Norwegian Oil and Gas Association for permitting use of data. A.B. acknowledges...

Sean R. Connolly; M. Aaron MacNeil; M. Julian Caley; Nancy Knowlton; Ed Cripps; Mizue Hisano; Loïc M. Thibaut; Bhaskar D. Bhattacharya; Lisandro Benedetti-Cecchi; Russell E. Brainard; Angelika Brandt; Fabio Bulleri; Kari E. Ellingsen; Stefanie Kaiser; Ingrid Kröncke; Katrin Linse; Elena Maggi; Timothy D. O’Hara; Laetitia Plaisance; Gary C. B. Poore; Santosh K. Sarkar; Kamala K. Satpathy; Ulrike Schückel; Alan Williams; Robin S. Wilson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Nature and Extent of the Deep Biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...records (Dickens 2003; Gu et al. 2011). Although Earth-system models indicate that the current phase of planetary warming...life comparable to how progress has been made in Earth system models, simulations of deep astronomical time, and human...

Frederick S. Colwell; Steven D’Hondt

412

Anthropogenic transformation of the terrestrial biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...humans are ecosystem engineers-species like the beaver that alter their environment by mechanical or other...seek out, use and engineer ecosystems in relation...other less-inviting environments [50,63,84...Database of the Global Environment (HYDE)-[13] and...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Water: the bloodstream of the biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leaving only desert. This happened with...been replaced by scrub vegetation. But...were turned into deserts. Even in central...organisms is enhanced and salts are formed in the...1931 land from the desert. Greenhouse facilities...solar distillation of salt solutions, or seawater...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Anthropogenic transformation of the terrestrial biosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...only by proxy [105], they are used here to aid in general assessment of human transformation of ecosystems. Combustion processes often leave clear geological records and are important both ecologically and for indicating different stages of...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Low energy atmospheric muon neutrinos in MACRO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flux of low energy neutrinos (~ 4 GeV) has been studied with the MACRO detector at Gran Sasso via the detection of muon neutrinos interactions inside the apparatus, and of upward-going stopping muons. Data collected in ~3 y with the full apparatus were analyzed. The results are compatible with a deficit of the flux of atmospheric muon neutrinos from below, and no reduction from above, with respect to Monte Carlo predictions. The deficit and the angular distributions are interpreted in terms of neutrino oscillations, and compared with the MACRO results on the upward throughgoing muons (~ 100 GeV).

M. Spurio; for the MACRO Collaboration

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sampling procedure for atmospheric geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamic and chemical changes can alter the characteristics of geothermal brine samples significantly. A procedure which minimizes these changes has been developed for sampling atmospheric geothermal brines. The method is fast with minimal cooling and yields representative samples which have been stabilized to preserve their integrity. The procedure provides reliable suspended solids data and both the solid and liquid samples are suitable for elemental analysis. The procedure is also a valuable tool to aid in monitoring a geothermal brine conditioning system. Data are included from a flow test at an MCR Geothermal well in the Imperial Valley area of California to illustrate the utility of the sampling procedure.

Kochelek, J.T.; Zienty, D.F.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sulfur capture by oil shale ashes under atmospheric and pressurized FBC conditions  

SciTech Connect

When oil shale contains large quantities of limestone, a significant auto-absorption of sulfur is possible under suitable conditions. The sulfur capture by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. The Ca/S molar ratios in the two oil shales studied were 8 (Estonian) and 10 (Israeli). The samples were first burned in a gas atmosphere containing O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2} if pressurized). After the combustion step, SO{sub 2} was added and sulfation started. The results with the oil shales were compared to those obtained with an oil shale cyclone ash from the Narva power plant in Estonia. In general, the results from the sulfur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized conditions showed that the oil shale cannot only capture its own sulfur but also significant amounts of additional sulfur of another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. For example from the runs at atmospheric pressure, the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} was about 70% for Israeli oil shale and about 55% for Estonian oil shale (850 C). For the cyclone ash the corresponding conversion was about 20%. In comparison it could be mentioned that under the same conditions the conversions of natural limestones are about 30%. The reason the cyclone ash was a poor sulfur absorbent was probably due to its temperature history. In Narva the oil shale was burned at a significantly higher temperature (1,400 C) than was used in the experiments (750 C and 850 C). This caused the ash to sinter and the reactive surface area of the cyclone ash was therefore decreased.

Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kuelaots, I.; Ots, A. [Tallinn Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) govCampaignsARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) Campaign Links ARESE Website Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) 1995.09.25 - 1995.11.01 Website : http://www.arm.gov/science/arese/ Lead Scientist : Ted Cress For data sets, see below. Summary ARESE, the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment, concluded a very successful deployment to Oklahoma on November 1, 1995. The purpose of this five week long campaign was to conduct a series of instrumented flights to measure the interaction of solar energy with clear and cloudy skies to provide additional insight into recent observations of enhanced absorption in cloudy atmospheres.As such, ARESE focused on two scientific objectives:

420

Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, and D. D. Turner University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction An overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) is given. This field experiment was conducted during November-December 2000 near the central ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma, and was sponsored jointly by the ARM, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE), and the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) programs. Its primary goal was to collect accurate measurements of upper-level (~8 to 12 km) water vapor near the ground-based ARM site. These data are being used to determine the accuracy of measurements that are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

FIRST-PRINCIPLES APPROACHES TO THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY OF ATMOSPHERICALLY RELEVANT AQUESOUS INTERFACES  

SciTech Connect

The field of atmospheric science is very rich in problems ranging from the molecular to the regional and global scale. These problems are often extremely complex, and although the statement of a particular atmospheric science question may be clear, finding a single, concise computational approach to address this question can be daunting. As a result, the broad scope of scientific problems that lie within the umbrella of atmospheric science require a multi-discipline approach. Of particular interest to atmospheric chemists is the role that heterogeneous chemistry plays in the important processes that take place throughout the atmosphere. The definition of heterogeneous is: consisting of dissimilar elements or parts. The chemical environment induced by the presence of the interface can be dramatically different than the corresponding gas- or condensed phase homogeneous environment and can give rise to novel chemistry. Although the importance of heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere has been known for decades, a challenge to both experimentalists and theorists in provide simplified models and experiments that can yield insight into the field measurements of the atmospheric process. The use of molecular modeling has been widely used to provide a particle-based picture of atmospherically relevant interfaces to deduce the novel chemistry that is taking place. Unfortunately, even with the most computationally efficient particle-based approach, it is still impossible to model the full ice-crystal in the stratosphere or the sea-salt aerosol in the troposphere. Figure 1 depicts a caricature of the actual system of interest, and highlights the region where efficient molecular modeling can be employed. Although there is seemingly a large disconnect between reality and the model, we hope to convince the reader that there is still much insight to be gained from a particle-based picture. There is a myriad of different approaches to molecular modeling that have been successfully applied to studying the complex problems put forth by atmospheric chemists. To date, the majority of the molecular models of atmospherically relevant interfaces have been comprised of two genres of molecular models. The first is based on empirical interaction potentials. The use of an empirical interaction potential suffers from at least two shortcomings. First, empirical potentials are usually fit to reproduce bulk thermodynamic states, or gas phase spectroscopic data. Thus, without the explicit inclusion of charge transfer, it is not at all obvious that empirical potentials can faithfully reproduce the structure at a solid-vapor, or liquid-vapor interface where charge rearrangement is known to occur (see section 5). One solution is the empirical inclusion of polarization effects. These models are certainly an improvement, but still cannot offer insight into charge transfer processes and are usually difficult to parameterize. The other shortcoming of empirical models is that, in general, they cannot describe bond-making/breaking events, i.e. chemistry. In order to address chemistry one has to consider an ab initio (to be referred to as first-principles throughout the remaining text) approach to molecular modeling that explicitly treats the electronic degrees of freedom. First-principles modeling also give a direct link to spectroscopic data and chemistry, but at a large computational cost. The bottle-neck associated with first-principles modeling is usually determined by the level of electronic structure theory that one chooses to study a particular problem. High-level first-principles approaches, such as MP2, provide accurate representation of the electronic degrees of freedom but are only computationally tractable when applied to small system sizes (i.e. 10s of atoms). Nevertheless, this type of modeling has been extremely useful in deducing reaction mechanisms of atmospherically relevant chemistry that will be discussed in this review (see section 4). However, to solve problems relating to heterogeneous chemistry at interfaces where the interfacial syste

Mundy, C; Kuo, I W

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Neutron EDM Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron EDM experiment has played an important part over many decades in shaping and constraining numerous models of CP violation. This review article discusses some of the techniques used to calculate EDMs under various theoretical scenarios, and highlights some of the implications of EDM limits upon such models. A pedagogical introduction is given to the experimental techniques employed in the recently completed ILL experiment, including a brief discussion of the dominant systematic uncertainties. A new and much more sensitive version of the experiment, which is currently under development, is also outlined.

P. G. Harris

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

SciTech Connect

The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1970s.6) In order to explain this weakening *1 Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Kyoto Univer- sity, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan (e-mail: tsuda processes of atmospheric gravity waves was proposed.7),8) In the 1980s a notable advance was made

Takada, Shoji

425

Hydrodynamics of Embedded Planets' First Atmospheres. II. A Rapid Recycling of Atmospheric Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following Paper I we investigate the properties of atmospheres that form around small protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc by conducting hydrodynamical simulations. These are now extended to three dimensions, employing a spherical grid centred on the planet. Compression of gas is shown to reduce rotational motions. Contrasting the 2D case, no clear boundary demarcates bound atmospheric gas from disc material; instead, we find an open system where gas enters the Bondi sphere at high latitudes and leaves through the midplane regions, or, vice versa, when the disc gas rotates sub-Keplerian. The simulations do not converge to a time-independent solution; instead, the atmosphere is characterized by a time-varying velocity field. Of particular interest is the timescale to replenish the atmosphere by nebular gas, $t_\\mathrm{replenish}$. It is shown that the replenishment rate, $M_\\mathrm{atm}/t_\\mathrm{replenish}$, can be understood in terms of a modified Bondi accretion rate, $\\sim$$R_\\mathrm{Bondi}^2\\rho...

Ormel, Chris W; Kuiper, Rolf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Spectrophotometric Resolution of Stellar Atmospheres with Microlensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microlensing is a powerful tool for studying stellar atmospheres because as the source crosses regions of formally infinite magnification (caustics) the surfaceof the star is resolved, thereby allowing one to measure the radial intensity profile, both photometrically and spectroscopically. However, caustic crossing events are relatively rare, and monitoring them requires intensive application of telescope resources. It is therefore essential that the observational parameters needed to accurately measure the intensity profile are quantified. We calculate the expected errors in the recovered radial intensity profile as a function of the unlensed flux, source radius, spatial resolution the recovered intensity profile, and caustic crossing time for the two principle types of caustics: point-mass and binary lenses. We demonstrate that for both cases there exist simple scaling relations between these parameters and the resultant errors. We find that the error as a function of the spatial resolution of the recovered profile, parameterized by the number of radial bins, increases as $N_R^{3/2}$, considerably faster than the naive $N_R^{1/2}$ expectation. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages of binary caustic-crossing events and point-lens events. Binary events are more common, easier to plan for, and provide more homogeneous information about the stellar atmosphere. However, a sub-class of point-mass events with low impact parameters can provide dramatically more information provided that they can be recognized in time to initiate observations.

B. Scott Gaudi; Andrew Gould

1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Ann Stepp, Mary [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States)] [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States); Trink, Barry [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Atmospheric model intercomparison project: Monsoon simulations  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of monsoons, in particular the Indian summer monsoon, has proven to be a critical test of a general circulation model`s ability to simulate tropical climate and variability. The Monsoon Numerical Experimentation Group has begun to address questions regarding the predictability of monsoon extremes, in particular conditions associated with El Nino and La Nina conditions that tend to be associated with drought and flood conditions over the Indian subcontinent, through a series of seasonal integrations using analyzed initial conditions from successive days in 1987 and 1988. In this paper the authors present an analysis of simulations associated with the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP), a coordinated effort to simulate the 1979--1988 decade using standardized boundary conditions with approximately 30 atmospheric general circulation models. The 13 models analyzed to date are listed. Using monthly mean data from these simulations they have calculated indices of precipitation and wind shear in an effort to access the performance of the models over the course of the AMIP decade.

Sperber, K.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Palmer, T.N. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading (United Kingdom)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Proposal to upgrade the MIPP experiment  

SciTech Connect

The upgraded MIPP physics results are needed for the support of NuMI projects, atmospheric cosmic ray and neutrino programs worldwide and will permit a systematic study of non-perturbative QCD interactions. The MIPP TPC is the largest contributor to the MIPP event size by far. Its readout system and electronics were designed in the 1990's and limit it to a readout rate of 60 Hz in simple events and {approx} 20 Hz in complicated events. With the readout chips designed for the ALICE collaboration at the LHC, we propose a low cost scheme of upgrading the MIPP data acquisition speed to 3000 Hz. This will also enable us to measure the medium energy numi target to be used for the NOvA/MINERvA experiments. We outline the capabilities of the upgraded MIPP detector to obtain high statistics particle production data on a number of nuclei that will help towards the understanding and simulation of hadronic showers in matter. Measurements of nitrogen cross sections will permit a better understanding of cosmic ray shower systematics in the atmosphere. In addition, we explore the possibilities of providing tagged neutral beams using the MIPP spectrometer that may be crucial for validating the Particle Flow Algorithm proposed for calorimeters for the International Linear Collider detectors. Lastly, we outline the physics potential of such a detector in understanding non-perturbative QCD processes.

Isenhower, D.; Sadler, M.; Towell, R.; Watson, S.; /Abilene Christian U.; Peterson, R.J.; /Colorado U.; Baker, W.; Carey, D.; Christian, D.; Demarteau, M.; Jensen, D.; Johnstone, C.; Meyer, H.; Raja, R.; Ronzhin, A.; Solomey, N.; Wester, W.; /Fermilab; Gutbrod, H.; Peters, K.; /Darmstadt, GSI; Feldman, G.; /Harvard U.; Torun, Y.; /IIT, Chicago; Messier, M.D.; /Indiana U. /Iowa U. /Dubna, JINR /Kent State U. /Groningen, KVI /Michigan U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Purdue U. /South Carolina U. /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments AE01 - Micro-undulator FEL Experiment. Spokesperson: I. Ben-Zvi, BNL. (1992 - 1997) AE02. - Inverse FEL Accelerator. Spokesperson: A. van Steenbergen, BNL. [Yale, Columbia]. (1992-1997) AE03 - Laser Grating Accelerator Experiment. Spokesperson: R. Fernow, BNL. [Princeton, LANL]. (1992- 1996) AE05 - Nonlinear-Compton Scattering. Spokesperson: K. McDonald, Princeton (1992-) AE06 - Inverse Cherenkov Acceleration. Spokesperson: W. Kimura, STI Optronics. [UCSB,BNL]. (1992-1997) AE08 - Far Infrared Radiation Source. Spokesperson J. Walsh, Dartmouth. [Oxford, BNL]. (1992 - 1994) AE09. - Photocathode R&D. Spokesperson: T. Rao, BNL. (1992 - ) AE10. - High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL. Spokesperson: L.H. Yu, BNL. [ANL] (1992 - 2001)

431

The Colorado FRC Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new experiment is under development for the study of turbulence, flow, and cross-field transport in a field-reversed configuration. The facility is a merged-spheromak device driven by magnetized coaxial plasma ...

T. Munsat; C. L. Ellison; A. Light; J. Nuger; W. Willcockson…

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program helps to prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends by sharing performance information, lessons learned and good practices across the DOE complex.

433

General relativity and experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

T. Damour

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

434

Some Experiments in Magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1904 research-article Some Experiments in Magnetism T. C. Porter The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. www.jstor.org

1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Solar neutrino experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main results of solar neutrino experiments are presented, ranging from the pioneering Cl - Ar experiment up to the most recent Borexino data. Solar neutrino fluxes and spectra are given for two versions of the standard solar model, and radiochemical and electronic detectors are briefly described. The results of Be- and pep-neutrino detection by Borexino are presented. The LMA-MSW oscillation solution of the solar neutrino problem is considered.

A V Derbin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The MAJORANA Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MAJORANA collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR.

The MAJORANA Collaboration

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

438

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii The graphs on this page are generated from data taken from "Trends in Carbon Dioxide" page on the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website. The NOAA website presents monthly and weekly atmospheric CO2 concentrations measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. It offers weekly and monthly data, additional graphs, analysis, descriptions of how the data are collected, and an animation of historical changes in atmospheric CO2. Mauna Loa constitutes the longest record of direct measurements of CO2 in the atmosphere. The measurents were started by C. David Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in March of 1958. Recent Monthly Average CO2

439

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

440

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

442

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

443

SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES  

SciTech Connect

Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Consequence Management > National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center

445

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

446

Hierardlicsl Diagnosis V. V. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Atmospheric Optics Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Systematic observations of the earth's ozone layer over the last ten years indicate a...

447

Enhancing Electrostatic Properties and Hydroentangling Efficiency via Atmospheric Plasma Treatment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT MALSHE, PRIYADARSHINI PRAKASH. Enhancing Electrostatic Properties and Hydroentangling Efficiency via Atmospheric Plasma Treatment. (Under the guidance of Professors Marian G. McCord and Mohamed A.… (more)

Malshe, Priyadarshini Prakash

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Novel Applications of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Textile Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on… (more)

Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Dissociation of carbon dioxide in atmospheric pressure microchannel plasma devices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Plasma discharge of carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure was successfully demonstrated in microchannel plasma devices at breakdown voltages lower than 1 kVRMS. Optical emissions of… (more)

Oh, Taegon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Stain Repellent-Antimicrobial Textiles via Atmospheric Plasma Finishes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research was aimed to impart antimicrobial and stain repellent finishes to polyester fabrics using atmospheric pressure plasma-aided graft copolymerization of active monomers. The process… (more)

McLean, Robert II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Technical Sessions M. C. MacCracken Atmospheric amj Geophysical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system, including treatment of the deep ocean and horizontal transport by ocean currents 4 Separate, uncoupled, and limited treatment of atmospheric composition,...

452

Technical Sessions D. A. Randall K. Xu Department of Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. A. Randall K. Xu Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 simulating observations collected during ARM, and to suggest...

453

atmospheric control systems: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

454

atmospheres psychiatric knowledge: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

455

atmospheric parameters uncertainlty: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

456

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evidence to suggest that particle aggregation is particularly successful in removing glass shards with high surface areasmass ratios. The primary atmospheric hazard of...

457

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of...

458

Atmospheric Neutrino Induced Muons in the MINOS Far Detector  

SciTech Connect

The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The MINOS Far Detector, located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Soudan MN, has been collecting data since August 2003. The scope of this dissertation involves identifying the atmospheric neutrino induced muons that are created by the neutrinos interacting with the rock surrounding the detector cavern, performing a neutrino oscillation search by measuring the oscillation parameter values of {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23}, and searching for CPT violation by measuring the charge ratio for the atmospheric neutrino induced muons. A series of selection cuts are applied to the data set in order to extract the neutrino induced muons. As a result, a total of 148 candidate events are selected. The oscillation search is performed by measuring the low to high muon momentum ratio in the data sample and comparing it to the same ratio in the Monte Carlo simulation in the absence of neutrino oscillation. The measured double ratios for the ''all events'' (A) and high resolution (HR) samples are R{sub A} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.60{sub -0.10}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst) and R{sub HR} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.58{sub -0.11}{sup +0.14}(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst), respectively. Both event samples show a significant deviation from unity giving a strong indication of neutrino oscillation. A combined momentum and zenith angle oscillation fit is performed using the method of maximum log-likelihood with a grid search in the parameter space of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}. The best fit point for both event samples occurs at {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 1. This result is compatible with previous measurements from the Super Kamiokande experiment and Soudan 2 experiments. The MINOS Far Detector is the first underground neutrino detector to be able to distinguish the charge of the muons. The measured charge is used to test the rate of the neutrino to the anti-neutrino oscillations by measuring the neutrino induced muon charge ratio. Using the high resolution sample, the {mu}{sup +} to {mu}{sup -} double charge ratio has been determined to be R{sub CPT} = R{sub {mu}{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}}{sup data}/R{sub {mu}{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}}{sup MC} = 0.90{sub -0.18}{sup +0.24}(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst). With the uncertainties added in quadrature, the CPT double ratio is consistent with unity showing no indication for CPT violation.

Rahman, Dipu; /Minnesota U.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.F. Keeling, S.C. Piper, A.F. Bollenbacher and J.S. Walker Carbon Dioxide Research Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California La Jolla, California 92093-0444, U.S.A. Period of Record 1958-2008 Methods Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5

460

Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume  

SciTech Connect

The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Atmospheric considerations for the CTA site search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next high-energy gamma-ray observatory. Selection of the sites, one in each hemisphere, is not obvious since several factors have to be taken into account. Among them, and probably the most crucial, are the atmospheric conditions. Since July 2012, the site working group has deployed automatic ground based instrumentation (ATMOSCOPE) on all the candidate sites. Due to the limited time span available from ground based data, long term weather forecast models become necessary tools for site characterization. It is then of prime importance to validate the models by comparing it to the ATMOSCOPE measurements. We will describe the sources of data (ATMOSCOPE, weather forecasting model and satellite data) for the site evaluation and how they will be used and combined.

Vincent, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Wave Heating of the Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding on coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding on the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation, and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us understanding and quantifying magnetic wave heating of the sola...

Arregui, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Emulation to simulate low resolution atmospheric data  

SciTech Connect

Climate simulations require significant compute power, they are complex and therefore it is time consuming to simulate them. We have developed an emulator to simulate unknown climate datasets. The emulator uses stochastic collocation and multi-dimensional in- terpolation to simulate the datasets. We have used the emulator to determine various physical quantities such as temperature, short and long wave cloud forcing, zonal winds etc. The emulation gives results which are very close to those obtained by simulations. The emulator was tested on 2 degree atmospheric datasets. The work evaluates the pros and cons of evaluating the mean first and inter- polating and vice versa. To determine the physical quantities, we have assumed them to be a function of time, longitude, latitude and a random parameter. We have looked at parameters that govern high stable clouds, low stable clouds, timescale for convection etc. The emulator is especially useful as it requires negligible compute times when compared to the simulation itself.

Hebbur Venkata Subba Rao, Vishwas [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Thermodynamics of atmospheric circulation on hot Jupiters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric circulation on tidally-locked exoplanets is driven by the absorption and reradiation of heat from the host star. They are natural heat engines, converting heat into mechanical energy. A steady state is possible only if there is a mechanism to dissipate mechanical energy, or if the redistribution of heat is so effective that the Carnot efficiency is driven to zero. Simulations based on primitive, equivalent-barotropic, or shallow-water equations without explicit provision for dissipation of kinetic energy and for recovery of that energy as heat, violate energy conservation. More seriously perhaps, neglect of physical sources of drag may overestimate wind speeds and rates of advection of heat from the day to the night side.

J. Goodman

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

465

Helium in the outer solar atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We construct models of the outer solar atmosphere comprising the region from the mid chromosphere and into the solar wind in order to study the force and energy balance in models with a significant helium abundance. The corona is created by dissipation of an energy flux from the Sun. The energy flux is lost as radiation from the top of the chromosphere and as gravitational and kinetic solar wind energy flux. We find that in models with significant ion heating of the extended corona most of the energy flux is lost in the solar wind. The ion temperatures are higher than the electron temperature in these models and the ?-particle temperature is much higher than the proton temperature. Roughly speaking we find that the relative ?-particle and proton fluxes are set by the degree of chromospheric mixing while the speeds are set by the details of the coronal heating process.

V. H. Hansteen; E. Leer; T. E. Holzer

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation  

SciTech Connect

A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hershey-Chase experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hershey-Chase experiment Hershey-Chase experiment Name: pei01 Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I would like to know the characteristics of Griffth's experiment, and Hershey-Chase experiment. Replies: For the H-C experiment: It was designed to show that the type of virus known as a bacteriophage infected bacteria by injecting its DNA, and not by incorporating the entire virus into the bacterium. This was important because it showed that the entire replication of the virus could be coded for in the DNA of the virus, and not in the coat protein. They labeled with radioactivity the coat of the virus using one type of label 35-S, and the DNA with another, 32-P and then infected bacteria. After infection, the bacteria contained only 32-P, and no 35-S. The viruses went on to destroy the bacteria and reproduce, and the new viruses contained no 35-S in their coats. Source: Biology, 3rd ed., by Solomon et al., although the same information is in almost all texts at the college level

468

US science: The Obama experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... he announced other members of his future staff, who would make up a star-studded science team (see ‘The ... team (see ‘The science dream team’): marine ecologist Jane Lubchenco would head the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric ...

Jeff Tollefson

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE;2 #12;MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N 20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE cli- mate has on natural emissions of N2 0 and CH4 from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere

470

KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment  

SciTech Connect

Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Modeling of atmospheric corrosion behavior of weathering steel in sulfur dioxide-polluted atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric corrosion resistance of carbon steel (CS) and high-phosphorus weathering steel (WS, Acr-Ten A) was compared after exposure for up to 6 years in Taiwan. In an industrial atmosphere, corrosion kinetics of WS after 3 years of exposure deviated from behavior predicted by the well-known bilogarithmic law. This deviation was simulated using a laboratory accelerated test under cyclic wet/dry conditions with addition of 1 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). In-situ electrochemical impedance measurements also were carried out in a modified three-electrode cell covered by a thin electrolyte layer to investigate corrosion behavior of WS in SO{sub 2}-polluted environments. Three impedance models were proposed to explain the characteristic corrosion behavior of WS in various stages of exposure.

Wang, J.H.; Shih, H.C. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wei, F.I. [China Steel Corp., Kaoshiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A demonstration mobility experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation, Albuquerque& New Nhxico& for his assl. stance and advice in the preparation of the crystslsl snd my wife, Ellen, who corrected gram&asr& typed, proofread& and offered sncouragesmnt throughout the comple- tion of this thesis, I I I 8 I w... Shockley Haynes mobil. ty experiment. Tp Fig, 2. Sketch of oscilloscope trace from asr1y version of tha Shoo'klay Hagrnes momlity experiment, drift toward the eollsotor point with e velocity~? whereMLO the h ~ ability of a boles Ths Current tlsw...

Martin, Howard Lawrence

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Atmospheric Temperature Effect for ? Mesons Observed at a Depth of 846 m.w.e.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experiment reported was a measurement of the effect of variations in atmospheric temperatures on the intensity of ? mesons observed underground at a depth of 846 m.w.e. The average energy of these particles is known to be ?2×1011 ev. A total of ?1.2×106 coincidences, between two large trays of Geiger counters located in a salt mine, was collected over a two-year period. The correlation between variations in counting rate and simultaneous variations in effective atmospheric temperature was analyzed. The effective temperature was determined from radiosonde measurements of atmospheric temperatures at pressure levels up to 20 millibars performed by a U. S. Air Force weather observation unit near the salt mine. The resulting temperature coefficient is 0.22±0.06 percent per degree and the correlation coefficient is 0.75. The results are compared with those obtained from similar measurements at 1574 m.w.e. and with the theoretical values of the temperature coefficient derived from various schemes describing the production of ? mesons with high energies.

Noah Sherman

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

High Resolution Transmission Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Jovian Exoplanet Atmospheres: Constraints from Theoretical Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled 3-D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9 to 55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3-D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple 1-D models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blue shifts of up to 3 km s$^{-1}$, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. Compared to 1-D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheri...

Kempton, Eliza M -R; Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

478

Interactive Visualization of Modeled Atmospheric Trace Constituents Carmen M. Benkovitz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of the emissions of Popocatepetl volcano, located near Mexico City. The effects of stronger of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Chemical Transport Model (CTM) of sulfate in the atmosphere. The visualization on climate. Anthropogenic activities affect the aerosol content of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions

479

Cassini Imaging Science: Initial Results on Saturn's Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...originating in the atmosphere and are probably caused...bursts—below 5 MHz—only when the...the ionospheric plasma density near the noon...3 , escape of atmospheric radio bursts below 5 MHz would be prevented...see Help with Printing for instructions...

C. C. Porco; E. Baker; J. Barbara; K. Beurle; A. Brahic; J. A. Burns; S. Charnoz; N. Cooper; D. D. Dawson; A. D. Del Genio; T. Denk; L. Dones; U. Dyudina; M. W. Evans; B. Giese; K. Grazier; P. Helfenstein; A. P. Ingersoll; R. A. Jacobson; T. V. Johnson; A. McEwen; C. D. Murray; G. Neukum; W. M. Owen; J. Perry; T. Roatsch; J. Spitale; S. Squyres; P. Thomas; M. Tiscareno; E. Turtle; A. R. Vasavada; J. Veverka; R. Wagner; R. West

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

480

Apparent Temperature Dependence on Localized Atmospheric Water Vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apparent Temperature Dependence on Localized Atmospheric Water Vapor Matthew Montanaroa, Carl), hence water vapor is the primary constituent of concern. The tower generates a localized water vapor, Office B108, Aiken, SC, USA ABSTRACT The atmosphere is a critical factor in remote sensing. Radiance from

Salvaggio, Carl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biosphere atmosphere experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Predicting mesh density for adaptive modelling of the global atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...under investigation for atmospheric modelling for some time...atmosphere, using the shallow water equations-a necessary...to solve the shallow water equations on fixed meshes...discussed in 3. The mesh generator and the predictive adaptive...Solving the shallow water equations on polygons...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements Tim Arnolda,1's radiative budget; however, our understand- ing of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited together with an atmo- spheric model and inverse method, we estimate that the global emissions of NF3

Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

483

Computational Methods for Atmospheric Science, ATS607 Colorado State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Methods for Atmospheric Science, ATS607 Colorado State University Department of Atmospheric Science, Spring 2014 Wednesdays and Fridays @ 2:15 ­ 3:30 Room: ENGR Research Center (ERC://pierce.atmos.colostate.edu Office hours: During the lab classes or by appointment. Teaching assistant: Chris Slocum (cslocum

484

An Introduction to Nonequilibrium Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1 An Introduction to Nonequilibrium Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure Sander Nijdam, Eddie van;2 1 An Introduction to Nonequilibrium Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure pulsed power source for ozone Veldhuizen, Peter Bruggeman, and Ute Ebert 1.1 Introduction 1.1.1 Nonthermal Plasmas and Electron Energy

Ebert, Ute

485

Atmospheric Plasma Deposited Dense Silica Coatings on Plastics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Plasma Deposited Dense Silica Coatings on Plastics ... (8) Finally, some plasma techniques including atmospheric plasmas work at low gas temperature, are suitable for treating plastics with low glass transition temperatures, and can even be used on biological samples. ... These results suggest that the mechanism in the atm.-pressure plasma is the same as that in low-pressure plasmas. ...

Linying Cui; Alpana N. Ranade; Marvi A. Matos; Liam S. Pingree; Theo J. Frot; Geraud Dubois; Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

486

Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

Elliott, Emily M.

487

Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide Water vapor #12;Atmospheric composition (parts per million by volume) · Nitrogen (N2) 780Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere Bill Satzer 3M Company #12;Outline,840 · Oxygen (O2) 209,460 · Argon (Ar) 9340 · Carbon dioxide (CO2) 394 · Methane (CH4) 1.79 · Ozone (O3) 0

Olver, Peter

488

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is to realize the vision through building pillars of excellence in the following three areas: · Breakthrough discoveries through research in earth and atmospheric sciences as well research to inform public policy, resource management, environmental sustainability, and economic

Weber, Rodney

489

Extended Canadian middle atmosphere model: zonal-mean climatology and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and data assimilation; 3334 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Middle atmosphere dynamics (0341, 0342 the Upper Atmos- phere Research Satellite (UARS), such as the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) [Shepherd and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. These observations have provided (or will provide) a unique set of information

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

490

EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment Spring 2012 Instructors: Steven Hall E Overview Description: EPS22 introduces students to the fluid earth, emphasizing Earth's weather is EPS22? A graphical representation of major topics. Current topics in atmospheric and ocean sciences

Huybers, Peter

491

Aero-Assisted Orbital Transfer Vehicles Utilizing Atmosphere Ingestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aero-Assisted Orbital Transfer Vehicles Utilizing Atmosphere Ingestion by THOMAS JOHN MC GUIRE B #12;2 Aero-Assisted Orbital Transfer Vehicles Utilizing Atmosphere Ingestion by: Thomas J. Mc Guire solar thermal orbital transfer vehicle from the Boeing company. Performance increases possible

492

Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity R. Giles Harrison a is the major source of air's electrical conductivity over the oceans and well above the continents atmospheric electrical circuit, including the local vertical current density and the related surface potential

Usoskin, Ilya G.

493

The middle-atmosphere Hadley circulation and equatorial inertial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The middle-atmosphere Hadley circulation and equatorial inertial adjustment 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 S 2001 American Meteorological Society 3077 The Middle-Atmosphere Hadley Circulation and Equatorial toward a balanced state results in a type of Hadley circulation that lies outside the ``downward control

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

494

On Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Atmospheric Pollution Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Atmospheric Pollution Models Emil M. Constantinescu and Adrian Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 #12;On Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Atmospheric Pollution Models 799 res- olution system for modeling regional air pollution based on the chemical transport model STEM

Sandu, Adrian

495

Trans Boundary Transport of Pollutants by Atmospheric Mineral  

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Trans Boundary Transport of Pollutants by Atmospheric Mineral Dust Y I G A L E R E L , * , U R I D, and solid constituents in the atmosphere (3-11). Uptake of pollutants by mineral dust has been shown Jerusalem, Israel The transport of anthropogenic pollution by desert dust in the Eastern Mediterranean

Einat, Aharonov

496

Ris-R-1183(EN) Atmospheric Chemistry of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1183(EN) Atmospheric Chemistry of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds with Special Emphasis as semi-rural air is atmospheric transformation of PAHs initiated by OH radicals. Especially during long-range transport (LRT) of air pollution from Central Europe, the nitro-PAH composition in Denmark is dominated

497

Engineering Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Engineering Abstract Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant or phenomena this question using combinations of atmospheric models and remote sensing observations will be presented challenge currently facing the US EPA in developing secondary standards for the control of this pollutant

498

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust Emissions and Measurements of Trace gas and Aerosol properties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust exhaust experiment It has previously been difficult to identify the emissions of diesel exhaust until reactive with organic compounds such as alkanes which are present in diesel exhaust emissions. The reaction

Collins, Gary S.

499

Air-sea interactions during the passage of a winter storm over the Gulf Stream: A three-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean model study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the surface currents in the Gulf Stream and generate southwestward flows on the shelf. The oceanic feedback% weaker. Differences in the surface ocean currents between these two experiments are significant-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean model study Yongping Li1 and Huijie Xue School of Marine Sciences, University

Maine, University of

500

Venus Fly Trap Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Venus Fly Trap Experiment Venus Fly Trap Experiment Name: Jeremy Bailey Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My name is Jeremy Bailey, and I am a student of Dorseyville Middle School. I have been working on a science project about Venus' Fly Traps. A recent addition to the project involved designing an experiment about something I found interesting about them. However, I don't know where to get them or how to grow them in the moderate climate of Pittsburgh. Also, I don't know how a successful experiment could be designed. Replies: Jeremy, I believe Venus Fly traps can be found 'in the wild' in the coastal floodplain of the Carolinas. As far as where to buy them, look in the phonebook yellow pages under plants or houseplants and do some calling. I live in eastern Pennsylvania, and over here they even sell them in hardware stores like Hechinger's and Home Depot (in their garden departments). I don't think you will have luck trying to grow them outside, our winters here are a bit too harsh for them. From what I recall they require substantial moisture and more moderate climes. You might try looking for houseplant books at your local library for more detailed information.