Sample records for biomedical implants aerospace

  1. Wireless power transfer for scaled electronic biomedical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theilmann, Paul Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implantable Micro Oxygen Generator (IMOG)," BiomedicalImplantable Micro Oxygen Generator (IMOG)," Biomedical

  2. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  3. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation with Solid Targets for Space and Aerospace Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, R. M.; Goncalves, J. A. N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, G. [National Institute for Space Research, PO Box 515, ZIP 12227-010 Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, 2-1303-8, Ikeda, Omura Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan)

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes successful results obtained by a new type of plasma source, named as Vaporization of Solid Targets (VAST), for treatment of materials for space and aerospace applications, by means of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Here, the solid element is vaporized in a high pressure glow discharge, being further ionized and implanted/deposited in a low pressure cycle, with the aid of an extra electrode. First experiments in VAST were run using lithium as the solid target. Samples of silicon and aluminum alloy (2024) were immersed into highly ionized lithium plasma, whose density was measured by a double Langmuir probe. Measurements performed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed clear modification of the cross-sectioned treated silicon samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that lithium was implanted/deposited into/onto the surface of the silicon. Implantation depth profiles may vary according to the condition of operation of VAST. One direct application of this treatment concerns the protection against radiation damage for silicon solar cells. For the case of the aluminum alloy, X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the appearance of prominent new peaks. Surface modification of A12024 by lithium implantation/deposition can lower the coefficient of friction and improve the resistance to fatigue of this alloy. Recently, cadmium was vaporized and ionized in VAST. The main benefit of this element is associated with the improvement of corrosion resistance of metallic substrates. Besides lithium and cadmium, VAST allows to performing PIII and D with other species, leading to the modification of the near-surface of materials for distinct purposes, including applications in the space and aerospace areas.

  4. Science and technology of biocompatible thin films for implantable biomedical devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Kabius, B.; Auciello, O.; Materials Science Division

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation focuses on reviewing research to develop two critical biocompatible film technologies to enable implantable biomedical devices, namely: (1) development of bioinert/biocompatible coatings for encapsulation of Si chips implantable in the human body (e.g., retinal prosthesis implantable in the human eye) - the coating involves a novel ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film or hybrid biocompatible oxide/UNCD layered films; and (2) development of biocompatible films with high-dielectric constant and microfabrication process to produce energy storage super-capacitors embedded in the microchip to achieve full miniaturization for implantation into the human body.

  5. Energy management techniques for ultra-small bio-medical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide medical professionals a means to continuously monitor bio-markers over long time scales with ...

  6. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CIVIL, ARCHITECTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING MECHANICAL, MATERIALS, AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING IIT ARMOUR #12;WHY ENGINEERINGAT IIT ARMOUR? Five Departments. One Distinctive Educational

  7. CARLETON UNIVERSITY Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    ............................................................................................................................................... 3 FLUID MECHANICS, COMBUSTION AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING................................... 6 HEATCARLETON UNIVERSITY Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Funded Graduate Research - Graduate students under the direction of Prof. T. Pearce from Systems and Computer Engineering department

  8. FacultyofAerospaceEngineering Aerospace Masterweeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindken, Ralph

    faster. The technological demands of larger wind turbines, wind farms, integration in the electricity · Wind farm aerodynamics Rotor Design · Aerodynamics · Structure & Composites Electrical Power SystemsFacultyofAerospaceEngineering Aerospace Masterweeks Aerospace Engineering & European Wind Energy

  9. Reprint & Copyright by Aerospace Medical Association, Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reprint & Copyright by Aerospace Medical Association, Washington, DC TECHNICAL NOTE Reflectance.EPICS Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Drexel and pulsatile and mean Doppler velocities were examined as predictors of impending peripheral light loss (PLL

  10. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering It is a new beginning for innovative fundamental and applied and consolidation of bulk nanocrystalline materials using mechanical alloying, the alloy development and synthesis

  11. Overview of Biomedical Engineering and Biomedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Virtual Autopsy #12;OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomedical Engineering and the University of Tennessee Leverages strong programs in mechanical engineering, materials, sensors, biologyOverview of Biomedical Engineering and Biomedical Informatics in the Computational Sciences

  12. Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineering is a discipline that advances knowledge in engineering, biology and medicine, and improves human#12;Biomedical Engineering Dr. Kevin Lear, Director, Undergraduate Program Ms. Brett Eppich Beal, Adviser 5280 CSU Engineering Showcase January 29, 2011 #12;SBME Who are We? Director Stuart Tobet

  13. Faculty of Engineering Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Engineering Aerospace Engineering Canada's aerospace industry is one of the largest. One of the key factors that will continue this success is a steady stream of engineering talent.uwindsor.ca/mame Rigorous, Enriching Programs Our new Aerospace Engineering program at Windsor is an optional stream within

  14. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integration Specialist in the Smart Grid Technologies and Strategy Division of the California IndependentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar The Challenges of Renewable Energy Integration into the CAISO Grid Abstract I will be presenting who the CAISO is and what we do. We will also discuss where we

  15. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Abstract Solid materials used in energy conversion and storage Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University April 6, 2012 at 2:00pm in SCOB 252 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy #12;

  16. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering An experimental methodology is presented for mechanism Yang is a second graduate student in the department of mechanical engineering of ASU. He received his Jian Yang School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy Arizona State University October 5

  17. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The development of high-energy storage devices has been one energy capacity over 500 cycles. Teng Ma received his BS degree in Thermal and Power Engineering from Xi and Technology of China in 2009. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering at School

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Mechanical Engineering at the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, working in Dr. MarcusMechanical & Aerospace Engineering The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross.S.E. degree in mechanical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology in 2006 and M.S. degree

  19. aerospace engineering students: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerospace Lindken, Ralph 2 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Postgraduate Student Physics Websites Summary: & Aerospace Engineering and Naval Architecture & Marine...

  20. Biomedical device potential for robust, implantable product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable Version Share this

  1. Aerospace Applications for OLED Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Boeing. All rights reserved. Export Controlled ECCN: 9E991 NLR Aerospace economics drive long development cycles and even longer product lifecycles * Development of a...

  2. TO TRANSFORM BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IT'S TIME TO TRANSFORM BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION #12;Charles H. & Bettye Barclay Professor Head, Department of Biomedical Engineering Texas A&M University We're dedicated to solving the world in biomedical engineering research and education and we're well on our way. Our faculty continues to engineer

  3. aerospace industries division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Aerospace Survey & Earth Rossiter, D G "David" 31 AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY PANEL Geosciences Websites Summary: AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY PANEL ANNUAL...

  4. Design of a nitrogen-implanted titanium-based superelastic alloy with optimized properties for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Design of a nitrogen-implanted titanium-based superelastic alloy with optimized properties-based biomedical alloy was treated in surface by implantation of nitrogen ions for the first time. The N osteoblasts. After implantation, surface analysis methods revealed the formation of a titanium-based nitride

  5. Investigation of surface endothelialization on biomedical nitinol (NiTi) alloy: Effects of surface micropatterning combined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, James

    Investigation of surface endothelialization on biomedical nitinol (NiTi) alloy: Effects of surface and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA c Department of Physics and Astronomy alloy surfaces was systematically investigated. Our study focuses on elucidating the effects of surface

  6. Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Interdisciplinary Programs Master of Science in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with specialization in Energy/Environment/Economics (E3 ) Master of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with specialization in EnergyMechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace

  7. The following courses will fulfill Biomedical Engineering technical electives for students in Biomedical Engineering and Chemical & Biomedical Engineering (3 credits required), Biomedical Engineering and Electrical Engineering (9 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    and Electrical Engineering (9 credits required), Biomedical Engineering and Electrical Engineering with LasersThe following courses will fulfill Biomedical Engineering technical electives for students in Biomedical Engineering and Chemical & Biomedical Engineering (3 credits required), Biomedical Engineering

  8. An energy management IC for bio-implants using ultracapacitors for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R.

    We present the first known energy management IC to allow low-power systems, such as biomedical implants, to optimally use ultracapacitors instead of batteries as their chief energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in ...

  9. New environmental regulation for the aerospace industry: The aerospace NESHAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, J.P.; Gampper, B.P. [Brusn and McDonnell Waste Consultants, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baker, J.M. [Raytheon Aircraft Co., Wichita, KS (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    40 CFR Part 63, Subpart GG, the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities, commonly referred to as the Aerospace NESHAP, was issued on September 1, 1995 and requires compliance by September 1, 1998. The regulation affects any facility that manufactures or reworks commercial, civil, or military aircraft vehicles or components and is a major source of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs). The regulation targets reducing Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) and Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) emissions to the atmosphere. Processes affected by the new regulation include aircraft painting, paint stripping, chemical milling masking, solvent cleaning, and spray gun cleaning. Regulatory requirements affecting these processes are summarized, and different compliance options compared in terms of cost-effectiveness and industry acceptance. Strategies to reduce compliance costs and minimize recordkeeping burdens are also presented.

  10. GRADUATE STUDIES IN MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    A Guide to GRADUATE STUDIES IN MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING at Department of Mechanical...................................................................................................... 3 2. Master of Science in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ........................................................................................................................ 6 4. Master of Science in Energy Systems Engineering (MSESE

  11. Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with specialization in Energy/Environment/Economics (E3 ) Master of Mechanical and Aerospace Enginering with specialization in Energy/Environment/Economics (E3 ) CertificateDepartment of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials

  12. Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 Satellite Attitude Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 Satellite Attitude Control System Design;3Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 ADCS ADCS: Attitude Determination and Control subsystem Attitude Determination - Using sensors Attitude Control - Using actuators #12;4Aerospace Power

  13. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at the University of Florida invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    and aerospace sciences, (4) cellular mechanics and engineering, (5) energy, with emphasis on renewable Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering The Department of Mechanical of the above areas. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in mechanical or aerospace engineering

  14. aerospace team online: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Aerospace Engineering Online by the SEAS Materials Science Websites Summary: Aerospace Engineering Online by the SEAS UCLA MS Engineering Online, msenrgol.seas.ucla.edu Area is...

  15. aerospace pyrotechnic systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Websites Summary: High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Scott A. Lintelman1 of this next-generation aerospace CPS. This paper...

  16. aerospace technology development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Master of Science Gallo, Linda C. 280 High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Engineering Websites Summary: High Assurance Aerospace CPS &...

  17. advanced aerospace systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Master of Science Gallo, Linda C. 300 High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Engineering Websites Summary: High Assurance Aerospace CPS &...

  18. Faculty Positions Department of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Positions Department of Aerospace Engineering Dwight Look College of Engineering Texas A&M University The Department of Aerospace Engineering in the Dwight Look College of Engineering is continuing for qualified students to pursue engineering education at Texas A&M University (http://engineering.tamu.edu/25by

  19. Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    * Engineering Statistics or Probability and Statistics* 3 ME 380 Kinematics & Machine Dynamics 4 ME, CE, or ENGRMechanical & Biomedical Engineering Department BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE Differential Equations and Matrix Theory 4 ENGR 245 Introduction to Materials Science & Engineering 3 ENGR 210

  20. Biomedical Engineering Student Enrollment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical and Biological Engineering 211 229 209 228 208 Degrees Awarded 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Bioresource and Agricultural Engineering Chemical and Biological Engineering 23 24 28Biomedical Engineering Student Enrollment Spring 2010 Spring 2011 Spring 2012 Spring 2013 Spring

  1. Integrated analysis procedure of aerospace composite structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Junghyun

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of composite material application in major commercial aircraft design, represented by the Boeing 787 and Airbus A350-XWB, signals a new era in the aerospace industry. The high stiffness to weight ratio of ...

  2. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor The School (6) tenure-track faculty positions at the Assistant Professor rank. Exceptional candidates in all precision manufacturing, HVAC&R, vibrations, aircraft and spacecraft, robotics, unmanned systems, autonomy

  3. Inventory optimization in an aerospace supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Billy S. (Billy Si Yee)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic inventory management has become a major focus for Honeywell Aerospace as the business unit challenged itself to meeting cost reduction goals while maintaining a high level of service to its customers. This challenge ...

  4. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing Author: Avila,in the Aerospace and Automotive Industry, SAE Transactionsin the aerospace and automotive industries has become

  5. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing Miguel vila, Joelin the aerospace and automotive industries has becomes in the aerospace and automotive industry, only during the

  6. Department of Bioengineering Definition of Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a discipline that advances knowledge in engineering, biology and medicine, and improves human health throughDepartment of Bioengineering Definition of Biomedical Engineering Biomedical engineering cross-disciplinary activities that integrate the engineering sciences with the biomedical sciences

  7. Wireless power transfer for scaled electronic biomedical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theilmann, Paul Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S 67 Figure 2.16: Power loss due to induced eddyFigure 4.9: Instantaneous power loss in branch 1 versus time6 slope which describes power loss versus distance for an

  8. Wireless power transfer for scaled electronic biomedical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theilmann, Paul Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System Model .. 105 3.3.1 Model Verification . 108 Summary . 112 References .. 113 Chapter 4 Low Power

  9. Wireless power transfer for scaled electronic biomedical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theilmann, Paul Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7.17: Normalized short circuit current of FD-SOI versusFigure 7.30: Normalized short circuit current of the FD-SOIthe photodiode whose short circuit current is measured by a

  10. Aerospace Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Engineering Analysis MAE 2323 Dynamics MAE 3330 Matrices Lin Alg Prerequisite Prerequisite or Concurrent Enrollment MAE 3309 Thermo Engineering MAE 2301 Intro to A&A MAE 2312 Solid Mech Concurrent EnrollmentConcurrentAerospace Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science in Aerospace

  11. aerospace vehicle development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A350-XWB, signals a new era in the aerospace industry. The high stiffness to weight ratio of ... Ahn, Junghyun 2008-01-01 214 Steven H. Collins Mechanical and Aerospace...

  12. aerospace tools faast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and laboratory facilities unsurpassed in Europe: low-speed (35msec) and high-speed wind in aerospace technology in all of Europe. The Faculty of Aerospace Engineering draws...

  13. auxiliary aerospace power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Solar Simulation Workshop 2004 Spacecraft control type Passive control - Gravity gradient control - Spin controlAerospace Power & Electronics...

  14. aerospace battery workshop: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Solar Simulation Workshop 2004 Spacecraft control type Passive control - Gravity gradient control - Spin controlAerospace Power & Electronics...

  15. Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Traditionally, parts fabrication in the aerospace and automotive industries has been associated with a number for the aerospace and automotive industries. The thesis lays out a set of generic flexibility strategies and sets I could receive an impression of manufacturing in today's automotive and aerospace industry

  16. Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saniie, Jafar

    instrumentation, com- bustion, internal combustion engines, two-phase flow and heat-transfer, electrohydrodynamics mobile and stationary combustion sources. Materials science and engineering laboratories includeDepartment of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials

  17. Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonassar, Larry

    design; sustainable design; additive manufacturing; manufacturing of advanced and multifunctional 607 255-0813 mc288@cornell.edu October 2014 Faculty Position in Design and Manufacturing Mechanical and Manufacturing, as related strongly to the disciplines within Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Candidates

  18. FacultyofAerospace Engineering MSc Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    as Nuna 6, the solar- powered car that won second place in the 2011 World Solar Challenge in Australia in aircraft and propulsion system design. Aerodynamics and Wind Energy The MSc track in Aerodynamics and Wind Energy combines fundamental and applied research disciplines of aerospace and wind-power systems

  19. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality EnErgy Environ m Ent HEaltH mat Overview The Courses Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) Mechanical Engineering With International Study (MEng / BEng) Aero-Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) E N T r y F A Q S A p p l y i n g C a m p u

  20. Single Ion Implantation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  1. Single Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  2. M.Eng/B.Eng Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    M.Eng/B.Eng Biomedical Engineering Dr Phil Riches, Course Director #12;Formation of Bioengineering Bioengineering Bioengineering and National Centre Merge to create Biomedical Engineering 1962/3 1972 1974 2012 Dr Phil Riches, Course Director The History of Biomedical Engineering @ Strathclyde #12;Excellence

  3. ageless aerospace vehicles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in SCOB 228 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy 12; 49 Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Geosciences Websites Summary: Joseph W. Dyer, USN (Ret.), Chair Dr....

  4. aerospace sciences meeting: Topics by E-print Network

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    School of Engineering and Applied Science Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Materials Science Websites Summary: Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied...

  5. aerospace medicine vol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON AEROSPACE AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2006 1 Knowledge-based system for multi-target tracking Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  6. aerospace expeditionary force: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important as matrix materials for the advanced composites used in aerospace, electronics, automotive and other industries. (more) Subramaniam, C 1994-01-01 257 The influence of...

  7. aerospace research establishment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important as matrix materials for the advanced composites used in aerospace, electronics, automotive and other industries. (more) Subramaniam, C 1994-01-01 371 Microscale...

  8. aging aerospace structures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and improving performance are two key factors in structural design. In the aerospace and automotive industries, this is particularly true with respect to design criteria such as...

  9. aerospace medicine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important as matrix materials for the advanced composites used in aerospace, electronics, automotive and other industries. (more) Subramaniam, C 1994-01-01 244 The influence of...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Aerospace Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportationVice-President ofScience &AboutAerospace

  11. Career Map: Aerospace Engineer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Change RequestFirst Report to the PrimePilotAwardsCareerAerospace

  12. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Aerospace and Automotive Industry, SAE Transactions J.aerospace and automotive industries has become increasinglyaerospace and automotive industries has become increasingly

  13. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aerospace and automotive industries has become increasinglythe aerospace and automotive industry, only during the pastLMA partners in the automotive industry. formation and crown

  14. aerospace systems test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace systems test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 26th Aerospace Testing Seminar,...

  15. 34 McCormick / spring Lead mechanical engineer, Titan Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    and solar panels. Anyway, I learned about the job through a solar car listserv. I contacted him and becameCormick: What does Titan Aerospace do? Cornew: Titan Aerospace is a startup that designs and builds solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. Our long-term goal is to build solar-powered UAVs that could stay

  16. aerospace nuclear safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace nuclear safety First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY...

  17. High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Scott A. Lintelman1 assurance CPS can mutually benefit aerospace and automotive industries. I. INTRODUCTION Commercial aviation]. In the automotive industry, recent trends in intelligent transportation systems can be evidently mapped to e

  18. T. G. Bifano Department of Aerospace and Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. G. Bifano Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 T. A. Dow Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Precision Engineering Center, North stress, the mechanism of deformation will change from one of re- versible energy storage via elastic

  19. BS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context (iBS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http

  20. BS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context (iBS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET

  1. Designing a Career in Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing a Career in Biomedical Engineering Robot-assisted surgery. Photo courtesy The Acrobot equipment, robots and therapeutic devices to improve human performance. They are also solving problems

  2. Biomedical devices from ultraviolet LEDs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnical Report:Biomedical

  3. advanced biomedical research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rose, Michael R. 2 THE CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE BIOMEDICAL COMPUTING: ADVANCING BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE WITH OPEN SOURCE Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  4. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. qAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation

  5. aerospace mechanisms symposium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Aerospace Engineering We present an arbitrary high-order quadrature- free, Runge for Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy. He received his B.S. in physics from Arizona...

  6. adaptive aerospace tools: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Airbus is the main Euro- pean aerospace company in the civil sector, however a large part of the work is performed at various...

  7. aerospace medical panel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Rprint & Copyright @ by Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, V A w. P. ROACH, M.S., Ph.D., M, B.S., and CRAIG M. BRAMLETTE, A.S. ROACH WP, ROGERS ME, ROCKWELL BA,...

  8. Aerospace mergers and acquisitions from a lean enterprise perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Junhong, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past twenty years, companies in the aerospace industry experienced major transitions: mergers and acquisitions, and lean transformation initiatives. This thesis presents research about the relation of lean efforts ...

  9. aerospace personal cooling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a reliable and fast NDT-technique that can be applied for a wide range of testing problems in aerospace applications. It is robust and sensitive enough to be used in...

  10. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Updated: Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Updated: Spring 2012 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Mechanical Engineering Majors are required to complete four (4) Technical Electives Century Energy Technologies II MAE 135 Computational Mechanics MAE 180A Spacecraft Guidance MAE 181 Space

  11. West Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , solid mechanics, energy systems, engineering materials, automatic controls, mechatronicsWest Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Degrees Offered Master of science in mechanical engineering Master of science in engineering with a major in mechanical

  12. Risk from network disruptions in an aerospace supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bryan K. (Bryan Keith)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents methods for determining the effects of risk from disruptions using an aerospace supply chain as the example, primarily through the use of a computer simulation model. Uncertainty in the current marketplace ...

  13. Reduction of rework at a large aerospace manufacturer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Jeremy A. (Jeremy Alan)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an axiom of the manufacturing of any complex product that errors will occur that require repair or discard of said product. In building aircraft, Raptor Aerospace encounters and repairs numerous deviations from the ...

  14. Development of alternate parts for the aerospace industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapley, James Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the topic of the development of alternate parts for the aerospace industry, drawing on industry examples to demonstrate methods and approaches and the benefits to firms engaged in these activities. I ...

  15. Heart Valve Lesson Plan Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Heart Valve Lesson Plan Biomedical Engineering Objective Introduce students to biomedical Learning Outcomes Students will understand the role and function of heart valves. Students will learn does a heart valve work? Why do we need to replace heart valves? Time Required (Itemized) Lecture

  16. New Degree Program in BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    to several exciting careers: Medical School Pharmacy school Industry - R & D in medical instrumentation (ask us for details). MS or Ph.D. in Medical Physics Pharmacy School or a career in Biomedical) (4cr.) Modern Physics topics for Biomedical physics: Quantum mechanics, nuclear physics, Magnetic

  17. Solid state power bus controllers for aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villarreal, Terry Joseph

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLID STATE POWER BUS CONTROLLERS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS A Thesis by TERRY JOSEPH VILLARREAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Electrical Eny'neering SOLID STATE POWER BUS CONTROLLERS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS A Thesis TERRY JOSEPH VILLARREAL Approved as to style and content by: Mehrdad Ehsani (Chairman of Committee) Robert D. Nevels...

  18. Fire fighting in aerospace product development : a study of project capacity and resource planning in an aerospace enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuarrie, Allan J. (Allan John), 1963-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is broadly recognized in the aerospace industry, as well as many others, that organizations which effectively execute development projects to meet desired cost, schedule, and performance targets for their customers ...

  19. New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

  20. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, Barry A. [Isys, 2727 Walsh Ave., Suite 103, Santa Clara, CA 95051 (United States); Ruffell, John P. [Group 3, LLC, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  1. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  2. Multistate analysis and design : case studies in aerospace design and long endurance systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agte, Jeremy S. (Jeremy Sundermeyer)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research contributes to the field of aerospace engineering by proposing and demonstrating an integrated process for the early-stage, multistate design of aerospace systems. The process takes into early consideration ...

  3. Service bulletin inventory management and modeling for aerospace parts in customer service organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardede, Erna K. (Erna Kertasasmita)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Customer Service department of United Technology Corporation (UTC) Aerospace System is primarily responsible for providing spare parts, repair services, training, and technical support for products that UTC Aerospace ...

  4. 2001 -4380 -0 Aerospace EngineeringIto, Ward, and Valasek ROBUST DYNAMIC INVERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    2001 - 4380 - 0 Aerospace EngineeringIto, Ward, and Valasek ROBUST DYNAMIC INVERSION CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR THE X-38 AIAA-2001-4380 Dai Ito, Dr. Donald T. Ward, and Dr. John Valasek Aerospace Engineering AIAA GN&C Conference, Montreal, Canada 9 August 2001 #12;2001 - 4380 - 1 Aerospace Engineering

  5. 1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Conference April 27, 2011 #12;2Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility Nuclear Criticality Safety1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility

  6. UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE Lecturer/Senior Lecturer/Reader in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas: space/aerospace systems; micro/nano fluids and flows; energy engineering; or the mechanicsUNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE Lecturer/Senior Lecturer/Reader in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Salary range: 33,320 - 58,157, open contract (with 3-year

  7. Nanocellulose in Polymer Composites and Biomedical: Research and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Yuan [ORNL; Tekinalp, Halil L [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocellulose materials are nano-sized cellulose fibers or crystals that are produced by bacteria or derived from plants. These materials exhibit exceptional strength characteristics, light weight, transparency, and excellent biocompatibility. Compared to some other nanomaterials, nanocellulose is renewable and less expensive to produce. As such, a wide range of applications for nanocellulose has been envisioned. Most extensively studied areas include polymer composites and biomedical applications. Cellulose nanofibrils and nanocrystals have been used to reinforce both thermoplastic and thermoset polymers. Given the hydrophilic nature of these materials, the interfacial properties with most polymers are often poor. Various surface modification procedures have thus been adopted to improve the interaction between polymer matrix and cellulose nanofibrils or nanocrystals. In addition, the applications of nanocellulose as biomaterials have been explored including wound dressing, tissue repair, and medical implants. Nanocellulose materials for wound healing and periodontal tissue recovery have become commercially available, demonstrating the great potential of nanocellulose as a new generation of biomaterials. In this review, we highlight the applications of nanocellulose as reinforcing fillers for composites and the effect of surface modification on the mechanical properties as well as the application as biomaterials.

  8. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. q As a consequence plasmaAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation codes are based on the magnetohydrodynamic

  9. Applying Semantic Web Technologies to Knowledge Sharing in Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciravegna, Fabio

    Applying Semantic Web Technologies to Knowledge Sharing in Aerospace Engineering A.-S. Dadzie , R. This paper details an integrated methodology to optimise Knowledge reuse and sharing, illustrated with a use of Knowledge from legacy documents via automated means, or directly in systems interfacing with Knowledge

  10. advanced aerospace materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Recent Advances in the Analysis and...

  11. aerospace structural materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace structural materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. aerospace materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL,...

  13. PROPULSION AND ENERGY 54 AEROSPACE AMERICA/DECEMBER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    PROPULSION AND ENERGY 54 AEROSPACE AMERICA/DECEMBER 2005 Electric propulsion Several significant advancements in electric propulsion (EP) systems and related technolo- gies occurred this year. Flight programs throughout the discharge and includes the effects of magnetic fields on the primary electrons. PRIMA is used

  14. Honors and Awards 2008-2009 Department of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Honors and Awards 2008-2009 Department of Aerospace Engineering D. Chimenti: Invited plenary Base, Florida H. Hu: 2009 AIAA Best Paper Award, AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee A. Laws: Deans' Staff Excellence Award, College of Engineering, ISU V. Levitas: Einstein Award for Scientific

  15. Herek Clack Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saniie, Jafar

    Herek Clack Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering You could say, Clack has developed a new combustion laboratory at IIT and established a research group focusing on reacting, multiphase, and turbulent flows; and mitigation of toxic products of combustion. An expert

  16. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  17. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  18. Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson-Prior, Linda

    Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue Joseph P. Culver,1, * Wolfgang; accepted 25 March 2009; posted 25 March 2009 (Doc. ID 109253); published 30 March 2009 This Applied Optics feature issue on Topics in Biomedical Optics highlights papers presented at the 2008 Biomedical Topical

  19. Fluorescent Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Fluorescent Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications V.M.Dao, Dr. G. Coullerez, Dr. L, the main goal was to synthesize and to characterize novel fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles (NPs) involve superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), a fluorescently-labeled polymer

  20. Biomechanical and Biomedical Engineering Anton Filatov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science 2. An organism is a living thing that has physical characteristics to help it survive 2nd Grade and biomedical engineering. The students will be exposed the concepts like the strucutre and functions to think of the human body in an engineering context. This activity is aimed at students in the 3rd - 5th

  1. Ultra Low Power Bioelectronics Fundamentals, Biomedical Applications,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    Ultra Low Power Bioelectronics Fundamentals, Biomedical Applications, and Bio-inspired Systems to articulate information-based principles for ultra-low-power design that apply to biology or to electronics of ultra- low-power electronics and bioelectronics is shown in the figure below. Engineering can aid

  2. BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles are urgently needed to support risk assessments and regulatory policy decisions regarding materials containing Environmental Protection Agency DuPont BASF Evonik Cabot General Electric Approach The quartz crystal

  3. Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human Health as a Leading Integrated Research and global impact. The University also strives to complement this breadth of scholarship with focus Medicine, Nature Genetics, Lancet and Science Contribution to 68 out of the 395 `top' papers from

  4. New Degree Program in BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    to several exciting careers: Medical School Pharmacy School Industry - R & D in medical instrumentation Physics Graduate School in Physics, Biophysics or related fields Pharmacy or Dentistry School Career (4cr.) Modern physics topics for biomedical physics: quantum mechanics, nuclear physics, magnetic

  5. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira [University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single Column ModelRSPgovCampaignsUnmanned Aerospace

  7. 2013 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro http:www.biomedicalimaging.org2013 April 7-11, 2013; San Francisco, CA, USA...

  8. africa biomedical publications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENGINEERING Jean-Yves Bansard, Michel Kerbaol, Jean Louis Coatrieux, IEEE Fellow Physics Websites Summary: AN ANALYSIS OF IEEE PUBLICATIONS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING...

  9. An Assessment of the Degree of Implementation of the Lean Aerospace Initiative Principles and Practices within the US Aerospace and Defense Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Thomas E.

    This report is a formal documentation of the results of an assessment of the degree to which Lean Principles and Practices have been implemented in the US Aerospace and Defense Industry. An Industry Association team prepared ...

  10. JOURNAL OF AEROSPACE COMPUTING, INFORMATION, AND COMMUNICATION Vol. 6, March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    control the shape of aerospace structures has spawned the use of shape memory alloy actuatorsJOURNAL OF AEROSPACE COMPUTING, INFORMATION, AND COMMUNICATION Vol. 6, March 2009 Reinforcement Learning for Characterizing Hysteresis Behavior of Shape Memory Alloys Kenton Kirkpatrick and John Valasek

  11. Health Monitoring of Aging Aerospace Structures using the Electro-Mechanical Impedance Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Health Monitoring of Aging Aerospace Structures using the Electro- Mechanical Impedance Method-mechanical (E/M) impedance method for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures. As a nondestructive aircraft, health monitoring, statistics, neural networks, 1. INTRODUCTION Structural health monitoring (SHM

  12. Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering IIT Graduate Bulletin 2006-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    , and thermal sciences. The department also offers programs in materials science and engineering241 Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering IIT Graduate Bulletin 2006-2008 Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering 243 Engineering 1 Building 10 W. 32nd St

  13. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Dept. West Virginia University, Oct. 2nd, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Dept. West Virginia University, Oct. 2nd, 2008 www STUDENTS in MECHANICAL and AEROSPACE ENGINEERING #12;OBJECTIVES Overview of Departmental Policies M.S. & Ph.D. Degrees in Energy Materials Multidisciplinary program based in the MAE dept Five

  14. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  15. Department Name Degrees Phone Email Website Aerospace Engineering MS, PhD 303-492-6416 aerograd@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Jane

    Department Name Degrees Phone Email Website Aerospace Engineering MS, PhD 303-492-6416 aerograd@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/aerospace Anthropology MA, PhD 303-492-7947 anthro@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/anthropology Applied Mathematics MS, PhD 303-492-1238 amgradco@colorado.edu http://amath.colorado.edu Art and Art

  16. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  17. A low-power cochlear implant system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Michael W. (Michael Warren), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochlear implants, or bionic ears, restore hearing to the profoundly deaf by bypassing missing inner-ear hair cells in the cochlea and electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. For miniaturized cochlear implants, including ...

  18. Trends in modeling Biomedical Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    into account as shown in Figure 1. The future of biomedical scientific research will be to use massive computing data-crunching applications, data grids for distributed storage of large amounts of data and to develop new approaches to the study of the medical... range of spatial and temporal intervals, from cells to organs or individuals, and from micro- seconds to hours. A central feature of all these imaging techniques is the ability to produce in vivo molecular data in a dynamic way (see [14] for a review...

  19. Biomedical Environmental Sciences Divisions Lawrence Livermore

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnical Report:Biomedical Applications

  20. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sferlazzo, P. [Eaton Corp., Beverly, MA (United States). SED Division

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  1. 2014 Bloodborne Pathogen Program and Biomedical Waste Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    2014 Bloodborne Pathogen Program and Biomedical Waste Training Compliance Receipt Acknowledgement and Training Coordinator Designation I have received the 2014 Bloodborne Pathogen Program and Biomedical Waste Training notification. I understand that this program is intended to ensure that those in my department

  2. Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Medical Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    one course): BIOMEDE 503 Statistical Methods for Biomedical Engineering (3) (II) BIOSTAT 602 Statistics II: Extensions for Linear Regression (3) (II) EECS 501 Probability and Random Processes (4) (I of Experiments (4) (I) STATS 500 Applied Statistics I (3) (I) STATS 525 Probability Theory (3) (I) STATS 547

  3. Bootstrapping Biomedical Ontologies for Scientific Text Dana Movshovitz-Attias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, William W.

    are automatically derived from existing biomedical resources. We show that NELL's boot- strapping algorithm by one source, is re- peated by others, like a "rumor". Detecting this type of duplicated information. There is a growing need for automation of this process in a way that combines available resources. The biomedical

  4. DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (ELE) BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING EMPHASIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    1 DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (ELE) BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING EMPHASIS Ibrahim Abdel-Motaleb, Department Chair and Professor Phone: 815-753-9974 FAX: 815-753-1289 The Department of Electrical Engineering offers a B.S. in electrical engineering with an emphasis in biomedical engineering. Track 1

  5. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Biomedical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Biomedical Imaging Volume 2006, Article ID, functional, cel- lular, and molecular imaging. The overall goal of the Inter- national Journal of Biomedical the current imaging journals handle. In addition, there are new imag- ing areas that are not specifically

  6. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F. [Department of Physics, College of Arts and Sciences, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088 (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH{sub 2} and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI)

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic implantable cardioverter Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Other... Implant Devices Examples: Cochlear implant or implanted hearing aid, drug-infusion pump (including Insulin... infusion pump), any other electronic implant ... Source:...

  8. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  9. Biomedical silver-109m isotope generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanek, P.M.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Moody, D.C.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, composition of matter, and apparatus for producing substantially pure Ag-109m for use in biomedical imaging techniques. Cd-109, which decays with a half-life of 453 days to Ag-109m, is loaded onto an ion exchange column consisting of particulate tin phosphate. After secular equilibrium is reached in about ten minutes, Ag-109m may be selectively eluted from the column by means of a physiologically acceptable aqueous buffered eluent solution of sodium thiosulfate, and either ascorbic acid or dextrose. The breakthrough of toxic Cd-109 is on the order of 1 x 10-7, which is sufficiently low to permit administration of the Ag-109m-containing eluate, with but a minor pH adjustment, directly to a human patient within a matter of seconds. 1 fig.

  10. An examination of Boeing's supply chain management practices within the context of the global aerospace industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    izmeci, DaŸ lar

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the supply chain management practices of the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company within the context of the global aerospace industry. The methodology used for this study includes a study of emerging ...

  11. Doctor of Engineering internship experience at Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Wiley J.

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This monograph describes the author's internship experiences at Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado. A system-level spacecraft design procedure is presented. It describes a spacecraft design flow with emphasis...

  12. Implementation Planning for the Introduction of Knowledge Management in an Aerospace Engineering Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Neil

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of information within an aerospace organization is required for engineers to perform activities. As information is considered, its the experience of the engineer that allows information to become knowledge for use. Knowledge...

  13. An Approach to Analyze Tradeoffs for Aerospace System Design and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Gregory

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

  14. An approach to analyze tradeoffs for aerospace system design and operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

  15. Raman P. Singh School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Phone (Tulsa): 918.594.8155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    Raman P. Singh School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Phone (Tulsa): 918.594.8155 Oklahoma State University Phone (Stillwater): 405.744.1825 700 N. Greenwood Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74106 raman

  16. Design of a small fast steering mirror for airborne and aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulet, Michael Thomas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a small advanced fast steering mirror (sAFSM) for airborne and aerospace platforms. The sAFSM provides feedback-controlled articulation of two rotational axes for precision ...

  17. Design for affordability in defense and aerospace systems using tradespace-based methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Marcus Shihong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program failures have plagued the defense and aerospace industry for decades, as unanticipated cost and schedule overruns have rendered the development of systems ineffective in terms of time and cost considerations. This ...

  18. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical, and electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    20 Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical Engineering students conduct extensive basic and applied research within and crossing usual disciplinary vehicle aerodynamics, combustion, robotics, heat transfer and nonlinear dynamics. In addition, recent

  19. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    20 Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical Engineering students conduct extensive basic and applied research within and crossing usual disciplinary vehicle aerodynamics, combustion, robotics, heat transfer and nonlinear dynamics. In addition, recent

  20. Biomedical Engineering Interdisciplinary Studies Minor Curriculum Requirements & Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control concepts. CIVE 260 Engineering Mechanics-Statics 3 MATH 160; PH 141 or concurrent reg. F, S Forces1 Biomedical Engineering Interdisciplinary Studies Minor Curriculum Requirements & Course Information Non-Engineering Students Curriculum Requirements: The undergraduate program requires completion

  1. PHOTOACOUSTIC IMAGING AND HIGH INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND IN BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Janggu

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical and acoustical technologies for biomedical devices have been developed rapidly in the past years. These non-invasive technologies are used for diagnostic and therapeutic studies with great potential for improving ...

  2. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., George W. (Tijeras, NM); Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  3. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  4. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  5. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

  6. The University's Aerospace Engineering Research Centre was established in 2007 and has since made a significant contribution to research and development in the aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    The aerospace industry is increasingly using composite materials, such as carbon fibre, in the building damage from an impact forms in composite aircraft materials, with the aim of assisting designers to power them. However, the difficulty with these new materials is that a low velocity impact

  7. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  8. Source/drain profile engineering with plasma implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.C.; Cheung, N.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jiqun Shao; Denholm, A.S. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow junction profiles are controlled by the variable implant profile, implant damage profile and annealing cycle. For plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) systems, the dopant and damage profiles vary with plasma source conditions and implanter waveforms. These can lead to different implant profiles for the same dose and energy, and different junction profiles after annealing. In the low energy regime, the as-implanted profiles resemble those from conventional implanters. In the Berkeley PIH system, a 55 mn p{sup +} junction is formed by 1 kV BF{sub 3} PIII implantation and a two-step rapid thermal annealing cycle.

  9. aluminium ions implanted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties of ion implanted ceramics are primarily a function of the radiation damage produced by the implantation process. For crystalline ceramics this damage is chiefly...

  10. arc ion implantation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties of ion implanted ceramics are primarily a function of the radiation damage produced by the implantation process. For crystalline ceramics this damage is chiefly...

  11. Resistivity changes in carbon-implanted Teflon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . e Figure 10: Carbon Distribution vs Depth for 50 kV/140 kV Dual Implantation Based on the simulation results above, it was determined that using dual energies would maximize the concentration of carbon in the implanted area. Consequently carbon...

  12. Department of Biomedical Engineering BME 479: BioMEMS: Introduction to Microfabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    , oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, and wafer bonding will be discussed for various materials orientation and doping. Lecture 8. Ion implantation and diffusion. Simulation of implantation and diffusion. Ohmic contacts. Lecture 12. Bonding of silicon wafers. Fusion bonding. Anodic bonding. Thermocompression

  13. Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS2 6 0 1 2 3 0 2 1 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Steven

    Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS2 6 0 1 #12; Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997

  14. Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS-2 6 0 1 2 3 0 2 1 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Steven

    Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS-2 6 0 1 #12;Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997

  15. 16.423J Space Biomedical Engineering & Life Support, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Dava J.

    Fundamentals of human performance, physiology, and life support impacting engineering design and aerospace systems. Topics include: effects of gravity on the muscle, skeletal, cardiovascular, and neurovestibular systems; ...

  16. Surface and Coatings Technology 169170 (2003) 408410 0257-8972/03/$ -see front matter 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6Al4V (TAV) alloy was carried out to improve the surface tribological properties of test samples of the wear resistance of such nitrogen implanted Ti alloy is expected, increasing considerably the useful lifetime of components made of TAV which is finding widespread use in biomedical and aerospace applications

  17. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 8/24/2010 RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Biomedical engineering is a discipline that advances knowledge in engineering, biology and medicine-related problems by combining their knowledge of biology and medicine with engineering principles and practices1 BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 8/24/2010 RENSSELAER

  18. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 11/8/2010 RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Biomedical engineering is a discipline that advances knowledge in engineering, biology and medicine-related problems by combining their knowledge of biology and medicine with engineering principles and practices1 BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 11/8/2010 RENSSELAER

  19. Dr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    and oxygenation of the brain and muscle. Since 2002 he heads the Biomedical Optics Research LaboratoryDr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory Clinic of Neonatology

  20. Andrew K. Dunn, PhD Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew K. Dunn, PhD Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering University of Texas at Austin in electrical engineering from Northeastern University in 1994, and his PhD in biomedical engineering from UT

  1. Five (5) Tenure Track Position in ME/AE at University of Tennessee Knoxville The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keaveny, Tony

    , and internal combustion engines are of particular interest. Appointments at the Assistant Professor rank automotive research and combustion engines facility. The University of Alabama currently enrolls about 34

  2. To be published in IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 2003, Cat No. 0-7803-7651-X/03/$17.00 2003 IEEE Planar REDOX and Conductivity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    To be published in IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 2003, Cat No. 0-7803-7651-X/03 are AeroRedox2C14 - 1 #12;To be published in IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 2003, Cat No. 0. BIOGRAPHIES 1. INTRODUCTION This paper extends the work reported at last year's IEEE Aerospace conference

  3. Proceedings of the fifth PTCOG meeting and international workshop on biomedical accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the proceeding and individual papers presented at the Fifth PTCOG meeting and International Workshop on Biomedical Accelerators. The meeting was divided into sessions on the biomedical aspects of therapy delivery, new biomedical accelerators, facilities, and beam localization and status report. Individual papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  4. A miniature, implantable wireless neural stimulation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arfin, Scott K. (Scott Kenneth)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present the design of a wireless neural stimulation system. The system consists of an external transmitter, controllable through a computer interface, and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver and ...

  5. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  6. EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Study on the eddy current damping of the spin dynamics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    4TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Study on the eddy current damping of the spin consideration in this article, are impacted by torques generated by eddy currents as the conducting non, the permanent magnetic field from the magnetosphere generates eddy current in the spinning, conducting body

  7. FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS After the FOB alignment is complete, and it passes environmental tests, it will be checked out in a second HST. The NICMOS FOB will relay simulated images from RAS/HOMS to a Photometrics CCD camera placed where the three

  8. Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium January 811, 2001, Reno, NV or implicitly, for a number of design codes--especially Copyright 2001 by The American Institute of Aeronautics, 1999) have begun to adopt these code formats, in analogy with long-standing practice in the building

  9. October 24, 2000 13:32 Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    October 24, 2000 13:32 Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium, either explicitly or implicitly, for a number of design codes---especially Copyright 2001 by The American turbine standards (e.g., IEC, 1999) have begun to adopt these code formats, in analogy with long

  10. aerospace materials aluminum-lithium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace materials aluminum-lithium First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The effect of...

  11. R~print & Copyright @ by Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, V A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boppart, Stephen

    R~print & Copyright @ by Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, V A w. P. ROACH, M.S., Ph.D., M, B.S., and CRAIG M. BRAMLETTE, A.S. ROACH WP, ROGERS ME, ROCKWELL BA, BOPPART SA, STEIN CD, BRAMLETTE

  12. Dr. Brian L. Wardle Director, Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    are in the areas of nano-engineered advanced composites, bulk nanostructured materials, carbon-based material applications. Such hybrid advanced composites employ aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance laminate Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium and has served as the materials/structures lead on MIT

  13. 1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory Nuclear Data Research at RPI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory Nuclear Data Research at RPI Y. Danon Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180 RPI Nuclear Data (RND) 2011 Symposium for Criticality Safety and Reactor Applications Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, April 27, 2011 #12;2Mechanical

  14. Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipson, Michal

    for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 69 Number Responded: 55 Response Rate: 80% (-N & Control Engineer (3) El Segundo CA Canadian Center for Aerospace* - N Test Engineer Calgary, Alberta Design Eng Lynn MA General Motors Fuel Cell Systems Analyst Honeoye Falls NY Gotham Consulting Partners

  15. EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Semi-intrusive and non-intrusive stochastic methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    4TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Semi-intrusive and non-intrusive stochastic methods, 33400 Talence, France Abstract In this work we present semi-intrusive and non-intrusive techniques and non-intrusive. The intrusive technique consist to write an ad-hoc code by modifying an existing

  16. ME/AE 381 Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems TWO FLYWHEEL SYSTEM LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, Robert G.

    ME/AE 381 Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems TWO FLYWHEEL SYSTEM LABORATORY The objective of this laboratory is to design controllers that will regulate the angular position of a twoflywheel system (see tasks: 1. Ignoring Coulomb friction, determine a statespace description of the two flywheel system

  17. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , and electronic systems, ranging in scale from the International Space Station to micro-scale electric generators undergraduate research and student projects have included the creation of a composite material violin, electric airplanes, and formula race cars for competition. aerospace & mechanical ame overview programs available

  18. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical-optical-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    -optical- electronic systems, ranging in scale from the International Space Station to micro-scale electric generators undergraduate research and student projects have included the creation of a composite material violin, electric airplanes, formula race cars for competition, and custom wave-tanks for testing surfboards. AEROSPACE

  19. CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snooke, Neal

    M2 CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke Department- oped on top of the MCIRQ simulator with the aim to produce an automated FMEA for aircraft fuel systems similar to pre- viously developed automated electrical FMEA. Introduction This paper describes a circuit

  20. Dynamic Spherical Volumetric Simplex Splines with Applications in Biomedical Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    Dynamic Spherical Volumetric Simplex Splines with Applications in Biomedical Simulation Yunhao Tan computational framework based on dy- namic spherical volumetric simplex splines for simulation of genus- zero to reconstruct the high-fidelity digi- tal model of a real-world object with spherical volumetric simplex splines

  1. >> bme.wustl.edu The Department of Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stormo, Gary

    (Math 217) 3 Engineering Mathematics A,B (ESE 318, 319) 6 Probability and Statistics for Engineers engineering and its diverse career paths. You will build a foundation in physical sciences, mathematics Science The BS in Biomedical Engineering requires completion of the courses in the Core Curriculum

  2. MSc Biotechnology UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Biotechnology Facility Design Environmental Biotechnology Regulatory Affairs Drug Development and pharmaceutical products. It also provides modules on food and environmental biotechnology as well as industriallyMSc Biotechnology UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science Some of the reasons to study

  3. Biomedical applications of proton induced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vis, R.D.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apart from studies on aerosols, the majority of applications of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) with a normal beam or a microprobe (micro-PIXE) is found in biology and medicine. Two aspects of broad beam PIXE are often decisive for the choice of this analytical technique. Compared to other techniques capable of analysis down beyond the ppm level, PIXE can be carried out with a very small amount of material and minute fractions of the composite samples, even in the scale of micrometers and quite often with minimal sample preparation, which are important requirements for biomedical investigations. Secondly, the speed of the total analysis opens the possibility to analyze large numbers of samples in a reasonable time, which is often necessary in biomedical studies in order to obtain sufficiently significant correlations between trace element concentrations and biomedical phenomena. Few, if any, techniques can compete with micro-PIXE; quantitative trace element analysis on a micrometer scale still represent a challenging problem. The electron microprobe normally lacks the sensitivity while the laser induced techniques suffer as yet from quantification problems. This paper describes recent developments especially in micro-PIXE in biomedical research.

  4. A Novel Surface Registration Algorithm with Biomedical Modeling Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Heng

    1 A Novel Surface Registration Algorithm with Biomedical Modeling Applications Heng Huang, Li Shen and motion. Matheny et al. [2] used 3D Manuscript received October 19, 2005; revised April 17, 2006. Heng: Heng Huang (heng.huang@dartmouth.edu). and 4D surface harmonics to reconstruct rigid and nonrigid

  5. Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Sciences Mission Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    in Biomedical Sciences (DBMS) is to provide excellent educational and research opportunities for students in the advancement of knowledge through research. Program Overview The DBMS offers students integrated training. The DBMS is centered in the Faculty of Medicine, where investigative collaborations among basic

  6. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Biomedical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    dark-field signals; for example, via digitally subtraction. In the numerical experiments-ray computed tomography (CT) has revolutionized medical imaging and become a cornerstone of modern radiology. Improving resolution and reducing dose are two critical factors in biomedical applications and remain

  7. Integrating Biomedical Text Mining Services into a Distributed Workflow Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaizauskas, Rob

    the workflow. While many scientific workflows primarily involve operations on struc- tured or numerical dataIntegrating Biomedical Text Mining Services into a Distributed Workflow Environment Rob Gaizauskas they are distributed, i.e., where some of the data or processing resources are remote from the scientist initiating

  8. A Meshing Pipeline for Biomedical Computing Michael Callahan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    , will incorporate a flexible suite of tools that will offer some gener- ality to mesh generation of biomedical, mesh generation, and numerical simulations. An impor- tant requirement of the numerical approximation of the resulting visualizations. Historically, the generation of these meshes has been a significant bottleneck

  9. 46th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, January 7-10, 2008, Reno, Nevada A Smart Wind Turbine Blade Using Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Robert C.

    46th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, January 7-10, 2008, Reno, Nevada A Smart Wind Turbine Blade Using of "smart" wind turbine blades with integrated sensor-actuator-controller modules to im- prove

  10. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfuderer, H.A.; Moody, J.B.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences.

  11. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, J.B. (comp.)

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division.

  12. Photoresist integrity during high energy implant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrill, T.M. [Texas Instruments Productization, Dallas, TX (United States); Jones, M. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Jain, A. [Texas Indstruments Semiconductor Process and Development Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoresist integrity was evaluated on a commercial high-energy ion implanter operated up to the specified energy (1.7 MeV B or 3.0 MeV P) and power (1.0 MeV B at 1000 p{mu}A or 2.0 MeV P at 500 p{mu}A) limits. SEM Cross-sectional analysis of several photoresists showed that the proper cooling was maintained to avoid significant photoresist degradation. Photoresist shrinkage was observed, resulting in thickness reductions up to 22% and significant changes in sidewall slope. Little asymmetry was observed when photoresist was implanted at a 7{degrees} tilt. At the specified power limits, photoresist outgassing prevented smooth implant operation unless pressure compensation was implemented.

  13. Sound localization and interaural time sensitivity with bilateral cochlear implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Becky Bikkei

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming more common as clinicians attempt to provide better sound-source localization and speech reception in noise for cochlear implant (CI) users. While some improvement over the ...

  14. Ultrasound image guided acetabular implant orientation during total hip replacement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, John; Haddad, Waleed; Kluiwstra, Jan-Ulco; Matthews, Dennis; Trauner, Kenneth

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for assisting in precise location of the acetabular implant during total hip replacement. The system uses ultrasound imaging for guiding the placement and orientation of the implant.

  15. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous silicon has become potentially important material for microelectronics applications. By using low energy implantation and energy scan implantation, a stable silicide with good electrical conductivity can be formed, and can be used...

  16. Micro Raman Spectroscopy of Annealed Erbium Implanted GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajpeyi, Agam P.

    Wurtzite GaN epilayers grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on sapphire substrates were subsequently ion implanted with Er to a dose of 510? cm?. The implanted samples were annealed in nitrogen atmosphere ...

  17. Plasma etching of ion-implanted polysilicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karulkar, P.C.; Wirzbicki, M.A.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation is increasingly used to dope polysilicon gates to obtain lower resistivities and also to control the cumulative time-temperature cycling of VLSI wafers. Dry etching of polysilicon doped with phosphorus by ion implantation was studied using a parallel-plate etcher and two different etch chemistries sulfur haxafluoride-O{sub 2}-argon and SF6-CCl2F2-Ar. These two etch procedures were previously found to result in excellent etching of polysilicon which was doped with phosphorus by solid-source diffusion. Large differences in the cross-sectional profiles of ion-implanted polysilicon were found while using the two chemistries. SF6-dichlorodifluoromethane-Ar chemistry caused sharp notch-like undercuts, while the SF6-O2-Ar chemistry exhibited linewidth loss without any notching. Examples of the cross sections of ion-implanted polysilicon are presented along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms that cause the different cross-sectional profiles in the two etch chemistries. The notching is explained in terms of the variation in the dopant concentration and in the structure of ion-implanted polysilicon at different depths. The absence of notching in the cross section of ion-implanted polysilicon etched in the SF6-O2-Ar chemistry is explained by proposing that the interaction of oxygen in the SF6-O2-Ar chemistry with the etched surface makes the chemistry less sensitive to the dopant concentration in the etched material. Results of a simple experiment which support the proposed explanation are presented.

  18. An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Enver G. Kilinc, Camilla of the implantable monitoring system for long- term duration has many challenges. First, a multi-target biosen- sor coil; (ii) A power manage- ment IC dealing with the energy source of the implantable microsystem

  19. Photocurable Inorganic-Organic Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Yaping

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................. 4 1.3 Hydrogels as Sensor Membranes ............................................. 6 II PHOTO-CROSSLINKED PDMSstar-PEG HYDROGELS: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND POTENTIAL APPLICATION FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLD........... 9........................................................... 5 1.2 Sequence of events that leads to formation of fibrous capsules around implanted biosesors .................................................................................... 8 2.1 Synthesis of: (top) inorganic PDMS star -MA (A...

  20. ON DEVELOPMENT OF TOTALLY IMPLANTABLE VESTIBULAR PROSTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, William C

    ON DEVELOPMENT OF TOTALLY IMPLANTABLE VESTIBULAR PROSTHESIS Andrei M. Shkel 1 Department vestibular prosthesis. The sensing element of the prosthesis is a custom designed one-axis MEMS gyroscope of the prosthesis on a rate table indicate that the device's output matches the average firing rate of vestibular

  1. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  2. 2001 4232 -0 Aerospace EngineeringBokadia and Valasek SEV ER E W EATH ER AV O ID AN C E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    2001 4232 -0 Aerospace EngineeringBokadia and Valasek SEV ER E W EATH ER AV O ID AN C E U SIN G IN FO R M ED H EU R ISTIC SEAR C H AIAA-2001-4232 Sangeeta Bokadia and Dr. John Valasek Aerospace Engineering AIAA GN&C Conference, Montreal, Canada 7 August 2001 #12;2001 4232 -1 Aerospace Engineering

  3. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampikian, Janet M (Decatur, GA); Hunt, Eden M (Atlanta, GA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  4. Recent advances in wavefront shaping techniques for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Lee, KyoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, KyungDuk; Lee, Shinwha; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the highly inhomogeneous distributions of refractive indexes, light propagation in complex media such as biological tissue experiences multiple light scattering events. The suppression and control of multiple light scattering events are investigated because they offer the possibility of optical focusing and imaging through biological tissues, and they may open new avenues for diagnosis and treatment of several human diseases. In order to provide insight into how new optical techniques can address the issues of multiple light scattering in biomedical applications, the recent progress in optical wavefront-shaping techniques is summarized.

  5. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  6. Biomedical Applications of Microfluidic Technology | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnical Report:Biomedical Applications of

  7. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Brian M., E-mail: Brian.Keller@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Carlo Fidani Regional Cancer Center, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the prescription dose to minimize delayed skin toxicity.

  8. Single Ion Implantation and Deterministic Doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, Thomas

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of single atoms, e.g. dopant atoms, in sub-100 nm scale electronic devices can affect the device characteristics, such as the threshold voltage of transistors, or the sub-threshold currents. Fluctuations of the number of dopant atoms thus poses a complication for transistor scaling. In a complementary view, new opportunities emerge when novel functionality can be implemented in devices deterministically doped with single atoms. The grand price of the latter might be a large scale quantum computer, where quantum bits (qubits) are encoded e.g. in the spin states of electrons and nuclei of single dopant atoms in silicon, or in color centers in diamond. Both the possible detrimental effects of dopant fluctuations and single atom device ideas motivate the development of reliable single atom doping techniques which are the subject of this chapter. Single atom doping can be approached with top down and bottom up techniques. Top down refers to the placement of dopant atoms into a more or less structured matrix environment, like a transistor in silicon. Bottom up refers to approaches to introduce single dopant atoms during the growth of the host matrix e.g. by directed self-assembly and scanning probe assisted lithography. Bottom up approaches are discussed in Chapter XYZ. Since the late 1960's, ion implantation has been a widely used technique to introduce dopant atoms into silicon and other materials in order to modify their electronic properties. It works particularly well in silicon since the damage to the crystal lattice that is induced by ion implantation can be repaired by thermal annealing. In addition, the introduced dopant atoms can be incorporated with high efficiency into lattice position in the silicon host crystal which makes them electrically active. This is not the case for e.g. diamond, which makes ion implantation doping to engineer the electrical properties of diamond, especially for n-type doping much harder then for silicon. Ion implantation is usually a highly statistical process, where high fluences of energetic ions, ranging from {approx}10{sup 9} to >10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted. For single atom device development, control over the absolute number of ions is needed and ions have to be placed with high spatial resolution. In the following sections we will discuss a series of approaches to single ion implantation with regard to single ion impact sensing and control of single ion positioning.

  9. www.engr.colostate.edu/sbmewww.engr.colostate.edu/sbme Overview of the School of Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    two Bachelor of Science degrees -- Biomedical Engineering and one of the following degrees: Chemical Engineering Biomedical Engineering applies engineering principles to medicine and improving quality of life for humans and animals. It is a highly transdisciplinary field, integrating physical, chemical

  10. Mechanical reliability of silica optical fiber: a case study for a biomedical application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Mechanical reliability of silica optical fiber: a case study for a biomedical application Yunn, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8065 ABSTRACT The mechanical reliability of optical fiber used in certain biomedical the fiber can be safely used. In this paper we study two commercially available optical fibers designed

  11. JOYCE Y. WONG Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOYCE Y. WONG Professor Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering and Engineering, 1994 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA S.B., Materials Science and Engineering, Departments of Biomedical Engineering & Materials Science & Engineering (2013-) Co-Director, Affinity Research

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Self-Assembled Peptide Nanostructures for Biotechnological and Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvajal Diaz, Jennifer Andrea

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF SELF-ASSEMBLED PEPTIDE NANOSTRUCTURES FOR BIOTECHNOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS A Dissertation... THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF SELF-ASSEMBLED PEPTIDE NANOSTRUCTURES FOR BIOTECHNOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS A Dissertation by JENNIFER ANDREA CARVAJAL DIAZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  13. Production of Endohedral Fullerenes by Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diener, M.D.; Alford, J. M.; Mirzadeh, S.

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The empty interior cavity of fullerenes has long been touted for containment of radionuclides during in vivo transport, during radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and radioimaging for example. As the chemistry required to open a hole in fullerene is complex and exceedingly unlikely to occur in vivo, and conformational stability of the fullerene cage is absolute, atoms trapped within fullerenes can only be released during extremely energetic events. Encapsulating radionuclides in fullerenes could therefore potentially eliminate undesired toxicity resulting from leakage and catabolism of radionuclides administered with other techniques. At the start of this project however, methods for production of transition metal and p-electron metal endohedral fullerenes were completely unknown, and only one method for production of endohedral radiofullerenes was known. They therefore investigated three different methods for the production of therapeutically useful endohedral metallofullerenes: (1) implantation of ions using the high intensity ion beam at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surface Modification and Characterization Research Center (SMAC) and fullerenes as the target; (2) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following alpha decay; and (3) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following neutron capture, using ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as a thermal neutron source. While they were unable to obtain evidence of successful implantation using the ion beam at SMAC, recoil following alpha decay and neutron capture were both found to be economically viable methods for the production of therapeutically useful radiofullerenes. In this report, the procedures for preparing fullerenes containing the isotopes {sup 212}Pb, {sup 212}Bi, {sup 213}Bi, and {sup 177}Lu are described. None of these endohedral fullerenes had ever previously been prepared, and all of these radioisotopes are actively under investigation for RIT. Additionally, the chemistry for derivatizing the radiofullerenes for water-solubility and a method for removing exohedral radionuclides are reported. The methods and chemistry developed during this CRADA are the crucial first steps for the development of fullerenes as a method superior to existing technologies for in vivo transport of radionuclides.

  14. Resistivity changes in carbon-implanted Teflon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW April 2004 Major: Nuclear Engineering RESISTIVITY CHANGES IN CARBON-IMPLANTED TEFLON A Senior Honors Thesis by MATTHEW R. JACKSON Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University... In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW Approved as to style and content by: Ron Hart (Fellows Advisor) April 2004 Edward A. Funkhouser (Executive Director) Major: Nuclear Engineering ABSTRACT...

  15. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T. (Los Alamos, NM); Lowe, Terry C. (Santa Fe, NM); Valiev, Ruslan Z. (Ufa, RU); Stolyarov, Vladimir V. (Ufa, RU); Latysh, Vladimir V. (Ufa, RU); Raab, Georgy J. (Ufa, RU)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  16. Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite materials for aerospace and transportation applications. Polymer composites are inherited lighter than their metallic counterparts resulting in significant weight reduction

  17. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Infotech@Aerospace Conference, Paper No. 2005-7077 A Small Semi-Autonomous Rotary-Wing Unmanned Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -7077 1 A Small Semi-Autonomous Rotary-Wing Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) Scott D. Hanford* , Lyle N. Long System (GPS) will not work indoors, so other sensors will have to be used for indoor flight. The software. * NSF Fellow, Aerospace Engineering, Member AIAA, sdh187@psu.edu. Professor, Aerospace Engineering

  18. Defects and diffusion in MeV implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezia, V. C.; Haynes, T. E.; Agarwal, Aditya; Gossmann, H.-J.; Pelaz, L.; Jacobson, D. C.; Eaglesham, D. J.; Duggan, J. L. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, 55 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76201 (United States)

    1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we demonstrate that the defects that are created by 2-MeV Si ions can interact with dopant atoms both during implantation and during post-implant annealing. We show that the interstitials and vacancies created during MeV Si implantation result in a radiation enhanced diffusion of B and Sb markers, respectively, when the temperature of implantation is above the threshold temperature for formation of mobile dopant complexes. With the use of these dopant markers we also demonstrate that a vacancy-rich near surface region results during post-implant annealing of MeV implanted silicon. The depth distribution and the thermal evolution of clustered vacancies was measured by a Au labeling technique.

  19. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Gonzales, Gilbert R. (New York, NY); Adzic, Radoslav (East Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  20. Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

  1. automatic defibrillator implantation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    som en litteraturversikt, dr (more) Andersson, Kristoffer 2009-01-01 3 Peace of Mind: The Decision to Accept an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator (ICD): Qualitative...

  2. ace dental implant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31) 1750 Nelson, Tim 23 Comparison of clinically projected and radiographically optimal implant fixture placement. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??M.S....

  3. ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantchenko, Oxana S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    38 3. Renewable Power for ImplantableCOMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLER, Isaacson M, Shakouri A: A renewable energy power source

  4. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  5. Improving Ion Implanter Productivity with In-situ Cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Steve [ATMI Inc., 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury CT (United States); Perry, Alfred [Analog Devices, 804 Woburn Street, Wilmington, MA (United States)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion source lifetime is generally a critical factor in overall implanter productivity. However, extended ion source life only provides value in a manufacturing environment if the ion beam remains stable. As an ion source ages, apertures and insulators become coated with conductive dopant residues which cause beam instabilities, resulting in implant stoppages. These stoppages create failures and/or assists which are logged in the implanter's data files. Analog Devices has recently evaluated in-situ ion source cleaning based on use of xenon difluoride chemistry. The paper will describe how the in-situ cleaning decreased logged failures/assists, resulting in increased implanter productivity.

  6. actuales del implante: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) as a treatment option for prostate cancer requires implantation of 80-150 radioactive iodine-125 (I-125) "seeds" into the...

  7. alejados del implante: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) as a treatment option for prostate cancer requires implantation of 80-150 radioactive iodine-125 (I-125) "seeds" into the...

  8. THE AEROSPACE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1 \.

  9. THE AEROSPACE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1 \.Suile

  10. Electrical activation and spin coherence of ultra low dose antimony implants in silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and spin coherence of ultra low dose antimony implants inClara, CA 95054 We implanted ultra low doses (0.2 to 210 11100 nm, corresponding to ultra low ion implantation doses of

  11. An extensive analysis of modified nanotube surfaces for next-generation orthopedic implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Christine Jeanette

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cemented versus cementless press-fit condylar total kneecemented implants or press-fit implants. For cemented boneThe second approach is to use press-fit implants, which are

  12. Damage Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. Damage Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. Abstract: Damage evaluation processes in patterned GaN implanted by 3...

  13. Smart Materials and Adaptive Systems (3 Credits) Instructor Gregory Washington, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC Irvine (gnwashin@uci.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials. Each subsection will result in a mini-design project. Text Course Notes preparedSmart Materials and Adaptive Systems (3 Credits) Instructor Gregory Washington, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC Irvine (gnwashin@uci.edu) Synopsis Modeling and control of smart materials

  14. Experimental and computational analysis of toughness anisotropy in an AA2139 Al-alloy for aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Experimental and computational analysis of toughness anisotropy in an AA2139 Al-alloy for aerospace applications T.F. Morgeneyer1,3 , J. Besson1 , H. Proudhon1 , M.J. Starink2 and I. Sinclair2 1

  15. AIAA Paper No. 2005-6982 InfoTech@Aerospace Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Sept., 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Astronautics, Sept., 2005 1 An Undergraduate Course in Unmanned Air Vehicles Lyle N. Long* , Scott D. Hanford of unmanned air vehicles. A two semester course at the senior-level in the Aerospace Engineering Department wing loading. In the second semester, teams of students worked together to build a larger aircraft from

  16. 44th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 9-12, 2006, Reno, Nevada Turbine Tip Clearance Flow Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Scott C.

    clearance between the rotor blade tips and outer casing. For a turbine, this clearance is on the order in an engine. In a turbine stage, blade rotation is caused by work extraction through turning of the post44th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 9-12, 2006, Reno, Nevada Turbine Tip Clearance

  17. The CU Aerospace / VACCO Propulsion Unit for CubeSats (PUC) is a complete high-performance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    such as solar panels and magnetic torquers. For increased performance, or to meet customer specific missionThe CU Aerospace / VACCO Propulsion Unit for CubeSats (PUC) is a complete high necessary propulsion subsystems, including controller, power processing unit, micro-cavity discharge

  18. ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC Florence, Italy / 30 March 1 April 2009 A NOVEL WAY OF USING REVERBERATION CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC Florence, Italy / 30 March ­ 1 April 2009 A NOVEL WAY OF USING of facility, among others, are often used nowadays for high frequency EMC radiated-immunity tests of using RCs for EMC testing with the generation of high-intensity deterministic temporal wavefronts inside

  19. An Algorithm for Computing Customized 3D Printed Implants with Curvature Constrained Channels for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    An Algorithm for Computing Customized 3D Printed Implants with Curvature Constrained Channels results in 3D printing and steerable needle motion planning to create customized implants containing

  20. The Effect of Titanium Implants on the Peripheral Circadian Rhythm of Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarville, Kirstin Ty

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treatment promotes titanium implant osseointegration inSurface treatments of titanium dental implants for rapidmarrow stromal cells to titanium surfaces. Journal of Oral

  1. Beam Profile Disturbances from Implantable Pacemakers or Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossman, Michael S., E-mail: mgossman@tsrcc.com [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States); Nagra, Bipinpreet; Graves-Calhoun, Alison; Wilkinson, Jeffrey [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The medical community is advocating for progressive improvement in the design of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and implantable pacemakers to accommodate elevations in dose limitation criteria. With advancement already made for magnetic resonance imaging compatibility in some, a greater need is present to inform the radiation oncologist and medical physicist regarding treatment planning beam profile changes when such devices are in the field of a therapeutic radiation beam. Treatment plan modeling was conducted to simulate effects induced by Medtronic, Inc.-manufactured devices on therapeutic radiation beams. As a continuation of grant-supported research, we show that radial and transverse open beam profiles of a medical accelerator were altered when compared with profiles resulting when implantable pacemakers and cardioverter-defibrillators are placed directly in the beam. Results are markedly different between the 2 devices in the axial plane and the sagittal planes. Vast differences are also presented for the therapeutic beams at 6-MV and 18-MV x-ray energies. Maximum changes in percentage depth dose are observed for the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator as 9.3% at 6 MV and 10.1% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.3 cm and 1.3 cm, respectively. For the implantable pacemaker, the maximum changes in percentage depth dose were observed as 10.7% at 6 MV and 6.9% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.5 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. No differences were discernible for the defibrillation leads and the pacing lead.

  2. Short communication Ion-implantation modification of lithiumphosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    -implantation. Impedance measurements at 25 8C show that the nitrogen-implanted Lipon films enhance or retard the ionic-film solid-state batteries have received greater attention for the fabrication of batteries that can-large-scale integration (VLSI). The operational accept- ability of such integrated devices is contingent on the high

  3. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muller, R.H.; Zhang, S.

    1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, and sodium sulfur. 6 figs.

  4. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj,1 William Hubbard,2 and J. A. Golovchenko1,2,a demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled

  5. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Page 1 Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1 , William Hubbard2 , and J. A We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled

  6. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muller, Rolf H. (Berkeley, CA); Zhang, Shengtao (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, end sodium sulfur.

  7. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices A. Zebda1,2 , S. Cosnier1 the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal further developments. Following recent developments in nano- and biotechnology, state-of-the-art biofuel

  8. Neurophysiologic Basis for Cochlear and Auditory Brainstem Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    subjected 13 individuals with the House type of cochlear implants to an extensive battery of audiologic (Michelson, 1971) and W. House (House & Ur- ban, 1973). But before that, other investigators had shown (Simmons, 1966). It was, however, Dr. William House who intro- duced cochlear implants as a means

  9. Implant for in-vivo parameter monitoring, processing and transmitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  10. Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appleton, B.R.; Ashley, P.R.; Buchal, C.J.

    1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 360 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000/degree/C produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguiding properties.

  11. Ice-templated structures for biomedical tissue repair: From physics to final scaffolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawelec, K. M.; Husmann, A; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature and solutes. The porous structures created using ice-templating allow scaffolds to be used for many diverse applications, from microfluidics to biomedical tissue engineering. Within the field of tissue engineering, scaffold structure can influence...

  12. Materials Science and Engineering Department Of Biomedical, Chemical And Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Minor Form Materials Science and Engineering Department Of Biomedical, Chemical And Materials_______________________________________ Requirements for the Minor in Materials Science and Engineering: 12 units of approved academic work CME Department requirements for a Minor in Materials Science and Engineering. Signed

  13. The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    32 The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life sciences (biology, physiology, biochemistry) to define and solve problems in biology and medicine. Students choose this growing branch of engineering

  14. The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    32 The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life sciences (biology, physiology, biochemistry) to define and solve problems in biology and medicine. Students choose this growing branch of engineering

  15. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Biomed. Engng. (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Biomed iterative coupling of dimen- sionally heterogeneous flow models in computational hemodynamics. INTRODUCTION In recent years, several efforts have been directed at integrating different mathematical models

  16. Report of the First Confidence Building Exercise For Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We participated in the first exercise to build confidence in the analysis of biomedical samples for trace levels of CW agents and/or their degradation, reaction or metabolites.

  17. Flesh yours, bones mine : the making of the biomedical subject in Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanal, Aslihan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the emergence of biomedical technologies, human body parts from living or dead donors have become commodities in the international networks of trade. This dissertation tries to understand religious, political and ...

  18. The GraduaTe School of Biomedical ScienceS mcw.edu/gradschool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs.These programs offer opportunities to study at the cutting edge of biomedical research through labs was the deciding factor." "i felt the communication about the process and the welcoming

  19. Biomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowinski, Roland

    | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering Manufacturing, service and retail industries hireBiomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial a significant number of industrial engineers. Specific industries include automobile manufacturers, electronics

  20. OFFICE OF MATERIALS & LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT Policy for Charge Capture of Implant(s), Instrument(s), Device(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    OFFICE OF MATERIALS & LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT Policy for Charge Capture of Implant(s), Instrument entirety and fax to Materials Management at x1993. 3.0 Materials Management must complete Section 2 Service. Materials Management will provide the product part number, cost and charge code, if applicable

  1. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, J. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Department of 702, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, L. H., E-mail: liliuhe@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F. [Department of 702, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu, K. M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K., E-mail: liliuhe@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  2. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi [Physics Department and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Djerdj, Igor [Department of Materials, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Tonejc, Andelka [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Gamulin, Ozren [School of Medicine, Zagreb University, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  3. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  4. Glass/ceramic coatings for implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomsia, Antoni P. (Pinole, CA); Saiz, Eduardo (Berkeley, CA); Gomez-Vega, Jose M. (Nagoya, JP); Marshall, Sally J. (Larkspur, CA); Marshall, Grayson W. (Larkspur, CA)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

  5. Studies of Impurity Deposition/Implantation in JET Divertor Tiles using SIMS and Ion Beam Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studies of Impurity Deposition/Implantation in JET Divertor Tiles using SIMS and Ion Beam Techniques

  6. Using lean enterprise principles to drive quality and on time delivery to customers : a study of the Honeywell Aerospace Engine Assembly and Test Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Andrea (Andrea Sieg)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Honeywell Aerospace has been a leader in manufacturing high quality engines to customers for decades. With engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) growth of-9% in 2005, and projected growth similar or greater for 2006, ...

  7. Proceedings of BIOMed2008 3rd Frontiers in Biomedical Devices Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    µl elastomeric reservoir was built by molding silicone in two-part metal casts. The valve was powered by inductive power transfer from an external 20 cm diameter primary coil to an implanted miniature 8-turn, 1. INTRODUCTION The MIP is an implantable, remotely activated micro bolus infusion pump designed for radiotracer

  8. ELSEVIER Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics 38 (1995) 203-207 Biomedical applications of electric pulses with special emphasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELSEVIER Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics 38 (1995) 203-207 Biomedical applications presentations from the XIlth Symposium on Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics that dealt with this subject

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1981 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drucker, H.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 32 reports of this volume which describes progress on biomedical and health effects research conducted at Battelle PNL in 1981. (KRM)

  10. Memory and data communication link architecture for micro-implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khurana, Harneet Singh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the growing need for the development of smaller implantable monitors, alternative energy storage sources such as high density ultra capacitors are envisioned to replace the bulky batteries in these devices. Ultracapacitors ...

  11. A fully implantable intracochlear drug delivery device : development and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan, Erin Eileen Leary, 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Draper Laboratory is developing an implantable microfluidic drug delivery system for long-term treatment of inner ear disorders and prevention of ...

  12. Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    interactions to the charge transport. The interfacial interactions of an implanted electrode with neural system will be studied in two types of electrodes: silver and graphene coated. The interfacial impedance of both samples will be studied using EIS...

  13. Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    at establishing the fundamental knowledge of interfacial interactions between the host biological environment and an implanted electrode. We will identify the dynamic mechanisms of such interfacial interactions. Quantitative analysis of the electrical properties...

  14. Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

  15. Biomedical Engineering Bionanosystems Research at Louisiana Tech University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, James; Lvov, Yuri; Hegab, Hisham; Snow, Dale; Wilson, Chester; McDonald, John; Walker, Lynn; Pratt, Jon; Davis, Despina; Agarwal, Mangilal; DeCoster, Mark; Feng, June; Que, Long; O'Neal, Chad; Guilbeau, Eric; Zivanovic, Sandra; Dobbins, Tabbetha; Gold, Scott; Mainardi, Daniela; Gowda, Shathabish; Napper, Stan

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of this project is to equip and support research in nanoengineered systems for biomedical, bioenvironmental, and bioenergy applications. Funds provided by the Department of Energy (DoE) under this Congressional Directive were used to support two ongoing research projects at Louisiana Tech University in biomedical, bioenvironmental, and bioenergy applications. Two major projects (Enzyme Immobilization for Large Scale Reactors to Reduce Cellulosic Ethanol Costs, and Nanocatalysts for Coal and Biomass Conversion to Diesel Fuel) and to fund three to five additional seed projects were funded using the project budget. The project funds also allowed the purchase and repair of sophisticated research equipment that will support continued research in these areas for many years to come. Project funds also supported faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students, contributing to the development of a technically sophisticated work force in the region and the State. Descriptions of the technical accomplishments for each funded project are provided. Biofuels are an important part of the solution for sustainable transportation fuel and energy production for the future. Unfortunately, the country's appetite for fuel cannot be satisfied with traditional sugar crops such as sugar cane or corn. Emerging technologies are allowing cellulosic biomass (wood, grass, stalks, etc.) to also be converted into ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol does not compete with food production and it has the potential to decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 86% versus current fossil fuels (current techniques for corn ethanol only reduce greenhouse gases by 19%). Because of these advantages, the federal government has made cellulosic ethanol a high priority. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires a minimum production of at least 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol by 2022. Indeed, the Obama administration has signaled an ambitious commitment of achieving 2 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol by 2013. Louisiana is well positioned to become a national contributor in cellulosic ethanol, with an excellent growing season, a strong pulp/paper industry, and one of the nation's first cellulosic ethanol demonstration plants. Dr. Palmer in Chemical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University is collaborating with Drs. Lvov and Snow in Chemistry and Dr. Hegab in Mechanical Engineering to capitalize on these advantages by applying nanotechnology to improve the cellulosic ethanol processes. In many of these processes, expensive enzymes are used to convert the cellulose to sugars. The nanotechnology processes developed at Louisiana Tech University can immobilize these enzymes and therefore significantly reduce the overall costs of the process. Estimates of savings range from approximately $32 million at each cellulosic ethanol plant, to $7.5 billion total if the 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol is achieved. This process has the advantage of being easy to apply in a large-scale commercial environment and can immobilize a wide variety or mixture of enzymes for production. Two primary objectives with any immobilization technique are to demonstrate reusability and catalytic activity (both reuse of the immobilized enzyme and reuse of the polymer substrate). The scale-up of the layering-by-layering process has been a focus this past year as some interesting challenges in the surface chemistry have become evident. Catalytic activity of cellulase is highly dependent upon how the feed material is pretreated to enhance digestion. Therefore, efforts this year have been performed this year to characterize our process on a few of the more prevalent pretreatment methods.

  16. Development of Tritium AMS for Biomedical Sciences Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingley, K H; Chiarappa-Zucca, M L

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological research. Normally in the biological sciences, {sup 3}H is quantified by liquid scintillation counting. For the most sensitive measurements, liquid scintillation counting requires large samples and counting times of several-hours. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be-used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological research community. However, before {sup 3}H AMS can be used routinely and successfully, two areas of concern needed to be addressed: (1) sample preparation methods needed to be refined and standardized, and (2) smaller and simpler AMS instrumentation needed to be developed. To address these concerns, the specific aims of this project were to: (1) characterize small dedicated {sup 3}H AMS spectrometer (2) develop routine and robust biological sample preparation methods, and (3) with the aid of our external collaborations, demonstrate the application of {sup 3}H AMS in the biomedical sciences. Towards these goals, the {sup 3}H AMS instrument was installed and optimized to enhance performance. The sample preparation methodology was established for standard materials (water and tributyrin) and biological samples. A number of biological and environmental studies which require {sup 3}H AMS were undertaken with university collaborators and our optimized analysis methods were employed to measure samples from these projects.

  17. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Kulikov, Stanislav (Sarov, RU); Osorio, Ivan (Leawood, KS); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  18. Ion implanted step recovery diodes - influence of material parameter variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosman, Thomas Michael

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the successful application of ion implantation in the fabrication of an improved step recovery diode (SRD). At the same time a comprehensive account of the actual device processing will bring to light the problems and difficulties that are ordinarily...ION IMPLANTED STEP RECOVERY DIODES ? INFLUENCE OF MATERIAL PARAMETER VARIATIONS A Thesis by THOMAS MICHAEL MOSMAN Submitted to the Craduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  19. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  20. Influence of the chemical nature of implanted ions on the structure of a silicon layer damaged by implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbachev, K. D., E-mail: chterb@mail.ru; Voronova, M. I.; Bublik, V. T. [National University of Science and Technology MISIS (Russian Federation); Mordkovich, V. N., E-mail: mord36@mail.ru; Pazhin, D. M.; Zinenko, V. I.; Agafonov, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronic Technology and Ultra-High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the implantation of silicon single crystals by fluorine, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon ions on the distribution of strain and the static Debye-Waller factor in the crystal lattice over the implanted-layer depth has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. The density depth distribution in the surface layer of native oxide has been measured by X-ray reflectometry. Room-temperature implantation conditions have ensured the equality of the suggested ranges of ions of different masses and the energies transferred by them to the target. It is convincingly shown that the change in the structural parameters of the radiation-damaged silicon layer and the native oxide layer depend on the chemical activity of the implanted ions.

  1. Development of Co-Ni-Ga Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys (FSMAs) by Investigating the Effects of Solidification Processing Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaantari, Haamun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alloys. These materials are promising candidates for biomedical devices, Micro-Electro- Mechanical-System (MEMS) [4] and aerospace

  2. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for biomedical and catalytical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaoxing

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous silica materials, discovered in 1992 by the Mobile Oil Corporation, have received considerable attention in the chemical industry due to their superior textual properties such as high surface area, large pore volume, tunable pore diameter, and narrow pore size distribution. Among those materials, MCM-41, referred to Mobile Composition of Matter NO. 41, contains honeycomb liked porous structure that is the most common mesoporous molecular sieve studied. Applications of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica material in biomedical field as well as catalytical field have been developed and discussed in this thesis. The unique features of mesoporous silica nanoparticles were utilized for the design of delivery system for multiple biomolecules as described in chapter 2. We loaded luciferin into the hexagonal channels of MSN and capped the pore ends with gold nanoparticles to prevent premature release. Luciferase was adsorbed onto the outer surface of the MSN. Both the MSN and the gold nanoparticles were protected by poly-ethylene glycol to minimize nonspecific interaction of luciferase and keep it from denaturating. Controlled release of luciferin was triggered within the cells and the enzymatic reaction was detected by a luminometer. Further developments by varying enzyme/substrate pairs may provide opportunities to control cell behavior and manipulate intracellular reactions. MSN was also served as a noble metal catalyst support due to its large surface area and its stability with active metals. We prepared MSN with pore diameter of 10 nm (LP10-MSN) which can facilitate mass transfer. And we successfully synthesized an organo silane, 2,2'-Bipyridine-amide-triethoxylsilane (Bpy-amide-TES). Then we were able to functionalize LP10-MSN with bipyridinyl group by both post-grafting method and co-condensation method. Future research of this material would be platinum complexation. This Pt (II) complex catalyst has been reported for a C-H bond activation reaction as an alternative of the traditional Friedel-Crafts reaction. And we will compare the turnover numbers of MSN supported material with homogenous catalyst to evaluate the catalytical efficiency of our material.

  3. An ultra-compact and efficient Li-ion battery charger circuit for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do Valle, Bruno Guimaraes

    This paper describes an ultra-compact analog lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery charger for wirelessly powered implantable medical devices. The charger presented here takes advantage of the tanh output current profile of an ...

  4. Reduction of phosphorus diffusion in germanium by fluorine implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mubarek, H. A. W. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The control of phosphorus (P) diffusion in germanium (Ge) is essential for the realisation of ultrashallow n-type junctions in Ge. This work reports a detailed study of the effect of fluorine (F) co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge. P and F profiles were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The ion implantation damage was investigated using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that F co-implantation reduces the implanted P profile width and reduces both intrinsic and extrinsic P diffusion in Ge. A defect mediated mechanism for the strong influence of F co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge is proposed and invokes the formation of F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters in the F-amorphized Ge layer. A fraction of these F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters decorate the interstitial type end-of-range defects in the re-grown Ge layer and the rest react during re-growth with interstitial germanium atoms diffusing back from the amorphous crystalline interface. The Ge vacancies are then annihilated and mobile interstitial F is released and out diffuses from the surface. This results in a re-grown Ge layer which has a low vacancy concentration and in which the P diffusion rate is reduced. These results open the way to the realization of enhanced Ge n-type devices.

  5. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

  6. The Lexicon Builder Web service: Building Custom Lexicons from two hundred Biomedical Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    this need and reduces the investment of time and effort involved in lexicon maintenance. The service has and background The analysis of the enormous amount of publicly available biomedical data requires the use, derived from terminologies and ontologies, for text mining and information extraction tasks is not new

  7. Automation of Challenging Spatial-Temporal Biomedical Observations with the Adaptive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, John Ting-Yung

    Automation of Challenging Spatial-Temporal Biomedical Observations with the Adaptive Scanning Optical Microscope (ASOM) Benjamin Potsaid and John T. Wen Center for Automation Technologies and Systems benefit greatly from automated microscope plat- forms that can outperform even the most skilled human

  8. Functionalization-induced improvement in magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Functionalization-induced improvement in magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical were synthesized nanoparticles by thermal decomposition method with oleic acid as the surfactant. The nanoparticle size and phase was quantified by transmission electron microscopy TEM and x-ray diffraction XRD

  9. FEATURED PROJECT Biomedical Sciences Building: Slated to open in March 2012, UCSC's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    materials, as well as an inspiring setting for teaching and research. Now the largest building on campus, Mc. Construction was completed in less than 15 months and the building will receive LEED "Silver" or "GoldSanta Cruz FEATURED PROJECT Biomedical Sciences Building: Slated to open in March 2012, UCSC

  10. Concurrent Testing of Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems for Multiplexed Biomedical Assays*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Concurrent Testing of Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems for Multiplexed Biomedical Assays* Fei Su methodology for detecting catastrophic faults in droplet-based microfluidic systems and investigate-based microfluidic array that was fabricated and used to perform multiplexed glucose and lactate assays. The test

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING Maite L,cerquide,davidm,anna}@maia.ub.es ABSTRACT This paper introduces a machine learning approach into the process of direct volume rendering that generates the classification func- tion within the optical property function used for rendering. Briefly

  12. 1174 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 Microwave Drilling of Bones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gefen, Amit

    1174 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 Microwave Drilling*, Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper presents a feasibility study of drilling in fresh wet bone tissue in vitro using the microwave drill method [Jerby et al., 2002], toward testing its applicability

  13. Biomedical and environmental sciences programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, C.R.; Johnson, C.A.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences Programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the major organizational units. Following the accounts of research programs, is a list of publications and awards to its members. 6 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. An ultra-low voltage high gain operational transconductance amplifier for biomedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    An ultra-low voltage high gain operational transconductance amplifier for biomedical applications that work at ultra low voltage power supply. Moreover, low power dissipation is essential in these systems dissipation is also proposed in [5]. Differential pairs are commonly used as input stages, in an ultra-low

  15. Dynamic Switching and Real-time Machine Learning for Improved Human Control of Assistive Biomedical Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Richard S.

    Dynamic Switching and Real-time Machine Learning for Improved Human Control of Assistive Biomedical Abstract-- A general problem for human-machine interaction occurs when a machine's controllable dimensions outnumber the control channels available to its human user. In this work, we examine one prominent example

  16. Research Literature: Effects of Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs) | p. 1/82 Biomedical research literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Research Literature: Effects of Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs) | p. 1/82 Biomedical research literature with respect to the effects of Conducted Energy Weapons Andy Adler, David P Dawson, Maimaitjian: Institutions involved in research on CEWs 82 #12;Research Literature: Effects of Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs

  17. Biomedical Applications for Correlation Di usion 5.1 Blood Flow Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 5 Biomedical Applications for Correlation Di usion 5.1 Blood Flow Monitoring Near-infraredspectroscopy(NIRS)has long beenused to non-invasivelymeasurepulse rate 8, 9, 10] and blood oxygenation 5, 6, 7, 10] and recently to measure blood ow 19, 121]. The advantage of NIRS over laser Doppler blood owmetry (LDBF

  18. Ultrafast high-pressure AC electro-osmotic pumps for portable biomedical microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    Ultrafast high-pressure AC electro-osmotic pumps for portable biomedical microfluidics Chien details the development of an integrated AC electro-osmotic (ACEO) microfluidic pump for dilute (100 mM) biological solutions in separate microfluidic devices, with potential applications in portable

  19. Electroless iron plating on pure magnesium for biomedical applications Xingkai Zhang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    : Biomaterials Deposition Corrosion Thin films a b s t r a c t Electroless nickel plating is usually adopted geometries. Electroless nickel plating [10] is usually used to protect the magnesium alloy from corrosionElectroless iron plating on pure magnesium for biomedical applications Xingkai Zhang a , Wei Han a

  20. Biomedical Engineering AND Electrical Engineering Student Name:_______________________ Curriculum Check Sheet 157 Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PREREQS) TERM CR BIOM 101 Intro to Biomedical Engineering F 3 ECE 103 DC Circuit Analysis (MATH 160) S 3 Analysis I (ECE 202 c-; MATH 340 or MATH 345; PH142) F 3 ECE 312 Linear Systems Analysis II (ECE 311) S 3 ECE 102 Digital Circuit Logic F 4 MATH 161 Calculus for Physical Scientists II (MATH 124; MATH 160) F

  1. Biomedical Engineering AND Electrical Engineering Student Name:_______________________ Curriculum Check Sheet 157 Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PREREQS) TERM CR BIOM 101 Intro to Biomedical Engineering F 3 ECE 103 DC Circuit Analysis (MATH 160) S 3 Year Fall 3rd Year Spring ECE 311 Linear Systems Analysis I (ECE 202; MATH 340 or MATH 345) F 3 ECE 312 Linear Systems Analysis II (ECE 311) S 3 ECE 341 Electromagnetics Fields and Devices I (ECE 202; PH 142

  2. Biomedical Engineering AND Electrical Engineering -Lasers & Optics Student Name:_____________________ Curriculum Check Sheet 158 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PREREQS) TERM CR BIOM 101 Intro to Biomedical Engineering F 3 ECE 103 DC Circuit Analysis (MATH 160) S 3 TOTAL 15 TOTAL 15 3rd Year Fall 3rd Year Spring ECE 311 Linear Systems Analysis I (ECE 202; MATH 340 ECE 102 Digital Circuit Logic F 4 MATH 161 Calculus for Physical Scientists II (MATH 124; MATH 160) F

  3. Biomedical Engineering AND Electrical Engineering Student Name:_______________________ Curriculum Check Sheet 157 Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PREREQS) TERM CR BIOM 101 Intro to Biomedical Engineering F 3 ECE 103 DC Circuit Analysis (MATH 160) S 3 TOTAL 15 TOTAL 15 3rd Year Fall 3rd Year Spring ECE 311 Linear Systems Analysis I (ECE 202; MATH 340 or MATH 345) F 3 ECE 312 Linear Systems Analysis II (ECE 311) S 3 ECE 331 Electronics Principles I (ECE

  4. | Link to Us | or Ads by Google Biomedical Nano Sensor Review Nano Nano Market Car Nano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    | Link to Us | or Ads by Google Biomedical Nano Sensor Review Nano Nano Market Car Nano Printer optical cloaking design for invisibility Posted: Apr 2nd, 2007 Rationally designed smart nanotechnology | Reports | Encyclopdia | Events | Debate | Neat Stuff Home Database News Resources Nanowerk Nanomaterials

  5. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conrad, John R. (Madison, WI)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

  6. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conrad, J.R.

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

  7. Mesoporous silica as a membrane for ultra-thin implantable direct glucose Tushar Sharma,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and worldwide.1 Consequently, there is an upsurge in the various novel implantable devices to diag- nose- dioverter defibrillator (AICD) and pacemakers. Implantable direct glucose fuel cells (biofuel cells) provide

  8. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO(110) Rutile. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO(110) Rutile. Abstract: Interest in diluted...

  9. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO(110) Rutile. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO(110) Rutile. Abstract: Ferromagnetic...

  10. Development of a Novel Piezoelectric Implant to Improve the Success Rate of Spinal Fusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobaben, Nicholas

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................................................. 36 Negative Potential Outer Electrode ............................................................................................... 37 Implant Geometry... .............................................................................................................. 91 VIII. Proof of Concept Testing ................................................................................................................... 106 Battery Recharge Tests...

  11. UV curing and photoresist outgassing in high energy implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.A.; Erokhin, Y.; Horsky, T. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick photoresists, typically 3 microns or more in thickness, necessary for high energy implantation present some unique problems. The outgassing of thick photoresist In high energy applications varies from that of thinner resist and lower energies. It requires appropriate processing to cure without reticulation of field regions deformity of features, or blistering during subsequent processing. This paper examines different resist treatments and their effects on implanter pressure during processing. Data on outgassing of thick photoresist, outgassing effects on absolute dose and dose uniformity as measured by sheet resistance contour maps, and the variation in gas composition are presented.

  12. Microwave annealing of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, J.A.; Rao, M.V.; Tian, Y.L. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Holland, O.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kelner, G.; Freitas, J.A. Jr. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Ahmad, I. [FM Technologies Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave rapid thermal annealing has been utilized to remove the lattice damage caused by nitrogen(N) ion-implantation as well as to activate the dopant in 6H-SiC. Samples were annealed at temperatures as high as 1,400 C, for 10 min. Van der Pauw Hall measurements indicate an implant activation of 36%, which is similar to the value obtained for the conventional furnace annealing at 1,600 C. Good lattice quality restoration was observed in the Rutherford backscattering and photoluminescence spectra.

  13. Microwave annealing of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, J.A.; Rao, M.V.; Tian, Y.L. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Holland, O.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kelner, G.; Freitas, J.A. Jr. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Ahmad, I. [FM Technologies Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave rapid thermal annealing has been utilized to remove the lattice damage caused by nitrogen (N) ion-implantation as well as to activate the dopant in 6H-SiC. Samples were annealed at temperatures as high as 1,400 C, for 10 min. Van der Pauw Hall measurements indicate an implant activation of 36%, which is similar to the value obtained for the conventional furnace annealing at 1,600 C. Good lattice quality restoration was observed in the Rutherford backscattering and photoluminescence spectra.

  14. Defects in Ge and Si caused by 1 MeV Si+ implantation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Defects in Ge and Si caused by 1 MeV Si+ implantation* D. P. Hickeya Department of Materials defect formation and evolution in the 001 Ge and Si wafers implanted with 1 MeV Si+ and 40 keV Si dissolve at the projected range for nonamorphizing implants into Si. However, in Ge, no 311 defect

  15. Proton implanted singlemode holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choquette, Kent

    Proton implanted singlemode holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers P.O. Leisher, A.J. Danner of proton implant confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. The index confinement and selective loss (both fundamental and non-fundamental) operation [9]. Although proton implantation for current

  16. Titanium alloy mini-implants for orthodontic anchorage: Immediate loading and metal ion release q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Marc A.

    Titanium alloy mini-implants for orthodontic anchorage: Immediate loading and metal ion release q 2006 Abstract Removable osseointegrated titanium mini-implants were successfully used as anchorage ion release during the healing pro- cess. Titanium alloy mini-implants were inserted in the tibiae

  17. ROUGH SURFACES OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR IMPLANTS AND PROSTHESES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ROUGH SURFACES OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR IMPLANTS AND PROSTHESES 1 E. Conforto, 2 B. Abstract Titanium and titanium alloys for dental implants and hip prostheses were surface-treated and and the stability of the implant. The microstructure of titanium and titanium alloys submitted to these treatments

  18. IMAGE: A new type of implantable device uses flexible silicon technology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    generation of active, flexible, implantable devices for applications in many areas of the body," says coIMAGE: A new type of implantable device uses flexible silicon technology. Click here for more-hugging implant maps heart electrical activity in unprecedented detail Next-generation devices pave way

  19. A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable BrainMachine Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.

    We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3:4 mW cm{2steady-state power and up to 180 mW cm{2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, ...

  20. INTRACELLULAR NEURONAL RECORDING WITH FLEXIBLE MICRO-MACHINED PROBE IMPLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for the first time, an implantable device can record intracellular action potentials from a single neuron (Pd5 electrodes used conventionally for similar intracellular recording purposes. The success of this prototype due to their small dimensions, compact geometry, and the ease with which multi electrode recording

  1. DIFFUSION OF MAGNESIUM AND MICROSTRUCTURES IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Weilin; Edwards, Danny J.; Jung, Hee Joon; Wang, Zheming; Zhu, Zihua; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Following our previous reports [ 1- 3], further isochronal annealing (2 hrs.) of the monocrystalline 6H-SiC and polycrystalline CVD 3C-SiC was performed at 1573 and 1673 K in Ar environment. SIMS data indicate that observable Mg diffusion in 6H-SiC starts and a more rapid diffusion in CVD 3C-SiC occurs at 1573 K. The implanted Mg atoms tend to diffuse deeper into the undamaged CVD 3C-SiC. The microstructure with Mg inclusions in the as-implanted SiC has been initially examined using high-resolution STEM. The presence of Mg in the TEM specimen has been confirmed based on EDS mapping. Additional monocrystalline 3C-SiC samples have been implanted at 673 K to ion fluence 3 times higher than the previous one. RBS/C analysis has been performed before and after thermal annealing at 1573 K for 12 hrs. Isothermal annealing at 1573 K is being carried out and Mg depth profiles being measured. Microstructures in both the as-implanted and annealed samples are also being examined using STEM.

  2. Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortensi, Javier

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation of Ga ions into 316 stainless steel was performed at fluences ranging from 8x10? to 10? ions/cm. The depth profile of Ga in the steel was analyzed via Rutherford Backscattering and ToFSIMS. The surface effects were...

  3. artificial implantation materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial implantation materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 "In Vivo" Pose...

  4. Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Shu; Ferrara, Joseph; Bell, Edward; Patel, Shital; Sieradzki, Manny [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Optima XE is the first production worthy single wafer high energy implanter. The new system combines a state-of-art single wafer endstation capable of throughputs in excess of 400 wafers/hour with a production-proven RF linear accelerator technology. Axcelis has been evolving and refining RF Linac technology since the introduction of the NV1000 in 1986. The Optima XE provides production worthy beam currents up to energies of 1.2 MeV for P{sup +}, 2.9 MeV for P{sup ++}, and 1.5 MeV for B{sup +}. Energies as low as 10 keV and tilt angles as high as 45 degrees are also available., allowing the implanter to be used for a wide variety of traditional medium current implants to ensure high equipment utilization. The single wafer endstation provides precise implant angle control across wafer and wafer to wafer. In addition, Optima XE's unique dose control system allows compensation of photoresist outgassing effects without relying on traditional pressure-based methods. We describe the specific features, angle control and dosimetry of the Optima XE and their applications in addressing the ever-tightening demands for more precise process controls and higher productivity.

  5. PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-435 PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*) F. MEUNIER and P of Si and Ge in Al thin films at 8 K produces alloys exhibiting enhanced superconducting transition in the superconducting transition temperature Tc of several such alloys [2], [5], [6] : Josephson tunnelling

  6. auditory brain stem implantation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    auditory brain stem implantation First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Auditory Brain Stem...

  7. auditory brain stem implants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    brain stem implants First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Auditory Brain Stem Response to...

  8. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as an electrode in field emission applications. In this project, the formation of a CoSi2, conducting layer on porous silicon by high dose ion implantation while preserving the pore structure and field emission properties of the underlying porous silicon...

  9. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high charge state phosphorus and antimony could have resulted in a lower power consumption of 30 kW/implanter) for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. Nevertheless, BNL has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to high charge state ions need for RHIC preinjection. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as on molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation; which is the last frontier of ion implantation. To summarize the significant accomplishments: 1. Record steady state output currents of high charge state phosphorous, P, ions in particle milli-Ampere: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA). 2. Record steady state output currents of high charge state antimony, Sb, ions in particle milli-Ampere: Sb{sup 3+} (16.2 pmA), Sb{sup 4+} (7.6 pmA), Sb{sup 5+} (3.3 pmA), and Sb{sup 6+} (2.2 pmA). 3. 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art) from a Calutron-Bemas ion source. These accomplishments have the potential of benefiting the semiconductor manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem w

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 52, NO. 7, JULY 2005 1237 Ultrawideband Microwave Breast Cancer Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    :1. Index Terms--Array signal processing, biomedical electromag- netic imaging, breast cancer detection not require breast compression. For this modality, low-power electromagnetic waves that are transmitted

  11. The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    34 The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life sciences (biology, physiology, biochemistry) to define and solve problems in biology and medicine. Students choose this growing branch of engineering

  12. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G. (comps.)

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Abstract--The influence of head tissue conductivity on mag- netoencephalography (MEG) was investigated

  14. Mehrdad Negahban, Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Engineering, Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Wave Propagation Solar Engineering Thermal-Fluids Engineering 3 John P. Barton #12;MechanicalMehrdad Negahban, Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research #12;Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Engineering, Biomedical Engineering The graduate program in Mechanical

  15. Method for implantation of high dopant concentrations in wide band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Usov, Igor (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method that combines alternate low/medium ion dose implantation with rapid thermal annealing at relatively low temperatures. At least one dopant is implanted in one of a single crystal and an epitaxial film of the wide band gap compound by a plurality of implantation cycles. The number of implantation cycles is sufficient to implant a predetermined concentration of the dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film. Each of the implantation cycles includes the steps of: implanting a portion of the predetermined concentration of the one dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film; annealing one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film and implanted portion at a predetermined temperature for a predetermined time to repair damage to one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film caused by implantation and activates the implanted dopant; and cooling the annealed single crystal and implanted portion to a temperature of less than about 100.degree. C. This combination produces high concentrations of dopants, while minimizing the defect concentration.

  16. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02491.x A vision for a biomedical cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02491.x A vision for a biomedical cloud R. L. Grossman1,2 & K. P.WhiteUniversityofChicago,Chicago, IL,USA Abstract. Grossman RL, White KP (Institute for Genom- ics and Systems Biology; The University of Chicago, Chicago) A vision for a biomedical cloud (Key Symposium). JInternMed2012; 271: 122130. We

  17. Published in 2001 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2001, Vol.1, 331-338 -DOI 10.1109/AERO.2001.931724 Designing a Water-Quality Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Published in 2001 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2001, Vol.1, 331-338 - DOI 10.1109/AERO.2001-7803-6599-2/01/$10.00 2001 IEEE Abstract---This effort is directed at developing a sensor for evaluating water quality. A set on the ionophore to control transport and generate a gradient of the analyte through the #12;Published in 2001 IEEE

  18. Development of nano-scale and biomimetic surfaces for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, James Edward

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairs of Committee, Theresa Good Daniel z Committee Members, Gerard Cot? Rosana ira Head of Department, Kenneth Hall August 2005 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Development of Nano-scale and Biomimetic Surfaces... for Biomedical Applications. (August 2005) James Edward Henry, B.S.; M.S., University of Arkansas Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Theresa Good Dr. Daniel Shantz The work described in this dissertation details the development of a biomimetic...

  19. C implantation and surface degradation of InGaP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; Pearton, S.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Zolper, J.C.; Howard, A.J. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C ions were implanted alone, or with either N, Al, Ar, or P co-implants, into In{sub 0.51}Ga{sub 0.49}P at does between 5x10{sup 12}-5x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and the electrical activation was measured for annealing temperatures between 650-1000{degree}C. Capless proximity annealing preserves the surface to 900{degree}C, as measured by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The acceptor activation percentages are low (20%) in all cases. This is consistent with a model in which C has a strong tendency for self-compensation in InGaP. 28 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Ultraviolet photoluminescence from Gd-implanted AlN epilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavada, J. M.; Nepal, N.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Brown, E.; Hoemmerich, U.; Hite, J.; Thaler, G. T.; Abernathy, C. R.; Pearton, S. J.; Gwilliam, R. [U.S. Army Research Office, Durham, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601 (United States); Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Surrey Ion Beam Center, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep ultraviolet emission from gadolinium (Gd)-implanted AlN thin films has been observed using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The AlN epilayers were ion implanted with Gd to a total dose of {approx}6x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Using the output at 197 nm from a quadrupled Ti:sapphire laser, narrow PL emission was observed at 318 nm, characteristic of the trivalent Gd ion. A broader emission band, also centered at 318 nm, was measured with excitation at 263 nm. The PL emission intensity decreased by less than a factor of 3 over the sample temperature range of 10-300 K and decay transients were of the order of nanoseconds.

  1. Ion implantation in compound semiconductors for high-performance electronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced electronic devices based on compound semiconductors often make use of selective area ion implantation doping or isolation. The implantation processing becomes more complex as the device dimensions are reduced and more complex material systems are employed. The authors review several applications of ion implantation to high performance junction field effect transistors (JFETs) and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) that are based on compound semiconductors, including: GaAs, AlGaAs, InGaP, and AlGaSb.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic prosthesis implantation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cardiac pacing wires Yes No Artificial limb or joint Yes... No Implanted drug infusion device Yes No Body ... Source: Knutson, Brian - Departments of Psychology &...

  3. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  4. Controlled release of gentamicin from polyelectrolyte multilayers to treat implant-related infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, Joshua Seth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyelectrolyte multilayered (PEM) coatings were fabricated to incorporate and release the small, hydrophilic antibiotic gentamicin from implant surfaces for infection control. The use of a cationic hydrolytically cleavable ...

  5. Physical properties of erbium implanted tungsten oxide films deposited by reactive dual magnetron sputtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Sodky H.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of erbium implanted tungsten oxide films deposited byDual magnetron sputtering; tungsten oxide films; Er ionoptical waveguides [3,5]. Tungsten oxide (WO 3 ) thin films

  6. Productivity Improvement for the SHX--SEN's Single-Wafer High-Current Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Yumiyama, Toshio; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kurose, Takeshi; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ishikawa, Koji; Ueno, Kazuyoshi [SEN Corporation, 1501, Imazaike, Saijo, Ehime, 799-1362 (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment productivity is a critical issue for device fabrication. For ion implantation, productivity is determined both by ion current at the wafer and by utilization efficiency of the ion beam. Such improvements not only result in higher fabrication efficiency but also reduce consumption of both electrical power and process gases. For high-current ion implanters, reduction of implant area is a key factor to increase efficiency. SEN has developed the SAVING system (Scanning Area Variation Implantation with Narrower Geometrical pattern) to address this opportunity. In this paper, three variations of the SAVING system are introduced along with discussion of their effects on fab productivity.

  7. Processing of Silver-Implanted Aluminum Nitride for Energy Harvesting Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alleyne, Fatima

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conductive layer in a ceramic matrix via ion implantation.Ag precipitation in a ceramic matrix; and evaluate theform metal particles in a ceramic matrix at a concentration

  8. Ion implantation for high performance III-V JFETS and HFETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation has been an enabling technology for realizing many high performance electronic devices in III-V semiconductor materials. We report on advances in ion implantation processing for GaAs JFETs (joint field effect transistors), AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs (heterostructure field effect transistors), and InGaP or InAlP-barrier HFETs. The GaAs JFET has required the development of shallow p-type implants using Zn or Cd with junction depths down to 35 nm after the activation anneal. Implant activation and ionization issues for AlGaAs are reported along with those for InGaP and InAlP. A comprehensive treatment of Si-implant doping of AlGaAs is given based on donor ionization energies and conduction band density-of-states dependence on Al-composition. Si and Si+P implants in InGaP are shown to achieve higher electron concentrations than for similar implants in AlGaAs due to absence of the deep donor level. An optimized P co- implantation scheme in InGaP is shown to increase the implanted donor saturation level by 65%.

  9. Magnetic Processing A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.); Magee, J. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNLs unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNLs expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNLs Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

  10. The Mechanical and Tribological Properties or Ion Implanted Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Stephen John

    1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    by Wei et al (1987a. b) has shown that ion beam mixing of some ceramic discs with Ti, Ni or Co can result in reduced coefficients of friction at 800C in a simulated diesel exhaust environment. 1.1.3 Oxidation and Corrosion Surface films have long... ions and defects below the surface to be determined both qualitatively and quantitatively. This has an important bearing on the other surface property changes produced by ion implantation discussed in the next chapter. 2.1 The Stopping of Ions...

  11. Redistribution of Implanted Dopants in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, M.; Gao, X.A.; Han, J.; Pearton, S.J.; Rieger, D.J.; Scarvepalli, V. Sekhar, J.A.; Shul, R.J.; Singh, R.K.; Wilson, R.G.; Zavada, J.M.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Donor (S, Se and Te) and acceptor (Mg, Be and C) dopants have been implanted into GaN at doses of 3-5x1014 cm-2 and annealed at temperatures up to 1450 *C. No redistribution of any of the elements is detectable by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, except for Be, which displays an apparent damage-assisted diffusion at 900 "C. At higher temperatures there is no further movement of the Be, suggesting that the point defect flux that assists motion at lower temperatures has been annealed. Effective diffusivities are <2X 1013 cm2.sec-1 at 1450 `C for each of the dopants in GaN.

  12. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin [Advanced Ion Beam Technology Inc., 47370 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 (United States)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  13. Superconductivity in Metal-mixed Ion-Implanted Polymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Micolich; E. Tavenner; B. J. Powell; A. R. Hamilton; M. T. Curry; R. E. Giedd; P. Meredith

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion-implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50 keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10 nm Sn/Sb alloy film into the sub-surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3 K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin-film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drucker, H.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomedical and health effects research conducted at PNL in 1982 on the evaluation of risk to man from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies are described. Most of the studies described in this report relate to activities for three major energy technologies: nuclear fuel cycle; fossil fuel cycle (oil, gas, and coal process technologies, mining, and utilization; synfuel development), and fudion (biomagnetic effects). The report is organized under these technologies. In addition, research reports are included on the application of nuclear energy to biomedical problems. Individual projects are indexed separately.

  15. Thermal Energy Harvesting with Thermoelectrics for Self-powered Sensors: With Applications to Implantable Medical Devices, Body Sensor Networks and Aging in Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Alic

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to lose favor to lithium batteries which had calculatedof lithium and lithium-ion batteries in implantable medicalof lithium and lithium-ion batteries in implantable medical

  16. Towards a better speech processor for cochlear implants : auditory- nerve responses to high-rate electric pulse trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvak, Leonid, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochlear implants are prosthetic devices that seek to restore hearing in profoundly deaf patients by electrically stimulating the auditory-nerve (AN). With current implants, the representation of the sound waveform in ...

  17. Annealing kinetics of ^311 defects and dislocation loops in the end-of-range damage region of ion implanted silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 L. M. Rubin and J. Jackson Eaton Corporation, Beverly was implanted using an Eaton NV-GSD 200E. The wafer was amorphized using a Si implantation, with an energy of 20

  18. On the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Nitinol forBiomedical Stent Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Scott W.

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation was motivated by the alarming number of biomedical device failures reported in the literature, coupled with the growing trend towards the use of Nitinol for endovascular stents. The research is aimed at addressing two of the primary failure modes in Nitinol endovascular stents: fatigue-crack growth and overload fracture. The small dimensions of stents, coupled with their complex geometries and variability among manufacturers, make it virtually impossible to determine generic material constants associated with specific devices. Instead, the research utilizes a hybrid of standard test techniques (fracture mechanics and x-ray micro-diffraction) and custom-designed testing apparatus for the determination of the fracture properties of specimens that are suitable representations of self-expanding Nitinol stents. Specifically, the role of texture (crystallographic alignment of atoms) and the austenite-to-martensite phase transformation on the propagation of cracks in Nitinol was evaluated under simulated body conditions and over a multitude of stresses and strains. The results determined through this research were then used to create conservative safe operating and inspection criteria to be used by the biomedical community for the determination of specific device vulnerability to failure by fracture and/or fatigue.

  19. Come to Boston for a nine-week summer research experience in the growing and dynamic eld of biomedical optics! You'll live at MIT, attend lectures in minimally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    of biomedical optics! You'll live at MIT, attend lectures in minimally invasive surgery, photodynamic therapy participants in the study of optics and the innovative uses of biomedical optic technologies in human health the skills to communicate their research ndings e ec- tively. Broadly, biomedical optics is the use

  20. Come to Boston for a nine-week summer research experience in the growing and dynamic field of biomedical optics! You'll live at MIT, attend lectures in minimally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    of biomedical optics! You'll live at MIT, attend lectures in minimally invasive surgery, photodynamic therapy participants in the study of optics and the innovative uses of biomedical optic technologies in human health the skills to communicate their research findings effec- tively. Broadly, biomedical optics is the use

  1. CBC Reduction in InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor with Selectively Implanted Collector Pedestal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    CBC Reduction in InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor with Selectively Implanted Collector-3812 Fax: (805) 893-8714 Email: yingda@ece.ucsb.edu The base-collector junction capacitance (Cbc) is a key with a collector pedestal under the HBT's intrinsic region by using selective ion implantation and MBE regrowth

  2. Mass and charge overlaps in beamline implantation into compound semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Current, M. I.; Eddy, R.; Hudak, C.; Serfass, J.; Mount, G. [Current Scientific, 1729 Comstock Way, San Jose, CA 95124 (United States); Core Systems, 1050 Kifer Rd., Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States); Evans Analytical Group, 810 Kifer Rd., Sunnyvale, CA 95051 (United States)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass overlaps occurring as a result of extraction of ions from an arc discharge and gas collisions, producing molecular break up and charge exchange in the accelerator beamline, are examined for ion implantation into compound semiconductors. The effects of the choice of plasma gas elements for Be{sup +} implants are examined as an example.

  3. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester K Pancharoen, D Zhu, and S P Beeby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Schematic of hip prosthesis: (a) 3D-printing model (b) cross-section diagram. The design consists of twoA Hip Implant Energy Harvester K Pancharoen, D Zhu, and S P Beeby Electronics and Computer Science a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency

  4. The electrical and optical properties of thin lm diamond implanted with silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodzey, James

    :Si alloys were formed by the implantation of Si into polycrystalline diamond lms grown by che- mical vaporThe electrical and optical properties of thin lm diamond implanted with silicon K.J. Roea,* , J of diamond make it an attractive material for use in extreme conditions. Diamond devices have been fabricated

  5. THE ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN FILM DIAMOND IMPLANTED WITH SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodzey, James

    devices. The C:Si alloys were formed by the implantation of Si into polycrystalline diamond films grownTHE ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN FILM DIAMOND IMPLANTED WITH SILICON K. J. Roe and J and electrical properties of diamond make it an attractive material for use in extreme conditions. Diamond

  6. AN IMPLANTABLE ALL-PARYLENE LIQUID-IMPEDANCE BASED MEMS FORCE SENSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    . Specifically, in situ and in vivo measurement of interfacial forces exerted on tissue by chronically implantedAN IMPLANTABLE ALL-PARYLENE LIQUID-IMPEDANCE BASED MEMS FORCE SENSOR Christian A. Gutierrez1 ABSTRACT We present a new transducer paradigm based on the electrochemical impedance transduction

  7. Adaptive Threshold Spike Detection using Stationary Wavelet Transform for Neural Recording Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    to optimize power consumption. The system was designed in 130nm CMOS and shown to occupy 0.082 mm2. Such a system must operate with very low power and occupy minimal area in order to facilitate implantationAdaptive Threshold Spike Detection using Stationary Wavelet Transform for Neural Recording Implants

  8. Title: Predictors of 6-months clinical poor outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Title: Predictors of 6-months clinical poor outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve.acvd.2013.10.005 #12;2 Abstract Background: Patients' selection for transcatheter aortic valve implantation institution with a transcatheter-implanted aortic valve were prospectively followed. Our population

  9. DEFECTS AND CHARACTERIZA TION Il. -MINORITY CARRIERS LIFETIME DEGRADATION DURING ION IMPLANTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    cost [1, 2]. With regard to this point it sufficies to observe that the ion implanted solar cell SILICON SOLAR CELL PROCESSING (*) M. FINETTI (**), P. OSTOJA, S. SOLMI and G. SONCINI Laboratorio LAMEL In this work a silicon solar cell fabrication process based on ion implantation follow- ed by low temperature

  10. JOIJKUAL I)E I'HYSIQUE Diffusion study of oxygen implanted in nickel oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    JOIJKUAL I)E I'HYSIQUE Diffusion study of oxygen implanted in nickel oxide M. Meyer, S. Barbezat, C coefficients d'autodiffusion de I'oxygene dans l'oxyde de nickel, mesurkes rkemment, par Cchange isotopique implanted in nickel oxide; the experiments are carried out by annealing between 1 300 and 1 500 OC nickel

  11. Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    ! ! ! Corrosion Behavior of Solution- Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys Pooja Panigrahi University June 6, 2011 #12;! ! ""! Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys and Applied Sciences Northwestern University June 6, 2011 Abstract Corrosion behavior of solution annealed

  12. Bonding PMMA with Titanium for Dental Implants By Zhong Yuan Luo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    ` Bonding PMMA with Titanium for Dental Implants By Zhong Yuan Luo1 1Department of Mining(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from Titanium (Ti) metal in dental implants. Project Overview Bonding is enhanced by modifying the titanium surface Modification is achieved using diazonium chemistry Different procedures

  13. Aluminum plasma immersion ion implantation in polymers M. Ueda a,*, I.H. Tan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum plasma immersion ion implantation in polymers M. Ueda a,*, I.H. Tan a , R.S. Dallaqua on the implantation of Kapton, Mylar, polypropylene and polyethylene samples with aluminum ions at 2.5, 5 and 7 k doses of (13) 1016 cm2 , with most of the aluminum concentrated on the surface. This is probably due

  14. The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

  15. Biomedical Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An errorA Mostbio

  16. Cavity nucleation and evolution in He-implanted Si and GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.; Barbour, J.C.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The criteria for forming stable cavities by He{sup +} implantation and annealing are examined for Si and GaAs. In Si, implanting at room temperature requires a minimum of 1.6 at. % He to form a continuous layer of cavities after annealing at 700{degrees}C. The cavities are located at dislocations and planar defects. Implanting peak He concentrations just above this threshold produces narrow layers of cavities at the projected range. In GaAs, room-temperature implantation followed by annealing results in exfoliation of the surface layer. Cavities were formed instead by implanting Ar followed by overlapping He, both at 400{degrees}C, with additional annealing at 400{degrees}C to outgas the He. This method forms 1.5--3.5 nm cavities that are often on [111] planar defects.

  17. Implantable device for in-vivo intracranial and cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  18. Central Vein Dilatation Prior to Concomitant Port Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krombach, Gabriele A., E-mail: krombach@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Plumhans, Cedric; Goerg, Fabian; Guenther, Rolf W. [University of Technology (RWTH) Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital (Germany)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Implantation of subcutaneous port systems is routinely performed in patients requiring repeated long-term infusion therapy. Ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided implantation under local anesthesia is broadly established in interventional radiology and has decreased the rate of complications compared to the surgical approach. In addition, interventional radiology offers the unique possibility of simultaneous management of venous occlusion. We present a technique for recanalization of central venous occlusion and angioplasty combined with port placement in a single intervention which we performed in two patients. Surgical port placement was impossible owing to occlusion of the superior vena cava following placement of a cardiac pacemaker and occlusion of multiple central veins due to paraneoplastic coagulopathy, respectively. In both cases the affected vessel segments were dilated with balloon catheters and the port systems were placed thereafter. After successful dilatation, the venous access was secured with a 25-cm-long, 8-Fr introducer sheath, a subcutaneous pocket prepared, and the port catheter tunneled to the venipuncture site. The port catheter was introduced through the sheath with the proximal end connected to a 5-Fr catheter. This catheter was pulled through the tunnel in order to preserve the tunnel and, at the same time, allow safe removal of the long sheath over the wire. The port system functioned well in both cases. The combination of recanalization and port placement in a single intervention is a straightforward alternative for patients with central venous occlusion that can only be offered by interventional radiology.

  19. Hydrophilic property by contact angle change of ion implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chan Young; Kil, Jae Keun [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); R and D Team, Accel Korea, 146-1 Pyeongchon-dong Daeduck-gu Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, ion implantation was performed onto a polymer, polycarbonate (PC), in order to investigate surface hydrophilic property through contact angle measurement. PC was irradiated with N, Ar, and Xe ions at the irradiation energy of 20-50 keV and the dose range of 5x10{sup 15}, 1x10{sup 16}, 7x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The contact angle of water was estimated by means of the sessile drop method and was reduced with increasing fluence and ion mass but increased with increasing implanted energy. The changes of chemical and structural properties are discussed in view of Furier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which shows increasing C-O bonding and C-C bonding. The surface roughness examined by atomic force microscopy measurement changed smoothly from 3.59 to 2.22 A as the fluence increased. It is concluded that the change in wettability may be caused by surface carbonization and oxidation as well as surface roughness.

  20. Excess vacancies in high energy ion implanted SiGe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, R.; Muecklich, A.; Skorupa, W.; Peeva, A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Christensen, J. S.; Svensson, B. G. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics BAS, Boulevard Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Deparment of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excess vacancies generated by high energy implantation with 1.2 MeV Si{sup +} and 2 MeV Ge{sup +} ions in SiGe were investigated after rapid thermal annealing at 900 degree sign C. Excess vacancies were probed by decoration with Cu and measuring the Cu profile by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cross section transmission electron microscopy of cleaved specimen enabled to visualize nanocavities resulting from agglomeration of excess vacancies. The ion-induced damage in SiGe increases with increasing Ge fraction of the alloy. The amorphization threshold decreases and the extension of a buried amorphous layer increases for given implantation and annealing conditions. In contrast to ballistic simulations of excess defect generation where perfect local self-annihilation is assumed the concentrations of excess vacancies and excess interstitials in SiGe increase with increasing Ge fraction. The main contribution to the high excess vacancy concentration in SiGe results from the inefficient recombination of vacancies and interstitials. The widely used +1 model describing the ion-induced damage in Si is not valid for SiGe.

  1. Selective compositional mixing in GaAs/AIGaAs superlattice induced by low dose Si focused ion beam implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    of the mixing process was observed at 100 keV implantation energy, with a "pinch-off" (more heavily mixed ion beam (FIB) implantation technology has been especially attractive in this application, since/or transfer technology, the lateral profiles of the ion beam (and of the ions implanted in the solid

  2. Report No. PA 14 of 2008 Compliance to rules governing municipal solid, bio-medical and plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    -medical and plastic waste Objective 5: Whether effective compliance to rules/laws regulating municipal solid waste, bio-medical waste and plastic waste was taking place in the state. The United Nations Conference of 2008 54 The Recycled Plastics Manufacture and Usage Rules were notified in 1999 with an amendment

  3. Porous, Biphasic CaCO3-Calcium Phosphate Biomedical Cement Scaffolds from Calcite (CaCO3) Powder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    Porous, Biphasic CaCO3-Calcium Phosphate Biomedical Cement Scaffolds from Calcite (CaCO3) Powder A porous, biocompatible, and resorb- able materials. Commercially available CaCO3 powders were physically crystallographically and spectroscopically resembled calcium hydroxyapatite. Upon mixing CaCO3 powders and the setting

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 55, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2008 485 Analog CMOS Design for Optical Coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Jennifer K.

    photodetector and low noise differential transimpedance amplifier which converts the optical interference signal of the lock-in amplifier each include an analog mixer and switched-capacitor low-pass filter with an externalIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 55, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2008 485 Analog CMOS Design

  5. The newesT addiTion To The UniversiTy of MinnesoTa's BioMedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Hitecture Minnesotanovember/december 2011 Magnetic personality #12;The glass-walled public areas of the University as a sculptural piece, can be glimpsed through the layered glass walls of a main corridor. 1 lobby 2 clinical in the U's Biomedical Discovery District. "The brick, precast concrete, and curtain wall vocabulary

  6. Genomics and Computational Biology lie at the center of a rapid convergence of biomedical research fields. Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Center for Bioinformatics, which provide a focus for genomics and computational biology on the PennGenomics and Computational Biology lie at the center of a rapid convergence of biomedical research in genomics, as well as computational activities in bioinformatics. Students and faculty in Penn's Genomics

  7. Plasma-Ion Processing of Three-Dimensional Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yukimura, Ken [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe 610-0321 (Japan); Wei Ronghua [Surface Engineering Section, Materials Engineering Department, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78238-5166 (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII and D) technology has been developed rapidly in the past decade. This technique is especially promising for modifying three-dimensional components. In PBII and D, plasma is generated in the entire processing chamber and then surrounds the components. When a train of negative voltage pulses are applied to the parts, ions are drawn to all the surfaces exposed to the plasma. At a high energy, ions are implanted to the surfaces, but at a low energy and with a proper precursor gases, ions are deposited to form a film. This technology has found applications in many areas including semiconductors, automotive, aerospace, energy and biomedical. This article reviews PBII and D fundamentals, describes features of various PBII and D systems and plasma sources, and discusses implantation and deposition techniques. The paper will also present application examples of this technology.

  8. The SYRMEP Beamline of Elettra: Clinical Mammography and Bio-medical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tromba, G.; Abrami, A.; Casarin, K.; Chenda, V.; Dreossi, D.; Mancini, L.; Menk, R. H.; Quai, E.; Sodini, N.; Vascotto, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Castelli, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Area Science Park Padriciano 99, 34149, Trieste (Italy); Astolfo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Bregant, P. [Struttura Complessa Fisica Sanitaria, Az. Ospedaliero Universitaria, Via Pieta' 19, 34129 Trieste (Italy); Brun, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Trieste-Dipartimento di Elettrotecnica, Elettronica ed Informatica, via Valerio 10, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Hola, M. [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University, Kamenice 4, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mech. Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Quaia, E.; Tonutti, M. [Dipartimento Universitario Clinico di Scienze Cliniche, Morfologiche e Tecnologiche, Universita' di Trieste, Osp. di Cattinara, Strada di Fiume 447, 34139 Trieste (Italy)

    2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At the SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline of Elettra Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Trieste (Italy), an extensive research program in bio-medical imaging has been developed since 1997. The core program carried out by the SYRMEP collaboration concerns the use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) for clinical mammography with the aim of improving the diagnostic performance of the conventional technique. The first protocol with patients, started in 2006 has been completed at the end of 2009 and the data analysis is now in progress.Regarding applications different from clinical imaging, synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) is the most used technique, both in absorption and phase contrast. A new software tool, Pore3D, has been developed to perform a quantitative morphological analysis on the reconstructed slices and to access textural information of the sample under study.

  9. Facile synthesis of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scano, A., E-mail: alescano80@tiscali.it; Pilloni, M., E-mail: alescano80@tiscali.it; Cabras, V., E-mail: alescano80@tiscali.it; Ennas, G. [Universit di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche and Research Unit of the National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato- 09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Vazquez-Vazquez, C. [Departamento de Qumica Fsica, Facultad de Qumica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Galicia (Spain)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Silica nanoparticles (SiO{sub 2} NPs) for biomedical applications have been prepared by using a facile modified Stber-synthesis. Potassium borohydride (KBH{sub 4}) has been introduced in the synthesis procedure in order to control NP size. Several samples have been prepared varying tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) concentration, and using different process conditions (temperature, reaction time and atmosphere). In order to study the influence of the process conditions on the NP size, morphology and properties, several characterization techniques were used. Size and morphology of the as-prepared SiO{sub 2} NPs have been studied by using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) techniques. Structural characterization was carried out by X-ray powder diffraction. To investigate the SiO{sub 2} NP fluorescence emission properties the fluorescence spectroscopy was also used.

  10. Lecture 10: The European Bioinformatics Institute - "Big data" for biomedical sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva; Dana, Jose

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1: Big data for biomedical sciences (Tom Hancocks) Ten years ago witnessed the completion of the first international 'Big Biology' project that sequenced the human genome. In the years since biological sciences, have seen a vast growth in data. In the coming years advances will come from integration of experimental approaches and the translation into applied technologies is the hospital, clinic and even at home. This talk will examine the development of infrastructure, physical and virtual, that will allow millions of life scientists across Europe better access to biological data Tom studied Human Genetics at the University of Leeds and McMaster University, before completing an MSc in Analytical Genomics at the University of Birmingham. He has worked for the UK National Health Service in diagnostic genetics and in training healthcare scientists and clinicians in bioinformatics. Tom joined the EBI in 2012 and is responsible for the scientific development and delivery of training for the BioMedBridges pr...

  11. Mechanism for the reduction of interstitial supersaturations in MeV-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezia, V.C. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Agarwal, A. [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, 55 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, 55 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Pelaz, L.; Gossmann, H.; Jacobson, D.C.; Eaglesham, D.J. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the excess vacancies induced by a 1 MeV Si implant reduce the excess interstitials generated by a 40 keV Si implant during thermal annealing when these two implants are superimposed in silicon. It is shown that this previously observed reduction is dominated by vacancy annihilation and not by gettering to deeper interstitial-type extended defects. Interstitial supersaturations were measured using B doping superlattices (DSL) grown on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Implanting MeV and keV Si ions into the B DSL/SOI structure eliminated the B transient enhanced diffusion normally associated with the keV implant. The buried SiO{sub 2} layer in the SOI substrate isolates the deep interstitials-type extended defects of the MeV implant, thereby eliminating the possibility that these defects getter the interstitial excess induced by the keV Si implant. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  13. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genebes, Caroline, E-mail: genebes.caroline@claudiusregaud.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Jonca, Frdric [Department of Urology, Clinique Ambroise Par, Toulouse (France); Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard [Department of Urology and Andrology, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  14. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in a Broken Vertebral Titanium Implant (Titanium Mesh Cage)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierry, G.; Buy, X.; Mohan, P. Chandra; Cupelli, J. [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology B (France); Steib, J.P. [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Orthopedic and Spinal Surgery (France); Gangi, A. [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology B (France)], E-mail: gangi@rad6.u-strasbg.fr

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the case of a percutaneous consolidation of a broken vertebral implant (Surgical Titanium Mesh Implants; DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA, USA) by vertebroplasty. Four years after anterior spondylectomy with cage implantation and stabilization with posterior instrumentation, the patient was admitted for excruciating back pain. Radiographs showed fracture of the cage, screw, and rod. An anterior surgical approach was deemed difficult and a percutaneous injection of polymethyl methacrylate into the cage was performed following posterior instrumentation replacement. This seems to be an interesting alternative to the classical anterior surgical approach, which is often difficult in postoperative conditions.

  15. Development and evaluation of an implantable chronic DC stimulation and measurement probe for nerve regeneration studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macha, Douglas Bryan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isotropic. The actual field strength or current density induced by the applied current is seldom directly measured in-vivo. This research seeks to evaluate the design of an implantable DC stimulator capable of delivering a constant, stable and measurable...

  16. Low power data acquisition for microImplant biometric monitoring of tremors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Tania

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide doctors a means to continuously monitor biometrics over long time scales ...

  17. The Effect of Titanium Implants on the Peripheral Circadian Rhythm of Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarville, Kirstin Ty

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium Figure 11. Surface Topography Data at 310x FigureVitamin D Table 3. Surface Topography of Implants from FourRough Titanium Surface Topography Data 310x 32mm

  18. Emergency delivery of Vasopressin from an implantable MEMS rapid drug delivery device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable rapid drug delivery device based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology was designed, fabricated and validated for the in vivo rapid delivery of vasopressin in a rabbit model. In vitro ...

  19. Properties of two biological glasses used as metallic prosthesis coatings and after an implantation in body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Properties of two biological glasses used as metallic prosthesis coatings and after an implantation the corrosive environment during some months, to confer the layer biocompatibility on the prosthesis and to keep

  20. Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang Y, J Jagielski, IT Bae, X Xiang, L Thome, G Balakrishnan, DM Paul, and WJ Weber.2010."Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore."Nuclear...

  1. The Effect of Electrode Placement on Cochlear Implant Function and Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Sandra

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochlear implants have been an effective treatment for restoring profound sensorineural hearing loss to those who do not benefit from traditional hearing aids. Advances in surgical technique and electrode design allow for preservation of residual...

  2. Mechanical characterization and in vivo operation of an implantable drug delivery MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yawen, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis was to advance an implantable drug delivery MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) device developed in our laboratory. This device was designed to locally deliver multiple substances in complex release ...

  3. Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of {approx}2 {mu}m depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

  4. Proteomic comparison of biomaterial implants for regeneration of peripheral nerve tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miu, Kathy K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue regenerates resulting from the healing of transected peripheral nerve differ in morphological and electrophysiological properties based on the biomaterial implant used to bridge the interneural wound gap. At gap ...

  5. CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC PROPERTIES AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF TITANIUM HYDRIDE LAYERS GROWN ON TITANIUM IMPLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC PROPERTIES AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF TITANIUM HYDRIDE LAYERS GROWN ON TITANIUM, Switzerland Keywords: SLA treated titanium - bone-anchored dental implants - transmission and scanning electron microscopy - titanium hydride sub-surface layer - epitaxy Abstract Commercially pure titanium

  6. Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants E. Meng1 1 University of Southern California, Los technological deficiencies can be addressed by integrating microfluidics with electrodes and electrochemical sensors. Multimodality neural interfaces that combine electronics and microfluidics open new possibilities

  7. Coralline hydroxyapatite implants for use in the treatment of surgically created subchondral defects in the horse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillis, John Patrick

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Implant areas of interest. Figure 2. Implant regions of interest. were grouped with bone tissue. Using point counting and lineal analysis methods the volume fraction (%), specific surface area (mm /mm ) and specific interface area (mm /mm ) of each... tissue were then computed. The interface area is the measure of the boundary of one tissue with that of a complimentary tissue, or tissues. To remove the effect of linear anisotropy, lineal analysis was computed along two perpendicular axes...

  8. Evolution of Ion Implantation Technology and its Contribution to Semiconductor Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsukamoto, Katsuhiro [Mitsubishi Electric Corporation (Japan); Kuroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Yoji [Renesas Electronics Corporation (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial aspects of the evolution of ion implantation technology will be reviewed, and their impact on the semiconductor industry will be discussed. The main topics will be the technology's application to the most advanced, ultra scaled CMOS, and to power devices, as well as productivity improvements in implantation technology. Technological insights into future developments in ion-related technologies for emerging industries will also be presented.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research Part 1: Biomedical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.F.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in the biomedical sciences at PNL is described. Activities reported include: inhaled plutonium in dogs; national radiobiology archives; statistical analysis of data from animal studies; genotoxicity of inhaled energy effluents; molecular events during tumor initiation; biochemistry of free radical induced DNA damage; radon hazards in homes; mechanisms of radon injury; genetics of radon induced lung cancer; and in vivo/in vitro radon induced cellular damage.

  10. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of biomedical Ti22Nb and Ti22Nb6Zr alloys in saline medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Electrochemical corrosion behavior of biomedical Ti­22Nb and Ti­22Nb­6Zr alloys in saline medium B addition and potentiodynamic polarization on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Ti­22Nb and Ti­22Nb­6Zr alloy samples.The corrosion tests were carried out in 0.9% NaCl at 37 8C and neutral p

  11. Experimental Implementation of a Hybrid Nonlinear Control Design for Magnetostrictive Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development in many biomedical, automotive, aerospace, and industrial applications. These materials provide shape memory alloys [5]; at these field levels, obtaining accurate and precise control is greatly

  12. Advanced Composites Expert Named Newest UT-ORNL Governor's Chair...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will serve as a professor in UT's Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering. "The industry is in urgent need of trained engineers with comprehensive...

  13. acp urges congress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace and biomedical applications. Moderate to high field inputs are of- ten 184 REPORT from ISWA 2011 WORLD CONGRESS 17-20 October 2011, DAEGU, KOREA Renewable Energy...

  14. Ion implantation of silicon at the nanometer scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianconi, Marco; Bergamini, Fabio; Cristiani, Stefano; Lulli, Giorgio [CNR-IMM-Sezione di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy) and Laboratory MIST E-R, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); CNR-IMM-Sezione di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SiO{sub 2} layers ({approx}0.5 {mu}m thick) thermally grown on (100) Si were irradiated with 12.5 MeV Ti ions at 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} fluence, and subsequently exposed to the HF vapor, in order to selectively etch the latent tracks generated by the passage of swift ions. Nearly cylindrical nanoholes having diameters as small as 25 nm, with an average value of 54{+-}5 nm, were generated by this procedure. The nanopatterned SiO{sub 2} layer served as a mask for selective amorphization of the underlying Si, achieved by implantation with 180 keV Ar{sup +} ions at a fluence of 2.0x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. Dip in aqueous HF solution was then performed to selectively etch ion amorphized Si, thus transferring the nanometric pattern of the SiO{sub 2} mask to the underlying substrate. As expected, the maximum depth of amorphizazion in Si, and consequently of etching depth, decreases when the hole radius decreases below values of the order of the lateral ion straggling. The effect has been characterized and investigated by the comparison of experiments and three dimensional Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Bilateral implant reconstruction does not affect the quality of postmastectomy radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: hoa1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Patel, Nisha [Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mehrara, Babak J.; Disa, Joseph J.; Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gelblum, Daphna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine if the presence of bilateral implants, in addition to other anatomic and treatment-related variables, affects coverage of the target volume and dose to the heart and lung in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). A total of 197 consecutive women with breast cancer underwent mastectomy and immediate tissue expander (TE) placement, with or without exchange for a permanent implant (PI) before radiation therapy at our center. PMRT was delivered with 2 tangential beams + supraclavicular lymph node field (50 Gy). Patients were grouped by implant number: 51% unilateral (100) and 49% bilateral (97). The planning target volume (PTV) (defined as implant + chest wall + nodes), heart, and ipsilateral lung were contoured and the following parameters were abstracted from dose-volume histogram (DVH) data: PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, Lung V{sub 20}Gy > 30%, and Heart V{sub 25}Gy > 5%. Univariate (UVA) and multivariate analyses (MVA) were performed to determine the association of variables with these parameters. The 2 groups were well balanced for implant type and volume, internal mammary node (IMN) treatment, and laterality. In the entire cohort, 90% had PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, indicating excellent coverage of the chest wall. Of the patients, 27% had high lung doses (V{sub 20}Gy > 30%) and 16% had high heart doses (V{sub 25}Gy > 5%). No significant factors were associated with suboptimal PTV coverage. On MVA, IMN treatment was found to be highly associated with high lung and heart doses (both p < 0.0001), but implant number was not (p = 0.54). In patients with bilateral implants, IMN treatment was the only predictor of dose to the contralateral implant (p = 0.001). In conclusion, bilateral implants do not compromise coverage of the target volume or increase lung and heart dose in patients receiving PMRT. The most important predictor of high lung and heart doses in patients with implant-based reconstruction, whether unilateral or bilateral, is treatment of the IMNs. Refinement of radiation techniques in reconstructed patients who require comprehensive nodal irradiation is warranted.

  16. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    information that the responsibility of remedial action, environmental monitoring andor control of these sites has been assumed by other DOE ,programs or offices or other Federal...

  17. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    information that the responsibility of remedial action, environmental monitoring andor control of these sites has been assumeo by other DOE programs or offices or other Federal...

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and natural gas engines and related components, with sales exceeding $18 billion. Charlton started his career and natural gas engine technologies - for Ford Motor Company, British Gas, Lloyds of London among others of internal combustion engine technology. (cont'd.) (bio cont'd.) At Cummins he was directly involved

  19. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AZ o TVA, Muscle Shoals, AL o Dow Chemical Company, Walnut Creek, CA e Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO o Havens Lab, Bridgeport Brass, Bridgeport, CT o General Chemical...

  20. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power/ CSP (thermal energy storage/ TES), nuclear, oil and gas exploration (deep drilling ('09)" at SPAWAR. seminar Nano-Devices for Enhanced Thermal Energy Storage, Cooling and Se cooling, sensing and energy storage (involving both experimental and computational studies). Coupling

  1. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implementation of predictive methods in commercial, numerical codes. Finally, opportunities for students University in 2007. During this time, he has been elected to several leadership positions within the ASME, including as the secretary of the ASME Research Committee on the Mechanics of Jointed Structures, he has

  2. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    researching at the Air Force Research Lab in Dayton, Ohio. seminar Thermoelastodynamic Responses of Panels & Energy Arizona State University November 9, 2012 at 1:30pm in SCOB 228 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy #12;

  3. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation highly complex drivetrain systems (such as HEV, PHEV, FCHEV, ..etc) where the interaction variances due to an inclusion of highly cross linked on-board automatic controls. The development of next

  4. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes and distributed energy generation systems using detailed nonlinear models. Finally, we control architectures utilizing dedicated, wired links to measurement sensors and control actuators, potentially asynchronous and/or delayed measurements in the overall distributed control system. To address

  5. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a member of expert panels reviewing the health impacts of wind turbines. seminar Predicting Turbofan Fan to the interaction of the fan rotor wake with the fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs). Both tonal and broadband noise of the RSI (rotor-stator interaction) method that will be discussed. Input to RSI consists of rotor wake

  6. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    conductivity. Coupled with its low thermal conductivity, polymer thermoelectric composites are attractive and thermoelectric applications. I will show that the thermal conductivity of ultra-thin polymer films can both conductivity and phonon transport mechanisms over the past 2 decades, owing much to the challenging needs

  7. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a microgrid serving a large commercial building, and two building-scale PV arrays with storage. If well, battery storage, a microgrid, several large thermal storage devices and residential HVAC. It is shown that augmenting or even replacing large power generation capacity. Most of these resources will be located

  8. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    on condition monitoring and control opportunities in the emerging agriculture, environment and energy method, 2) an input de-convolution method, and 3) an efficient quality assurance metric, all applicable

  9. Jinkyu Yang Graduate Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    -Specific Quantification of Bone Quality Using Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves Osteoporosis is a well recognized problem of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center, more than 40 million Americans are at risk of fracture due to osteoporosis or low bone density. Osteoporosis can influence surgical decision

  10. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the waste heat, presenting efficiency loss. We discuss in-situ (at/adjacent to the emission site) recycling

  11. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-. \5-

  12. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-.

  13. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-.. . s

  14. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-.. .

  15. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-..

  16. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-..,' \

  17. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-..,'

  18. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t

  19. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i tCORPORATION

  20. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i

  1. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w, 9.55

  2. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,

  3. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53 L'

  4. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53

  5. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53q 3

  6. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION /

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53q

  7. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION \

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie'Al ...

  8. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH Ef3

  9. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH

  10. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION ,'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH,'

  11. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH,'1 e

  12. Thermoelectric applications as related to biomedical engineering for NASA Johnson Space Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents current NASA biomedical developments and applications using thermoelectrics. Discussion will include future technology enhancements that would be most beneficial to the application of thermoelectric technology. A great deal of thermoelectric applications have focused on electronic cooling. As with all technological developments within NASA, if the application cannot be related to the average consumer, the technology will not be mass-produced and widely available to the public (a key to research and development expenditures and thermoelectric companies). Included are discussions of thermoelectric applications to cool astronauts during launch and reentry. The earth-based applications, or spin-offs, include such innovations as tank and race car driver cooling, to cooling infants with high temperatures, as well as, the prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy. In order to preserve the scientific value of metabolic samples during long-term space missions, cooling is required to enable scientific studies. Results of one such study should provide a better understanding of osteoporosis and may lead to a possible cure for the disease. In the space environment, noise has to be kept to a minimum. In long-term space applications such as the International Space Station, thermoelectric technology provides the acoustic relief and the reliability for food, as well as, scientific refrigeration/freezers. Applications and future needs are discussed as NASA moves closer to a continued space presence in Mir, International Space Station, and Lunar-Mars Exploration.

  13. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States)] [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)] [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  14. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G. [Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Halln, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH-ICT, Electrum 229, SE-164 40, Kista, Stockholm (Sweden); Du, X. L. [Institute of Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from {sup 11}B to {sup 209}Bi) to ion doses up to 2??10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?2}. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600?C, while co-implantation with B (via BF{sub 2}) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ?500?C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900?C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

  15. Investigation of (110)Mo, (110)W monocrystals and Nb polycrystal implanted by oxygen ions and used as TEC electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakadze, L.M.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to improve efficiency of a thermionic energy converter (TEC), converting thermal power into electric power, there were investigated collectors made of (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, and Nb polycrystal, all being implanted by oxygen ions with fluence of 1*10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2}. For emitters there were used (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, and Nb polycrystal implanted by oxygen ions, respectively. The performance of TEC with implanted electrode material is compared with this of TEC having electrodes of non-implanted materials. It is demonstrated that for emitter temperature range of 1,473 to 1,873 K employment of (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, implanted by oxygen ions, for TEC collector allows to increase the specific output power of a converter approximately by a factor of 1.6, and employment of implanted Nb for electrodes -- to increase this value approximately by a factor of 3, as compared with non-implanted electrode materials. The upgraded performance of TEC with implanted electrode materials is caused by the increase of minimum values of the collector working function by {approximately}0.15--0.2 eV as compared with non-implanted collectors, as well as by improvement of emitter emissive and adsorption properties due to oxygen supply from collectors at operating temperatures.

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 52, NO. 4, APRIL 2005 711 An Ultra-Low-Power Programmable Analog Bionic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    of the future which require decades of operation on a 100-mAh rechargeable battery with a finite number in such next-generation implants. It can operate on a 100-mAh battery with a 1000 charge a mel cepstrum filter bank with 820 channels. The mel scale maps frequencies to a perceptually linear

  17. Integration of Ion Implantation with Scanning ProbeAlignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, A.; Rangelow, I.W.; Schenkel, T.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a scanning probe instrument which integrates ion beams with imaging and alignment functions of a piezo resistive scanning probe in high vacuum. Energetic ions (1 to a few hundred keV) are transported through holes in scanning probe tips [1]. Holes and imaging tips are formed by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) drilling and ion beam assisted thin film deposition. Transport of single ions can be monitored through detection of secondary electrons from highly charged dopant ions (e. g., Bi{sup 45+}) enabling single atom device formation. Fig. 1 shows SEM images of a scanning probe tip formed by ion beam assisted Pt deposition in a dual beam FIB. Ion beam collimating apertures are drilled through the silicon cantilever with a thickness of 5 {micro}m. Aspect ratio limitations preclude the direct drilling of holes with diameters well below 1 {micro}m, and smaller hole diameters are achieved through local thin film deposition [2]. The hole in Fig. 1 was reduced from 2 {micro}m to a residual opening of about 300 nm. Fig. 2 shows an in situ scanning probe image of an alignment dot pattern taken with the tip from Fig. 1. Transport of energetic ions through the aperture in the scanning probe tip allows formation of arbitrary implant patterns. In the example shown in Fig. 2 (right), a 30 nm thick PMMA resist layer on silicon was exposed to 7 keV Ar{sup 2+} ions with an equivalent dose of 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} to form the LBL logo. An exciting goal of this approach is the placement of single dopant ions into precise locations for integration of single atom devices, such as donor spin based quantum computers [3, 4]. In Fig. 3, we show a section of a micron size dot area exposed to a low dose (10{sup 11}/cm{sup 2}) of high charge state dopant ions. The Bi{sup 45+} ions (200 keV) were extracted from a low emittance highly charged ions source [5]. The potential energy of B{sup 45+}, i. e., the sum of the binding energies required to remove the electrons, amounts to 36 keV. This energy is deposited within {approx}10 fs when an ion impinges on a target. The highly localized energy deposition results in efficient resist exposure, and is associated with strongly enhanced secondary electron emission, which allows monitoring of single ion impacts [4]. The ex situ scanning probe image with line scan in Fig. 3 shows a single ion impact site in PMMA (after standard development). In our presentation, we will discuss resolution requirements for ion placement in prototype quantum computer structures [3] with respect to resolution limiting factors in ion implantation with scanning probe alignment.

  18. Physiological Stress Responses to Prolonged Exposure to MS-222 and Surgical Implantation in Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katie A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While many studies have investigated the effects of transmitters on fish condition, behavior, and survival, to our knowledge, no studies have taken into account anesthetic exposure time in addition to tag and surgery effects. We investigated stress responses to prolonged MS-222 exposure after stage 4 induction in surgically implanted juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Survival, tag loss, plasma cortisol concentration, and blood [Na+], [K+], [Ca2+], and pH were measured immediately following anesthetic exposure and surgical implantation and 1, 7, and 14 days post-treatment. Despite the prolonged anesthetic exposure, 3-15 minutes post Stage 4 induction, there were no mortalities or tag loss in any treatment. MS-222 was effective at delaying immediate cortisol release during surgical implantation; however, osmotic disturbances resulted, which were more pronounced in longer anesthetic time exposures. From day 1 to day 14, [Na+], [Ca2+], and pH significantly decreased, while cortisol significantly increased. The cortisol increase was exacerbated by surgical implantation. There was a significant interaction between MS-222 time exposure and observation day for [Na+], [Ca2+], [K+], and pH; variations were seen in the longer time exposures, although not consistently. In conclusion, stress response patterns suggest stress associated with surgical implantation is amplified with increased exposure to MS-222.

  19. Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay (France); David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Fichtner, P. F. P. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, 90035-190 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

  20. Charging and discharging in ion implanted dielectric films used for capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical systems switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Gang; Chen Xuyuan [Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Faculty of Science and Engineering, Vestfold University College, P.O. Box 2243, N-3103 Toensberg (Norway); San Haisheng [Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structure was used to investigate the dielectric charging and discharging in the capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical switches. The insulator in MIS structure is silicon nitride films (SiN), which were deposited by either low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) processes. Phosphorus or boron ions were implanted into dielectric layer in order to introduce impurity energy levels into the band gap of SiN. The relaxation processes of the injected charges in SiN were changed due to the ion implantation, which led to the change in relaxation time of the trapped charges. In our experiments, the space charges were introduced by stressing the sample electrically with dc biasing. The effects of implantation process on charge accumulation and dissipation in the dielectric are studied by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement qualitatively and quantitatively. The experimental results show that the charging and discharging behavior of the ion implanted silicon nitride films deposited by LPCVD is quite different from the one deposited by PECVD. The charge accumulation in the dielectric film can be reduced by ion implantation with proper dielectric deposition method.

  1. Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fetherston, Robert P. (Madison, WI), Shamim, Muhammad M. (Madison, WI), Conrad, John R. (Madison, WI)

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

  2. The effect of boron implant energy on transient enhanced diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.; Krishnamoorthy, V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States); Gossman, H. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Rubin, L. [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Division, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Division, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Law, M.E. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States); Jones, K.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of boron in silica after low energy boron implantation and annealing was investigated using boron-doping superlattices (DSLs) grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Boron ions were implanted at 5, 10, 20, and 40 keV at a constant dose of 2{times}10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Subsequent annealing was performed at 750{degree}C for times of 3 min, 15 min, and 2 h in a nitrogen ambient. The broadening of the boron spikes was measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and simulated. Boron diffusivity enhancement was quantified as a function of implant energy. Transmission electron microscopy results show that {l_angle}311{r_angle} defects are only seen for implant energies {ge}10 keV at this dose and that the density increases with energy. DSL studies indicate the point defect concentration in the background decays much slower when {l_angle}311{r_angle} defects are present. These results imply there are at least two sources of TED for boron implants (B-I): short time component that decays rapidly consistent with nonvisible B-I pairs and a longer time component consistent with interstitial release from the {l_angle}311{r_angle} defects. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Single-crystal diamond plate liftoff achieved by ion implantation and subsequent annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parikh, N.R.; Hunn, J.D.; McGucken, E.; Swanson, M.L. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)); White, C.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6048 (United States)); Rudder, R.A.; Malta, D.P.; Posthill, J.B.; Markunas, R.J. (Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709-2194 (United States))

    1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method for removing thin, large area sheets of diamond from bulk or homoepitaxial diamond crystals. This method consists of an ion implantation step, followed by a selective etching procedure. High energy (4--5 MeV) implantation of carbon or oxygen ions creates a well-defined layer of damaged diamond that is buried at a controlled depth below the surface. For C implantations, this layer is graphitized by annealing in vacuum, and then etched in either an acid solution, or by heating at 550--600 [degree]C in oxygen. This process successfully lifts off the diamond plate above the graphite layer. For O implantations of a suitable dose (3[times]10[sup 17] cm[sup [minus]2] or greater), the liftoff is achieved by annealing in vacuum or flowing oxygen. In this case, the O required for etching of the graphitic layer is also supplied internally by the implantation. This liftoff method, combined with well-established homoepitaxial growth processes, has considerable potential for the fabrication of large area single crystalline diamond sheets.

  4. Ecological and biomedical effects of effluents from near-term electric vehicle storage battery cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the ecological and biomedical effects due to commercialization of storage batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles is given. It deals only with the near-term batteries, namely Pb/acid, Ni/Zn, and Ni/Fe, but the complete battery cycle is considered, i.e., mining and milling of raw materials, manufacture of the batteries, cases and covers; use of the batteries in electric vehicles, including the charge-discharge cycles; recycling of spent batteries; and disposal of nonrecyclable components. The gaseous, liquid, and solid emissions from various phases of the battery cycle are identified. The effluent dispersal in the environment is modeled and ecological effects are assessed in terms of biogeochemical cycles. The metabolic and toxic responses by humans and laboratory animals to constituents of the effluents are discussed. Pertinent environmental and health regulations related to the battery industry are summarized and regulatory implications for large-scale storage battery commercialization are discussed. Each of the seven sections were abstracted and indexed individually for EDB/ERA. Additional information is presented in the seven appendixes entitled; growth rate scenario for lead/acid battery development; changes in battery composition during discharge; dispersion of stack and fugitive emissions from battery-related operations; methodology for estimating population exposure to total suspended particulates and SO/sub 2/ resulting from central power station emissions for the daily battery charging demand of 10,000 electric vehicles; determination of As air emissions from Zn smelting; health effects: research related to EV battery technologies. (JGB)

  5. Long-term survival and maturation of spinally grafted human fetal and embryonic stem cellderived neural precursors in implantable tacrolimus pellet- immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-G93A model rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    after Tacrolimus releasable pellet implantation. Rats werein implantable tacrolimus pellet-immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-releasing Tacrolimus pellets. 12 3.2 Tolerability

  6. 2.782J / 3.961J / 20.451J / HST.524J Design of Medical Devices and Implants, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannas, Ioannis V.

    Solution of clinical problems by use of implants and other medical devices. Systematic use of cell-matrix control volumes. The role of stress analysis in the design process. Anatomic fit: shape and size of implants. Selection ...

  7. Diffusion of nitrogen implanted in titanium nitride (TiN1-x) F. Abautret and P. Eveno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1113 Diffusion of nitrogen implanted in titanium nitride (TiN1- x) F. Abautret and P. Eveno The diffusion of nitrogen 15, implanted in non-stoichiometric titanium nitride single-crystals (03B4 - TiN1-x on i usion m m ri es compared with the oxides. No data are available about nitrogen (or titanium

  8. The structure of titanate nanobelts used as seeds for the nucleation of hydroxyapatite at the surface of titanium implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    at the surface of titanium implants E. Conforto1* , D. Caillard2 , L. Mller3 , F.A. Mller3 1 Centre Commun d to induce the nucleation and growth of hydroxyl carbonated apatite (HCA) at the surface of titanium implants etching forms a rough titanium hydride layer, which remains unchanged after subsequent treatments

  9. Lab-on-a-chip implants : a mini laboratory under the skin Giovanni De Micheli*, Cristina Boero*, and Sandro Carrara*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    have realized an implantable and wearable system for the continuous monitoring of human metabolites where the implant is placed. The patch produces an electromagnetic field that supports power Micheli*, Cristina Boero*, and Sandro Carrara* * Laboratory of Integrated Systems, EPFL, Lausanne, CH We

  10. Journal of Power Sources 170 (2007) 216224 Design of an implantable power supply for an intraocular sensor, using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the millimeter range, comprise Zinc and Lithium based electrochemistries (Zn- air, Zn/AgO, Li-polymer, Li/MnO2 1 [39]. The smallest commercial batteries cur- rently available on the market, with sizes that span for implantable technologies. Further miniaturization of implantable systems will require new battery technologies

  11. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sochman, Jan [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Cardiology (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jan.sochman@medicon.cz; Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Czech Republic); Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef [Oregon Health and Sciences University, Dotter Interventional Institute (United States)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  12. Metastable phase diagram for Ni-implanted Al and pulse surface melted Al(Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of <110> Al implanted with Ni was examined before and after subsequent electron beam pulsed surface melting (65 ns, 1.7 J/cm/sup 2/). Both processes were done with the Al substrate at room temperature. Implantation at several energies (160 to 15 keV) into a given sample produced a nearly constant measured Ni concentration through a approx. 0.1 ..mu..m region below the surface (7). Such samples with concentrations from 8 to 25 at. % Ni were examined, along with a sample with a peak concentration of 32 at. % Ni.

  13. Bubble microstructure evolution and helium behavior in He{sup +} implanted Ni-base alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalin, B.A.; Chernov, I.I.; Kalashnikov, A.N.; Solovyev, B.G. [Moscow State Engineering Physics Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Physical Problems of Materials Science

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavior of ion-implanted helium in Ni as a function of alloying element concentration (Al or Ti) and irradiation conditions (at 20 or 750 C) have been investigated by means of thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Substitution elements in solid solution were demonstrated to have substantial influence on the evolution of implanted helium, shifting the TDS spectrum peaks to higher temperature region and increasing the quantity of helium remaining in the samples after long-time postirradiation annealing. TEM investigations showed that in the case of postirradiation annealing, helium bubbles are formed earlier in quenched alloys than in those annealed.

  14. Letter Report for Analytical Results for five Swipe Samples from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility, Muskegon Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Wade

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received five swipe samples on December 10, 2013 from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility in Norton Shores, Michigan. The samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14 according to the NRC Form 303 supplied with the samples. The sample identification numbers are presented in Table 1 and the tritium and carbon-14 results are provided in Table 2. The pertinent procedure references are included with the data tables.

  15. Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world in which damaged parts of the body -an arm, or an eye, or even

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Richard

    1 Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world, today's implants are limited severely by the interface between the artificial and biological systems by artificial implants capable of restoring or even enhancing human performance. The associated improvements

  16. The Effects of Damage on Hydrogen-Implant-Induced Thin-Film Separation from Bulk Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, R.B.; Holland, O.W.; Thomas, D.K.; Wetteroth, T.A.; Wilson, S.R.

    1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Exfoliation of Sic by hydrogen implantation and subsequent annealing forms the basis for a thin-film separation process which, when combined with hydrophilic wafer bonding, can be exploited to produce silicon-carbide-on-insulator, SiCOI. Sic thin films produced by this process exhibit unacceptably high resistivity because defects generated by the implant neutralize electrical carriers. Separation occurs because of chemical interaction of hydrogen with dangling bonds within microvoids created by the implant, and physical stresses due to gas-pressure effects during post-implant anneal. Experimental results show that exfoliation of Sic is dependent upon the concentration of implanted hydrogen, but the damage generated by the implant approaches a point when exfoliation is, in fact, retarded. This is attributed to excessive damage at the projected range of the implant which inhibits physical processes of implant-induced cleaving. Damage is controlled independently of hydrogen dosage by elevating the temperature of the SiC during implant in order to promote dynamic annealing. The resulting decrease in damage is thought to promote growth of micro-cracks which form a continuous cleave. Channeled H{sup +} implantation enhances the cleaving process while simultaneously minimizing residual damage within the separated film. It is shown that high-temperature irradiation and channeling each reduces the hydrogen fluence required to affect separation of a thin film and results in a lower concentration of defects. This increases the potential for producing SiC01 which is sufficiently free of defects and, thus, more easily electrically activated.

  17. Ranges and moments of depth distributions of boron and phosphorus implanted into silicon in the energy range 1.7-5.0 MeV with an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, L.; Shaw, W.; Jones, M.A. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Wilson, R.G. [Hughes Research Labs., Malibu, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy implantation of dopant atoms is used to form buried layers of high conductivity in silicon. These layers have many potential applications, including triple wells for FLASH memory devices, buried layers for CCD devices, and damage induced gettering regions in all devices. In order to make optimum use of very high energy dopant implants, the depth and profile shape characteristics of these implants need to be determined. This paper presents the results of depth profiling by SIMS of implants of boron and phosphorus in silicon. The implants were done on an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE mechanically scanned implanter with energies of 1.7-3.0 MeV for boron and 3-5 MeV for phosphorus, doses of 1 {times} 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}, and tilt/twist orientations of 0{degrees}/0{degrees}, 5.2{degrees}/16.7{degrees}, and 7{degrees}/27{degrees}. The four central moments of the depth distributions, as well as the peak depth have been calculated for each of the profiles. The projected ranges of all these implants are underestimated by TRIM92 calculations.

  18. Lattice site location and annealing behaviour of Ca and Sr implanted GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, Bart; Wahl, Ulrich; Correia, J G; Arajo, Joo Pedro; Lojkowski, W; Kolesnikov, D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the lattice location of ion-implanted Ca and Sr in thin films of single-crystalline wurtzite GaN. Using the emission channeling technique the angular distributions of $\\beta\\!^{-}$?particles emitted by the radioactive isotopes $^{45}$Ca(t$_{ 1/2}$=163.8 d) and $^{89}$Sr(t$_{ 1/2}$=50.53 d) were monitored with a position-sensitive detector following 60 keV room-temperature implantation. Our experiments give direct evidence that $\\sim$90% of Ca and > 60% of Sr atoms were occupying substitutional Ga sites with root mean square displacements of the order of 0.150.30 , i.e., larger than the expected thermal vibration amplitude of 0.074 . Annealing the Ca implanted samples at 11001350 C in high-pressure N$_{2}$ atmosphere resulted in a better incorporation into the substitutional Ga site. The Sr implanted sample showed a small decrease in rms displacements for vacuum annealing up to 900 C, while the substitutional fraction remained nearly constant. The annealing behavior of the rms disp...

  19. MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY OF57 Fe IMPLANTED TO ALUMINIUM AT LIQUID NITROGEN TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY OF57 Fe IMPLANTED TO ALUMINIUM AT LIQUID NITROGEN TEMPERATURE K. Sassa, Y. The ageing behavior of the specimen was examined by conversion electron Mossbauer spec- troscopy at 77 K at room temperature. Internal conversion electron Mossbauer spec- troscopy is most suitable

  20. Cellular Inductive Powering System for Weakly-Linked Resonant Rodent Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genov, Roman

    implements a low-cost technique which tracks the location of the animal using an impedance measurement of an infection is always present [4]. Alternatively, on-board battery can be used to power the NI implant which inevitably limits the duration of the experiment. Typically, battery life limits the length of studies to 7