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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Gaseous emissions during concurrent combustion of biomass and non-recyclable municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass and municipal solid waste offer sustainable sources ... form of combined cooling, heat and power. Combustion of biomass has a lesser impact than solid fossil ... an integrated, sustainable waste managemen...

René Laryea-Goldsmith; John Oakey; Nigel J Simms

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Combined Municipal Solid Waste and biomass system optimization for district energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Combined energy conversion of MSW and agricultural residue biomass is examined. • The model optimizes the financial yield of the investment. • Several system specifications are optimally defined by the optimization model. • The application to a case study in Greece shows positive financial yield. • The investment is mostly sensitive on the interest rate, the investment cost and the heating oil price. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal has been a controversial issue in many countries over the past years, due to disagreement among the various stakeholders on the waste management policies and technologies to be adopted. One of the ways of treating/disposing MSW is energy recovery, as waste is considered to contain a considerable amount of bio-waste and therefore can lead to renewable energy production. The overall efficiency can be very high in the cases of co-generation or tri-generation. In this paper a model is presented, aiming to support decision makers in issues relating to Municipal Solid Waste energy recovery. The idea of using more fuel sources, including MSW and agricultural residue biomass that may exist in a rural area, is explored. The model aims at optimizing the system specifications, such as the capacity of the base-load Waste-to-Energy facility, the capacity of the peak-load biomass boiler and the location of the facility. Furthermore, it defines the quantity of each potential fuel source that should be used annually, in order to maximize the financial yield of the investment. The results of an energy tri-generation case study application at a rural area of Greece, using mixed MSW and biomass, indicate positive financial yield of investment. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effect of the most important parameters of the model on the optimum solution, pinpointing the parameters of interest rate, investment cost and heating oil price, as those requiring the attention of the decision makers. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is enhanced by a stochastic analysis to determine the effect of the volatility of parameters on the robustness of the model and the solution obtained.

Rentizelas, Athanasios A., E-mail: arent@central.ntua.gr; Tolis, Athanasios I., E-mail: atol@central.ntua.gr; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Plasmatron gasification of biomass lignocellulosic waste materials derived from municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this work is to study the feasibility and operational performance of plasmatron (plasma torch) gasification of municipal solid waste mixed with raw wood (MSW/RW) derived from the pretreatment of Steam Mechanical Heat Treatment (SMHT), as the target material (MRM). A 10 kW plasmatron reactor is used for gasification of the MRM. The production of syngas (CO and H2) is the major component, and almost 90% of the gaseous products appear in 2 min of reaction time, with relatively high reaction rates. The syngas yield is between 88.59 and 91.84 vol%, and the recovery mass ratio of syngas from MRM is 45.19 down to 27.18 wt% with and without steam with the energy yields of 59.07–111.89%. The concentrations of gaseous products from the continuous feeding of 200 g/h are stable and higher than the average concentrations of the batch feeding of 10 g. The residue from the plasmatron gasification with steam is between 0 and 4.52 wt%, with the inorganic components converted into non-leachable vitrified lava, which is non-hazardous. The steam methane reforming reaction, hydrogasification reaction and Boudouard reaction all contribute to the increase in the syngas yield. It is proved that MSW can be completely converted into bioenergy using SMHT, followed by plasmatron gasification.

Je-Lueng Shie; Li-Xun Chen; Kae-Long Lin; Ching-Yuan Chang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Effect of air flow rate and fuel moisture on the burning behaviours of biomass and simulated municipal solid wastes in packed beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combustion of biomass and municipal solid wastes is one of the key areas in the global cleaner energy strategy. But there is still a lack of detailed and systematically theoretical study on the packed bed burning of biomass and municipal solid wastes. The advantage of theoretical study lies in its ability to reveal features of the detailed structure of the burning process inside a solid bed, such as reaction zone thickness, combustion staging, rates of individual sub-processes, gas emission and char burning characteristics. These characteristics are hard to measure by conventional experimental techniques. In this paper, mathematical simulations as well as experiments have been carried out for the combustion of wood chips and the incineration of simulated municipal solid wastes in a bench-top stationary bed and the effects of primary air flow rate and moisture level in the fuel have been assessed over wide ranges. It is found that volatile release as well as char burning intensifies with an increase in the primary air flow until a critical point is reached where a further increase in the primary air results in slowing down of the combustion process; a higher primary airflow also reduces the char fraction burned in the final char-burning-only stage, shifts combustion in the bed to a more fuel-lean environment and reduces CO emission at the bed top; an increase in the moisture level in the fuel produces a higher flame front temperature in the bed at low primary air flow rates.

Y.B Yang; V.N Sharifi; J Swithenbank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

6

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSolidWaste&oldid...

7

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

8

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector.

9

The Combustion of Solid Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of solid biomass is covered in this chapter. This covers the general mechanism of combustion, moisture evaporation, devolatilisation, the combustion of the volatiles gases and tars and finally char...

Jenny M. Jones; Amanda R. Lea-Langton…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal solid waste (MSW) is...

11

Experimental analysis of municipal solid waste samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the analysis of municipal solid waste consolidation, large-scale devices are usually used to measure the compression and hydraulic conductivity parameters. The use of those devices is justified due to difficulties in probing undisturbed samples...

Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Municipal Consortium 0 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications

13

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Municipal Consortium 1 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications

14

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities ArunArun PurandarePurandare Eco Designs India Pvt. Ltd.Eco Designs India Pvt. Ltd. #12;What is a Landfill? A sanitary landfill refers to an engineered facility for the disposal of MSW designed and operated

Columbia University

15

Combustion of Solid Biomass: Classification of Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of solid biomass and the classification of these fuels are considered. Firstly the different methods of combustion appliances and plants are outlined from a ... view. The forms and types of solid biomass

Jenny M. Jones; Amanda R. Lea-Langton…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cellulosic materials recovered from steam classified municipal solid wastes as feedstocks for conversion to fuels and chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the treatment of municipal solid waste to separate and recover the cellulosic biomass from the nonbiomass components. ... highly suitable as a feedstock for conversion to fuel, fe...

Michael H. Eley; Gerald R. Guinn; Joyita Bagchi

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saugus Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Saugus Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste...

18

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Municipal Consortium North 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings

19

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff to someone by Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on

20

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts

22

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

23

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

24

Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Digg

25

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consortium North Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program

26

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network

27

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Angeles, CA to someone Los Angeles, CA to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium

28

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Digg

29

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Northwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network

30

Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal  

SciTech Connect

In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Didelet, Filipe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Also, the energy that results from waste combustion is often used to produce heat and/or electricityNonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants M. Leskens , R.h.Bosgra@tudelft.nl, p.m.j.vandenhof@tudelft.nl Keywords : nonlinear model predictive control, municipal solid waste

Van den Hof, Paul

32

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from problematic for landfill operations by generating undesirable heat, liquid leachate, and gases

33

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal

34

Aqueous alteration of municipal solid waste ash  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste (MSW) ash is composed largely of amorphous oxides and approximately 20% minerals including halite, magnetite, hematite, quartz, gypsum, calcite, and rutile. It is also enriched in toxic trace metals by up to three orders of magnitude over average soil. The thermodynamic stabilities and rates of dissolution of the minerals and glasses in MSW ash will determine whether the ash is an environmental problem. The authors have used batch reactors at 20, 40, and 60 C over time periods up to 60 days to simulate longer reaction times for ash under cooler landfill conditions. Soluble salts are most quickly dissolved, giving solutions dominated by Ca[sup 2+], Na[sup +], K[sup +], SO[sub 2][sup 2[minus

Kirby, C.S.; Rimstidt, J.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Conversion of municipal solid waste to hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen via the steps of hydrothermal pretreatment, gasification and purification. LLNL`s focus has been on hydrothermal pretreatment of MSW in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. The project has evolved along 3 parallel paths: laboratory scale experiments, pilot scale processing, and process modeling. Initial laboratory-scale MSW treatment results (e.g., viscosity, slurry solids content) over a range of temperatures and times with newspaper and plastics will be presented. Viscosity measurements have been correlated with results obtained at MRL. A hydrothermal treatment pilot facility has been rented from Texaco and is being reconfigured at LLNL; the status of that facility and plans for initial runs will be described. Several different operational scenarios have been modeled. Steady state processes have been modeled with ASPEN PLUS; consideration of steam injection in a batch mode was handled using continuous process modules. A transient model derived from a general purpose packed bed model is being developed which can examine the aspects of steam heating inside the hydrothermal reactor vessel. These models have been applied to pilot and commercial scale scenarios as a function of MSW input parameters and have been used to outline initial overall economic trends. Part of the modeling, an overview of the MSW gasification process and the modeling of the MSW as a process material, was completed by a DOE SERS (Science and Engineering Research Semester) student. The ultimate programmatic goal is the technical demonstration of the gasification of MSW to hydrogen at the laboratory and pilot scale and the economic analysis of the commercial feasibility of such a process.

Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Municipal solid waste effective stress analysis  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical behavior of municipal solid waste (MSW) has attracted the attention of many researchers in the field of geo-environmental engineering in recent years and several aspects of waste mechanical response under loading have been elucidated. However, the mechanical response of MSW materials under undrained conditions has not been described in detail to date. The knowledge of this aspect of the MSW mechanical response is very important in cases involving MSW with high water contents, seismic ground motion and in regions where landfills are built with poor operation conditions. This paper presents the results obtained from 26 large triaxial tests performed both in drained and undrained conditions. The results were analyzed taking into account the waste particles compressibility and the deformation anisotropy of the waste samples. The waste particles compressibility was used to modify the Terzaghi effective stress equation, using the Skempton (1961) proposition. It is shown that the use of the modified effective stress equation led to much more compatible shear strength values when comparing Consolidated-Drained (CD) and Consolidated-Undrained (CU), results, explaining the high shear strength values obtained in CU triaxial tests, even when the pore pressure is almost equal to the confining stress.

Shariatmadari, Nader, E-mail: shariatmadari@iust.ac.i [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, 16846-13114 Teharn (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Machado, Sandro Lemos, E-mail: smachado@ufba.b [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Federal University of Bahia, 02 Aristides Novis St., 40210-630 Salvador-BA (Brazil); Noorzad, Ali, E-mail: noorzad@pwut.ac.i [Faculty of Water Engineering, Power and Water University of Technology, Tehranpars, 1719-16765 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimpour-Fard, Mehran, E-mail: karimpour_mehran@iust.ac.i [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, 16846-13114 Teharn (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest...

38

Frequently Asked Questions About the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page addresses many of the questions about the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium.

39

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors  

SciTech Connect

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site -- Biomass Power Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing biomass at the Kansas City, Missouri, Municipal Farm site, a group of City-owned properties, is explored. The study that none of the technologies we reviewed--biomass heat, power and CHP--are economically viable options for the Municipal Farms site. However, if the site were to be developed around a future central biomass heating or CHP facility, biomass could be a good option for the site.

Hunsberger, R.; Mosey, G.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Facility I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Fairfax County, Virginia Coordinates 38.9085472°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9085472,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

Rogers, R. III

1994-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

45

Information Resources: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided a guided walk-through of what the tool can do and how to use it to evaluate costs and benefits associated with converting to LED street and roadway lighting. The webcast showed how city and other government agencies, utilities, finance and budget offices, and energy efficiency organizations can use the tool to compute annualized energy-cost savings, maintenance savings, greenhouse gas reductions, net present value, and simple payback, which can be helpful when putting together construction and conservation grant applications, as well as for preparing budgets and comparing incumbent costs to new costs.

46

Municipal solid waste characteristics and management in Allahabad, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by political, legal, socio-cultural, environmental and economic factors, as well as available resources on a suitable management plan (Shimura et al., 2001). More than 90% of MSW in India is directly disposedMunicipal solid waste characteristics and management in Allahabad, India Mufeed Sharholy a , Kafeel

Columbia University

47

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Seismic Response Analysis of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the engineering practice of municipal solid waste landfill, the dynamic response of landfill based on the finite element method is implemented. The equivalent linearization method is used to consider the non-linear dynamic response characteristics. ... Keywords: Dynamic response, Ground motion input, Finite element method

Zhang Guodong; Li Yong; Jin Xing; Li Rongbin; Chen Fei

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains background information, technical descriptions, economic data, mass and energy balances, and information on environmental releases for the refuse derived fuels (RDF) option in municipal solid waste management alternatives. Demonstration programs at St. Louis, Missouri; Franklin, Ohio; and Delaware are discussed. Information on pellet production and cofiring with coal is also presented.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Determination of Insoluble Solids in Pretreated Biomass Material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of Insoluble NRELTP-510-42627 Solids in Pretreated Biomass March 2008 Material Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 03212008 A. Sluiter, D. Hyman, C....

51

The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol-restricted Halocarbons of Geophysics #12;2 #12;The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill as a Source of Montreal Protocol municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. With several hundred MSW landfills in both the US and UK, estimating

52

A legislator`s guide to municipal solid waste management  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this guide is to allow individual state legislators to gain a better understanding of municipal solid waste (MSW) management issues in general, and examine the applicability of these concerns to their state. This guide incorporates a discussion of MSW management issues and a comprehensive overview of the components of an integrated solid waste management system. Major MSW topics discussed include current management issues affecting states, federal activities, and state laws and local activities. Solid waste characteristics and management approaches are also detailed.

Starkey, D.; Hill, K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette sample composition was similar to biomass fuels but had significant advantages due to addition of waste plastics that have high energy content compared to other waste types. Addition of PP and HDPE presented better benefits than addition of PET due to lower softening temperature and lower oxygen content. It should be noted that while harmful emissions such as dioxins, furans and mercury can result from burning plastics, WTE facilities have been able to control these emissions to meet US EPA standards. This research provides a drop-in coal replacement that reduces demand on landfill space and replaces a significant fraction of fossil-derived fuel with a renewable alternative.

JeongIn Gug; David Cacciola; Margaret J. Sobkowicz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy Topics: Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unescap.org/esd/environment/publications/cdm/Guide.pdf UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, "Pacific" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

55

Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: December 2, 2013 S. Van Wychen and L. M. L. Laurens Technical Report NRELTP-5100-60956 December...

56

Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

57

Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

58

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

59

Sepiolite as an Alternative Liner Material in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sepiolite as an Alternative Liner Material in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Yucel Guney1 ; Savas in municipal solid waste landfills. However, natural clays may not always provide good contaminant sorption necessitates addition of kaolinite before being used as a landfill material. The valence of the salt solutions

Aydilek, Ahmet

60

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effects of biodrying process on municipal solid waste properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of biodrying process on municipal solid waste (MSW) properties was studied. The results obtained indicated that after 14 d, biodrying reduced the water content of waste, allowing the production of biodried waste with a net heating value (NHV) of 16,779 ± 2,074 kJ kg?1 wet weight, i.e. 41% higher than that of untreated waste. The low moisture content of the biodried material reduced, also, the potential impacts of the waste, i.e. potential self-ignition and potential odors production. Low waste impacts suggest to landfill the biodried material obtaining energy via biogas production by waste re-moistening, i.e. bioreactor. Nevertheless, results of this work indicate that biodrying process because of the partial degradation of the organic fraction contained in the waste (losses of 290 g kg?1 VS), reduced of about 28% the total producible biogas.

F. Tambone; B. Scaglia; S. Scotti; F. Adani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium shares technical information and experiences related to LED street and area lighting demonstrations and serves as an objective resource for evaluating new products on the market intended for those applications. Cities, power providers, and others who invest in street and area lighting are invited to join the Consortium and share their experiences. The goal is to build a repository of valuable field experience and data that will significantly accelerate the learning curve for buying and implementing high-quality, energy-efficient LED lighting. Consortium members are part of an international knowledge base and peer group, receive updates on Consortium tools and resources, receive the Consortium E-Newsletter, and help steer the work of the Consortium by participating on a committee. Learn more about the Consortium.

64

Long-term behavior of municipal solid waste landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is presented to predict the long-term behavior of element concentrations (non-metals and metals) in the leachate of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. It is based on water flux and concentration measurements in leachates over one year, analysis of drilled cores from MSW landfills and leaching experiments with these samples. A mathematical model is developed to predict the further evolution of annual flux-weighted mean element concentrations in leachates after the “intensive reactor phase”, i.e. after the gas production has dropped to a very low level. The results show that the organic components are the most important substances to control until the leachate is compatible with the environment. This state of low emissions, the so-called “final storage quality”, will take many centuries to be achieved in a moderate climate.

H. Belevi; P. Baccini

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Clean solid biofuel production from high moisture content waste biomass employing hydrothermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Our society currently faces three challenges, including resource depletion, waste accumulation and environmental degradation, leading to rapidly escalating raw material costs and increasingly expensive and restrictive waste disposal legislation. This work aims to produce clean solid biofuel from high moisture content waste biomass (bio-waste) with high nitrogen (N)/chlorine (Cl) content by mild hydrothermal (HT) conversion processes. The newest results are summarized and discussed in terms of the mechanical dewatering and upgrading, dechlorination, denitrification and coalification resulting from the HT pretreatment. Moreover, both the mono-combustion and co-combustion characteristics of the solid fuel are reviewed by concentrating on the pollutants emission control, especially the NO emission properties. In addition, the feasibility of this HT solid biofuel production process is also discussed in terms of “Energy Balance and economic viability”. As an alternative to dry combustion/dry pyrolysis/co-combustion, the HT process, combining the dehydration and decarboxylation of a biomass to raise its carbon content aiming to achieve a higher calorific value, opens up the field of potential feedstock for lignite-like solid biofuel production from a wide range of nontraditional renewable and plentiful wet agricultural residues, sludge and municipal wastes. It would contribute to a wider application of HT pretreatment bio-wastes for safe disposal and energy recycling.

Peitao Zhao; Yafei Shen; Shifu Ge; Zhenqian Chen; Kunio Yoshikawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

An integrated appraisal of energy recovery options in the United Kingdom using solid recovered fuel derived from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports an integrated appraisal of options for utilising solid recovered fuels (SRF) (derived from municipal solid waste, MSW) in energy intensive industries within the United Kingdom (UK). Four potential co-combustion scenarios have been identified following discussions with industry stakeholders. These scenarios have been evaluated using (a) an existing energy and mass flow framework model, (b) a semi-quantitative risk analysis, (c) an environmental assessment and (d) a financial assessment. A summary of results from these evaluations for the four different scenarios is presented. For the given ranges of assumptions; SRF co-combustion with coal in cement kilns was found to be the optimal scenario followed by co-combustion of SRF in coal-fired power plants. The biogenic fraction in SRF (ca. 70%) reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions significantly ({approx}2500 g CO{sub 2} eqvt./kg DS SRF in co-fired cement kilns and {approx}1500 g CO{sub 2} eqvt./kg DS SRF in co-fired power plants). Potential reductions in electricity or heat production occurred through using a lower calorific value (CV) fuel. This could be compensated for by savings in fuel costs (from SRF having a gate fee) and grants aimed at reducing GHG emission to encourage the use of fuels with high biomass fractions. Total revenues generated from coal-fired power plants appear to be the highest ( Pounds 95/t SRF) from the four scenarios. However overall, cement kilns appear to be the best option due to the low technological risks, environmental emissions and fuel cost. Additionally, cement kiln operators have good experience of handling waste derived fuels. The scenarios involving co-combustion of SRF with MSW and biomass were less favourable due to higher environmental risks and technical issues.

Garg, A.; Smith, R. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Hill, D. [DPH Environment and Energy Ltd., c/o Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Simms, N.J. [Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: n.j.simms@cranfield.ac.uk

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste- Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context of estimating heat value of municipal wastes, from the view point of assessing the waste's amenability for thermal treatment in the Indian context at the present juncture. The paper also seeks to reason out

Columbia University

68

Patterns in Trash: Factors that Drive Municipal Solid Waste Recycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Municipal recycling is driven by a variety of factors. Yet how these factors change over time is not well understood. I analyze a suite of… (more)

Starr, Jared

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest...

70

Pyrolysis of Municipal Solid Waste for Syngas Production by Microwave Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, we discuss the application of microwave-irradiated pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW) for total recovery of useful gases and energy. The MSW pyrolysis under microwave irradiation hi...

Vidyadhar V. Gedam; Iyyaswami Regupathi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Integrated facility for municipal solid waste disposal, electrical generation, and desalination. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design was completed for a facility that uses municipal solid waste as fuel for generating electricity and cogeneration steam for a seawater desalination unit. An average city of 100,000 population is the basis of the design. The design showed that heat from the combustion of municipal solid waste will provide nearly 2% of per capita electrical power needs and 7% of fresh water requirements. This thesis proposes a new arrangement of known technologies for use in Public Works.

Hanby, G.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill ... The most common disposal method in the United States for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. ... Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and/or measurements. ...

Bart Eklund; Eric P. Anderson; Barry L. Walker; Don B. Burrows

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

73

A new technique to monitor ground-water quality at municipal solid waste landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEW TECHNIQUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER EQUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology A NEW TECHNIIIUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER IIUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Approved as to style and content by: Christo her C. Mathewson (Chair...

Hart, Steven Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

PRODUCTION OF NEW BIOMASS/WASTE-CONTAINING SOLID FUELS  

SciTech Connect

CQ Inc. and its team members (ALSTOM Power Inc., Bliss Industries, McFadden Machine Company, and industry advisors from coal-burning utilities, equipment manufacturers, and the pellet fuels industry) addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that includes both moisture reduction and pelletization or agglomeration for necessary fuel density and ease of handling. Further, this method of fuel production must be applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provide environmental benefits compared with coal. Notable accomplishments from the work performed in Phase I of this project include the development of three standard fuel formulations from mixtures of coal fines, biomass, and waste materials that can be used in existing boilers, evaluation of these composite fuels to determine their applicability to the major combustor types, development of preliminary designs and economic projections for commercial facilities producing up to 200,000 tons per year of biomass/waste-containing fuels, and the development of dewatering technologies to reduce the moisture content of high-moisture biomass and waste materials during the pelletization process.

David J. Akers; Glenn A. Shirey; Zalman Zitron; Charles Q. Maney

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost.

76

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Minimum project size for the full $5,000 grant is 20 fixtures; smaller projects will receive a $250 per-fixture grant. Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to $5,000 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible roadway lighting fixtures. Participants must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of

77

'Incineration: A burning issue or a load of rubbish?’ Examining public attitudes to municipal solid waste incineration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The author set out to investigate public attitudes to municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. The area chosen for the study was Carlow town, a regional… (more)

Dillon, Rachel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for...

79

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the potential to provide a significant amount of energy to meet US liquid fuel requirements. MSW is defined as household waste, commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. It has an average higher heating value (HHV) of approximately 5100 btu/lb (as arrived basis).

80

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program (Iowa) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on November 9, 2012. Financial Incentive Program Place Iowa Additional Place applies to MidAmerican Energy Name MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program Incentive Type Utility Grant Program Applicable Sector Local Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Induction Lighitng, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Up to $5,000 Equipment Requirements Fixtures must have an efficiency rating equal to or greater than 66 lumens per watt as tested under Illuminating Engineering Society of North America LM-79-08 testing to qualify for a grant.

82

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock July 2009 For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among of technologies can be used to create energy from MSW: · Landfill Gas Capture -- Waste in landfills naturally

Columbia University

83

Production of New Biomass/Waste-Containing Solid Fuels  

SciTech Connect

CQ Inc. and its industry partners--PBS Coals, Inc. (Friedens, Pennsylvania), American Fiber Resources (Fairmont, West Virginia), Allegheny Energy Supply (Williamsport, Maryland), and the Heritage Research Group (Indianapolis, Indiana)--addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that is applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provides environmental benefits compared with coal. During Phase I of this project (January 1999 to July 2000), several biomass/waste materials were evaluated for potential use in a composite fuel. As a result of that work and the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production, paper mill sludge and coal were selected for further evaluation and demonstration in Phase II. In Phase II (June 2001 to December 2004), the project team demonstrated the GranuFlow technology as part of a process to combine paper sludge and coal to produce a composite fuel with combustion and handling characteristics acceptable to existing boilers and fuel handling systems. Bench-scale studies were performed at DOE-NETL, followed by full-scale commercial demonstrations to produce the composite fuel in a 400-tph coal cleaning plant and combustion tests at a 90-MW power plant boiler to evaluate impacts on fuel handling, boiler operations and performance, and emissions. A circuit was successfully installed to re-pulp and inject paper sludge into the fine coal dewatering circuit of a commercial coal-cleaning plant to produce 5,000 tons of a ''composite'' fuel containing about 5% paper sludge. Subsequent combustion tests showed that boiler efficiency and stability were not compromised when the composite fuel was blended with the boiler's normal coal supply. Firing of the composite fuel blend did not have any significant impact on emissions as compared to the normal coal supply, and it did not cause any excursions beyond Title V regulatory limits; all emissions were well within regulatory limits. SO{sub 2} emissions decreased during the composite fuel blend tests as a result of its higher heat content and slightly lower sulfur content as compared to the normal coal supply. The composite fuel contained an extremely high proportion of fines because the parent coal (feedstock to the coal-cleaning plant) is a ''soft'' coal (HGI > 90) and contained a high proportion of fines. The composite fuel was produced and combustion-tested under record wet conditions for the local area. In spite of these conditions, full load was obtained by the boiler when firing the composite fuel blend, and testing was completed without any handling or combustion problems beyond those typically associated with wet coal. Fuel handling and pulverizer performance (mill capacity and outlet temperatures) could become greater concerns when firing composite fuels which contain higher percent

Glenn A. Shirey; David J. Akers

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein was not carried out in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation

Columbia University

85

The potential of GHG emission savings for programmatic CDM by municipal solid waste composting in the Western Province - Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Western Province (WP) of Sri Lanka, as the most populated province in the country is burdened with a high level of municipal solid waste generation. Out of the 48 administrative local authorities within the WP, only 16 local authorities are practicing municipal solid waste composting. All other local authorities are practicing the most common method of MSW disposal; open dumping. The study was aimed at finding the potential of green house gas emission savings by municipal solid waste composting according to Programmatic Clean Development Mechanism in 32 local authorities of the WP which are not currently practicing MSW composting in order to quantify the certified emission reduction. The daily collection rate of municipal solid waste in the entire WP is around 2,000 tons per day. Biodegradable portion dominates the bulk of municipal solid waste in WP as about 76.30%. There is potential of claiming 231 certified emission reductions annually with regard to MSW composting within the WP.

V.K.D.H. Kariyakarawana; N.J.G.J. Bandara; S. Leelarathne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Study developed a methodology for the evaluation of gasification for MSW treatment. • Study was conducted comparatively for USA, UAE, and Thailand. • Study applies a thermodynamic model (Gibbs free energy minimization) using the Gasify software. • The energy efficiency of the process and the compatibility with different waste streams was studied. - Abstract: Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify®) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration.

Arafat, Hassan A., E-mail: harafat@masdar.ac.ae; Jijakli, Kenan

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 12, Numerically indexed bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-energy (WTE) plants, 0.27 million tons (0.7%) were used as alternative fuel in cement production, and 32 Earth Engineering Center (EEC) Report to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) which was based on U.S. 2008 data and quantified the energy and economic value of municipal solid wastes (MSW) and non

Columbia University

89

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 4, Appendix B: RDF technologies  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains background information, technical descriptions, economic data, mass and energy balances, and information on environmental releases for the refuse derived fuels (RDF) option in municipal solid waste management alternatives. Demonstration programs at St. Louis, Missouri; Franklin, Ohio; and Delaware are discussed. Information on pellet production and cofiring with coal is also presented.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The problem addressed by our invention is that of municipal solid waste utilization. The dimensions of the problem can be visualized by the common comparison that the average individual in America creates in five years time an amount of solid waste equivalent in weight to the Statue of Liberty. The combustible portion of the more than 11 billion tons of solid waste (including municipal solid waste) produced in the United States each year, if converted into useful energy, could provide 32 quads per year of badly needed domestic energy, or more than one-third of our annual energy consumption. Conversion efficiency and many other factors make such a production level unrealistic, but it is clear that we are dealing with a very significant potential resource. This report describes research pertaining to the co-combustion of oil shale with solid municipal wastes in a circulating fluidized bed. The oil shale adds significant fuel content and also constituents that can possible produce a useful cementitious ash.

NONE

1996-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Process and technological aspects of municipal solid waste gasification. A review  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical assessment of the main commercially available MSW gasifiers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed discussion of the basic features of gasification process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of configurations of gasification-based waste-to-energy units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance analysis, on the basis of independent sources data. - Abstract: The paper proposes a critical assessment of municipal solid waste gasification today, starting from basic aspects of the process (process types and steps, operating and performance parameters) and arriving to a comparative analysis of the reactors (fixed bed, fluidized bed, entrained bed, vertical shaft, moving grate furnace, rotary kiln, plasma reactor) as well as of the possible plant configurations (heat gasifier and power gasifier) and the environmental performances of the main commercially available gasifiers for municipal solid wastes. The analysis indicates that gasification is a technically viable option for the solid waste conversion, including residual waste from separate collection of municipal solid waste. It is able to meet existing emission limits and can have a remarkable effect on reduction of landfill disposal option.

Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Integrated municipal solid waste scenario model using advanced pretreatment and waste to energy processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper an Integrated Municipal Solid Waste scenario model (IMSW-SM) with a potential practical application in the waste management sector is analyzed. The model takes into account quantification and characterization of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) streams from different sources, selective collection (SC), advanced mechanical sorting, material recovery and advanced thermal treatment. The paper provides a unique chain of advanced waste pretreatment stages of fully commingled waste streams, leading to an original set of suggestions and future contributions to a sustainable IMSWS, taking into account real data and EU principles. The selection of the input data was made on MSW management real case studies from two European regions. Four scenarios were developed varying mainly SC strategies and thermal treatment options. The results offer useful directions for decision makers in order to calibrate modern strategies in different realities.

Gabriela Ionescu; Elena Cristina Rada; Marco Ragazzi; Cosmin M?rculescu; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Municipal solid waste degradation and landfill gas resources characteristics in self-recirculating sequencing batch bioreactor landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the degradation characteristics of municipal solid waste (MSW) in China, the traditional anaerobic sequencing batch bioreactor landfill (ASBRL) was optimized, and an improved anaerobic sequencing batch b...

Xiao-zhi Zhou ???; Shu-xun Sang ???; Li-wen Cao ???

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Complex analysis of energy production technologies from solid biomass in the Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of the energetic, economic, and environmental analyses of technologies of energy production from solid biomass are considered. Examples of the introduction of the technology of the direct combustion o...

T. A. Zheliezna; O. I. Drozdova

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass: Biomass: Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Traditional and Thermal Use of Biomass Traditional use of biomass, particularly burning wood, is one of the oldest manners in which biomass has been utilized for energy. Traditional use of biomass is 14% of world energy usage which is on the same level as worldwide electricity usage. Most of this consumption comes from developing countries where traditional use of biomass accounts for 35% of primary energy usage [1] and greater than 75% of primary energy use is in the residential sector. The general trend in developing countries has been a

97

Coal/biomass gasifier lab tests are a success  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal/biomass gasifier lab tests are a success ... The process produces a medium-Btu gas from a mixture of coal, municipal solid waste, and dewatered sewage sludge. ...

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

NEW SOLID FUELS FROM COAL AND BIOMASS WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Under DOE sponsorship, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and Minergy Corporation developed and evaluated a sludge derived fuel (SDF) made from sewage sludge. Our approach is to dry and agglomerate the sludge, combine it with a fluxing agent, if necessary, and co-fire the resulting fuel with coal in a cyclone boiler to recover the energy and to vitrify mineral matter into a non-leachable product. This product can then be used in the construction industry. A literature search showed that there is significant variability of the sludge fuel properties from a given wastewater plant (seasonal and/or day-to-day changes) or from different wastewater plants. A large sewage sludge sample (30 tons) from a municipal wastewater treatment facility was collected, dried, pelletized and successfully co-fired with coal in a cyclone-equipped pilot. Several sludge particle size distributions were tested. Finer sludge particle size distributions, similar to the standard B and W size distribution for sub-bituminous coal, showed the best combustion and slagging performance. Up to 74.6% and 78.9% sludge was successfully co-fired with pulverized coal and with natural gas, respectively. An economic evaluation on a 25-MW power plant showed the viability of co-firing the optimum SDF in a power generation application. The return on equity was 22 to 31%, adequate to attract investors and allow a full-scale project to proceed. Additional market research and engineering will be required to verify the economic assumptions. Areas to focus on are: plant detail design and detail capital cost estimates, market research into possible project locations, sludge availability at the proposed project locations, market research into electric energy sales and renewable energy sales opportunities at the proposed project location. As a result of this program, wastes that are currently not being used and considered an environmental problem will be processed into a renewable fuel. These fuels will be converted to energy while reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from power generating boilers and mitigating global warming concerns. This report describes the sludge analysis, solid fuel preparation and production, combustion performance, environmental emissions and required equipment.

Hamid Farzan

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

SciTech Connect

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Stabilisation of biodried municipal solid waste fine fraction in landfill bioreactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biodrying process of solid waste is a pre-treatment for the bio-stabilisation of the municipal solid waste. This study aims to investigate the fate of the municipal solid waste fine fraction (MSWFF) resulting from a biodrying treatment when disposed in landfills that are operated as bioreactors. Biodried MSWFF was apparently stable due to its low moisture content that slows down the microbial activity. The lab-scale anaerobic bioreactors demonstrated that a proper moisture content leads to a complete biodegradation of the organic matter contained in the biodried MSWFF. Using a pilot-scale landfill bioreactor (LBR), MSWFF stabilisation was achieved, suggesting that the leachate recirculation could be an effective approach to accomplish the anaerobic biodegradation and biostabilisation of biodried MSWFF after landfilling. The biostabilisation of the material resulting from the LBR treatment was confirmed using anaerobic and aerobic stability indices. All anaerobic and aerobic indices showed a stability increase of approximately 80% of the MSWFF after treatment in the LBR. The similar values of OD7 and BMP stability indices well agree with the relationship between the aerobic and anaerobic indices reported in literature.

Selene Grilli; Andrea Giordano; Alessandro Spagni

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 3, Appendix A: Mass burn technologies  

SciTech Connect

This appendix on Mass Burn Technologies is the first in a series designed to identify, describe and assess the suitability of several currently or potentially available generic technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). These appendices, which cover eight core thermoconversion, bioconversion and recycling technologies, reflect public domain information gathered from many sources. Representative sources include: professional journal articles, conference proceedings, selected municipality solid waste management plans and subscription technology data bases. The information presented is intended to serve as background information that will facilitate the preparation of the technoeconomic and life cycle mass, energy and environmental analyses that are being developed for each of the technologies. Mass burn has been and continues to be the predominant technology in Europe for the management of MSW. In the United States, the majority of the existing waste-to-energy projects utilize this technology and nearly 90 percent of all currently planned facilities have selected mass burn systems. Mass burning generally refers to the direct feeding and combustion of municipal solid waste in a furnace without any significant waste preprocessing. The only materials typically removed from the waste stream prior to combustion are large bulky objects and potentially hazardous or undesirable wastes. The technology has evolved over the last 100 or so years from simple incineration to the most highly developed and commercially proven process available for both reducing the volume of MSW and for recovering energy in the forms of steam and electricity. In general, mass burn plants are considered to operate reliably with high availability.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)  

SciTech Connect

This procedure describes the methods used to determine the amount of moisture or total solids present in a freeze-dried algal biomass sample, as well as the ash content. A traditional convection oven drying procedure is covered for total solids content, and a dry oxidation method at 575?C is covered for ash content.

Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Strategies for continuous monitoring of hydrogen chloride emissions from municipal solid-waste incinerators  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a discussion of sampling and analytical techniques for continuous monitoring of hydrogen chloride (HCl) emissions from incineration sources. The discussion focuses on commercially available systems for sample conditioning and measurement. Six HCl continuous-emission monitors were evaluated at a municipal facility for solid-waste incineration. Field-test results indicate that several techniques for continuous monitoring of HCl concentrations are available. Most of the analyzers tested, regardless of the detection or calibration techniques, indicated the same trend in the effluent HCl concentrations and produced data that was in good agreement with wet-chemistry results.

Jernigan, J.R.; Shanklin, S.; Rollins, R.; Logan, T.J.; Midgett, M.R.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Study of Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste Using a Double Inverse Diffusion Flame Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Study of Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste Using a Double Inverse Diffusion Flame Burner ... Furthermore, the experiences of the waste incineration industry driven in the past by regulatory as well as technical issues may facilitate their commercial potentials outside the common market, especially in highly populated developing countries such as Korea with scarce landfill sites. ... Recently, several new technologies that involve gasification or combinations of pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification processes are currently being brought into the market for energy-efficient, environmentally friendly and economically sound methods of thermal processing of wastes. ...

Tae-Heon Kwak; Seungmoon Lee; Sanjeev Maken; Ho-Chul Shin; Jin-Won Park; Young Done Yoo

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of a sequential aerobicâ??anaerobic treatment of municipal solid waste in a bioreactor landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sequential aerobic-anaerobic bioreactor landfill was operated and monitored over a period of 184 days. The bioreactor was filled with 120 kg of organic fraction of Municipal Solid Waste. Leachate recirculation was applied. The results showed rapid degradation of organic matter with rapid settlement during the aerobic period. The initial COD and BOD5 were reduced from 46,500 and 41,500 mg/L to 9000 and 6000 mg/L, respectively, within one month. The SO42? concentration, during the anaerobic period, was decreased from 1500 mg/L to 250 mg/L. The sequential treatment had positive effects on nitrification and denitrification efficiencies.

Aris Nikolaou; Apostolos Giannis; Evangelos Gidarakos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Integration of biomass fast pyrolysis and precedent feedstock steam drying with a municipal combined heat and power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) is a promising pre-treatment technology for converting biomass to transport fuel and in the future also for high-grade chemicals. BFP can be integrated with a municipal combined heat and power (CHP) plant. This paper shows the influence of BFP integration on a CHP plant's main parameters and its effect on the energetic and environmental performance of the connected district heating network. The work comprises full- and part-load operation of a CHP plant integrated with BFP and steam drying. It also evaluates different usage alternatives for the BFP products (char and oil). The results show that the integration is possible and strongly beneficial regarding energetic and environmental performance. Offering the possibility to provide lower district heating loads, the operation hours of the plant can be increased by up to 57%. The BFP products should be sold rather than applied for internal use as this increases the district heating network's primary energy efficiency the most. With this integration strategy future CHP plants can provide valuable products at high efficiency and also can help to mitigate global CO2 emissions.

Thomas Kohl; Timo P. Laukkanen; Mika P. Järvinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Municipal solid waste energy conversion study on Guam and American Samoa  

SciTech Connect

In the Pacific Islands of Guam and Tutuila in American Samoa, conversion of municipal solid waste to useable energy forms - principally electricity but possibly steam - may hold promise for reducing economic dependence on imported petroleum. A secondary benefit may be derived from reduction of solid waste landfill requirements. At the preliminary planning stage, waste-to-energy facilities producing electricity appear technically and environmentally feasible. Economically, the projects appear marginal but could be viable under specific conditions related to capital costs, revenue from garbage collection and revenue from the sale of the energy generated. Grant funding for the projects would considerably enhance the economic viability of the proposed facilities. The projects appear sufficiently viable to proceed to the detailed planning stage. Such projects are not viable for the islands now emerging from the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and HRT of 15d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2-8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}, with VS reduction rates of 61.7-69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89-5.28 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

Liu Xiao, E-mail: liuxiao07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao Xingbao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhou Yingjun [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nisikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Solid waste disposal options: an optimum disposal model for the management of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and compostable material was generally burned in backyards. In 1970, the Clean Air Act was passed restricting the burning of leaves and other yard waste. ' These wastes were then disposed in landfills. As landfills reached capacity, commu- nities composted... separation pro- grams because of their "throw-away" mentality. " ~ln in r ttgtt Incineration is the controlled burning of the combustible fraction of solid waste. The first electrical generating station in the United States that was fueled by solid waste...

Haney, Brenda Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus ... When the reaction kinetics is not known, a rigorous reactor and multiphase equilibrium based on the minimization of the total Gibbs free energy of the product mixture (an RGibbs block) is preferred to predict the equilibrium composition of the produced syngas. ... Catalytic steam gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) to produce hydrogen-rich gas or syngas (H2 + CO) with calcined dolomite as a catalyst in a bench-scale downstream fixed bed reactor was investigated. ...

Miaomiao Niu; Yaji Huang; Baosheng Jin; Xinye Wang

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Data Summary of Municipal Solid Waste Management Alternatives. Volume VIII: Appendix F - Landfills  

SciTech Connect

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community's solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a transition'' document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

None

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 8, Appendix F, Landfills  

SciTech Connect

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community`s solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a ``transition`` document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A study of the pyrolysis behaviors of pelletized recovered municipal solid waste fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pelletized recovered solid waste fuel is often applied in gasification systems to provide feedstock with a stabilized quality and high heating value and to avoid the bridging behavior caused by high moisture content, low particle density, and irregular particle size. However, the swelling properties and the sticky material generated from pyrolysis of the plastic group components also tend to trigger bridging in the retorting zone. It is well known that the plastic group materials, which occupy a considerable proportion of municipal solid waste, can melt together easily even under low temperature. This study investigates the pyrolysis behaviors of typical recovered solid waste pellets, including the devolatilization rate, heat transfer properties, char properties, and swelling/shrinkage properties, in a small fixed-bed facility over a wide temperature range, from 900 °C to 450 °C. The results are also compared with those from wheat straw pellets, a typical cellulosic fuel. Moreover, the SEM images and BET analysis of the char structure are further analyzed to provide additional explanation for the mechanisms of swelling/shrinkage phenomena observed during heating.

Chunguang Zhou; Qinglin Zhang; Leonie Arnold; Weihong Yang; Wlodzimierz Blasiak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Multiple regression analysis for the estimation of energy content of municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A regression equation is proposed to predict the Higher Heating Value (HHV) of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) from the waste data of 86 cities of 35 countries. A mathematical model is developed, by using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS-10.0), to correlate the energy content of waste with the variables derived from its physical composition. Performance of the proposed multiple regression model is superior to available models. For validation, the proposed model is applied to the waste data of Jaipur City (India), nine cities of EEC countries and also to the MSW of USA. Energy content values obtained by proposed regression model and Modified Dulong's Equation (MDE) are closer to the measured mean energy content values for EEC countries compared to the values obtained by Khan's method. Objective of the paper is to propose a simple model, which can replace the lengthy MDE and which has universal applicability for the predication of HHVs.

G.D. Agrawal; A.P.S. Rathore; A.B. Gupta

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Risk assessment of gaseous emissions from municipal solid waste landfill: case study Rafah landfill, Palestine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the risk assessment of gaseous emissions from the municipal solid waste at Rafah landfill, Palestine. In this study, Gas-Sim model was used to quantify the gaseous emissions from the landfill and the Land-Gem model was used to verify the results. Risk assessment of both carcinogens and non-carcinogens were performed. Two scenarios were conducted namely with plant uptake and without plant uptake. The scenario with plant uptake revealed that the risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.45 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is not acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.69 × 10?6 risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.42 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.855 × 10?7 > 10?6).

Ahmad A. Foul; Mazen Abualtayef; Basel Qrenawi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Report No. PA 14 of 2008 Compliance to rules governing municipal solid, bio-medical and plastic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-medical and plastic waste Objective 5: Whether effective compliance to rules/laws regulating municipal solid waste, bio-medical waste and plastic waste was taking place in the state. The United Nations Conference of 2008 54 · The Recycled Plastics Manufacture and Usage Rules were notified in 1999 with an amendment

Columbia University

118

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock Adair Cherokee Nation Landfill 918-696-5342 Canadian OEMA Landfill 405-262-0161 Call ahead Carter Southern Okla. Regional Disposal Landfill 580-226-1276 Comanche City of Lawton Landfill 580

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

119

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of Bio in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation and Disposition

120

Definition: Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Biomass Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. It most often refers to plants or plant-derived materials which are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass. As a renewable energy source, biomass can either be used directly via combustion to produce heat, or indirectly after converting it to various forms of biofuel. Conversion of biomass to biofuel can be achieved by different methods which are broadly classified into: thermal, chemical, and biochemical methods. Historically, humans have harnessed biomass-derived

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge using multi-solid fluidized bed combustion technology  

SciTech Connect

This study was initiated to investigate the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) and domestic sewage sludge (DSS) simultaneously by using Battelle's multi-solid fluidized-bed combustion (MS-FBC) technology. The concept was to recover energy as high and low pressure steam, simultaneously. High pressure steam would be generated from flue gas using a conventional tubular boiler. Low pressure steam would be generated by direct contact drying of DSS (as 4% solids) with hot sand in a fluidized bed that is an integral part of the MS-FBC process. It was proposed that high pressure steam could be used for district heating or electricity generation. The low pressure steam could be used for close proximity building heat. Alternatively, low pressure steam could be used to heat wastewater in a sewage treatment plant to enhance sedimentation and biological activity that would provide a captive market for this part of the recovered energy. The direct contact drying or tubeless steam generation eliminates fouling problems that are common during heat exchange with DSS. The MS-FBC process was originally developed for coal and was chosen for this investigation because its combustion rate is about three times that of conventional fluidized beds and it was projected to have the flexibility needed for accomplishing tubeless steam generation. The results of the investigation show that the MS-FBC process concept for the co-utilization of MSW and DSS is technically feasible and that the thermal efficiency of the process is 76 to 82% based on experiments conducted in a 70 to 85 lb/h pilot plant and calculations on three conceptual cases.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

A direct steam heat option for hydrothermal treatment of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual process for producing a gasifiable slurry from raw municipal solid waste (MSW) using direct steam heating is outlined. The process is based on the hydrothermal decomposition of the organic matter in the MSW, which requires the MSW to be heated to 300-350{degrees}C in the presence of water. A process model is developed and it is shown, based on preliminary estimates of the hydrothermal reaction stoichiometry, that a process using multiple pressure vessels, which allows recovery of waste heat, results in a process capable of producing a product slurry having a 40 wt % solids content with no waste water emissions. Results for a variety of process options and process parameters are presented. It is shown that the addition of auxiliary feedstock to the gasifier, along with the MSW derived slurry, results in more efficient gasification. It is estimated that 2.6 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of MSW and 16 kg/s of heavy oil. Without the additional feedstock, heavy oil in this case, only 0.49 kmol/s of hydrogen would be produced.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city’s urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita?1 day?1. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%).

Guadalupe Gómez; Montserrat Meneses; Lourdes Ballinas; Francesc Castells

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city's urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%)

Gomez, Guadalupe [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Meneses, Montserrat [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ballinas, Lourdes [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Castells, Francesc [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.castells@urv.cat

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

EVALUATION OF POSSIBLE GASIFIER-ENGINE APPLICATIONS WITH MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (A CASE STUDY OF KAMPALA).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Gasification of biomass for electricity power generation has been a proven technology in a number of countries in the world. MSW consists of biomass,… (more)

BERNARD, KIVUMBI

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Linear and nonlinear TAR panel unit root analyses for solid biomass energy supply of European countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass is one of the major sources of renewable energy in the World. This paper aims at observing primary biomass energy supply in some EU countries within periods1971–2009 and 1982–2009. Following related two panel data sets for biomass in EU, this work employs linear models and nonlinear threshold autoregression (TAR) models to test linearity against nonlinearity and nonstationarity against stationarity. If nonlinearity is found, then, the next step is to search transition variable and threshold value of the panel data sets. This paper eventually has the purpose to reveal if EU countries converge in the production of biomass in a linear form or nonlinear form. Findings show that panel of Austria, Denmark, Finland, France and Portugal follows nonlinear process and reaches partial convergence in per million primary solid biomass energy supply. However, the involvement of Belgium, Greece, Norway, Poland and Sweden to the panel yields linearity and divergence. One may suggest policy makers of EU and/or OECD, upon conclusion of this paper, to revise their energy policies to stimulate both production and consumption of biomass energy source.

Faik Bilgili

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburt, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Emissions of unintentional persistent organic pollutants from open burning of municipal solid waste from developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Open burning of waste is the most significant source of polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) in many national inventories prepared pursuant to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. This is particularly true for developing countries. Emission factors for \\{POPs\\} such as PCDD/PCDF, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCB) and penta- and hexachlorobenzenes (PeCBz/HCB) from open burning of municipal solid waste in China and Mexico are reported herein. Six different waste sources were studied varying from urban-industrial to semi-urban to rural. For PCDD/PCDF, the emission factors to air ranged from 3.0 to 650 ng TEQ kg?1 waste and for dl-PCB from 0.092 to 54 ng TEQ kg?1 waste. Emission factors for PeCBz (17–1200 ng kg?1 waste) and HCB (24–1300 ng kg?1 waste) spanned a wide but similar range. Within the datasets there is no indication of significant waste composition effect on emission factor with the exception of significantly higher Mexico rural samples.

Tingting Zhang; Heidelore Fiedler; Gang Yu; Gustavo Solorzano Ochoa; William F. Carroll Jr.; Brian K. Gullett; Stellan Marklund; Abderrahmane Touati

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management in the Philippines - What does it need?  

SciTech Connect

The integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management is a challenge many developing countries face. In Iloilo City, Philippines around 220 tons of municipal solid waste are collected every day and disposed at a 10 ha large dumpsite. In order to improve the local waste management system the Local Government decided to develop a new Waste Management Center with integrated landfill. However, the proposed area is adjacent to the presently used dumpsite where more than 300 waste pickers dwell and depend on waste picking as their source of livelihood. The Local Government recognized the hidden threat imposed by the waste picker's presence for this development project and proposed various measures to integrate the informal sector into the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) program. As a key intervention a Waste Workers Association, called USWAG Calahunan Livelihood Association Inc. (UCLA) was initiated and registered as a formal business enterprise in May 2009. Up to date, UCLA counts 240 members who commit to follow certain rules and to work within a team that jointly recovers wasted materials. As a cooperative they are empowered to explore new livelihood options such as the recovery of Alternative Fuels for commercial (cement industry) and household use, production of compost and making of handicrafts out of used packages. These activities do not only provide alternative livelihood for them but also lessen the generation of leachate and Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions from waste disposal, whereby the life time of the proposed new sanitary landfill can be extended likewise.

Paul, Johannes G., E-mail: jp.aht.p3@gmail.com [GIZ-AHT Project Office SWM4LGUs, c/o DENR, Iloilo City (Philippines); Arce-Jaque, Joan [GIZ-AHT Project Office SWM4LGUs, c/o DENR, Iloilo City (Philippines); Ravena, Neil; Villamor, Salome P. [General Service Office, City Government, Iloilo City (Philippines)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

In-line continuous sizing of biomass particles in gas-solid two-phase flow at a biomass-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas-solid two-phase flows are widely seen in many industrial processes. A good exampleis the pneumatically conveyed pulverised fuel flow in the power generation industry. As a significant renewable fuel source biomass has been widely adopted in electrical power generation. The particle size distribution of pneumatically conveyed biomass correlates closely with combustion efficiency and pollutant emissions and should therefore be monitored on anin-line continuous basis. In this paper an integrated instrumentation system using both a piezoelectric sensorand anelectrostatic sensor arrayis proposed to measure the size distribution and flow velocity of biomass particles. A prototype system was tested on a 250mm bore pipe at a biomass-fired power plantand its performance has been evaluated under industrial conditions.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Taylor Biomass Energy LLC TBE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy LLC TBE Biomass Energy LLC TBE Jump to: navigation, search Name Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) Place Montgomery, New York Zip 12549-9900 Sector Biomass Product Montgomery-based municipal-solid-waste (MSW) recovery and recycling firm providing biomass gasification units in addition to operating its own gasifier plants. References Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) is a company located in Montgomery, New York . References ↑ "Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Taylor_Biomass_Energy_LLC_TBE&oldid=352048" Categories:

134

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that cocombustion of municipal solid waste and oil shale can reduce emissions of gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2} and HCl) to acceptable levels. Tests in 6- and 15-inch units showed that the oil shale absorbs acid gas pollutants and produces an ash which could be, at the least, disposed of in a normal landfill. Further analysis of the results are underway to estimate scale-up to commercial size. Additional work will be done to evaluate the cementitious properties of oil shale ash.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hammer mill operating and biomass physical conditions effects on particle size distribution of solid pulverized biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Milling is a required pre-treatment for the use of biomass as a pulverized solid biofuel in some thermochemical technologies such as combustion, gasification and bioethanol production, as well as in densification processes. The particle size plays a key role on these energy conversion technologies. Experimental tests for poplar and corn stover were performed to obtain pulverized material at different physical conditions of the biomass (input particle size and moisture content) and operational parameters (opening sizes of the screen and angular speed of hammers). Fourteen parameters related to size central trends, dispersion and shape of particle size distribution (PSD) were calculated and analyzed by a novel data post-processing methodology, combining Artificial Neural Networks and statistical analysis. Results show that the characteristic size of the product (geometric mean size) is mainly influenced by the classification of the screen with values from five to eight times lower than their openings size. The angular speed of the hammer governs the variability and dispersion of sizes. The higher the angular speed, the lower the dispersion on particle size. Physical conditions of the biomass present a negligible effect on PSD.

Miguel Gil; Inmaculada Arauzo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 11, Alphabetically indexed bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Critical review of size-reduction and separation equipment used on municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

municipal refuse for further processing as incineration, pyrolysis or biodegradation. Combinations of separation and size-reduction steps often are referred to as "front-end" systems because this is the first step in the overall con- version process... refuse for further processing by incineration, pyrolysis or biodegradation methods in the conversion and recovery of energy products and resources. Because of this first position in the overall conversion system, such com- binations of separation...

Chin, Billy Show-Ming

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Methane Production Quantification and Energy Estimation for Bangalore Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfills are considered as cornerstone of solid waste management. Landfill gas (LFG) and leachate are principal outputs ... from landfills. Methane, occupying significant volume of landfill gas, has considerable...

A. Kumar; R. Dand; P. Lakshmikanthan…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into  Municipal  Solid  Waste  Gasification  for  Power A thermal  waste gasification power generation facility Municipal Solid Waste Gasification for Power Generation. ”

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Oxygen demand for the stabilization of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in passively aerated bioreactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • The use of an passively aerated reactor enables effective stabilization of OFMSW. • Convective air flow does not inhibit the aerobic stabilization of waste. • The use of an passively aerated reactor reduces the heat loss due to convection. • The volume of supplied air exceeds 1.7–2.88 times the microorganisms demand. - Abstract: Conventional aerobic waste treatment technologies require the use of aeration devices that actively transport air through the stabilized waste mass, which greatly increases operating costs. In addition, improperly operated active aeration systems, may have the adverse effect of cooling the stabilized biomass. Because active aeration can be a limiting factor for the stabilization process, passive aeration can be equally effective and less expensive. Unfortunately, there are few reports documenting the use of passive aeration systems in municipal waste stabilization. There have been doubts raised as to whether a passive aeration system provides enough oxygen to the organic matter mineralization processes. In this paper, the effectiveness of aeration during aerobic stabilization of four different organic fractions of municipal waste in a reactor with an integrated passive ventilation system and leachate recirculation was analyzed. For the study, four fractions separated by a rotary screen were chosen. Despite the high temperatures in the reactor, the air flow rate was below 0.016 m{sup 3}/h. Using Darcy’s equation, theoretical values of the air flow rate were estimated, depending on the intensity of microbial metabolism and the amount of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic compounds. Calculations showed that the volume of supplied air exceeded the microorganisms demand for oxidation and endogenous activity by 1.7–2.88-fold.

Kasinski, Slawomir, E-mail: slawomir.kasinski@uwm.edu.pl; Wojnowska-Baryla, Irena

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mercury in Municipal Solid Waste in China and Its Control: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regulation on mercury content limitation for batteries; China Light Industry Association: Beijing, China, 1997. ... The 2015 scheme 2 assumes mercury use by the battery industry is reduced to 26 Mg,(95) and mercury use by the lighting industry increases to 90 Mg (due to market growth), while the production and disposal patterns of mercury-containing medical devices are the same as the base case. ... Mercury-bearing material has been placed in municipal landfills from a wide array of sources including fluorescent lights, batteries, elec. ...

Hefa Cheng; Yuanan Hu

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending 31 December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The test plan is designed to demonstrate that oil shale co-combusted with municipal solid waste (MSW) can reduce gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO) to acceptable levels (90%+ reduction) and produce a cementitious ash which will, at a minimum, be acceptable in normal land fills. The small-scale combustion testing will be accomplished in a 6-in. circulating fluid bed combustor (CFBC) at Hazen Research Laboratories. This work will be patterned after the study the authors conducted in 1988 when coal and oil shale were co-combusted in a program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. The specific purpose of the test program will be to: determine the required ratio of oil shale to MSW by determining the ratio of absorbent to pollutant (A/P); determine the effect of temperature and resident time in the reactor; and determine if kinetic model developed for coal/oil shale mixture is applicable.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. • Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. • E.g. climate change impact ranges from ?58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. • Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of ?58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

Beylot, Antoine, E-mail: a.beylot@brgm.fr; Villeneuve, Jacques

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Leaching behavior and possible resource recovery from air pollution control residues of fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

Ash residues are generated at several points during combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW), i.e., in cyclones, electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Such residues are of a complex physical and chemical nature and are often enriched in soluble salts and heavy metals such as Pb, Cd and Zn. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of MSW is a relatively new technique and very little information is available about the leaching behavior of its residues. In this study, the total elemental composition, mineralogy and leaching behavior of cyclone and bag-house filter ashes from a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boiler fired with municipal solid waste have been investigated. In addition, the possibilities of recovery heavy metals from these ashes were studied. The long-term leaching behavior of the ash constituents was evaluated using a two-step batch leaching test known as the CEN-test, whereas short and medium term leaching behavior was evaluated using a Column test. The extraction of elements from cyclone and filter ashes with various acidic solutions was also investigated. The leaching behavior of acid washed ashes was evaluated using the CEN test. The cyclone ash was mainly composed of aluminosilicate minerals, whereas the filter ash consisted of chlorides and hydroxides of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The concentration of heavy metals such as Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb was higher in the filter ash than in the cyclone ash. The leached amounts of sulfates and Pb from the cyclone ash decreased with leaching test contact time, indicating the formation of secondary mineral phases. Large amounts of chlorides, sulfates, Ca, Cu and Pb were leached from the filter ash. Acid extraction removed large amounts ({gt}50%) of Zn, Pb and Cu from the filter ash and approximately 56% of the total amount of Zn present in the cyclone ash. An efficient removal of heavy metal species from these types of ashes can probably be achieved by application of a recycling or multi-step process.

Abbas, Z.; Andersson, B.A.; Steenari, B.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su Fan, Xueping Zhang, Qing Zhang, Jiping Chen *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su February 2009 Available online 21 March 2009 Keywords: MSWIs PCDD/Fs Congener patterns Emission factor a b s t r a c t Gas emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD

Columbia University

146

Fuel-Slurry Integrated Gasifier/Gas Turbine (FSIG/GT) Alternative for Power Generation Applied to Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gas is cleaned to bring the particle content and size as well alkaline concentration within the acceptable limits for injections into standard gas turbines. ... The proper disposal and use of Municipal Solid Wastes (MSW) for power generation remains among the most pressing problems of medium to large cities. ... Bubble sizes and raising velocities through the gasifier bed (Configuration A). ...

Marcio L. de Souza-Santos; Kevin B. Ceribeli

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made from a variety of organic materials, including both urban and agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISSUE Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made resources, restoring soils, and combating climate change. Biosolids are still viewed as harmful wastes County and a number of smaller treatment plants is applied to dryland wheat in Douglas County. More than

Collins, Gary S.

148

Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via Gasification Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via...

149

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fluidized Bed Combustion of Solid Biomass for Electricity and/or Heat Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluidised bed combustion (FBC) technology was developed in the ... . The FBC technology was soon expanded for biomass and other low-grade fuels, which have ... a definite trend to widen the range of biomass fuels...

Panagiotis Grammelis; Emmanouil Karampinis…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies  

SciTech Connect

The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis of cadmium in municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL. . 26 PGNAA Assembly. Detection System Background Determination of Detector Shielding. Self-Shielding. Optimal Bag Size and Orientation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detection Limit and Sensitivity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Neutron Flux... solid waste. This study modified a previous setup that was in a shadow- shield arrangement using Pu-Be neutron sources by: more elaborate detector shielding to reduce background levels; and, irradiating the target bilaterally. The system background...

Dendahl, Katherine Hoge

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electromotive Force for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Using Biomass Produced Gas as Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electromotive force (e.m.f.) of solid oxide fuel cells using biomass produced gas (BPG) as the fuels is calculated at 700-1 200 K using an in-house computer program based on thermodynamic equilibrium analysis. Tour program also predicts the concentration of oxygen in the fuel chamber as well as the concentration of equilibrium species such as H2 CO CO2 and CH4. Compared with using hydrogen as a fuel the e.m.f. for cells using BPG as the fuels is relative low and strongly influenced by carbon deposition. To remove carbon deposition the optimum amount of H2O to add is determined at various operating temperatures. Further the e.m.f. for cells based on yttria stabilized zirconia and doped ceria as electrolytes are compared. The study reveals that when using BPG as fuel the depression of e.m.f. for a SOFC using doped ceria as electrolyte is relatively small when compared with that using Yttria stabilized zirconia.

Wei Zhu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (50–60%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

M. Horttanainen; N. Teirasvuo; V. Kapustina; M. Hupponen; M. Luoranen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. ERIP technical progress report {number_sign}6  

SciTech Connect

The ground carbonized RDF slurry from the grinding trials at IKA Works at approximately 50 wt.% solids was sealed in drums and shipped to the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) for the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion tests. In addition, a fuel characterization and trace component analysis was completed for this final carbonized RDF slurry fuel. This final fuel was a blend of several fuels from the pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments. As can be seen from the data, the final carbonized RDF has an exceptional heating value and volatile matter content. In addition, trace components are significantly lower than the raw RDF pellets. The report summarizes results from combustion tests and air pollution monitoring of these tests. For the upcoming time period 10/96--01/97, it is anticipated that the analysis of the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion test will be completed. This analysis includes rheology and particle size distribution analysis of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel, carbon content and TCLP of the combustion ash, trace heavy metal balances around combustor, and dioxin/furan emissions. Finally, the slurry carbonization computer model and computer simulations will be completed in the next reporting period (including the waste water treatment subsystem). Based upon this computer model, initial economic estimates and optimizations of the slurry carbonization process will be completed in the next reporting period.

NONE

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

159

Wheelabrator Westchester Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westchester Biomass Facility Westchester Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Westchester Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Westchester Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Westchester County, New York Coordinates 41.1220194°, -73.7948516° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1220194,"lon":-73.7948516,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Haverhill Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Haverhill Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Essex County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.7051144°, -70.9071236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7051144,"lon":-70.9071236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Eco-efficiency for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation of municipal solid waste management: A case study of Tianjin, China  

SciTech Connect

The issue of municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been highlighted in China due to the continually increasing MSW volumes being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. This article presents a quantitative eco-efficiency (E/E) analysis on MSW management in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. A methodology for E/E analysis has been proposed, with an emphasis on the consistent integration of life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The environmental and economic impacts derived from LCA and LCC have been normalized and defined as a quantitative E/E indicator. The proposed method was applied in a case study of Tianjin, China. The study assessed the current MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, to investigate trade-offs between economy and GHG emissions mitigation. Additionally, contribution analysis was conducted on both LCA and LCC to identify key issues driving environmental and economic impacts. The results show that the current Tianjin's MSW management system emits the highest GHG and costs the least, whereas the situation reverses in the integrated scenario. The key issues identified by the contribution analysis show no linear relationship between the global warming impact and the cost impact in MSW management system. The landfill gas utilization scenario is indicated as a potential optimum scenario by the proposed E/E analysis, given the characteristics of MSW, technology levels, and chosen methodologies. The E/E analysis provides an attractive direction towards sustainable waste management, though some questions with respect to uncertainty need to be discussed further.

Zhao Wei, E-mail: zhaowei.tju@gmail.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Liaoning University of Technology, 121000 Jinzhou (China); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Huppes, Gjalt, E-mail: huppes@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Voet, Ester van der, E-mail: Voet@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary characterization of deposits formed on super heater surfaces in an FBC-boiler fired with municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary study of the chemical and mineralogical composition of deposits formed on super heater tubes in a CFB fired with 100% sorted municipal solid waste has been carried out. Samples of deposits formed on both the windward and leeward side of the tubes were analyzed with the aim to identify the ash species involved in fouling and to get information about chemical interaction between the tube alloys and the deposits. The metal temperatures in the super heater region were in the range 460--540 C during the sampling period. The identified deposit constituents show the importance of alkali metal chlorides in the deposit forming process. Alkali metal chlorides (NaCl and KCl) were found both on the windward side deposits and on the leeward side. Other components were CaSO{sub 4}m MgO and some oxide and phosphate compounds. Some of these components have probably been formed through reaction between the alloy and the deposit but more work will be done in co-operation with the Competence Centre for High Temperature Corrosion, Sweden in order to elucidate such interactions and the influence of deposits on the corrosion rates. The presence of chlorides on an alloyed steel at the temperatures used here may cause a rapid deterioration of the protective oxide scale on the alloy. First, a layer of molten chlorides may dissolve species from the protective oxide layer on the steel tube. Secondly, corrosion may occur according to a mechanism called active oxidation, which involves diffusion of chlorine to the metal/oxide interface and breakdown of the scale due to formation of new products.

Steenari, B.M.; Lindqvist, O.; Andersson, B.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combustion Technology Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Biomass...

164

Environmental impact of APC residues from municipal solid waste incineration: Reuse assessment based on soil and surface water protection criteria  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The Dutch Building Material Decree (BMD) was used to APC residues from MSWI. > BMD is a straightforward tool to calculate expectable loads to the environment of common pollutants. > Chloride load to the environment lead to classification of building material not allowed. > At least a pre-treatment (e.g. washing) is required in order to remove soluble salts. > The stabilization with phosphates or silicates eliminate the problem of heavy metals. - Abstract: Waste management and environmental protection are mandatory requirements of modern society. In our study, air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) were considered as a mixture of fly ash and fine particulate solids collected in scrubbers and fabric filters. These are hazardous wastes and require treatment before landfill. Although there are a number of treatment options, it is highly recommended to find practical applications rather than just dump them in landfill sites. In general, for using a construction material, beyond technical specifications also soil and surface water criteria may be used to ensure environmental protection. The Dutch Building Materials Decree (BMD) is a valuable tool in this respect and it was used to investigate which properties do not meet the threshold criteria so that APC residues can be further used as secondary building material. To this end, some scenarios were evaluated by considering release of inorganic species from unmoulded and moulded applications. The main conclusion is that the high amount of soluble salts makes the APC residues a building material prohibited in any of the conditions tested. In case of moulding materials, the limits of heavy metals are complied, and their use in Category 1 would be allowed. However, also in this case, the soluble salts lead to the classification of 'building material not allowed'. The treatments with phosphates or silicates are able to solve the problem of heavy metals, but difficulties with the soluble salts are still observed. This analysis suggests that for APC residues to comply with soil and surface water protection criteria to be further used as building material at least a pre-treating for removing soluble salts is absolutely required.

Quina, Margarida J., E-mail: guida@eq.uc.pt [Research Centre on Chemical Processes Engineering and Forest Products, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Silvio Lima, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal); Bordado, Joao C.M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, IBB, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M. [Research Centre on Chemical Processes Engineering and Forest Products, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Silvio Lima, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Gasification improvement of a poor quality solid recovered fuel (SRF). Effect of using natural minerals and biomass wastes blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The need to produce energy from poor quality carbonaceous materials has increased, in order to reduce European dependency on imported fuels, diversify the use of new and alternative fuels and to guarantee secure energy production routes. The valorisation of a poor quality solid residual fuel (SRF), with high content of ash and volatile matter, through its conversion into fuel gas was studied. The rise of gasification temperature and equivalent ratio (ER) led to higher gas yields and to lower undesirable gaseous components, though higher ER values led to a gas with lower energetic content. To reduce the negative effect of SRF unfavourable characteristics and to diversify the feedstocks used, SRF blended with three different types of biomass wastes: forestry pine, almond shells and olive bagasse was co-gasified. The use of biomass wastes tested was valuable for SRF gasification, as there was an increase in the overall reactivity and in H2 production and a reduction of about 55% in tar released, without great changes in gas yield and in its HHV. The use of natural minerals mixed with silica sand was also studied with the aim of improving SRF gasification performance and fuel gas quality. The best results were obtained in presence of dolomite, as the lowest tar and H2S contents were obtained, while an increase in gas yield was observed. Co-gasification of this poor quality SRF blended with biomass wastes in presence of dolomite increased gas yield by 25% while tar contents decreased by 55%.

Filomena Pinto; Rui Neto André; Carlos Carolino; Miguel Miranda; Pedro Abelha; Daniel Direito; Nikos Perdikaris; Ioannis Boukis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Agency/Company /Organization US Department of Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar - Concentrating Solar Power, Solar, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Bring the Right People Together, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 2/2/2011 Website http://www1.eere.energy.gov/co Locality Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA References Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects[1]

167

Investigation of chemical looping combustion by solid fuels. 2. redox reaction kinetics and product characterization with coal, biomass, and solid waste as solid fuels and CuO as an oxygen carrier  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the second in a series of two on the investigation of the chemical looping combustion (CLC) of solid fuels. The first paper put forward the concept of the CLC of solid fuels using a circulating fluidized bed as a reactor and Cu-CuO as the oxygen carrier, which was based on an analysis of oxygen transfer capability, reaction enthalpy, and chemical equilibrium. In this second paper, we report the results of the evaluation of the reduction of CuO reduced by solid fuels such as coal and some other 'opportunity' solid fuels. Tests on the reduction of CuO by the selected solid fuels were conducted using simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, which simulates a microreactor. An attached mass spectrometer (MS) was used for the characterization of evolved gaseous products. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for the characterization of the solid residues. Results strongly supported the feasibility of CuO reduction by selected solid fuels. CuO can be fully converted into Cu in a reduction process, either in a direct path by solid fuels, which was verified by MS analysis under a N{sub 2} atmosphere, or in an indirect path by pyrolysis and gasification products of solid fuels in the reducer. No Cu{sub 2}O exists in reducing atmospheres, which was characterized by an XRD analysis and mass balance calculations. No carbon deposit was found on the surface of the reduced Cu, which was characterized by SEM analysis. CuO reduction by solid fuels can start at temperatures as low as approximately 500 C. Tests indicated that the solid fuels with higher reactivity (higher volatile matter) would be desirable for the development of the chemical looping combustion process of solid fuels, such as sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal and solid waste and biomass. 4 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Yan Cao; Bianca Casenas; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

The mathematical modelling of biomethane production and the growth of methanogenic bacteria in batch reactor systems fed with organic municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model was developed and validated for an anaerobic digestion system of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes (OFMSWs) by using a laboratory-scale system of two Packed Bed Reactors (PBRs). The equations were obtained by the mass balances of methanogenic bacteria of affluent and effluent lixiviated, as well as the interior in each reactor. The methane rate was obtained by multiplying the methanogenic activity. A differential equation was fitted with experimental results to obtain the parameters that best describe methanogenic behaviour. These kinetic parameters were used with the modified logistic equation with the special case n = 1.

Liliana Alzate-Gaviria; Antonino Perez-Hernandez; Hector M. Poggi-Varaldo; P.J. Sebastian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Modelling, simulation and validation of the solid biomass combustion in different plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the combustion of biomass, mathematical models have been developed at the LUAT on the basis of models for waste incineration. These models were proven by comparison to experimental date under the same conditions. The optimisation was done for the MARS-plant and for a big biomass fired steam generator. The main focus for the optimisation of the MARS-plant is the air distribution. For the operational plant, the results from the computer simulations have been confirmed by measurements. Based on these results, the plant operation could be improved. From the point of view of the manufacturers, these tools and techniques can also be applied to the basic design of new plants.

K. Goerner; Th. Klasen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Derived Biomass and U.S. Northeast Forest Residuals Gasification for Electricity Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Derived Biomass and U.S. Northeast Forest Residuals Gasification for Electricity Production ... Various types of organic waste including (a) agriculture and forestry residues and (b) municipal and industrial wastes (i.e., biodegradable municipal solid waste, plastic waste, construction and demolition (C&D) waste, and sewage sludge) are considered as potential feedstock for bioenergy and chemicals production. ...

Philip Nuss; Kevin H. Gardner; Jenna R. Jambeck

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Exergy analysis of biomass-to-synthetic natural gas (SNG) process via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an exergy analysis of SNG production via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock, including virgin (woody) biomass as well as waste biomass (municipal solid waste and sludge). In indirect gasification heat needed for endothermic gasification reactions is produced by burning char in a separate combustion section of the gasifier and subsequently the heat is transferred to the gasification section. The advantages of indirect gasification are no syngas dilution with nitrogen and no external heat source required. The production process involves several process units, including biomass gasification, syngas cooler, cleaning and compression, methanation reactors and SNG conditioning. The process is simulated with a computer model using the flow-sheeting program Aspen Plus. The exergy analysis is performed for various operating conditions such as gasifier pressure, methanation pressure and temperature. The largest internal exergy losses occur in the gasifier followed by methanation and SNG conditioning. It is shown that exergetic efficiency of biomass-to-SNG process for woody biomass is higher than that for waste biomass. The exergetic efficiency for all biomass feedstock increases with gasification pressure, whereas the effects of methanation pressure and temperature are opposite for treated wood and waste biomass.

Caecilia R. Vitasari; Martin Jurascik; Krzysztof J. Ptasinski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Miami-Dade County, Florida Coordinates 25.7889689°, -80.2264393° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.7889689,"lon":-80.2264393,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Bristol Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Bristol Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

North County Regional Resource Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Resource Biomass Facility Regional Resource Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name North County Regional Resource Biomass Facility Facility North County Regional Resource Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Palm Beach County, Florida Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

Wheelabrator South Broward Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Broward Biomass Facility South Broward Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator South Broward Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator South Broward Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

178

Covanta Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Hennepin Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Hennepin Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hennepin County, Minnesota Coordinates 45.0208911°, -93.5094574° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0208911,"lon":-93.5094574,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Worcester County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.4096528°, -71.8571331° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4096528,"lon":-71.8571331,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Regional Waste Systems Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Regional Waste Systems Biomass Facility Facility Regional Waste Systems Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Cumberland County, Maine Coordinates 43.8132979°, -70.3870587° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8132979,"lon":-70.3870587,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Covanta Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Stanislaus Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Stanislaus Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Stanislaus County, California Coordinates 37.5090711°, -120.9876321° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5090711,"lon":-120.9876321,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

Commerce Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Commerce Refuse To Energy Biomass Facility Facility Commerce Refuse To Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

184

Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator North Broward Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator North Broward Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Kent County, Michigan Coordinates 43.0097027°, -85.520024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0097027,"lon":-85.520024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

186

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hampden County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.1172314°, -72.6624209° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1172314,"lon":-72.6624209,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

187

Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Biomass Facility Center Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility Facility Bay Resource Management Center Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Bay County, Florida Coordinates 30.1805306°, -85.684578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.1805306,"lon":-85.684578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

188

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

Penobscot Energy Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Penobscot Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Penobscot Energy Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Penobscot County, Maine Coordinates 45.3230777°, -68.5806727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3230777,"lon":-68.5806727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Facility Montenay Montgomery LP Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2290075°, -75.3878525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2290075,"lon":-75.3878525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

Covanta Babylon Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Babylon Energy Biomass Facility Babylon Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Babylon Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Babylon Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility Facility McKay Bay Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Montgomery County, Maryland Coordinates 39.1547426°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1547426,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

194

Introduction to Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass was the major fuel in the world ... hundreds when coal then became dominant. The combustion of solid biofuels as a primary energy...

Jenny M. Jones; Amanda R. Lea-Langton…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Quantitative appraisal of biomass resources and their energy potential in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The utilization of biomass as a renewable source of energy is important from the energetic as well as the environmental viewpoint. It can reduce the rate of fossil fuel depletion caused by the rapid increase in energy consumption. This paper presents an estimation of the biomass and its potential energy in Egypt. Four main types of biomass energy sources are included: agricultural residues (dedicated bioenergy crop residues), municipal solid wastes, animal wastes, and sewage sludge. The potential biomass quantity and its theoretical energy content were computed according to statistical reports, literature reviews, and personal investigations. The results show that Egypt produces a considerable amount of biomass with a total theoretical energy content of 416.9×1015 J. The dry biomass produced from bioenergy crop residue sources has been estimated at about 12.33 million tons/year, of which 63.75% is produced from rice straw. This source represents the highest percentage (44.6%) of the total theoretical potential energy in Egypt, followed by municipal solid wastes, which could produce 41.7% from an annual amount of 34.6 million tons. Meanwhile, the rest of the total theoretical potential energy could be produced from animal and sewage wastes. The estimated biomass with its considerable potential energy content represents an important renewable energy source in Egypt.

N. Said; S.A. El-Shatoury; L.F. Díaz; M. Zamorano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

197

Production of methane gas from organic fraction municipal solid waste (OFMSW) via anaerobic process: application methodology for the Malaysian condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid waste management in Malaysia is confronted with many problems, including low collection coverage, irregular collection services, inadequate equipment used for waste collection, crude open dumping and burning without air and water pollution control systems, inadequate legal provisions and resource constraints. These problems have various effects on the development of the solid waste management system in Malaysia. Anaerobic digestion has been suggested as an alternative method for removing high concentrations of organic waste. In this study, two types of anaerobic digesters which are Simulated Landfill Bioreactor (SLBR) and Anaerobic Solid-Liquid (ASL) reactor were proposed. The reactors were operated at a temperature 60°C, analysed for biogas production and volatile fatty acid.

Irnis Azura Zakarya; Ismail Abustan; Norli Ismail; Mohd Suffian Yusoff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Generation, storage, collection and transportation of municipal solid waste - A case study in the city of Kathmandu, capital of Nepal  

SciTech Connect

Solid waste management (SWM) services have consistently failed to keep up with the vast amount of solid waste produced in urban areas. There is not currently an efficient system in place for the management, storage, collection, and transportation of solid waste. Kathmandu City, an important urban center of South Asia, is no exception. In Kathmandu Metropolitan City, solid waste generation is predicted to be 1091 m{sup 3}/d (245 tons/day) and 1155 m{sup 3}/d (260 tons/day) for the years 2005 and 2006, respectively. The majority (89%) of households in Kathmandu Metropolitan City are willing to segregate the organic and non-organic portions of their waste. Overall collection efficiency was 94% in 2003. An increase in waste collection occurred due to private sector involvement, the shutdown of the second transfer station near the airport due to local protest, a lack of funding to maintain trucks/equipment, a huge increase in plastic waste, and the willingness of people to separate their waste into separate bins. Despite a substantial increase in total expenditure, no additional investments were made to the existing development plan to introduce a modern disposal system due to insufficient funding. Due to the lack of a proper lining, raw solid waste from the existing dumping site comes in contact with river water directly, causing severe river contamination and deteriorating the quality of the water.

Alam, R. [Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: rakib_env@yahoo.com; Chowdhury, M.A.I.; Hasan, G.M.J.; Karanjit, B.; Shrestha, L.R. [Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass 41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York Summary Taylor Biomass, LLC (Taylor) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support the construction and startup of a biomass gasification-to energy facility at a 95-acre recycling facility in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, NY. The Project would involve the construction of a Post-Collection Separation Facility, a Gasification System and a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Power Island. The Post-Collection Separation Facility would accept 950 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW), construction and demolition debris, and 100 tons of

200

Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

Trzcinski, Antoine P., E-mail: a.trzcinski05@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stuckey, David C., E-mail: d.stuckey@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 2007–2012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream?s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 2007–2010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 2010–2012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F™ for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox® showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F™ showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F™ test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program.

A. Melnyk; K. Kukli?ska; L. Wolska; J. Namie?nik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony sbfrom municipal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

municipal... solid waste in a municipal waste combustor (MWC). In an attempt to "turn the tide", officials from Polk Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - art municipal waste Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion of Municipal Solid Waste," Second Conference... on Municipal, Hazardous and Coal ... Source: Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering,...

204

Biothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

American Ref-Fuel of Niagara Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niagara Biomass Facility Niagara Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of Niagara Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Niagara Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Niagara County, New York Coordinates 43.3119496°, -78.7476208° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.3119496,"lon":-78.7476208,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Delaware County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 39.907793°, -75.3878525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.907793,"lon":-75.3878525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location New London County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.5185189°, -72.0468164° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5185189,"lon":-72.0468164,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

American Ref-Fuel of Essex Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Essex Biomass Facility Essex Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of Essex Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Essex Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Essex County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.7947466°, -74.2648829° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7947466,"lon":-74.2648829,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility MacArthur Waste to Energy Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. An assessment of the current situation in the United States and forecast of future emissions  

SciTech Connect

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

none,

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two trails of using solid recovered fuel and received theand briquettes. Densified recovered solid fuel can have net

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recycling and biomass conversion. More than a million tonsmost cellulosic biomass conversion processes should operateConversion process Fuel type Solid Thermochemical Biomass

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials—Phoenix, AZ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to presentations and materials from the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Annual Meeting held in Phoenix on September 11, 2013.

215

Understanding the product distribution from biomass fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fast pyrolysis of biomass is an attractive route to transform solid biomass into a liquid bio-oil, which has been envisioned as a renewable substitute for… (more)

Patwardhan, Pushkaraj Ramchandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

217

2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 19–20, 2011.

218

2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

219

2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southeast Region Workshop, held in Tampa, FL, February 17–18, 2011.

220

American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Nassau County, New York Coordinates 40.6546145°, -73.5594128° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.6546145,"lon":-73.5594128,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

222

Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.3. Effects of low pH on biomass solids……………………………. ………………of effects of low pH on biomass……………………………. ….25 2.4. Low pHof low pH biomass reactions………………………. ……………..46

McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

Tao, Greg, G.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

226

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

227

Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre Place Beijing Municipality, China Sector Biomass Product The centre focuses on biomass technology research and provides integrated technologic and service support for biomass utilisation and industrialisation. References State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre is a company located in Beijing Municipality, China .

229

Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic analysis of a system with biomass gasification, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic investigations of a small-scale integrated gasification solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine for combined heat and power (CHP) with a net electric capacity of 120 kWe have been performed. Woodchips are used as gasification feedstock to produce syngas, which is then utilized to feed the anode side of the SOFC stacks. A thermal efficiency of 0.424 LHV (lower heating value) for the plant is found to use 89.4 kg/h of feedstock to produce the above mentioned electricity. Thermoeconomic analysis shows that the production price of electricity is 0.1204 $/kWh. Furthermore, hot water is considered as a by-product, and the cost of hot water is found to be 0.0214 $/kWh. When compared to other renewable systems of similar scales, this result shows that if both SOFC and Stirling engine technology enter the commercialization phase, then they can deliver electricity at a cost that is competitive with the corresponding renewable systems of the same size.

Masoud Rokni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

231

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

232

Impact of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Quality on the Behavior of Alkali Metals and Trace Elements during Combustion: A Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light, thermal- and bacterial-resistant, and inexpensive leathers, especially in the footwear industry, are obtained by the Cr tanning method. ... The selected waste items are representing the major combustible fractions found in MSW, i.e. paper, plastic, textile, and biogenic materials (both food and biomass), but also the other waste fraction (a mixed and poorly defined fraction). ... Pedersen et al.(6) studies six different waste fractions separately under different operational conditions in a full-scale incinerator: NaCl (road salt), household batteries, automotive shredder waste (rubber and plastics), Cu?Cr?As (CCA)-impregnated wood, PVC, and shoes (leather mainly). ...

Michae?l Becidan; Lars Sørum; Daniel Lindberg

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In its simplest terms, biomass is all the plant matter found on our planet. Biomass is produced directly by photosynthesis, the fundamental engine of life on earth. Plant photosynthesis uses energy from the su...

Stephen R. Decker; John Sheehan…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accounting for all of the factors that go into energy demand (population, vehicle miles traveled per ... capita, vehicle efficiency) and land required for energy production (biomass land yields, biomass conversion

Stephen R. Decker; John Sheehan…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Status report on energy recovery from municipal solid waste: technologies, lessons and issues. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented of the lessons learned and issues raised regarding the recovery of energy from solid wastes. The review focuses on technologies and issues significant to currently operating energy recovery systems in the US - waterwall incineration, modular incineration, refuse derived fuels systems, landfill gas recovery systems. Chapters are: Energy Recovery and Solid Waste Disposal; Energy Recovery Systems; Lessons in Energy Recovery; Issues in Energy Recovery. Some basic conclusions are presented concerning the state of the art of energy from waste. Plants in shakedown or under construction, along with technologies in the development stages, are briefly described. Sources of additional information and a bibliography are included. (MCW)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass in Hot-Compressed Water, Alcohols, and Alcohol-Water Co-solvents for Biocrude Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HTL technology is particularly promising for converting wet biomass resources such as microalgae, agro waste streams (e.g., manures), municipal/industrial wastewater sludge and fresh/green forest biomass/residues...

Chunbao Charles Xu; Yuanyuan Shao…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

SEMASS Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » SEMASS Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SEMASS Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility SEMASS Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Plymouth County, Massachusetts Coordinates 41.9120406°, -70.7168469° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9120406,"lon":-70.7168469,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Wheelabrator North Andover Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wheelabrator North Andover Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator North Andover Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator North Andover Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Essex County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.7051144°, -70.9071236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7051144,"lon":-70.9071236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, heat and mass transfer, drying, pyrolysis, combustion of pyrolysis gases, combustion and gasificationTHERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials—Boston, MA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Boston August 2–3, 2012.

242

Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials—Los Angeles, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Los Angeles April 19–20, 2012.

243

Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials—Dallas, TX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Dallas March 15–16, 2012.

244

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Detroit, June 16–17, 2011.

246

2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Kansas City, MO, March 8–9, 2011.

247

Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have been found to contain many of the same hazardous constituents as found in hazardous waste landfills. Because of the large number of MSW landfills, these sites pose a serious environmental threat...

Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

248

AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy Feedstocks—From Field to Fuel AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation Glenn Farris, Marketing Manager Biomass, AGCO Corporation

249

Treatment of biomass to obtain a target chemical  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Target chemicals were produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Biomass Energy Heat Provision in Modern Large-Scale Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass is the most important renewable energy source in the European Union. In the field of energetic utilization of solid biomass, combustion is the most advanced and market-proven application. Consequently...

Dr. Ingwald Obernberger…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Biomass Energy Heat Provision in Modern Large-Scale Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass is the most important renewable energy source in the European Union. In the field of energetic utilization of solid biomass, combustion is the most advanced and market-proven application. Consequently...

Dr. Ingwald Obernberger; Dr. Friedrich Biedermann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Co-firing of coal and biomass fuel blends M. Sami, K. Annamalai*, M. Wooldridge1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co-firing of coal and biomass fuel blends M. Sami, K. Annamalai*, M. Wooldridge1 Department; accepted 6 June 2000 Abstract This paper reviews literature on co-firing of coal with biomass fuels. Here, the term biomass includes organic matter produced as a result of photosynthesis as well as municipal

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

253

Biomass Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass is an energy resource derived from organic matter, which includes wood, agricultural waste, and other living-cell material that can be burned to produce heat energy. It also includes algae,...

254

Novel catalysts for valorization of biomass to value-added chemicals and fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

? Biomass valorization to get platform chemicals and fuels such as HMF, FDCA and DMF is discussed. Solid acids w...

NISHITA LUCAS; NARASIMHA RAO KANNA; ATUL S NAGPURE…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste" means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

256

COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL  

SciTech Connect

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NREL: Biomass Research - David A. Sievers, P.E.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fermentation. In addition, he holds valuable research experience in lignocellulosic biomass solid-liquid separation and sugar concentration techniques. Research Interests...

258

Energy Densification of Lignocellulosic Biomass via Hydrothermal Carbonization and Torrefaction .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this study demonstrated the potential of hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of biomass for the production of carbon-rich solid fuel, known as hydrochar… (more)

Kambo, Harpreet Singh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Valuing climate protection through willingness to pay for biomass ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study uses a multi-part, split-sample contingent valuation method (CVM) and fair share (FS) survey to better understand the public's valuation of mitigating global climate change through its willingness to pay for biomass or “cellulosic” ethanol. In addition to a basic CVM question, a related scenario was developed that asked half of the survey respondents to state their fair share cost to lessen a potential food shortage in the next decade, also through the expanded use of cellulosic ethanol. Three alternative biomass feedstocks were assessed: farming residues, forestry residues and paper mill wastes, and municipal solid wastes. Overall a slightly larger proportion of respondents were WTP extra for cellulosic ethanol in the basic CVM scenario than in the FS scenario, though no significant differences were found in the WTP for the different feedstocks. Bid curve lognormal regression results for the two models were similar, supporting the idea that asking a FS rather than a conventional WTP question may be justifiable in some circumstances, such as in cases of a national emergency.

Barry D. Solomon; Nicholas H. Johnson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...allows processing at high concentrations...Methods allowing a higher starting biomass loading...aid in the design of efficient processes based...feed for a solid fuel boiler (62). Alternatively...excellent feedstock for high-value products (43...

Joseph B. Binder; Ronald T. Raines

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Municipal landfill leachate treatment by SBBGR technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper reports the results of a laboratory-scale investigation aimed at evaluating the performance of a periodic biofilter with granular biomass (SBBGR) for treating leachate coming from a mature municipal landfill. The results show that the SBBGR was able to remove roughly 80% of COD in leachate. The remaining 20% of COD were, therefore, presumably owing to the presence in the leachate of recalcitrant compounds. Ammonia removal efficiency was low because of the presence of high salinity and inhibitory compounds in the investigated leachate. The process was characterised by very low sludge production (lower than 0.02 kg TSS/kg CODremoved).

Claudio Di Iaconi; Guido Del Moro; Michele Pagano; Roberto Ramadori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Biomass and Other Unconventional Energy Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The primary technologies used to convert biomass to energy are direct combustion systems and Ithe gasification/pyrolysis method. IThe latter method creates a gaseous, li~uid or solid fuel to be used by an industry. Gasification involves the destr.... The primary technologies used to convert biomass to energy are direct combustion systems and Ithe gasification/pyrolysis method. IThe latter method creates a gaseous, li~uid or solid fuel to be used by an industry. Gasification involves the destr...

Gershman, H. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Municipal Sludge disposal economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal Sludge disposal economics ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ...

Jerry Jones; David Bomberger, Jr.; F Lewis; Joel Jacknow

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Representation in Municipal Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal governments play a vital role in American democracy, as well as in governments around the world. Despite this, little is known about the degree to which cities are responsive to the views of their citizens. In ...

Tausanovitch, Chris

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Clean energy from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes a slurry grinding trial where a carbonized refuse derived fuel was dispersed in water. The RDF slurry produced in this study is to subjected to dioxin combustion tests.

Klosky, M.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

SYNERGIA Forum Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERT Germany "Biogas utilization: Comparison between sanitary landfills and anaerobic digestionERT Germany, WTE Plants in Germany" Michael Jakuttis, Dipl.Ing. Wt

Columbia University

267

Tapping Resources in Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...operation: ferrous losses in the light fraction resulting from air classifica-tion...by air classifica-tion into light and heavy fractions, and the 20 FEBRUARY 1976 MINOR...screening after fracture in a shredder. It lends itself well to gravity...

S. L. Blum

1976-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

268

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006. * Does not include landfill gas from municipal wastemegawatts from solid-fuel, landfill gas and digester gasother fuels. Both landfill gas and digester ecological and

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RISÃ? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RISÃ?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

270

NREL: Biomass Research - Richard L. Bain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richard L. Bain Richard L. Bain Photo of Richard Bain Richard Bain is a Principal Engineer in the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. He has worked at NREL since 1990 and has extensive experience in the thermal conversion of biomass, municipal wastes, coal, and petroleum. He is a lead researcher in the area of production of transportation fuels and hydrogen via thermochemical conversion of biomass; technical advisor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on biofuels demonstrations; and Task Leader for the International Energy Agency Bioenergy Annex Biomass Gasification Task. Dr. Bain manages biomass gasification research activities for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program at NREL and coordinates support to the USDA for

271

Mass and Energy Balances of Wet Torrefaction of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mass and Energy Balances of Wet Torrefaction of Lignocellulosic Biomass† ... Wet torrefaction is a pretreatment process to convert biomass to energy-dense solid fuel, with relatively uniform handling characteristics. ... A wealth of research have been conducted in the wet torrefaction of lignocellulosic biomass,(5-9) but relatively few address the comprehensive mass and energy balance involved in the wet torrefaction. ...

Wei Yan; Jason T. Hastings; Tapas C. Acharjee; Charles J. Coronella; Victor R. Vásquez

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - asme solid waste Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: -21, 2008, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA NAWTEC16-1901 PLASMA ARC GASIFICATION FOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL... in municipal solid waste destruction since 1999 in...

273

Biomass shock pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Science Activities in Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

275

Managing America`s solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

Not Available

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Energy Integration and Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Microcombined Heat and Power Systems and Other Renewable Systems Using Biomass Waste Derived Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2, 3) The microgeneration or self-generation concept for dwellings is associated with several advantages, such as (1) cutting emissions of greenhouse gases, (2) reducing the number of people living in fuel poverty, (3) reducing the demands on transmission systems and distribution systems, (4) reducing the need for those systems to be modified, (5) enhancing the availability of electricity and heat for consumers, and (6) encouraging consumer engagement with energy efficient technologies. ... The SOFC can utilize heat of oxidization of gaseous fuels, such as hydrogen, syngas, and natural gas, in the anode in the presence of an oxidant in the cathode, to produce electricity. ... The biomass gasification plant under consideration comprises gasifiers, gas cooling and clean up technologies, gas turbines, heat recovery steam generators (HRSG), etc. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; Yingru Zhao; Matthew Leach; Nigel P. Brandon; Nilay Shah

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Integration of alternative feedstreams for biomass treatment and utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for treating biomass composed of integrated feedstocks to produce fermentable sugars. One aspect of the methods described herein includes a pretreatment step wherein biomass is integrated with an alternative feedstream and the resulting integrated feedstock, at relatively high concentrations, is treated with a low concentration of ammonia relative to the dry weight of biomass. In another aspect, a high solids concentration of pretreated biomass is integrated with an alternative feedstream for saccharifiaction.

Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA); Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Hames, Bonnie (Westminster, CO)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assessment of biomass energy resources and related technologies practice in Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Bangladesh is energy starve country facing a severe power crisis for the last few decades because of inadequate power generation capacity compared with demand. The power generation of the country largely depends on the non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy sources, mainly on the natural gas as accounts 64.5% of recent installed capacity. This trend causes rapid depletion of non-renewable energy sources. Thus, it is necessary to trim down the dependency on non-renewable energy sources and utilize the available renewable resources to meet the huge energy demand facing the country. Most of the people living in rural, remote, coastal and isolated areas in Bangladesh have no electricity access yet. However, renewable energy resources, especially biomass can play a pivotal role to electrify those rural, remote, coastal and isolated areas in the country. Humankind has been using biomass as an energy source for thousands of years. This study assesses the bio-energy potential, utilization and related Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) practice in Bangladesh. Improved cooking stove, biogas plant and biomass briquetting are the major \\{RETs\\} commonly practiced in Bangladesh. The assessment includes the potential of agricultural residue, forest residue, animal manure and municipal solid waste. The estimated total amount of biomass resource available for energy in Bangladesh in 2012–2013 is 90.21 million tons with the annual energy potential of 45.91 million tons of coal equivalent. The recoverable amount of biomass (90.21 million tons) in 2012–2013 has an energy potential of 1344.99 PJ which is equivalent to 373.71 TWh of electricity.

P.K. Halder; N. Paul; M.R.A. Beg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.

Unknown

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Projects Biomass Characterization Projects A photo of a magnified image on a computer screen. Many blue specks and lines in different sizes and shapes are visible on top of a white background. A microscopic image of biomass particles. Through biomass characterization projects, NREL researchers are exploring the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment and during processing. The characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. Among NREL's biomass characterization projects are: Feedstock/Process Interface NREL is working to understand the effects of feedstock and feedstock pre-processing on the conversion process and vice versa. The objective of the task is to understand the characteristics of biomass feedstocks

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on August 29, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Ontario Applies to States or Provinces Ontario Name Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Policy Category Financial Incentive Policy Type Grant Program Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Solar Photovoltaics, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Amount 50 percent of eligible costs Expiration Date 11/29/2013 Maximum Incentive 90,000 Program Administrator Ontario Ministry of Energy

282

Anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste for energy production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of anaerobic reactors treating OFMSW (organic fraction of municipal solid waste), especially in terms… (more)

Nayono, Satoto Endar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

This project is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to Design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

Unknown

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chemicals from Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Added Chemicals from Biomass. Volume I: Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas (www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/35523.pdf) . 6. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical...

David R. Dodds; Richard A. Gross

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Facility Tracy Biomass Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

289

Overburden effects on waste compaction and leachate generation in municipal landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a model to predict the effects of overburden pressure on the formation of leachate within municipal solid waste landfills. In addition, it estimates the compaction and subsequent settlement that the waste will undergo due...

Mehevec, Adam Wade

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biomass Analytical Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diversity and performance, The chemical and physical properties of biomass and biomass feedstocks are characterized as they move through the supply chain to various conversion...

291

Sandia National Laboratories: Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Assessing the Economic Potential of Advanced Biofuels On September 10, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable...

292

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Sandia National Laboratories: Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnergyBiomass Biomass Sandia spearheads research into energy alternatives that will help the nation reduce its dependence on fossil fuels and to combat the effects of climate...

294

Sandia National Laboratories: Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries On December 11, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities,...

295

Ohio Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) Ohio Biomass Energy Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info Funding Source Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program, Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Start Date 1983 State Ohio Program Type Grant Program Industry Recruitment/Support Training/Technical Assistance Workforce development Provider Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Ohio is one of seven states participating in the Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program which was established in 1983. The Regional Program is administered by the Council of Great Lakes Governors and receives funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The other six states under the

296

Biomass treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Lyons, Robert C. (Arvada, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

297

Preparation for commercial demonstration of biomass-to-ethanol conversion technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to complete the development of a commercially viable process to produce fuel ethanol from renewable cellulosic biomass. The program focused on pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation technologies where Amoco has a unique proprietary position. Assured access to low-cost feedstock is a cornerstone of attractive economics for cellulose to ethanol conversion in the 1990s. Most of Amoco`s efforts in converting cellulosic feedstocks to ethanol before 1994 focused on using paper from municipal solid waste as the feed. However, while many municipalities and MSW haulers expressed interest in Amoco`s technology, none were willing to commit funding to process development. In May, 1994 several large agricultural products companies showed interest in Amoco`s technology, particularly for application to corn fiber. Amoco`s initial work with corn fiber was encouraging. The project work plan was designed to provide sufficient data on corn fiber conversion to convince a major agriculture products company to participate in the construction of a commercial demonstration facility.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Biomass Energy R&D in the San Francisco Bay Area  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is plant matter such as trees, grasses, agricultural crops or other biological material. It can be used as a solid fuel, or converted into liquid or gaseous forms, for the production of electric power, heat, chemicals, or fuels. There are a number of ways of getting energy from biomass, and a number of factors influence the efficiency of the conversion process. All biomass can be easily combusted. The heat of combustion can be used as heat, or can be used to run gas/steam turbines to produce electricity. However, most biomass combustion processes are inefficient and environmentally non-benign. The main pollutants from direct biomass combustion are tars, particulates, and VOCs. Biodiesels can be made from oils obtained from plants/crops such as soybean, peanuts and cotton. The oils from these sources are mainly triglycerides of fatty acids and not directly suitable as diesel substitutes. Transesterification processes convert the triglycerides into simple esters of the corresponding fatty acids (for example, Fatty Acid Methyl Ester or FAME), which can be directly substitutes for diesel fuels. Starches, sugars and cellulose can be fermented to produce ethanol, which can be added to gasoline, or used directly as an engine fuel. Fermentation of starches and sugars is established technology, practiced for thousands of years. Fermentation of cellulose to make ethanol is relatively harder, requiring additional intermediate steps to hydrolyze the cellulose first by adding acids or by raising temperature. Forestry wastes predominantly comprise cellulose and lignin. Lignin cannot be fermented using the current bio-organisms, and, as mentioned above, even cellulose is difficult to ferment directly. In such cases, a suite of alternative technologies can be employed to convert the biomass into liquid fuels. For example, the biomass can be gasified with the use of air/oxygen and steam, the resultant syngas (mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) can be cleaned to remove tars and particulates, the gas can be shifted to obtain the proper balance between hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and the balanced gas can be converted into either methanol or other hydrocarbons with the use of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. The liquid fuels thus produced can be transported to the point of use. In addition, they can be reformed to produce hydrogen to drive fuel cells. In addition to agriculture and forestry, a third, and significant, source for biomass is municipal waste. The biomass component of municipal wastes consists mainly of cellulose (paper products and yard wastes) and lignin (yard wastes). This waste can be combusted or gasified, as described above. All the technologies mentioned above are relatively mature, and are being practiced in some form or another. However, there are other technologies that may be promising, yet present significant challenges and may require more work. An example of this is the use of bacteria to use light to decompose water to yield hydrogen.

Upadhye, R

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

300

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of... the nation’s power o Currently 1% of national power supply o Carbon neutral? combustion of biomass is part of the natural carbon cycle o Improved crop residue management has potential to benefit environment, producers, and economy Biomass Btu...

Schaetzel, Michael

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Molten Metal Anodes for Direct Carbon-Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis was to enable the direct utilization of solid carbonaceous fuels like coal and biomass, in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC).… (more)

Jayakumar, Abhimanyu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Russell Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts Sector: Biomass Product: Russell Biomass, LLC is developing a 50MW biomass to energy project at the former Westfield Paper Company site in Russell, Massachusetts....

304

NREL: Biomass Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Research Photo of a technician completing a laboratory procedure Biomass Compositional Analysis Find laboratory analytical procedures for standard biomass analysis. Photo...

305

Sandia National Laboratories: Lignocellulosic Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProgramLignocellulosic Biomass Lignocellulosic Biomass It is estimated that there is over 1 billion tons of non-food lignocellulosic biomass currently available on a sustainable...

306

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report, (unpublished, 1979). Biomass Project Progress 31.Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _LBL-11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Watertown Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watertown Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Watertown Municipal Utilities Place: South Dakota References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1...

309

Illinois Municipal Electric Agency- Electric Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Illinois Municipal Electric Agency (IMEA) offers rebates to member municipal utilities* (those who purchase wholesale electric service from IMEA) and retail customers for energy efficiency...

310

Draft Powerpoint: Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities, LLC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Powerpoint: Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities, LLC comment Draft Powerpoint: Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities, LLC comment Green Grid Gateway @ North Coast Oregon....

311

South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Green Power Purchasing Provider Santee Cooper Santee Cooper's Green Power Program was launched in September of 2001. All of the state's 20 electric cooperatives and the City of Georgetown participate in the Green Power Program, which is Green-e accredited. The renewable resources sold under the Green Power Program are comprised of 99% landfill gas (methane) and less than 1% solar energy. Santee Cooper is currently using landfill gas (methane) to produce electricity at six facilities in South Carolina: Horry Solid Waste

312

NREL: Biomass Research - Daniel J. Schell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daniel J. Schell Daniel J. Schell Photo of Daniel Schell Daniel Schell is a senior biochemical engineer and supervisor of the Bioprocess Integration R&D section of the National Bioenergy Center at NREL. Mr. Schell has more than 25 years of research experience in bio-based conversion of lignocellulosic biomass and has expertise in integrated operations at the bench and pilot scales. He also manages numerous projects for industrial clients investigating various aspects of lignocellulosic biomass conversion and currently leads a multi-disciplinary team of engineers, microbiologists, and chemists. Research Interests Integrated biomass processing High solids biomass conversion Fermentation development Separation processes Technoeconomic analysis Measurement uncertainty Pilot plant operation and process scale up

313

Energie aus Biomasse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomasse ist Sonnenenergie, die mithilfe von Pflanzen über den Prozess der Photosynthese in organische Materie umgewandelt wird und in dieser Form zur Deckung der Energienachfrage genutzt werden kann. Biomasse...

Martin Kaltschmitt; Wolfgang Streicher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Biomass One Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One Sector Biomass Owner Biomass One LP Location White City, Oregon Coordinates 42.4333333°, -122.8338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4333333,"lon":-122.8338889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

Pretreated densified biomass products  

SciTech Connect

A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Biobased Chemicals Without Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike most other companies using biology to make chemicals, LanzaTech does not rely on biomass feedstocks. ...

MELODY BOMGARDNER

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jones and w.s. Fong, Biomass Conversion of Biomass to Fuels11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII RonaldLBL-11902 Biomass Energy Conversion in Hawaii Ronald 1.

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India Sector: Biomass Product: Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References: Star Biomass1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Star Biomass...

320

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding Guide 2010 The Forestry Commission and the Humber Rural Partnership (co-ordinated by East Riding of Yorkshire Council) have jointly produced a biomass funding guide fuel prices continue to rise, and the emerging biomass sector is well-placed to make a significant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Flash Carbonization of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass feedstocks included woods (Leucaena and oak) and agricultural byproducts (macadamia nut shells and corncob). ... Biomass feedstocks employed in this study are listed in Table 1. ... 4 We presume that these differences represent the inherent variability of biomass feedstocks from one year, location, etc. to the next. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Kazuhiro Mochidzuki; Lloyd S. Paredes

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Prince Edward Island Program Type Environmental Regulations PEI Biomass Guidelines identify two major pathways that biomass projects may follow: No Public Investment, and Public Investment. Projects with Public Investment include any project that has: * Grants or loans for start-up, capital, or operating costs; * Silvicultural or other land management incentives provided through Departmental programs (e.g. Forest Enhancement Program, ALUS); or * Green credits or certification from Government. Guidelines for No Public Investment projects must only comply with existing

323

Analysis of syngas formation and ecological efficiency for the system of treating biomass waste and other solid fuels with CO2 recuperation based on integrated gasification combined cycle with diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass combustion is a more complex process and its model solving is difficult than combustion of traditional liquid fuels. At the same...2...] to obtain the data for operating regimes of ICE with syngas-based d...

A. Y. Pilatau; H. A. Viarshyna…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

325

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

326

Recirculation of municipal landfill leachate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECIRCULATION OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE A Thesis by BRIAN JUDE PINKO4ISKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering RECIRCULATION OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE A Thesis by BRIAN JUDE PINKOWSKI Approved as to style and content by: Charles P. Giammona (Chair of Committee) Roy . Harm, (Member) Kirk W. Brown (Member) Donald A. Maxwel...

Pinkowski, Brian Jude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Effect of Thermal Hydrolysis on Rheological Behavior of Municipal Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Thermal Hydrolysis on Rheological Behavior of Municipal Sludge ... Fenton oxidation facilitated sludge filterability resulting in capillary suction time values which were approximately 50% of the raw sludges, whereas ultrasonication with high input energy deteriorated the filterability. ... Bingham's parameters seem to be able to detect the evolution in sludges quality and in floc strength even at low total suspended solid as the one's usually found in activated sludge processes (less than 10 g l-1). ...

Guohong Feng; Liyan Liu; Wei Tan

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(5, 6) The ideal process to produce biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass would be a single step reactor at short residence times where solid biomass is directly converted into a liquid fuel. ... with converting plant biomass into commodity products are considered relative to overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass (converting cellulosic biomass into reactive intermediates) and product diversification (converting reactive intermediates into useful products). ... conversion processes that include combustion, gasification, liquefaction, hydrogenation and pyrolysis, have been used to convert the biomass into various energy products. ...

Yu-Ting Cheng; George W. Huber

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

On the effect of demographic characteristics on the formulation of solid waste charging policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the effect of demographic characteristics on the formulation of solid waste charging policy A. Karagiannidis *, A. Xirogiannopoulou, N. Moussiopoulos Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering of municipal charges in Greece, as the fees paid by municipal waste producers to the municipal authorities

Columbia University

330

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Association of Indiana Solid Wastes Districts Inc. The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Indiana Solid Waste Management Board are tasked with planning and adopting rules and regulations governing solid waste management practices. Provisions pertaining to landfill management and expansion, permitting,

331

Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.

Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO); Padukone, Nandan (Denver, CO); Hatzis, Christos (Denver, CO); Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

333

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Bridgeport Sector Biomass Facility Type...

335

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy resources include biomass, solar thermal resources”:  wind,  closed?loop  biomass,  open? loop  biomass,  geothermal  energy,  solar 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Downdraft gasification of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this research were to investigate the parameters affecting the gasification process within downdraft gasifiers using biomass feedstocks. In addition to investigations with… (more)

Milligan, Jimmy B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Biomass: Biogas Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIOGAS GENERATOR Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemicalcarbon cycles, plants, energy resourcestransformations) Grade Level: Middle School (6-8) Small groups (3 to...

338

Biomass 2012 Agenda  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

reach of biomass and biofuel applications, helping to build capacity that will allow for bioenergy markets to develop and deepen in the international arena. Moderator: Natasha...

339

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams Senior Manager American Petroleum Institute July 29, 2014 DRAFT 72814 Let's Agree with the Chicken Developing & Implementing Fuels & Vehicle...

340

Biomass Resource Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with universities and industry partners to maintain a library of herbaceous and woody biomass samples. All analyses performed on these samples, including moisture content,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Biomass 2014 Attendee List  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bender Novozymes Bryna Berendzen DOE - Bioenergy Technologies Office Joshua Berg The Earth Partners Dilfia Bermudez Summerhill Biomass Systems Inc. Michael Bernstein BCS, Inc....

342

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

343

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To support research and development (R&D) planning efforts within the Thermochemical Conversion Program, the Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted the Biomass Indirect Liquefaction (IDL)...

344

Biomass 2014 Draft Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass 2014 Draft Agenda Biomass 2014 Draft Agenda The following document is a draft agenda for the Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy conference. Biomass 2014 Draft...

345

Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Conference Agenda Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda bio2011fullagenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda Biomass 2010...

346

Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

09 Conference Agenda Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda bio2009fullagenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda Biomass 2011...

347

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum...

348

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal, wind, solar, landfill gas and municipal solidgeothermal, wind, solar, landfill gas and municipal solidGeothermal Wind Solar Wood Landfill & MSW Other Biomass

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste-Sewage Sludge. b 4.15 SCF CH 4 / cu ftUP I j methane 31.5 scf sludge 18.61b water 161b Btu/scfsewer 65.3 lb ( 7.9 gal) sludge ash 1.74 lb stack emissions

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

36% deduction of PV, solar thermal and energy efficiencyno biomass, solar -, geo- solid municipal thermal energy, no

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for future liquid biofuels might be better directed...because of higher energy density and at...priority for future biofuel research. However...perhaps including algae or thermochemical...support research alternatives that look beyond...biomass yields and the energy density of biomass...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

Biomass Research Program  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL's mission is to achieve DOE's vision of supplying high-quality raw biomass; preprocessing biomass into advanced bioenergy feedstocks; and delivering bioenergy commodities to biorefineries. You can learn more about research like this at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Kenney, Kevin; Wright, Christopher; Shelton-Davis, Colleen

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

353

Module Handbook Specialisation Biomass Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Module Handbook Specialisation Biomass Energy 2nd Semester for the Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009 University of Zaragoza Specialisation Provider: Biomass Energy #12;Specialisation Biomass Energy, University of Zaragoza Modul: Introduction and Basic Concepts

Damm, Werner

354

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY to treatment prescriptions and anticipated outputs of sawlogs and biomass fuel? How many individual operations biomass fuel removed. Typically in plantations. 50% No harvest treatment

355

Growth and biomass of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resource managers are challenged with waste disposal and leachate produced from its degradation. Poplar (Populus spp.) trees offer an opportunity for ecological leachate disposal as an irrigation source for managed tree systems. Our objective was to irrigate Populus trees with municipal solid waste landfill leachate or fertilized well water (control) (N, P, K) during the 2005 and 2006 growing seasons and test for differences in tree height, diameter, volume, and biomass of leaves, stems, branches, and roots. The trees were grown at the Oneida County Landfill located 6 km west of Rhinelander, Wisconsin, USA (45.6°N, 89.4°W). Eight clones belonging to four genomic groups were tested: NC13460, NC14018 [(Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray × Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh) × P. deltoides ‘BC1’]; NC14104, NC14106, DM115 (P. deltoides × Populus maximowiczii A. Henry ‘DM’); DN5 (P. deltoides × Populus nigra L. ‘DN’); NM2, NM6 (P. nigra × P. maximowiczii ‘NM’). The survival rate for each of the irrigation treatments was 78%. The total aboveground biomass ranged from 0.51 to 2.50 Mg ha?1, with a mean of 1.57 Mg ha?1. The treatment × clone interaction was not significant for tree diameter, total volume, dry mass of the stump or basal roots, or root mass fraction (P > 0.05). However, the treatment × clone interaction was significant for height, total tree dry mass, aboveground dry mass, belowground dry mass, and dry mass of the leaves, stems + branches (woody), and lateral roots (P < 0.05). There was broad clonal variation within the BC1 and DM genomic groups, with genotypes performing differently for treatments. In contrast, the performance of the NM and DN genomic groups was relatively stable across treatments, with clonal response to irrigation being similar regardless of treatment. Nevertheless, selection at the clone level also was important. For example, NC14104 consistently performed better when irrigated with leachate compared with water, while NC14018 responded better to water than leachate. Overall, these data will serve as a basis for researchers and resource managers making decisions about future leachate remediation projects.

Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S. Zalesny Jr.; David R. Coyle; Richard B. Hall

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biomass biomass Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

357

DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200016 A Light-Assisted Biomass Fuel Cell for Renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastewater in the US consumes $25 billion annually and a significant fraction of the US energy.[1] Recently from Wastewater Rachel L. Chamousis and Frank E. Osterloh*[a] Introduction Treatment of municipal, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that can degrade biomass in wastewater (glucose, fats, proteins, ammonia

Osterloh, Frank

358

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY Citation: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 2009. Biomass to Energy: Forest

359

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY study. The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is exploring the ecological and economic consequences

360

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY .................................................................................... 33 3.3 BIOMASS POWER PLANT OPERATION MODELS AND DATA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and continuously between the earth's biomass and atmosphere. From a greenhouse gas perspective, forest treatments

362

Developing better biomass feedstock | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing better biomass feedstock Developing better biomass feedstock Multi-omics unlocking the workings of plants Kim Hixson, an EMSL research scientist, is bioengineering...

363

NREL: Biomass Research - Video Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

common corn grain ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol is made from organic plant matter called biomass. The video shows different forms of biomass such as switchgrass, corn stalks, and...

364

Bioconversion of biomass to methane  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of biomass to methane is described. The biomethane potentials of various biomass feedstocks from our laboratory and literature is summarized.

Hashimoto, A.G. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector.

366

Flow-through biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for biologically converting carbohydrates from lignocellulosic biomass comprising the steps of: suspending lignocellulosic biomass in a flow-through reactor, passing a reaction solution into the reactor, wherein the solution is absorbed into the biomass substrate and at least a portion of the solution migrates through said biomass substrate to a liquid reservoir, recirculating the reaction solution in the liquid reservoir at least once to be absorbed into and migrate through the biomass substrate again. The biological converting of the may involve hydrolyzing cellulose, hemicellulose, or a combination thereof to form oligosaccharides, monomelic sugars, or a combination thereof; fermenting oligosaccharides, monomelic sugars, or a combination thereof to produce ethanol, or a combination thereof. The process can further comprise removing the reaction solution and processing the solution to separate the ethanol produced from non-fermented solids.

Herring, Christopher D.; Liu, Chaogang; Bardsley, John

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Characteristics of biomass in flameless combustion: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The demands of energy and pollutant emissions reduction have motivated the combustion researchers to work on combustion improvement. Flameless combustion or high temperature air combustion has many features such as flame stability, low pollutant emission and uniform profiles of temperature compared to the other modes of combustion. Combustion of solid fuels likes biomass and wastes in flameless combustion conditions has not been investigated as comprehensive as combustion of gaseous fuels. The aim of using biomass in combustion is to reduce the pollutant emissions and to decrease the rate of fossil fuel consumption. In this review, combustion characteristics of biomass in flameless combustion are explained. The paper summarizes the research on the mass loss, ignition time, and \\{NOx\\} emissions during biomass flameless combustion. These summaries show that biomass under flameless combustion gives low pollutant emissions, low mass loss and it decreases the ignition time.

A.A.A. Abuelnuor; M.A. Wahid; Seyed Ehsan Hosseini; A. Saat; Khalid M. Saqr; Hani H. Sait; M. Osman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Assessment of biomass open burning emissions in Indonesia and potential climate forcing impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an emission inventory (EI) for biomass open burning (OB) sources including forest, agro-residue and municipal solid waste (MSW) in Indonesia for year 2007. The EI covered toxic air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) and was presented as annual and monthly average for every district, and further on a grid of 0.25° × 0.25°. A rigorous analysis of activity data and emission factor ranges was done to produce the low, best and high emission estimates for each species. Development of EI methodology for MSW OB which, to our best knowledge, has not been presented in detail in the literature was a focus of this paper. The best estimates of biomass OB emission of toxic air pollutants for the country, in Gg, were: 9.6 SO2; 98 NOx; 7411 CO; 335 NMVOC; 162 NH3; 439 PM10; 357 PM2.5; 24 BC; and 147 OC. The best emission estimates of GHGs, in Gg, were: 401 CH4, 57,247 CO2; and 3.6 N2O. The low and high values of the emission estimates for different species were found to range from ?86% to +260% of the corresponding best estimates. Crop residue OB contributed more than 80% of the total biomass OB emissions, followed by forest fire of 2–12% (not including peat soil fire emission) and MSW (1–8%). An inter-annual active fires count for Indonesia showed relatively low values in 2007 which may be attributed to the high rainfall intensity under the influence of La Niña climate pattern in the year. Total estimated net climate forcing from OB in Indonesia was 110 (20 year horizon) and 73 (100 year horizon) Tg CO2 equivalents which is around 0.9–1.1% of that reported for the global biomass OB for both time horizons. The spatial distribution showed higher emissions in large urban areas in Java and Sumatra Island, while the monthly emissions indicated higher values during the dry months of August–October.

Didin Agustian Permadi; Nguyen Thi Kim Oanh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

OpenEI - biomass  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/827 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License: 

370

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

371

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies depending on utility Program Info Start Date Varies Expiration Date Varies State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on utility Provider Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company Certain municipal utilities in Massachusetts, in cooperation with

372

Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate $100 limit per customer account for appliances purchased in the same calendar year. Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2014 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $100 Refrigerators: $100 Clothes Washing Machines: $100 Dishwashers: $75 Dehumidifiers: $50 Window Air Conditioners: $50 Provider Mansfield Municipal Electric Department Mansfield Municipal Electric Department encourages energy efficiency

373

Lignin-blocking treatment of biomass and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion. Cellulase efficiencies are improved by the protein or polypeptide treatment. The treatment may be used in combination with steam explosion and acid prehydrolysis techniques. Hydrolysis yields from lignin containing biomass are enhanced 5-20%, and enzyme utilization is increased from 10% to 50%. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

Yang, Bin (Hanover, NH); Wyman, Charles E. (Norwich, VT)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

National Bio Energy Co Ltd formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio Energy Co Ltd formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd Bio Energy Co Ltd formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name National Bio Energy Co Ltd (formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd.) Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100005 Sector Biomass Product Invest in, build and run biomass power plants. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

American Municipal Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Power Municipal Power Jump to: navigation, search Name American Municipal Power Place Columbus, Ohio Zip 43219 Product AMP is a non-profit corporation that owns and operates electric facilities. AMP purchases wholesale electric power and energy, and develops alternate power resources for its members. References American Municipal Power[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Municipal Power is a company located in Columbus, Ohio . References ↑ "American Municipal Power" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Municipal_Power&oldid=342122" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs

376

Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Biomass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy » Energy » Biomass Biomass Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy. Featured Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel A behind-the-scenes video of how oil from algae is extracted and refined to create clean, renewable transportation fuel. Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain Hospital replaced one of its 1950s crude oil boilers with a wood-pellet boiler -- saving the hospital about $100,000 a year in heating costs. | Photo courtesy of the Oregon Department of Energy. Highlighting how a rural Oregon hospital was able to cut its heating bills while stimulating the local economy. Ceres: Making Biofuels Bigger and Better A Ceres researcher evaluates the performance of biofuel crops. | Photo courtesy of Ceres, Inc.

378

CLC of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developments on Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions Control Science & Technology Hangzhou, China May 28-30, 2008 Overview  Introduction  Technical approach  Experiments on chemical looping combustion of biomass  Conclusions Climate change is a result of burning too much coal, oil and gas.... We need to capture CO 2 in any way ! Introduction CCS is the world's best chance to have a major & immediate impact on CO 2 emission reduction Introduction Introduction  Biomass is renewable energy with zero CO 2 emission  A way to capture CO 2 from biomass ?  If so, a quick way to reduce CO 2 content in the atmosphere Normal combustion

379

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Annual Supply ( USDA and DOE , Washington, DC , 2005 ); www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/final_billionton_vision...hybridcars.com/. 12 Vehicle Technologies Program, DOE , www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2008_fotw514...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

380

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Increasing supplies of biodiesel is one priority for future...research. However, production of biodiesel from temperate oilseed crops...systems, perhaps including algae or thermochemical conversion...biomass either for burning or for biodiesel production. Reducing leaf...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

382

Modern Biomass Conversion Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of key biomass conversion technologies currently deployed and technologies that may...2...capture and sequestration technology (CCS). In doing so, special at...

Andre Faaij

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

AGCO Biomass Solutions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to update any forward-looking statements except as required by law. Who is AGCO? AGCO Biomass - A History * Started approximately 5 years ago - First OEM to have a department...

384

Overview of Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main combustion systems for biomass fuels are presented and the respective requirements ... etc.) in industrial boilers or for co-combustion in power plants. For fuels with high ... moving grate firings are u...

T. Nussbaumer; J. E. Hustad

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

386

Biomass 2014 Poster Session  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) invites students, researchers, public and private organizations, and members of the general public to submit poster abstracts for consideration for the annual Biomass Conference Poster Session. The Biomass 2014 conference theme focuses on topics that are advancing the growth of the bioeconomy, such as improvements in feedstock logistics; promising, innovative pathways for advanced biofuels; and market-enabling co-products.

387

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

388

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

389

Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment of municipal solid waste components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as follows: Combine 50 mL pH 4. 6 1. 0 M citrate buffer 500 mL distilled H, O 1. 8939 g Genencor 300P cellulase or Cytolase 300 5. 695 mL NOVOZYM Beta-glucosidase 03 g sodium azide Complete to 1 L with HrO Adjust pH to 4. 8 with 1. 0 M Na... is found in Appendix 8. 2. Novozym 188 cellobiose with an activity of 250 CBU/mL was added giving a loading of 285 CBU/g dry substrate. Both enzymes contain some sugars that must be subtracted from the sugar yields. A complete procedure is given...

Lundeen, Joseph Eric

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the project was to demonstrate the environmental and combustion performance advantages of a carbonized refuse derived fuel (RDF) slurry, produced from EnerTech`s slurry carbonization process, using continuous pilot scale equipment and its suitability as an alternative fuel for utility and industrial boilers.

Klosky, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gaseous missions rduction from arobic MBT of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recovery (by collecting biogas generated during anaerobic digestion) and/or return of organic matter the composting process, and the sec- ond one focused on the biogas génération from the associated landfill surface fluxes and biogas composition. ineris-00973342,version1-4Apr2014 Author manuscript, published

Boyer, Edmond

392

Haraldrud Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plant in Oslo.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis has studied Haraldrud MSW combustion process. Haraldrud is a realcombustion plant burning waste for citizens of Oslo. A thoroughly description ofthe combustion process… (more)

Gudim, Simen Johan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Kinematic wave model for water movement in municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conductivity and capillary potential suggested by Clapp and Hornberger [1978] have been employed. However, as pointed out by Bendz et at. (1997), the process assumptions on which the Richards equation and the ensuing CDE rely for their applicability have... and Environ- mental Impact, edited by T. H. Christensen, R. Cossu, and R. Steg- mann, pp. 29-49, Academic, San Diego, Calif., 1989. Clapp, R. B., and G. M. Hornberger, Empirical equations for some soil hydraulic properties, Water Resour. Res., 14, 601...

Bendz, David; Singh, Vijay P.; Rosqvist, H??kan; Bengtsson, Lars

394

About the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Numerous cities and organizations around the nation are announcing plans to conduct large scale retrofits/comparisons of LED street and area lighting products with their conventional street lights.

395

The Economics of Resource Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Eq. 2 when the unrecovered fraction is disposed of by incineration...worth of resource recovery in light of other demands such as those...Utilization of the Organic Fraction Figure 4 shows that 47 percent...that the value of the organic fraction as a fuel exactly offsets the...

James G. Abert; Harvey Alter; J. Frank Bernheisel

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Integrated Plant for the Municipal Solid Waste of Madrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as steam- boiler water treatment, compressed-air, control and instrumentation, etc. The incinerator of the project was to recover the energy content of RDF generated by the recycling plant of the city of Madrid and Composting Plant The MSW is brought by the collecting trucks which unload in the storage area with a two

Columbia University

397

Modeling of leachate generation in municipal solid waste landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters specified by the user. Ultimately, this model will strive to replace the time the user requires to generate and fill a given landfill geometry with time spent running and evaluating trials to yield the best design....

Beck, James Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Municipal Alternative Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation

399

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

400

Denton Municipal Electric- Standard Offer Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Within the GreenSense program, Denton Municipal Electric's Standard Offer Program provides rebates to large commercial and industrial customers for lighting retrofits, HVAC upgrades and motor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0 Conference Agenda Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda bio2010fullagenda.pdf More Documents & Publications QTR Cornerstone Workshop Agenda 2014 Biomass...

402

Biomass 2012 Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2 Agenda Biomass 2012 Agenda Detailed agenda from the July 10-11, 2012, Biomass conference--Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment...

403

Dinuba Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dinuba Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Dinuba Biomass Facility Facility Dinuba Sector Biomass Owner Community Recycling, Inc. Location Dinuba, California...

404

November 2011 Model documentation for biomass,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 November 2011 Model documentation for biomass, cellulosic biofuels, renewable of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;3 Contents Biomass.....................................................................................................................................................4 Variables in the biomass module

Noble, James S.

405

Mecca Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mecca Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mecca Biomass Facility Facility Mecca Sector Biomass Owner Colmac Energy Location Mecca, California Coordinates 33.571692,...

406

Santa Clara Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Santa Clara Biomass Facility Facility Santa Clara Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Santa Clara County,...

407

Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiantou Biomass Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power Place: Jinzhou, Hebei Province, China Zip: 50000 Sector: Biomass Product: A company engages in...

408

NREL: International Activities - Biomass Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Resource Assessment Map showing annual productivity of marginal lands in APEC economies. Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in...

409

Chowchilla Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chowchilla Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chowchilla Biomass Facility Facility Chowchilla Sector Biomass Owner London Economics Location Chowchilla, California...

410

Category:Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pages in category "Biomass" This category contains only the following page. B Biomass Scenario Model Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:Biomass&oldid3...

411

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Haryana Biomass Power Ltd. Place: Mumbai, Haryana, India Zip: 400025 Sector: Biomass Product: This is a JV consortium...

412

NREL: Biomass Research - David W. Templeton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. Templeton Photo of David Templeton David Templeton is the senior biomass analyst on the Biomass Analysis team (Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory) within the National...

413

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels, LLC  UCSD Biomass to Power  Economic Feasibility Figure 1: West Biofuels Biomass Gasification to Power rates..……………………. ……31  UCSD Biomass to Power ? Feasibility 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility Facility Hutchins LFG Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dallas County,...

415

Mecca Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mecca Plant Biomass Facility Facility Mecca Plant Sector Biomass Location Riverside County, California Coordinates...

416

Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name: Florida Biomass Energy Consortium Place: Florida Sector: Biomass Product: Association of biomass energy companies. References: Florida...

417

Opportunities for Farmers in Biomass Feedstock Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Opportunities for Farmers in Biomass Feedstock Production Richard Hess Biomass 2014, Feedstocks Plenary July 29, 2014 Getting into the Biomass Business Crop Residue Removal; Farm...

418

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Biomass Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

basics and biomass organizations. Technology Basics The following resources explain the fundamentals of biomass energy technologies: Biomass Energy Basics: NREL publishes this...

419

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Facility APS Biomass I Sector Biomass Location Arizona Coordinates 34.0489281°, -111.0937311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0489281,"lon":-111.0937311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Minimally refined biomass fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier  

SciTech Connect

The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

Carl Bielenberg

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

423

Biomass Feedstock National User Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

424

Biomass in a petrochemical world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...refinery, mapping out the possible routes from biomass feedstocks to fuels and petrochemical-type products, drawing...biorefinery enables the conversion of a range of biomass feedstocks into fuels and chemical feedstocks [6]. As with...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions Design Competitions National design competitions heighten awareness and market adoption of high-performance solid-state lighting products.

426

Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Biomass 2014 Attendee List | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass 2014 Attendee List Biomass 2014 Attendee List This document is the attendee list for Biomass 2014, held July 29-July 30 in Washington, D.C. biomass2014attendeelist.pdf...

428

Use of Climate Information in Municipal Drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Kenney W WA Western Water Assessment Report Number WWA01-06 The University of Colorado and the NationalUse of Climate Information in Municipal Drought Planning in Colorado Roberta Klein Douglas S Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration #12;Klein and Kenney: Municipal Drought Planning 2Western Water

Neff, Jason

429

Draft Transcript on Municipal PV Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Webinar on navigating the legal, tax, and finance issues associated with the installation of Municipal PV Systems. The following agenda was developed based on Pat Boylston's experience assisting municipalities with their PV projects and the requests for information that the Solar America City technical team leads have received from many of the 25 Solar America Cities since the April 2008 meeting in Tucson.

430

Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

Shih, Chien-Ju

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;5-2 #12;APPENDIX 5: BIOMASS TO ENERGY PROJECT:WILDLIFE HABITAT EVALUATION 1. Authors: Patricia Manley Ross management scenarios. We evaluated the potential effects of biomass removal scenarios on biological diversity

432

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY as a result of emerging biomass opportunities on private industrial and public multiple-use lands (tracked in the vegetation domain) and the quantity of biomass consumed by the wildfire (tracked

433

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;12-2 #12;Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members and Project Advisors Research Team. Nechodom's background is in biomass energy policy development and public policy research. Peter Stine

434

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY or recommendations of the study. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Domain Description The study area for the Biomass to Energy (B2 and environmental costs and benefits of using forest biomass to generate electrical power while changing fire

435

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

436

13, 3226932289, 2013 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern Great Plains T (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP if available. Biomass burning aerosol Geosciences Union. 32269 #12;ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern

Dong, Xiquan

437

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;10-2 #12;Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass to Renewable Fuels and Electricity 1. Report to the Biomass to Energy Project (B2E) Principal Authors: Dennis Schuetzle, TSS

438

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;6-2 #12;APPENDIX 6: Cumulative Watershed Effects Analysis for the Biomass to Energy Project 1. Principal the findings or recommendations of the study. Cumulative watershed effects (CWE) of the Biomass to Energy (B2E

439

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

440

Hull Municipal Light Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Light Plant Municipal Light Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Hull Municipal Light Plant Place Massachusetts Utility Id 8797 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lights Rate 150 WATT Lighting Area Lights Rate 250 WATT Lighting Area Lights Rate 400 WATT Lighting Large Power Rate 35 Industrial Large Power Taxable Rate 39 Industrial Municipal Lighting Rate 33 Lighting Municipal Rate 36 Commercial Residential Rate 31 Residential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Replacement: Up to $100 Second Refrigerator Pickup: $35 CFLs: 3 free replacement bulbs Motors: $0.18/per kWh saved Lighting: $0.20/per kWh saved HVAC: $0.22/per kWh saved Refrigeration: $0.22/per kWh saved Provider Alameda Municipal Power Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) has multiple program in place to help

442

Federal Biomass Activities | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Biomass Activities Federal Biomass Activities Statutory and executive order requirements for Bioproducts and Biofuels federalbiomassactivities.pdf More Documents &...

443

Biomass Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Technology characterizations Website: web.worldbank.orgWBSITEEXTERNALTOPICSEXTENERGY2EXTRENENERGYTK0,, References: Biomass...

444

Municipal Utilities' Investment in Smart Grid Technologies Improves...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Utilities' Investment in Smart Grid Technologies Improves Services and Lowers Costs Municipal Utilities' Investment in Smart Grid Technologies Improves Services and...

445

Municipal Bond - Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Municipal Bond - Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to Provide Low-Cost Solar Energy Municipal Bond - Power Purchase Agreement Model Continues to Provide Low-Cost Solar...

446

Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets This report describes how NREL used the CNG Vehicle and...

447

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Municipal Alternative Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on AddThis.com...

448

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests February 2012 #12;This Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests study was conducted by the Biomass Energy Resource Center Biomass Energy Resource Center Kamalesh Doshi Biomass Energy Resource Center Hillary Emick Biomass Energy

449

EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

451

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

452

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

453

Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Osage Municipal Utilities Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Facility Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Osage Municipal Utilities Developer Osage Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Osage Municipal Utilities Location West of Osage IA Coordinates 43.298363°, -92.84096° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.298363,"lon":-92.84096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct, alter or operate a solid waste processing facility or a solid waste disposal area of a solid waste management system, except for clean rubble disposal sites, without first obtaining a permit from the secretary. Every person desiring to obtain a permit shall make application for such a permit on forms

456

Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions LED Lighting Facts LED lighting facts - A Program of the U.S. DOE DOE's LED Lighting Facts® program showcases LED products for general

457

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

458

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Maximum Rebate $400,000 Program Info Start Date 3/17/2010 State New Hampshire Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount $5,000 to $400,000 Provider New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority In March 2010, the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) launched a revolving loan program to encourage the state's

459

Biomass One LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP Biomass Facility LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass One LP Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One LP Sector Biomass Location Jackson County, Oregon Coordinates 42.334535°, -122.7646577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.334535,"lon":-122.7646577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility Facility Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Sector Biomass Location Lewis County, New York Coordinates 43.840112°, -75.4344727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.840112,"lon":-75.4344727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aqueous fractionation of biomass based on novel carbohydrate hydrolysis kinetics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-function process for hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components comprising extractives and proteins; a portion of a solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising: a) introducing either solid fresh biomass or partially fractioned lignocellulosic biomass material with entrained acid or water into a reactor and heating to a temperature of up to about 185.degree. C.-205.degree. C. b) allowing the reaction to proceed to a point where about 60% of the hemicellulose has been hydrolyzed in the case of water or complete dissolution in case of acid; c) adding a dilute acid liquid at a pH below about 5 at a temperature of up to about 205.degree. C. for a period ranging from about 5 to about 10 minutes; to hydrolyze the remaining 40% of hemicellulose if water is used. d) quenching the reaction at a temperature of up to about 140.degree. C. to quench all degradation and hydrolysis reactions; and e) introducing into said reaction chamber and simultaneously removing from said reaction chamber, a volumetric flow rate of dilute acid at a temperature of up to about 140.degree. C. to wash out the majority of the solubilized biomass components, to obtain improved hemicellosic sugar yields.

Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

High-biomass sorghums for biomass biofuel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. William Rooney High-biomass sorghums provide structural carbohydrates for bioenergy production. Sorghum improvement is well established, but development of high- biomass sorghums... these goals and be economically viable, abundant and low-cost 3 biomass sources are needed. To provide this, dedicated bioenergy crops are necessary (Epplin et al., 2007). For a variety of reasons, the C4 grass sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L...

Packer, Daniel

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

Impact of solid fuel combustion technology on valence speciation of chromium in fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fly ash (FA) generated in real furnaces was used to evaluate the impact of the kind of the solid fuel burnt and combustion technology on chromium speciation, particularly the presence of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) forms as well as readily and hardly leachable chromium(VI) species in FAs. The \\{FAs\\} originated from a pulverized coal combustion boiler (PCC boiler), a fluidized bed combustion boiler (FBC boiler), a stoker-fired boiler (SF boiler), a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI), a cement rotary kiln (CRK) and a modern domestic boiler (DB). The speciation analysis of chromium was carried out by means of extraction followed by catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry with adsorption of Cr(III)-DTPA complexes (CCSV-DTPA) for determination of Cr(VI) and AAS was used for determination of Cr content. It has been revealed that the antagonistic action of alkali metal compounds and iron oxides plays a crucial role in shaping valence speciation of chromium. According to the proposed transformation path of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI), hard coal combustion in an SF boiler, an FBC boiler or a domestic boiler will generate \\{FAs\\} with a low Cr(VI) level. Replacing fuel with biomass should create favorable conditions for generating FA enriched with Cr(VI). Relatively high concentrations of Cr(VI) can also be expected in FA generated in the process of high-temperature combustion of coal in PCC boilers.

Ryszard ?wietlik; Marzena Trojanowska; Monika ?o?y?ska; Artur Molik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Waverly Municipal Elec Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Elec Utility Municipal Elec Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waverly Municipal Elec Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 20214 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service Commercial Commercial and Municipal time of Use Service Commercial Electric Heat Rate for Residential Service Residential General Service General and Minicipal Demand Time of Use Service Commercial

465

Sacramento Municipal Utility District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Utility District Municipal Utility District (Redirected from Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD)) Jump to: navigation, search Name Sacramento Municipal Util Dist Place Sacramento, California Website www.smud.org Utility Id 16534 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration

466

Gowrie Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gowrie Municipal Utilities Gowrie Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Gowrie Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 7424 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0976/kWh Commercial: $0.0900/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gowrie_Municipal_Utilities&oldid=41075

467

Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils Jump to: navigation, search Name Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils Place Indiana Utility Id 10798 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0749/kWh Commercial: $0.1150/kWh Industrial: $0.0597/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lawrenceburg_Municipal_Utils&oldid=410978

468

Minnesota Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Minnesota Municipal Power Agny) (Redirected from Minnesota Municipal Power Agny) Jump to: navigation, search Name Minnesota Municipal Power Agency Place Minnesota Utility Id 12667 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Minnesota_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=412260

469

Texas Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Power Agency Municipal Power Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name Texas Municipal Power Agency Place Texas Utility Id 18715 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Texas_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=411659" Categories:

470

Hudson Municipal Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Electric Utility Municipal Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hudson Municipal Electric Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 8966 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Residential All-Electric Residential School Rate Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0993/kWh Commercial: $0.0905/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hudson_Municipal_Electric_Utility&oldid=410846

471

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Municipal Power Start Date 01/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan with Lights: $15 Dehumidifier: $25 Select Clothes Washer: $50 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Furnace Fan with ECM: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $250 CFLs: up to 85% of cost Efficiency Smart (tm) provides energy efficiency incentives to the American

472

Woodstock Municipal Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Wind Municipal Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodstock Municipal Wind Facility Woodstock Municipal Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Juhl Wind Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Woodstock MN Coordinates 44.009957°, -96.100552° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.009957,"lon":-96.100552,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

473

New London Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New London Municipal Utilities New London Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 13468 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png City All-Electric Residential Residential City Residential Residential General Service and Municipal Commercial Large General Service and Municipal (Demand) Commercial Rural Resident and Farm Residential Rural Resident and Farm All-Electric Residential Security Lights 100w HPS Metered light Lighting

474

Municipal performance: does mayoral quality matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research addresses the question of what explains municipal performance in terms of delivering social services and fiscal performance. While the existing literature explains governmental performance with political, institutional and socio...

Avellaneda, Claudia Nancy

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Concord Municipal Light Plant- Solar Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that are designed to offset the customer's electrical needs. Systems must be owned by...

476

Biomass burning and global change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The burning of living and dead biomass including forests savanna grasslands and agricultural wastes is much more widespread and extensive than previously believed and may consume as much as 8700 teragrams of dry biomass matter per year. The burning of this much biomass releases about 3940 teragrams of total carbon or about 3550 teragrams of carbon in the form of CO2 which is about 40% of the total global annual production of CO2. Biomass burning may also produce about 32% of the world’s annual production of CO 24% of the nonmethane hydrocarbons 20% of the oxides of nitrogen and biomass burn combustion products may be responsible for producing about 38% of the ozone in the troposphere. Biomass burning has increased with time and today is overwhelmingly human?initiated.

Joel S. Levine; Wesley R. Cofer III; Donald R. Cahoon Jr.; Edward L. Winsted; Brian J. Stocks

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Biomass 2014: Breakout Speaker Biographies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document outlines the biographies of the breakout speakers for Biomass 2014, held July 29–July 30 in Washington, D.C.

479

Biomass 2009: Fueling Our Future  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

We would like to thank everyone who attended Biomass 2009: Fueling Our Future, including the speakers, moderators, sponsors, and exhibitors who helped make the conference a great success.

480

NREL: Biomass Research - Joseph Shekiro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deacetylation and Mechanical (Disc) Refining Process for the Conversion of Renewable Biomass to Lower Cost Sugars." Biotechnology for Biofuels (7:7). Shekiro, J. ; Kuhn, E.M.;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: POET  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in the project, including POET Design and Construction, POET Research, POET Biomass, and POET Biorefining - Emmetsburg. LIBERTY is partnering with Novozymes to optimize...

482

NREL: Biomass Research - Michael Resch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

improve the hydrolysis efficiency of cellulase and hemicellulase enzyme digestion of biomass. This work will help NREL lower the industrial cost of lignocellulosic enzyme...

483

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid waste and/or waste tires. The following solid waste disposal facilities require a solid waste permit prior to construction and/or operation: land disposal facilities; solid waste processing facilities, including: transfer stations; solid waste incinerators receiving waste from off-site sources; regulated medical waste

484

Hebei Milestone Biomass Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hebei Milestone Biomass Energy Co Ltd Place: Hebei Province, China Zip: 50051 Sector: Biomass Product: China-based biomass project developer. References: Hebei Milestone Biomass...

485

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

486

Process for concentrated biomass saccharification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

487

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and impact of Industrial Private Forestry (IPF) has been eliminated from most of the analyses that make up) Project is developing a comprehensive forest biomass-to- electricity model to identify and analyze the economic and environmental costs and benefits of using forest biomass to generate electricity while

488

Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

26 January 1983 research-article Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion...of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuel, ethanol. Within the scope of this objective...maximize the conversion efficiency of ethanol production from biomass. This can be...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Forrest The annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass Monika Winder 1 * James E. Cloern 2...Here, we ask whether phytoplankton biomass also fluctuates over a consistent annual...compiled 125 time series of phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a concentration) from temperate...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass [and Discussion] D. I. C. Wang G...microbiological conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuel, ethanol. Within the...efficiency of ethanol production from biomass. This can be achieved through the effective...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

492

Biomass 2013 Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3 Agenda Biomass 2013 Agenda This agenda outlines the sessions and events for Biomass 2013 in Washington, D.C., July 31-August 1. biomass2013agenda.pdf More Documents &...

493

Florida Biomass Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place: Florida Sector: Biomass Product: Florida-based biomass project developer. References: Florida Biomass Energy, LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

494

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

 The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass.  The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

495

Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, Melvin (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard (Evergreen, CO); Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

496

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

497

BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

icat ion Preheat zone Biomass liquefaction Tubular reactor (design is shown in Figure 7, C I Biomass ua efaction Fic LBL Process BiOMASS t NON-REVERS lNG CYCLONE CONDENSER (

Ergun, Sabri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Kentucky Division of Waste Management This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or

499