Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

2

Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT) Place New York, New York Zip 10036 Product Company set up by UTEK specifically for its sale to Xethanol, holding the exclusive license for microgasification technology developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota. References Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT) is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT)"

3

Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

2007 gasification technologies conference papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. The technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. Using these results, the carbon sequestration potential of the three technologies was then evaluated. The results of these evaluations are given in this final report.

Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. During this reporting period, the technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. The results of these evaluations are summarized in this report.

Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Downdraft gasification of biomass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objectives of this research were to investigate the parameters affecting the gasification process within downdraft gasifiers using biomass feedstocks. In addition to investigations with… (more)

Milligan, Jimmy B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

9

Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

190 190 July 2009 Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications David Peterson and Scott Haase National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-46190 July 2009 Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications David Peterson and Scott Haase Prepared under Task No. IGST.9034 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

10

An update technology for integrated biomass gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A discussion is presented on the technical analysis of a 6.4 MWe integrated biomass gasification combined cycle (IBGCC) plant. It features three numbers ... producing 5.85 MW electrical power in open cycle and 55...

Paritosh Bhattacharya; Suman Dey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water† ... A packed bed of carbon within the reactor catalyzed the gasification of these organic vapors in the water; consequently, the water effluent of the reactor was clean. ... A method for removing plugs from the reactor was developed and employed during an 8-h gasification run involving potato wastes. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Stephen Glen Allen; Deborah Schulman; Xiaodong Xu; Robert J. Divilio

2000-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fixed Bed Counter Current Gasification of Mesquite and Juniper Biomass Using Air-steam as Oxidizer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal gasification of biomass is being considered as one of the most promising technologies for converting biomass into gaseous fuel. Here we present results of gasification, using an adiabatic bed gasifier with air, steam as gasification medium...

Chen, Wei 1981-

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

EMERY BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emery Recycling Corporation (now Emery Energy Company, LLC) evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of the Emery Biomass Gasification Power System (EBGPS). The gasifier technology is owned and being developed by Emery. The Emery Gasifier for this project was an oxygen-blown, pressurized, non-slagging gasification process that novelly integrates both fixed-bed and entrained-flow gasification processes into a single vessel. This unique internal geometry of the gasifier vessel will allow for tar and oil destruction within the gasifier. Additionally, the use of novel syngas cleaning processes using sorbents is proposed with the potential to displace traditional amine-based and other syngas cleaning processes. The work scope within this project included: one-dimensional gasifier modeling, overall plant process modeling (ASPEN), feedstock assessment, additional analyses on the proposed syngas cleaning process, plant cost estimating, and, market analysis to determine overall feasibility and applicability of the technology for further development and commercial deployment opportunities. Additionally, the project included the development of a detailed technology development roadmap necessary to commercialize the Emery Gasification technology. Process modeling was used to evaluate both combined cycle and solid oxide fuel cell power configurations. Ten (10) cases were evaluated in an ASPEN model wherein nine (9) cases were IGCC configurations with fuel-to-electricity efficiencies ranging from 38-42% and one (1) case was an IGFC solid oxide case where 53.5% overall plant efficiency was projected. The cost of electricity was determined to be very competitive at scales from 35-71 MWe. Market analysis of feedstock availability showed numerous market opportunities for commercial deployment of the technology with modular capabilities for various plant sizes based on feedstock availability and power demand.

Benjamin Phillips; Scott Hassett; Harry Gatley

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

15

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

Biothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory% postconsumer waste #12;i Independent Review Panel Summary Report September 28, 2011 From: Independent Review Panel, Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE

18

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

19

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification is a thermo-chemical process which transforms biomass into valuable synthesis gas. Integrated with a biorefinery it can address the facility’s residue handling challenges and input demands. A number of feedstock, technology, oxidizer...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Downdraft Gasification Of Various Biomass Feedstocks For Energy Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Gasification of biomass for energy production has the potential to be a cost effective and environmentally sustainable technology. Small scale, 20-250 kWth, downdraft gasifiers… (more)

Roesch, Hans Patric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

J Luche; Q Falcoz; T Bastien; J P Leninger; K Arabi; O Aubry; A Khacef; J M Cormier; J Lédé

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Breakout Session 2A-Conversion...

23

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

25

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Integrated Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Cost and Performance Analysis of Biomass-Based Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (BIGCC) Power Systems Project ID: 106 Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann Brief Description: This project examines the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems--high-pressure air blown, low-pressure air blown, and low-pressure indirectly heated. Purpose Examine the cost and performance potential of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems - a high pressure air-blown, a low pressure indirectly heated, and a low pressure air-blown. Performer Principal Investigator: Margaret Mann

26

Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification may be an attractive alternative for converting heavy oil residue – petroleum coke into valuable synthetic gas. Due to the low reactivity of petroleum coke, it is maybe preferable to convert it in combination with other fuels such as biomass. Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass was studied in an atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed reactor and a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) at KTH Royal University of Technology. Biomass ash in the blends was found to have a catalytic effect on the reactivity of petroleum coke during co-gasification. Furthermore, this synergetic effect between biomass and petcoke was observed in the kinetics data. The activation energy Ea determined from the Arrhenius law for pure petcoke steam gasification in the TGA was 121.5 kJ/mol, whereas for the 50/50 mixture it was 96.3, and for the 20/80 blend – 83.5 kJ/mol.

Vera Nemanova; Araz Abedini; Truls Liliedahl; Klas Engvall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

THERMODYNAMIC MODELLING OF BIOMASS INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE (BIGCC) POWER GENERATION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An attractive and practicable possibility of biomass utilization for energy production is gasification integrated with a combined cycle. This technology seems to have the possibility… (more)

Desta, Melaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Biomass Gasification at The Evergreen State College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Gasification at The Evergreen State College Written by Students of the Winter 2011 Program "Applied Research: Biomass, Energy, and Environmental Justice" At The Evergreen State College, Olympia://blogs.evergreen.edu/appliedresearch/ #12; i Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction to Biomass at the Evergreen State College by Dani

30

2006 gasification technologies conference papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sessions covered: business overview, industry trends and new developments; gasification projects progress reports; industrial applications and opportunities; Canadian oil sands; China/Asia gasification markets - status and projects; carbon management with gasification technologies; gasification economics and performance issues addressed; and research and development, and new technologies initiatives.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2A—Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production Santosh Gangwal, Director–Business Development, Energy Technologies, Southern Research Institute

32

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Submitted Utilization of char from biomass gasification in catalytic applications Naomi Klinghoffer Utilization takes place during catalytic decomposition. This thesis focuses on the utilization of char as a catalyst

33

Biomass Gasification in Dual Fluidized Bed Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dual fluidized bed gasification technology is prospective because it produces high...2...dilution even when air is used to generate the required endothermic heat via in situ combustion. This study is devoted ...

Toshiyuki Suda; Takahiro Murakami…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-03GO13175 and DE-FC36-02GO12024) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. This multi-year effort to develop methods to effectively monitor gaseous species produced in thermochemical process streams resulted in a sampling and analysis approach that is continuous, sensitive, comprehensive, accurate, reliable, economical, and safe. The improved approach for sampling thermochemical processes that GTI developed and demonstrated in its series of field demonstrations successfully provides continuous transport of vapor-phase syngas streams extracted from the main gasification process stream to multiple, commercially available analyzers. The syngas stream is carefully managed through multiple steps to successfully convey it to the analyzers, while at the same time bringing the stream to temperature and pressure conditions that are compatible with the analyzers. The primary principle that guides the sample transport is that throughout the entire sampling train, the temperature of the syngas stream is maintained above the maximum condensation temperature of the vapor phase components of the conveyed sample gas. In addition, to minimize adsorption or chemical changes in the syngas components prior to analysis, the temperature of the transported stream is maintained as hot as is practical, while still being cooled only as much necessary prior to entering the analyzer(s). The successful transport of the sample gas stream to the analyzer(s) is accomplished through the managed combination of four basic gas conditioning methods that are applied as specifically called for by the process conditions, the gas constituent concentrations, the analyzer requirements, and the objectives of the syngas analyses: 1) removing entrained particulate matter from the sample stream; 2) maintaining the temperature of the sample gas stream; 3) lowering the pressure of the sample gas stream to decrease the vapor pressures of all the component vapor species in the sample stream; and 4) diluting the gas stream with a metered, inert gas, such as nitrogen. Proof-of-concept field demonstrations of the sampling approach were conducted for gasification process streams from a black liquor gasifier, and from the gasification of biomass and coal feedstocks at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility. In addition to the descriptions and data included in this Final Report, GTI produced a Special Topical Report, Design and Protocol for Monitoring Gaseous Species in Thermochemical Processes, that explains and describes in detail the objectives, principles, design, hardware, installation, operation and representative data produced during this successful developmental effort. Although the specific analyzers used under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were referenced in the Topical Report and this Final Report, the sampling interface design they present is generic enough to adapt to other analyzers that may be more appropriate to alternate process streams or facilities.

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Research on an Approach to High Temperature Flameless Combustion Technology of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the situation of biomass (straw) utilization technology is depicted. Besides, the present questions of biomass gasification, liquefaction along with direct combustion are analyzed. Biomass gasificat...

Peiyong Ma; Zhiguo Tang; Qizhao Lin; Abuliti…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Gasification of woody biomass Tessa Jansen (s0140600)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gasification of woody biomass Tessa Jansen (s0140600) University of Twente Internship at SINTEF costs. So I would be working on biomass gasification and perform thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA process and char reactivity has been investigated by performing multiple gasification, pyrolysis

Luding, Stefan

37

Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan exempts certain energy production related farm facilities from real and personal property taxes. Among exempted property are certain methane digesters, biomass gasification equipment,...

38

NETL, USDA design coal-stabilized biomass gasification unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal, poultry litter, contaminated corn, rice hulls, moldly hay, manure sludge - these are representative materials that could be tested as fuel feedstocks in a hybrid gasification/combustion concept studied in a recent US Department of Energy (DOE) design project. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) collaborated to develop a design concept of a power system that incorporates Hybrid Biomass Gasification. This system would explore the use of a wide range of biomass and agricultural waste products as gasifier feedstocks. The plant, if built, would supply one-third of electrical and steam heating needs at the USDA's Beltsville (Maryland) Agricultural Research Center. 1 fig., 1 photo.

NONE

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessing thermal energy storage technologies of concentrating solar plants for the direct coupling with chemical processes. The case of solar-driven biomass gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dynamic simulation, design improvements and control issues in solar power plants might compete with special considerations on energy storing techniques. In order to provide the stability in production of power or chemical commodities in spite of discontinuity in the source of energy, i.e., sun, overall concerns in the details of solar power plant, competition and comparison of common storing technologies should be taken into account to ensure the effectiveness and continuity of the supply. This research activity is aimed at extending the study from the power generation purpose to the solar-supplied chemical commodities production, highlighting the limitations of certain well-established thermal energy storage techniques when concentrating solar is directly coupled with chemical processes. The (intrinsically dynamic and closed-loop) simulation of solar power plants and direct thermal energy storage technologies is performed for the direct thermal energy storage technologies and, only for the case of thermocline, it is coupled with computational fluid-dynamic (CFD) studies for the proper assessment of molten salt and steam temperature trends. To investigate benefits/restrictions of the storage technologies, the solar steam generation is integrated with the gasification of biomasses for syngas production. Also, first-principles dynamic model for the biomass gasifier is provided.

Flavio Manenti; Andres R. Leon-Garzon; Zohreh Ravaghi-Ardebili; Carlo Pirola

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-02GO12024 and DE-FC36-03GO13175) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. The primary objectives of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were the selection, acquisition, and application of a suite of gas analyzers capable of providing near real-time gas analyses to suitably conditioned syngas streams. A review was conducted of sampling options, available analysis technologies, and commercially available analyzers, that could be successfully applied to the challenging task of on-line syngas characterization. The majority of thermochemical process streams comprise multicomponent gas mixtures that, prior to crucial, sequential cleanup procedures, include high concentrations of condensable species, multiple contaminants, and are often produced at high temperatures and pressures. Consequently, GTI engaged in a concurrent effort under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-03GO13175 to develop the means to deliver suitably prepared, continuous streams of extracted syngas to a variety of on-line gas analyzers. The review of candidate analysis technology also addressed safety concerns associated with thermochemical process operation that constrain the location and configuration of potential gas analysis equipment. Initial analyzer costs, reliability, accuracy, and operating and maintenance costs were also considered prior to the assembly of suitable analyzers for this work. Initial tests at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility (FFTF) in late 2004 and early 2005 successfully demonstrated the transport and subsequent analysis of a single depressurized, heat-traced syngas stream to a single analyzer (an Industrial Machine and Control Corporation (IMACC) Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR)) provided by GTI. In March 2005, our sampling approach was significantly expanded when this project participated in the U.S. DOE’s Novel Gas Cleaning (NGC) project. Syngas sample streams from three process locations were transported to a distribution manifold for selectable analysis by the IMACC FT-IR, a Stanford Research Systems QMS300 Mass Spectrometer (SRS MS) obtained under this Cooperative Agreement, and a Varian micro gas chromatograph with thermal conductivity detector (?GC) provided by GTI. A syngas stream from a fourth process location was transported to an Agilent Model 5890 Series II gas chromatograph for highly sensitive gas analyses. The on-line analyses made possible by this sampling system verified the syngas cleaning achieved by the NGC process. In June 2005, GTI collaborated with Weyerhaeuser to characterize the ChemrecTM black liquor gasifier at Weyerhaeuser’s New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill. Over a ten-day period, a broad range of process operating conditions were characterized with the IMACC FT-IR, the SRS MS, the Varian ?GC, and an integrated Gas Chromatograph, Mass Selective Detector, Flame Ionization Detector and Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detector (GC/MSD/FID/SCD) system acquired under this Cooperative Agreement from Wasson-ECE. In this field application, a single sample stream was extracted from this low-pressure, low-temperature process and successfully analyzed by these devices. In late 2005,

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biomass Gasification for Rural Electrification , Small Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, scrubbers with organic solvents (e.g., FAME) as washing solvent are the most common tar removal technologies for small and medium sized biomass gasifiers and are successfully tested at a number...105,

Dr. Marco Klemm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biomass Gasification for Rural Electrification , Small Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, scrubbers with organic solvents (e.g., FAME) as washing solvent are the most common tar removal technologies for small and medium sized biomass gasifiers and are successfully tested at a number...105,

Dr. Marco Klemm

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: West Biofuels Biomass Gasification to Power process will utilize  gasification technology provided by is  pioneering the gasification technology that has been 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Release of Fuel-Bound Nitrogen during Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of four biomass feedstocks (leucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass) with significantly different fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) content was investigated to determine the effects of operational parameters and nitrogen content of biomass on the partitioning of FBN among nitrogenous gas species. ... The present study attempts to clarify the effects of gasification conditions and fuel on the release and evolution of biomass FBN through parallel experiments utilizing four different biomass feedstocks having significantly different FBN contents. ... Four types of biomass feedstocks were used in the experimentsleucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass. ...

Jiachun Zhou; Stephen M. Masutani; Darren M. Ishimura; Scott Q. Turn; Charles M. Kinoshita

2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Biomass Gasification for Electricity and Fuels , Large Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is commonly agreed that gasification of biomass has a large potential for a more sustainable energy system in the future. However, a lot of research and demonstration efforts have been carried out during t...

Dr. Hermann Hofbauer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Biomass Gasification for Electricity and Fuels , Large Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is commonly agreed that gasification of biomass has a large potential for a more sustainable energy system in the future. However, a lot of research and demonstration efforts have been carried out during t...

Dr. Hermann Hofbauer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Thermodynamic Analysis of the Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The focus here is on biomass-water reacting system. The reaction process (gasification) is aimed at producing a syngas rich in combustible species, such as H2, CH4 and CO. According to the syngas final use (burner

Luca Fiori; Daniele Castello

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This independent review report assesses the 2009 state-of-the-art and 2020 projected capital cost, energy efficiency, and levelized cost for hydrogen production from biomass via gasification.

49

Simulation of biomass gasification in a dual fluidized bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass gasification with steam in a dual-fluidized bed gasifier (DFBG) was simulated with ASPEN Plus. ... that the content of char transferred from the gasifier to the combustor decreases from 22.5...2 concentra...

Jie He; Kristina Göransson; Ulf Söderlind…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CFD Modeling of Biomass Gasification Using a Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass, as a renewable energy resource, can be utilized to generate chemicals, heat, and electricity. Compared with biomass combustion, biomass gasification is more eco-friendly because… (more)

Liu, Hui

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

green waste for use in a biomass gasification process togasification method to process some of the 1.4 million tons of wastegasification / power generation model, accessed April 2008 from http://biomass.ucdavis.edu/calculator.html 10. California Integrated Waste

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and Fuel Cells for Farming Operations Biomass Gasification, Microturbines and Fuel Cells for Farming Operations Project Summary Full Title: Opportunities for Hydrogen: An Analysis of the Application of Biomass Gasification to Farming Operations Using Microturbines and Fuel Cells Project ID: 133 Principal Investigator: Darren Schmidt Purpose To determine the feasibility of a hydrogen based biomass fueled power installation for farming operations. Performer Principal Investigator: Darren Schmidt Organization: University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center Address: 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Telephone: 701-777-5120 Email: dschmidt@undeerc.org Additional Performers: J.R Gunderson, University of North Dakota Period of Performance Start: June 1999

53

2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, coal to liquids, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

NONE

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Simulation of Bio-syngas Production from Biomass Gasification via Pressurized Interconnected Fluidized Beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bio-syngas production from biomass gasification via pressurized interconnected fluidized...T g), gasification pressure (p g) and steam to biomass ratio (S/B) on bio-syngas production

Fei Feng; Guohui Song; Laihong Shen…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of a Biomass Gasification CHP Plant: Influence of Various Parameters on Energetic and Exergetic Efficiencies ... This paper presents a theoretical assessment of energy, exergy, and syngas cleaning performances in a biomass gasification combined heat and power (CHP) plant with varying operating parameters. ... The analysis is carried out using a detailed model of a biomass gasification CHP plant developed with Aspen Plus. ...

Jessica François; Guillain Mauviel; Michel Feidt; Caroline Rogaume; Yann Rogaume; Olivier Mirgaux; Fabrice Patisson; Anthony Dufour

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gasification and co-gasification of biomass wastes: Effect of the biomass origin and the gasifier operating conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of different biomass fuels, including forestry (pinus pinaster pruning) and agricultural (grapevine and olive tree pruning) wastes as well as industry wastes (sawdust and marc of grape), has been carried out in a circulating flow gasifier in order to evaluate the potential of using these types of biomass in the same equipment, thus providing higher operation flexibility and minimizing the effect of seasonal fuel supply variations. The potential of using biomass as an additional supporting fuel in coal fuelled power plants has also been evaluated through tests involving mixtures of biomass and coal–coke, the coke being a typical waste of oil companies. The effect of the main gasifier operating conditions, such as the relative biomass/air ratio and the reaction temperature, has been analysed to establish the conditions allowing higher gasification efficiency, carbon conversion and/or fuel constituents (CO, H2 and CH4) concentration and production. Results of the work encourage the combined use of the different biomass fuels without significant modifications in the installation, although agricultural wastes (grapevine and olive pruning) could to lead to more efficient gasification processes. These latter wastes appear as interesting fuels to generate a producer gas to be used in internal combustion engines or gas turbines (high gasification efficiency and gas yield), while sawdust could be a very adequate fuel to produce a H2-rich gas (with interest for fuel cells) due to its highest reactivity. The influence of the reaction temperature on the gasification characteristics was not as significant as that of the biomass/air ratio, although the H2 concentration increased with increasing temperature.

Magín Lapuerta; Juan J. Hernández; Amparo Pazo; Julio López

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Small-scale biomass gasification CHP utilisation in industry: Energy and environmental evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass gasification is regarded as a sustainable energy technology used for waste management and producing renewable fuel. Using the techniques of life cycle assessment (LCA) and net energy analysis this study quantifies the energy, resource, and emission flows. The purpose of the research is to assess the net energy produced and potential environmental effects of biomass gasification using wood waste. This paper outlines a case study that uses waste wood from a factory for use in an entrained flow gasification CHP plant. Results show that environmental impacts may arise from toxicity, particulates, and resource depletion. Toxicity is a potential issue through the disposal of ash. Particulate matter arises from the combustion of syngas therefore effective gas cleaning and emission control is required. Assessment of resource depletion shows natural gas, electricity, fossil fuels, metals, and water are all crucial components of the system. The energy gain ratio is 4.71MJdelivered/MJprimary when only electricity is considered, this increases to 13.94MJdelivered/MJprimary if 100% of the available heat is utilised. Greenhouse gas emissions are very low (7–15 g CO2-e/kWhe) although this would increase if the biomass feedstock was not a waste and needed to be cultivated and transported. Overall small-scale biomass gasification is an attractive technology if the high capital costs and operational difficulties can be overcome, and a consistent feedstock source is available.

P.W.R. Adams; M.C. McManus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy‘s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modern Biomass Conversion Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of key biomass conversion technologies currently deployed and technologies that may...2...capture and sequestration technology (CCS). In doing so, special at...

Andre Faaij

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Catalytic Conversion of Tars, Carbon Black and Methane from Pyrolysis/Gasification of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of catalysts in biomass gasification has been suggested for a long time.1 Fung and Graham found that potassium carbonate and calcium oxide have catalytic influences on the gasification rate and the produc...

Clas Ekström; Nils Lindman; Rune Pettersson

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Air Gasification of Biomass in a Downdraft Fixed Bed:? A Comparative Study of the Inorganic and Organic Products Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of lignocellulosic residues by means of such simple and versatile plants is dictated by the necessity of developing technologies capable of processing different biomass feedstocks for small-scale power production (e.g. ... Elemental Composition (wt %) and Fixed Carbon on Dry Matter of the Three Biomass Feedstocks ... Table 2.? Meana Trace Metal Contents (mg/Kg in ash) of Three Different Biomass Feedstocks ...

I. De Bari; D. Barisano; M. Cardinale; D. Matera; F. Nanna; D. Viggiano

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

means of fluidised bed gasification, Waste Management, 2008,metals in gasification of sewage sludge, Waste Management,mainstream gasification technologies for biomass and waste

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Supercritical Water Biomass Gasification Process As a Successful Solution to Valorize Wine Distillery Wastewaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are many gasification technologies that could potentially be part of the future energy industry. ... scale continuous-flow system with 2 different industrial wastewaters that contain a high concn. of orgs., with both wastes having a high energy potential: cutting oil wastes, oleaginous wastewater from metalworking industries, and vinasses, alc. ... Biomass feedstocks, including lignocellulosic materials (cotton stalk and corncob) and the tannery waste, were gasified in supercrit. ...

Anne Loppinet-Serani; Cédric Reverte; François Cansell; Cyril Aymonier

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hydrogen Production from Biomass via Indirect Gasification: The Impact of NREL Process Development Unit Gasifier Correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a set of updated gasifier correlations developed by NREL to predict biomass gasification products and Minimum Hydrogen Selling Price.

Kinchin, C. M.; Bain, R. L.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Study of the mechanism of pyrolysis and gasification of Mallee biomass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mechanisms of pyrolysis/gasification (steam and carbon dioxide) of mallee biomass were investigated. Wood biochar obtained under slow pyrolysis kept botanical structure but lost its original… (more)

Yang, Yanwu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NETL: C&CBTL - Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Project Number: FE0005476 Project Description The objectives of the proposed study are to obtain experimental reactor data and develop kinetic rate expressions for pyrolysis and char gasification for the coal-biomass blends under conditions free from transport limitations, to develop a detailed understanding of the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the porous char structure, to build mathematical models that combine true kinetic rate expressions with transport models for predicting gasification behavior for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, and to investigate the physical and chemical parameters that might lead to synergistic effects in coal-biomass blends gasification.

68

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higman, C. and M. Burgt, Gasification . 2003: Elsevier/Gulfand N.P. Cheremisinoff, Gasification technologies: a primerbiomass (part 3): gasification technologies. Bioresource

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Exergy analysis of biomass-to-synthetic natural gas (SNG) process via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an exergy analysis of SNG production via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock, including virgin (woody) biomass as well as waste biomass (municipal solid waste and sludge). In indirect gasification heat needed for endothermic gasification reactions is produced by burning char in a separate combustion section of the gasifier and subsequently the heat is transferred to the gasification section. The advantages of indirect gasification are no syngas dilution with nitrogen and no external heat source required. The production process involves several process units, including biomass gasification, syngas cooler, cleaning and compression, methanation reactors and SNG conditioning. The process is simulated with a computer model using the flow-sheeting program Aspen Plus. The exergy analysis is performed for various operating conditions such as gasifier pressure, methanation pressure and temperature. The largest internal exergy losses occur in the gasifier followed by methanation and SNG conditioning. It is shown that exergetic efficiency of biomass-to-SNG process for woody biomass is higher than that for waste biomass. The exergetic efficiency for all biomass feedstock increases with gasification pressure, whereas the effects of methanation pressure and temperature are opposite for treated wood and waste biomass.

Caecilia R. Vitasari; Martin Jurascik; Krzysztof J. Ptasinski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermochemical Gasification of Biomass: Fuel Conversion, Hot Gas Cleanup and Gas Turbine Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-blown fluidized bed biomass gasification integrated with a gas- and steam turbine combined cycle (BIGCC) is a potentially attractive way to convert biomass into electricity and heat with a high efficiency.

J. Andries; W. de Jong; P. D. J. Hoppesteyn…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector.

72

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).… (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gasification Characteristics of Coal/Biomass Mixed Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research project was undertaken that had the overall objective of developing the models needed to accurately predict conversion rates of coal/biomass mixtures to synthesis gas under conditions relevant to a commercially-available coal gasification system configured to co- produce electric power as well as chemicals and liquid fuels. In our efforts to accomplish this goal, experiments were performed in an entrained flow reactor in order to produce coal and biomass chars at high heating rates and temperatures, typical of the heating rates and temperatures fuel particles experience in real systems. Mixed chars derived from coal/biomass mixtures containing up to 50% biomass and the chars of the pure coal and biomass components were subjected to a matrix of reactivity tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) in order to obtain data on mass loss rates as functions of gas temperature, pressure and composition as well as to obtain information on the variations in mass specific surface area during char conversion under kinetically-limited conditions. The experimental data were used as targets when determining the unknown parameters in the chemical reactivity and specific surface area models developed. These parameters included rate coefficients for the reactions in the reaction mechanism, enthalpies of formation and absolute entropies of adsorbed species formed on the carbonaceous surfaces, and pore structure coefficients in the model used to describe how the mass specific surface area of the char varies with conversion. So that the reactivity models can be used at high temperatures when mass transport processes impact char conversion rates, Thiele modulus – effectiveness factor relations were also derived for the reaction mechanisms developed. In addition, the reactivity model and a mode of conversion model were combined in a char-particle gasification model that includes the effects of chemical reaction and diffusion of reactive gases through particle pores and energy exchange between the particle and its environment. This char-particle gasification model is capable of predicting the average mass loss rates, sizes, apparent densities, specific surface areas, and temperatures of the char particles produced when co-firing coal and biomass to the type environments established in entrained flow gasifiers operating at high temperatures and elevated pressures. A key result of this work is the finding that the reactivities of the mixed chars were not always in between the reactivities of the pure component chars at comparable gasification conditions. Mixed char reactivity to CO2 was lower than the reactivities of both the pure Wyodak coal and pure corn stover chars to CO2. In contrast, mixed char reactivity to H2O was higher than the reactivities of both the pure Wyodak coal and pure corn stover chars to H2O. This was found to be in part, a consequence of the reduced mass specific surface areas of the coal char particles formed during devolatilization when the coal and biomass particles are co-fired. The biomass particles devolatilize prior to the coal particles, impacting the temperature and the composition of the environment in which the coal particles devolatilize. This situation results in coal char particles within the mixed char that differ in specific surface area and reactivity from the coal char particles produced in the absence of the devolatilizing biomass particles. Due to presence of this “affected” coal char, it was not possible to develop a mixed char reactivity model that uses linear mixing rules to determine the reactivity of a mixed char from only the reactivities of the pure mixture components. However, it was possible to predict both mixed char specific surface area and reactivity for a wide range of fuel mixture rat os provided the specific surface area and reactivity of the affected coal char particles are known. Using the kinetic parameters determined for the Wyodak coal and corn stover chars, the model was found to adequately predict the observed conversion times and off-gas compositions

Mitchell, Reginald

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks ... 4 Here we report the preliminary results of continuous-flow reactor studies with wet biomass feedstocks using new catalyst systems developed specifically for these processing conditions. ... Developing catalysts for this processing environment has also been an important factor in making this processing technology viable.2 Previous reports of continuous reactor tests with biomass feedstocks provide preliminary short-term processing results,8,9 but also show the problems of long-term operation of the process with the contaminants inherent in biomass. ...

Douglas C. Elliott; Gary G. Neuenschwander; Todd R. Hart; R. Scott Butner; Alan H. Zacher; Mark H. Engelhard; James S. Young; David E. McCready

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

CO2 Gasification Kinetics of Biomass Char Derived from High-Temperature Rapid Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Gasification Kinetics of Biomass Char Derived from High-Temperature Rapid Pyrolysis ... The rapid pyrolysis char produced was isothermally gasified in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) under a CO2 atmosphere. ... In the study by Zhang and co-workers, where as much as 14 biomass chars were gasified, gasification rates of all of the wooden biomass chars present a similar feature as Figure 7a (PS char), but this feature has not been found from gasification rates of the herbaceous biomass char. ...

Shuai Yuan; Xue-li Chen; Jun Li; Fu-chen Wang

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

77

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-51726 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

78

Biomass Gasification using Solar Thermal Energy M. Munzinger and K. Lovegrove  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.lovegrove@anu.edu.au Hydrogen from Biomass as an energy carrier has generated increasing interest in recent years in connection with the use of solar heat as energy source for the conversion reaction. Biomass gasification effective as high energy density transport fuels. Gas derived from solar thermal conversion of biomass

79

10January 1998 Small-Scale Gasification-Based Biomass Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, gasified biomass canbe usedto power internal combustion engines(ICEs), gasturbines, and fuel cells, all. Historical Perspective on Biomass-Gasifier/Internal Combustion Engine (BiG/ICE) Systems Gasified wood10January 1998 I Small-Scale Gasification-Based Biomass Power Generation Eric D. Larson Centerfor

80

Co-gasification of Biomass and Non-biomass Feedstocks: Synergistic and Inhibition Effects of Switchgrass Mixed with Sub-bituminous Coal and Fluid Coke During CO2 Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of biomass, namely, switchgrass, with coal and fluid coke was performed to investigate the availability of the gasification catalysts to the mixed feedstock, especially alkali and alkaline earth elements, naturally present on switchgrass. ...

Rozita Habibi; Jan Kopyscinski; Mohammad S. Masnadi; Jill Lam; John R. Grace; Charles A. Mims; Josephine M. Hill

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Biomass characterization and reduced order modeling of mixed-feedstock gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has been much effort to characterize and model coal for use in combustion and gasification. This work seeks to delineate the differences and similarities between biomass and coal, with emphasis on the state of the ...

Chapman, Alex J. (Alex Jacob)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Co-Gasification of Biomass and Coal in a Pressurised Fluidised Bed Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a 3 year (1996 – 1998) project, partly funded by the EU as part of their JOULE 3 programme, experimental and theoretical research will be done on co-gasification of biomass and coal in a pressurised fluidi...

J. Andries; K. R. G. Hein

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Biomass gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A novel study on biomass-air gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas has been conducted. The study was designed… (more)

Legonda, Isack Amos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Simulation Analysis of Biomass Gasification in an Autothermal Gasifier Using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on simulation, biomass gasification in an autothermal gasifier is analyzed, the effects of the equivalence ... The results indicate that the temperature in the gasifier increases when the ER increases, whil...

Zhongbin Fu; Yaning Zhang; Hui Liu; Bo Zhang…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Influence of Proteins on the Hydrothermal Gasification and Liquefaction of Biomass. 1. Comparison of Different Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrothermal gasification of glucose with the addition of K2CO3 and two biomass feedstocks was performed in a continuous stirred tank reactor at 500 °C and 30 MPa. ...

Andrea Kruse; Andrzej Krupka; Valentin Schwarzkopf; Céline Gamard; Thomas Henningsen

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

Technoeconomic Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment of an Integrated Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A biomass gasification combined-cycle power plant, consisting of a low pressure...®...Economic analyses were then performed to determine the levelized cost of electricity. The economic viability and efficiency of...

M. K. Mann; P. L. Spath

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analysis of the energy efficiency of solar aided biomass gasification for pure hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a simulative analysis of the energy efficiency of solar aided biomass gasification for pure hydrogen production. Solar heat has been considered as available at 250 °C in three gasification processes: i) gasification reactor followed by two water gas shift reactors and a pressure swing adsorber; ii) gasification reactor followed by an integrated membrane water gas shift reactor; iii) supercritical gasification reactor followed by two flash separators and a pressure swing adsorber. Simulations are performed with the commercial software Aspen Plus® by considering biomass moisture content and the amount of solar heat as system variables. Results are presented in terms of energy and exergy system efficiency and are discussed and compared with the case of no solar integration.

Lucia Salemme; Marino Simeone; Riccardo Chirone; Piero Salatino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please Treatments and Biomass Gasification J Luche1 , Q Falcoz2 , T Bastien2 , J P Leninger2 , K Arabi1 , O Aubry1 various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass

Boyer, Edmond

89

Biomass Pyrolysis and Gasification of Varying Particle Sizes in a Fluidized-Bed Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light gases, char, and tar evolution as function of the bed temperature and particle size have been compared to literature data. ... A review of the primary measures for tar elimination in biomass gasification processes Biomass Bioenergy 2003, 24 ( 2) 125– 140 ... Some aspects of primary methods and the research and development in this area are reviewed and cited in the present paper. ...

Katherine R. Gaston; Mark W. Jarvis; Perrine Pepiot; Kristin M. Smith; William J. Frederick, Jr.; Mark R. Nimlos

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gasification of Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass with Enriched Air Mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

might result in land and water pollution if left untreated. Different methods are employed to extract the available energy from the cattle biomass (CB) which includes co-firing and gasification. There are two types of CB: Feedlot biomass (FB), animal...

Thanapal, Siva Sankar

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biomass Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Technology characterizations Website: web.worldbank.orgWBSITEEXTERNALTOPICSEXTENERGY2EXTRENENERGYTK0,, References: Biomass...

92

June 2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture and sequestration, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, co-production, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

NONE

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification CoalTek, Inc. Project Number: FE0005293 Project Description This project will demonstrate an application of a CoalTek, Inc. (CoalTek) proprietary microwave process for treating energy feedstock materials. The process combines coal and biomass to produce an economically viable and suitable single-stream feedstock for co-gasification. Phase I of the project will focus on microwave processing, batch-scale production, and laboratory characterizations of briquettes with the objective to identify the combinations of biomass and coal types that provide the most suitable briquetted product for co-gasification. Phase II will use a larger scale, continuous mode process to (1) demonstrate the performance of the co-briquetted fuels during co-gasification in two different pilot-plant designs, i.e., fixed-bed and fluidized-bed gasifiers, and (2) enable realistic cost estimates for the construction and operation of a commercial-scale biomass-coal briquetting plant based on CoalTek's proprietary microwave process.

94

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics, and Computational Fluid Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal-biomass Catalytic Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics, and Computational Fluid Dynamics Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports research and development efforts targeted to improve efficiency and reduce the negative environmental effects of the use of fossil fuels. One way to achieve these goals is to combine coal with biomass to create synthesis gas (syngas) for use in turbines and refineries to produce energy, fuels,

96

Concentrating-Solar Biomass Gasification Process for a 3rd Generation Biofuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrating-Solar Biomass Gasification Process for a 3rd Generation Biofuel ... The first step was to develop process flow diagrams and to use these along with literature information and research results as well as the practical industry experience to build process simulation models. ... In contrast, biofuels made from waste biomass or from biomass grown on degraded and abandoned agricultural lands planted with perennials incur little or no C debt and can offer immediate, sustained GHG advantages. ...

Edgar G. Hertwich; Xiangping Zhang

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Integration Strategy of Gasification Technology:? A Gateway to Future Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The historical evidence of the operation of a coal gasification plant goes as far back in time as 1878.1 The United State's first power plant based on coal gasification technology was installed in 1980.2 The concept of gasification has begun to attract much attention from the refining industry because of stringent environmental regulations on transportation fuel, slashing demands for fuel oils, and uncertainty in the availability of good crude oils. ... Therefore, it is a challenging task for refining industries to economically integrate gasification technology, and this is the major theme of the paper. ... Gasification is superior to many of the available power production and waste disposal technologies by addressing various issues together regarding environmental emissions, maintaining quality of refining products, and waste management. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; X. X. Zhu

2002-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fixed bed gasification studies on coal-feedlot biomass and coal-chicken litter biomass under batch mode operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the processes for energy conversion of biomass fuels is thermochemical gasification. For the current study, a laboratory scale, 10 kW[th], fixed-bed gasifier (reactor internal diameter 0.15 m, reactor height 0.30 m) facility was built at the Texas A...

Priyadarsan, Soyuz

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Ronald Breault Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4486 ronald.breault@netl.doe.gov Herbert E. andrus, Jr. Principal Investigator ALSTOM Power 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 860-285-4770 herbert.e.andrus@power.alstom.com Hybrid Combustion-GasifiCation CHemiCal loopinG Coal power teCHnoloGy development Description Gasification technologies can provide a stable, affordable energy supply for the nation, while also providing high efficiencies and near zero pollutants. With coal

100

Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Karel, E-mail: svoboda@icpf.cas.cz [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the ASCR, v.v.i., Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri [D.S.K. Ltd., Ujezdecek - Dukla 264, 415 01 Teplice I (Czech Republic); Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr [Dept. of Gas, Coke and Air protection, Institute of Chemical Technol., Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Biomass Gasification in Fluidized Bed:? Where To Locate the Dolomite To Improve Gasification?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 5 Steam content in the flue gas vs relative amount of dolomite used for two different locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures, GR = 0.86?1.16, ... Figure 6 Low heating value of the flue gas for two locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures, GR = 0.86?1.16, ... Figure 7 Gas yield for two locations of the dolomite and for two gasifying agents; (a) gasification with H2O + O2 mixtures; GR = 0.86?1.16, ...

José Corella; María-Pilar Aznar; Javier Gil; Miguel A. Caballero

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Steam gasification of various feedstocks at a dual fluidised bed gasifier: Impacts of operation conditions and bed materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of biomass is an attractive technology for...2, CO, CO2 and CH4. The DFB steam gasification process has been developed at Vienna University ... fuel moisture content, steam/fuel ratio and gasification

Christoph Pfeifer; Stefan Koppatz; Hermann Hofbauer

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AND BIO-MASS GASIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon dioxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K.

M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hydrothermal Gasification of Waste Biomass: Process Design and Life Cycle Asessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several scenarios are constructed for different Swiss biomass feedstocks and different scales depending on logistical choices: large-scale (155 MWSNG) and small-scale (5.2 MWSNG) scenarios for a manure feedstock and one scenario (35.6 MWSNG) for a wood feedstock. ... In conclusion, the simulation of the catalytic hydrothermal gasification of different biomass feedstocks allowed the design of industrial-scale process configurations. ...

Jeremy S. Luterbacher; Morgan Fröling; Frédéric Vogel; François Maréchal; Jefferson W. Tester

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

R&D to Prepare and Characterize Robust Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Prepare and Characterize Robust to Prepare and Characterize Robust Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Background Domestically abundant coal is a significant primary energy source and, when mixed with optimum levels of biomass, has lower carbon footprint compared to conventional petroleum fuels. Coal and biomass mixtures are converted via gasification into synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which can be subsequently converted to produce liquid fuels and

106

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification ... National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401, United States ... Similar activation energies (9-10 kcal/mol) were measured for ZnO and Zn-Ti-O sulfidation. ...

Abhijit Dutta; Singfoong Cheah; Richard Bain; Calvin Feik; Kim Magrini-Bair; Steven Phillips

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluation of Catalytic Effects in Gasification of Biomass at Intermediate Temperature and Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes and examines an alternative thermo-chemical process for biomethane production from lignocellulosic biomass, termed self-gasification. ... This paper introduces a new process for the production of biomethane. ... Biomethane can be used as a fuel for heat and power generation. ...

Pavlina Nanou; Guus van Rossum; Wim P. M. van Swaaij; Sascha R. A. Kersten

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

Co-gasification Reactivity of Coal and Woody Biomass in High-Temperature Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(20) Although the total pressure was 0.5 MPa and lower than the usual conditions of the gasifier, it has been confirmed that the total pressure has little influence on the gasification rate of char when the partial pressure of the gasifying agent is the same and the total pressure is less than 2 MPa. ... While the pyrolysis and the char gasification were tested separately in the above experiments, raw samples of coals, cedar bark, and the mixtures were gasified with carbon dioxide at high temperature using the PDTF facility in this section, the same as the reductor in the air-blown two-stage entrained flow coal gasifier. ...

Shiro Kajitani; Yan Zhang; Satoshi Umemoto; Masami Ashizawa; Saburo Hara

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James R

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

Co-gasification of Biomass with Coal and Oil Sand Coke in a Drop Tube Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From this work, a synergistic effect was observed for blends of coal with petcoke and an increase in the production of H2 and CO was obtained. ... Finally, blending biomass with coal?petcoke blends did not produce any significant change in H2 production, although slight variations were observed in the production of CO and CO2. ... In addn., co-gasification tests of binary blends of a bituminous coal with different types of biomass (up to 10%) and petroleum coke (up to 60%), as well as ternary blends of coal-petcoke-biomass (45-45-10%) were conducted to study the effect of blending on gas prodn. ...

Chen Gao; Farshid Vejahati; Hasan Katalambula; Rajender Gupta

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of Biomass Gasification Fly Ash in Lightweight Plasterboard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition, the overall environmental benefit of waste gasification plus ash utilization of a difficult fly ash makes the overall process attractive. ... Only the Autonomous Government of Catalonia has established regional regulations for waste management, including limited recycling for some wastes considered as byproducts. ... viability of gasifying untreated olive stone, also called "orujillo", a byproduct of the olive oil industry that comprises both olive stone and pulp. ...

C. Leiva; A. Gómez-Barea; L. F. Vilches; P. Ollero; J. Vale; C. Fernández-Pereira

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gasification Characteristics of Hydrothermal Carbonized Biomass in an Updraft Pilot-Scale Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification Characteristics of Hydrothermal Carbonized Biomass in an Updraft Pilot-Scale Gasifier ... At elevated temperatures near 200–250 °C at or above the saturation pressure, the process is carried out in a medium of water with a residence time varying between 3 and 8 h. ... When the gasification experiments were performed in a pilot-scale gasifier and air preheated to 900 °C was used as the gasifying medium, the H2, CO2, and hydrocarbon contents decreased with the ER value and the CO content increased. ...

Duleeka Sandamali Gunarathne; Andreas Mueller; Sabine Fleck; Thomas Kolb; Jan Karol Chmielewski; Weihong Yang; Wlodzimierz Blasiak

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Tar Formation in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Air Gasification of Woody Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bark and sawdust with two different particle sizes were used during the gasification experiments. ... When some calcined dolomite (CaO·MgO) is used in the bed of a biomass gasifier of fluidized bed type the raw gas produced is cleaner than when only silica sand is used in it as fluidizing medium. ... The influence of freeboard temperature, fluidization velocity, and particle size on tar production and composition during the air gasification of dried sewage sludge has been researched using a bench-scale gasifier. ...

Nader Padban; Wuyin Wang; Zhicheng Ye; Ingemar Bjerle; Ingemar Odenbrand

2000-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

115

Issues Impacting Refractory Service Life in Biomass/Waste Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different carbon sources are used, or are being considered, as feedstock for gasifiers; including natural gas, coal, petroleum coke, and biomass. Biomass has been used with limited success because of issues such as ash impurity interactions with the refractory liner, which will be discussed in this paper.

Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Air–steam gasification of biomass in fluidized bed with CO2 absorption: A kinetic model for performance prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Significance of decarbonized energy production in the context of a foreseeable hydrogen economy has called for the need of extensive research in biomass gasification-carbon dioxide capture technique. The feasibility of calcium oxide as a sorbent for CO2 in syngas is studied for air–steam fluidized bed (FB) gasification through a reaction kinetic modeling approach. Arrhenius rate equations are employed for primary and secondary pyrolysis, gasification and carbonation reactions. Devolatilization product yields are predicted using available correlations for FB gasification and cracking of tar is incorporated. Parametric performance analysis is carried out highlighting the significance of equivalence ratio (ER), gasification temperature, steam to biomass ratio (SBR) and sorbent to biomass ratio (SOBR). The effects of various gasifying media on H2 concentration and performance indicators such as heating value and efficiencies are analyzed. The simulation results are validated with the reported experimental results. The kinetic study reveals that air–steam gasification significantly reduces the unreacted steam but at a lower H2 concentration than steam gasification. A maximum of 53% hydrogen rich gas mixture is predicted at ER = 0.25, SBR = 1.5, SOBR = 2.7 and 1000 K. Against fossil fuel expended steam gasification, pure oxygen gasification is suggested by the study.

C.C. Sreejith; C. Muraleedharan; P. Arun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NETL: Gasification Archived Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Archived Projects Archived Projects | Active Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems Reaction-Driven Ion Transport Membranes Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Coal/Biomass Gasification at Colorado School of Mines Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-Based Catalyst Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity via Catalytic Coal Gasification Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development

118

Gasification Characteristics of Coal/Biomass Blend in a Dual Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

circulating flow/forestry, agricultural waste, industry wastes + coalcoke ... Whereas, a dual fluidized bed gasification technology enables production of the medium calorific value gas (12?18 MJ/Nm3) by separating the combustion and gasification zones in which steam is used as a gasifying agent. ... Since Quercus acutissima is widely used in building, pulp, and shipping industries, its demand and supply in Korea is high. ...

Myung Won Seo; Jeong Hoi Goo; Sang Done Kim; See Hoon Lee; Young Chan Choi

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Biomass Gasification-Based Syngas Production for a Conventional Oxo Synthesis Plant—Process Modeling, Integration Opportunities, and Thermodynamic Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification-Based Syngas Production for a Conventional Oxo Synthesis Plant—Process Modeling, Integration Opportunities, and Thermodynamic Performance ... A small amount of steam (0.4 kton·y–1) is used to control the burner temperature. ...

Maria Arvidsson; Matteo Morandin; Simon Harvey

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biomass gasification using low-temperature solar-driven steam supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A numerical modeling study on the low-temperature steam gasification process is presented to outline the possibility to drive the process with an integrated Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plant, which provides low-temperature steam, with the aim of preserving a comparable efficiency of the new plant with traditional high-temperature biomass gasification processes. To meet this, the effective parameters and operating conditions are assessed and determined for low-temperature biomass gasification by means of sensitivity analysis, in order to find out the optimal design of the new gasifier. Crucial parameters comprise the residence time of the solid fuel and of the gas phase (leading to efficient gas–solid interactions), as well as the amount of injected oxygen and steam. Moreover, several operative parameters such as content of moisture in the biomass feedstock, size of the solid particles, equivalence ratio and structural components amount in the biomass feedstock are taken into account to optimize the operation. The molar ratio of H2/CO has been selected as a benchmark of efficiency in the process because the produced syngas would be applied in the methanol synthesis process, which needs a molar ratio of H2/CO close to the value of two. The percentage of the solid residue (weight % of the solid feedstock) has been evaluated along with the molar ratio of H2/CO in the low-temperature process to guide the re-design of the solar driven gasifier, in terms of reactor volume and amount of required oxygen and steam, which are necessary to sustain the process. The modeling and simulation to design the process have been accomplished by a comprehensive modeling package (GASDS), which includes kinetics of biomass devolatilization and pyrolysis, gasification, and secondary gas phase kinetic schemes. The gasifier, owing to its intrinsic multi-scale nature, is simulated describing both the particle and the reactor scales.

Zohreh Ravaghi-Ardebili; Flavio Manenti; Michele Corbetta; Carlo Pirola; Eliseo Ranzi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermochemical Ethanol via Direct Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermochemical Ethanol via Thermochemical Ethanol via Direct Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass A. Dutta and S.D. Phillips Technical Report NREL/TP-510-45913 July 2009 Technical Report Thermochemical Ethanol via NREL/TP-510-45913 Direct Gasification and Mixed July 2009 Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass A. Dutta and S.D. Phillips Prepared under Task No. BB07.3710 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

123

Influences of Additives on Steam Gasification of Biomass. 1. Pyrolysis Procedure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To remove tar and upgrade the quality of gaseous product, researchers have extensively studied the influences of various additives(2-6) and diverse reactors(7-9) on biomass gasification. ... For the pyrolysis procedure, there are two effectual methods, improving operating conditions and adding additives into reactors, to control the formations of tar and CnHm. ... The chemical components of additives added in the related pyrolysis procedure are shown in Table 2. ...

Yu R. Xie; Lai H. Shen; Jun Xiao; Da X. Xie; Jing Zhu

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Exergy Analysis of the Process for Dimethyl Ether Production through Biomass Steam Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

About 6.37% of the total carbon is released to the environment in the form of wastewater and waste gas. ... If the heat for gasifying the biomass could be obtained from other energy resource, the carbon atom utilization could be increased greatly, and the CO2 emissions could be decreased considerably. ... A Cost?Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry: Volume 1 Main Report; Princeton University: Princeton, NJ, 2006. ...

Xiangping Zhang; Christian Solli; Edgar G. Hertwich; Xiao Tian; Suojiang Zhang

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Co-gasification of coal–petcoke and biomass in the Puertollano IGCC power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plants (IGCC) are efficient power generation systems with low pollutants emissions. Moreover, the entrained flow gasifier of IGCC plants allows the combined use of other lower cost fuels (biomass and waste) together with coal. Co-firing with biomass is beneficial for the reduction of CO2 emissions of fossil source. In this paper the results of co-gasification tests with two types of biomass deriving from agricultural residues, namely 2% and 4% by weight of olive husk and grape seed meal, in the 335 MWeISO IGCC power plant of ELCOGAS in Puertollano (Spain) are reported. No significant change in the composition of both the raw syngas and the clean syngas was observed. Furthermore, a process simulation model of the IGCC plant of Puertollano was developed and validated with available industrial data. The model was used to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the process co-fired with higher biomass contents up to 60% by weight. The results indicate that a 54% decrease of fossil CO2 emissions implies an energy penalty (a loss of net power) of about 20% while does not cause significant change of the net efficiency of the plant. The mitigation cost (the additional cost of electricity per avoided ton of CO2) is significantly dependent on the price of the biomass cost compared to the price of the fossil fuel.

Daniele Sofia; Pilar Coca Llano; Aristide Giuliano; Mariola Iborra Hernández; Francisco García Peña; Diego Barletta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Combustion and \\{NOx\\} emissions of biomass-derived syngas under various gasification conditions utilizing oxygen-enriched-air and steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the \\{NOx\\} emissions from combustion of syngas derived from gasification of three different biomass feedstock (i.e., pine, maple–oak mixture, and seed corn) at different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions. Three different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions were tested for each feedstock, thus resulting in nine different sets of syngas. The biomass-derived syngas was burned in an industrial burner that was integrated into the gasification system. The gasifier and burner are rated at 800 kW and 879 kW thermal, respectively. For each set of biomass-derived syngas, \\{NOx\\} emissions were measured at different burner operating conditions including various heat rates and equivalence ratios using emission analyzers with chemiluminescence technology. All the combustion test conditions are in the lean mixture ranges in order to avoid the peak temperature limitation of both the burner and combustion chamber. Results show that \\{NOx\\} emissions using syngas obtained from woody feedstock decrease almost linearly as the combustion mixture becomes leaner and the heat rate decreases. When compared to natural gas, syngas from both woody feedstock generates higher \\{NOx\\} emissions even when the heat rates are comparable, indicating that fuel \\{NOx\\} formation is highly important in biomass-derived syngas combustion. In contrast to syngas from woody feedstock, syngas from seed corn results in peak \\{NOx\\} emissions before \\{NOx\\} decreases with leaner conditions. The trend is observed for all fuel flow rates and all oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions of seed corn-derived syngas. Among the three feedstock, seed corn has the highest nitrogen content which yields the highest ammonia concentration in syngas, which, in turn, results in the highest \\{NOx\\} emissions for all test conditions. Overall, the \\{NOx\\} emissions from seed corn-derived syngas combustion are approximately in the range of 450–900 ppm higher compared to those from wood-derived syngas combustion.

Cuong Van Huynh; Song-Charng Kong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

128

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

129

Application of the integrated gasification combined cycle technology and BGL gasification design for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology promises to be the power generation technology of choice in the late 1990s and beyond. Based on the principle that almost any fuel can be burned more cleanly and efficiently if first turned into a gas, an IGCC plant extracts more electricity from a ton of coal by burning it as a gas in a turbine rather than as a solid in a boiler. Accordingly, coal gasification is the process of converting coal to a clean-burning synthetic gas. IGCC technology is the integration of the coal-gasification plant with a conventional combined-cycle plant to produce electricity. The benefits of this technology merger are many and result in a highly efficient and environmentally superior energy production facility. The lGCC technology holds significant implications for Asia-Pacific countries and for other parts of the world. High-growth regions require additional baseload capacity. Current low prices for natural gas and minimal emissions that result from its use for power generation favor its selection as the fuel source for new power generation capacity. However, fluctuations in fuel price and fuel availability are undermining the industry`s confidence in planning future capacity based upon gas-fueled generation. With the world`s vast coal reserves, there is a continuing effort to provide coal-fueled power generation technologies that use coal cleanly and efficiently. The lGCC technology accomplishes this objective. This chapter provides a summary of the status of lGCC technology and lGCC projects known to date. It also will present a technical overview of the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) technology, one of the leading and most promising coal gasifier designs.

Edmonds, R.F. Jr.; Hulkowich, G.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture...

131

Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Production Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Project Number: FE0012066 Project Description The project will assess the potential for integrated advanced technologies to substantially reduce capital and production costs for hydrogen-rich syngas with near-zero emissions from coal gasification for power production with carbon capture and for coal-to-liquids (specifically methanol) with carbon capture. These integrated technologies include those already tested successfully at pilot-scale with a new and innovative water-gas-shift technology, to show how multiple advanced technologies will leverage each other for significant cost and efficiency gains.

132

Energy recovery from solid waste fuels using advanced gasification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, TPS Termiska Processer AB has been working on the development of an atmospheric-pressure gasification process. A major aim at the start of this work was the generation of fuel gas from indigenous fuels to Sweden (i.e. biomass). As the economic climate changed and awareness of the damage to the environment caused by the use of fossil fuels in power generation equipment increased, the aim of the development work at TPS was changed to applying the process to heat and power generation from feedstocks such as biomass and solid wastes. Compared with modern waste incineration with heat recovery, the gasification process will permit an increase in electricity output of up to 50%. The gasification process being developed is based on an atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized bed gasifier coupled to a tar-cracking vessel. The gas produced from this process is then cooled and cleaned in conventional equipment. The energy-rich gas produced is clean enough to be fired in a gas boiler without requiring extensive flue gas cleaning, as is normally required in conventional waste incineration plants. Producing clean fuel gas in this manner, which facilitates the use of efficient gas-fired boilers, means that overall plant electrical efficiencies of close to 30% can be achieved. TPS has performed a considerable amount of pilot plant testing on waste fuels in their gasification/gas cleaning pilot plant in Sweden. Two gasifiers of TPS design have been in operation in Greve-in-Chianti, italy since 1992. This plant processes 200 tonnes of RDF (refuse-derived fuel) per day.

Morris, M.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)] [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Biomass and Other Unconventional Energy Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The primary technologies used to convert biomass to energy are direct combustion systems and Ithe gasification/pyrolysis method. IThe latter method creates a gaseous, li~uid or solid fuel to be used by an industry. Gasification involves the destr.... The primary technologies used to convert biomass to energy are direct combustion systems and Ithe gasification/pyrolysis method. IThe latter method creates a gaseous, li~uid or solid fuel to be used by an industry. Gasification involves the destr...

Gershman, H. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

135

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Experimental investigation on an entrained flow type biomass gasification system using coconut coir dust as powdery biomass feedstock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on an entrained flow concept, a prototype atmospheric gasification system has been designed and developed in the laboratory for gasification of powdery biomass feedstock such as rice husks, coconut coir dust, saw dust etc. The reactor was developed by adopting L/D (height to diameter) ratio of 10, residence time of about 2 s and a turn down ratio (TDR) of 1.5. The experimental investigation was carried out using coconut coir dust as biomass feedstock with a mean operating feed rate of 40 kg/h The effects of equivalence ratio in the range of 0.21–0.3, steam feed at a fixed flow rate of 12 kg/h, preheat on reactor temperature, product gas yield and tar content were investigated. The gasifier could able to attain high temperatures in the range of 976–1100 °C with gas lower heating value (LHV) and peak cold gas efficiency (CGE) of 7.86 MJ/Nm3 and 87.6% respectively.

P.K. Senapati; S. Behera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility As important as coal is as a primary gasification feedstock, gasification technology offers the important ability to take a wide range of feedstocks and process them into syngas, from which a similarly diverse number of end products are possible. Gasifiers have been developed to suit all different ranks of coal, and other fossil fuels, petcoke and refinery streams, biomass including agricultural waste, and industrial and municipal waste. The flexibility stems from the ability of gasification to take any carbon and hydrogen containing feedstock and then thermochemically break down the feedstock to a gas containing simple compounds which are easy to process into several marketable products.

138

Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases and aqueous phases. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay and mouse skin tumorigenicity tests). These results are the first step of a longer term program to determine the properties, handling requirements, and utility of the condensates recovered from biomass gasification and pyrolysis. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures. 56 refs., 25 figs., 21 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to quantify the energy, environmental, and economic performance of industrial facilities that would coproduce electricity and transportation fuels or chemicals from a mixture of coal and biomass via co-gasification in a single pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier, with capture and storage of CO{sub 2} (CCS). The work sought to identify plant designs with promising (Nth plant) economics, superior environmental footprints, and the potential to be deployed at scale as a means for simultaneously achieving enhanced energy security and deep reductions in U.S. GHG emissions in the coming decades. Designs included systems using primarily already-commercialized component technologies, which may have the potential for near-term deployment at scale, as well as systems incorporating some advanced technologies at various stages of R&D. All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

140

Biomass gasification project gets funding to solve black liquor safety and landfill problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on biomass gasifications. The main by-product in pulp making is black liquor from virgin fiber; the main by-product in paper recycling is fiber residue. Although the black liquor is recycled for chemical and energy recovery, safety problems plague the boilers currently used to do this. The fiber residue is usually transported to a landfill. The system being developed by MTCI will convert black liquor and fiber residue into a combustible gas, which can then be used for a wide variety of thermal or power generation applications.

Black, N.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integration of renewable energy in microgrids coordinated with demand response resources: Economic evaluation of a biomass gasification plant by Homer Simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper deals with how demand response can contribute to the better integration of renewable energy resources such as wind power, solar, small hydro, biomass and CHP. In particular, an economic evaluation performed by means of the micro-power optimization model HOMER Energy has been done, considering a micro-grid supplied by a biomass gasification power plant, operating isolated to the grid and in comparison with other generation technologies. Different scenarios have been simulated considering variations in the power production of the gasified biomass generator and different solutions to guarantee the balance generation/consumption are analyzed, demonstrating as using demand response resources is much more profitable than producing this energy by other conventional technologies by using fossil fuels.

Lina Montuori; Manuel Alcázar-Ortega; Carlos Álvarez-Bel; Alex Domijan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Biomass gasification: Influence of torrefaction on syngas production and tar formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper contains results of comparative gasification of standard wood biomass pellets, torrefied pellets and sawdust in a robust industrial fixed-bed gasifier. Parameters such as process stability, operating difficulties, gas parameters and tar content in syngas were analysed. The operating conditions were optimised to maximise production of liquid hydrocarbons, which can be both a problematic by-product and a valuable component. In order to collect the data concerning quantity and composition of the tars, the experimental set-up was equipped with a syngas cooler. The test runs conducted with sawdust and ordinary pellets did not cause any operational problems. The most complicated part of the experiment was maintaining process stability during gasification of torrefied pellets. The stabilisation effect of grinding of torrefied pellets and blending these pellets with wet sawdust were tested. It was concluded that effective and stable gasification of torrefied pellets in the tested type of fixed-bed gasifier is possible, but this type of fuel is much more suitable for co-gasification. The cleaned syngas from standard pellets had a relatively stable composition and calorific values in the range of 4.8–5.6 MJ/Nm3. Cold gas efficiencies of the process were in the range of 0.72–0.77 MJ/Nm3. Using torrefied pellets as a feedstock led to a higher calorific value of syngas, but the cold gas efficiency remained similar (0.75). For sawdust both the calorific value of syngas (LHV = 3.0 MJ/Nm3) and cold gas efficiency (0.57) were significantly lower than for pellets. The collected condensates contained a water fraction with dissolved organic compounds and thick viscous organic substances tar. It was observed that tar production from torrefied pellets is slower, characterised by lower yield, and technically more difficult in comparison to untreated biomass. The effectiveness of liquid hydrocarbon collection (tar to fuel ratio) varied between 0.0138 [kg tar/kg fuel] for torrefied pellets and 0.0213 [kg/kg] for sawdust. The main component of water fractions were organic acids. The content of organic acids in these fractions was as follows: 79.5% from South African pellets, 67% from Polish pellets, 64% from Polish sawdust and 59% from torrefied pellets respectively. The main organic species in tar from torrefied biomass remained acids, whereas in other cases tars were composed of alkylophenols, linear and cyclic aliphatic oxygenates and polyfunctional aromatic oxygenates.

Marek Dudy?ski; Johan C. van Dyk; Kamil Kwiatkowski; Marta Sosnowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energie-Cits 2001 BIOMASS -WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energie-Cités 2001 BIOMASS - WOOD Gasification / Cogeneration ARMAGH United Kingdom Gasification is transferring the combustible matters in organic waste or biomass into gas and pure char by burning the fuel via it allows biomass in small-scaled engines and co-generation units ­ which with conventional technologies

144

Co-gasification of biosolids with biomass: Thermogravimetric analysis and pilot scale study in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work studied the feasibility of co-gasification of biosolids with biomass as a means of disposal with energy recovery. The kinetics study at 800 °C showed that biomass, such as switchgrass, could catalyze the reactions because switchgrass ash contained a high proportion of potassium, an excellent catalyst for gasification. However, biosolids could also inhibit gasification due to interaction between biomass alkali/alkaline earth metals and biosolids clay minerals. In the pilot scale experiments, increasing the proportion of biosolids in the feedstock affected gasification performance negatively. Syngas yield and char conversion decreased from 1.38 to 0.47 m3/kg and 82–36% respectively as the biosolids proportion in the fuel increased from 0% to 100%. Over the same range, the tar content increased from 10.3 to 200 g/m3, while the ammonia concentration increased from 1660 to 19,200 ppmv. No more than 25% biosolids in the fuel feed is recommended to maintain a reasonable gasification.

Ming Ming Yu; Mohammad S. Masnadi; John R. Grace; Xiaotao T. Bi; C. Jim Lim; Yonghua Li

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Punctuated continuity: The technological trajectory of advanced biomass gasifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent interest in biofuels and bio-refineries has been building upon the technology of biomass gasification. This technology developed since the 1980s in three periods, but failed to break through. We try to explain this by studying the technological development from a quasi-evolutionary perspective, drawing upon the concepts of technological paradigms and technological trajectories. We show that the socio-economic context was most important, as it both offered windows of opportunity as well as provided direction to developments. Changes in this context resulted in paradigm shifts, characterized by a change in considered end-products and technologies, as well as a change in companies involved. Other influences on the technological trajectory were firm specific differences, like the focus on a specific feedstock, scale and more recently biofuels to be produced. These were strengthened by the national focus of supporting policies, as well as specific attention for multiple technologies in policies of the USA and European Commission. Over each period we see strong variation that likely benefitted the long term development of the technology. Despite policy efforts that included variation and institutionalization, our case shows that the large changes in socio-economic context and the technological challenges were hard to overcome.

Arjan F. Kirkels

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for...

147

State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combustion Technology Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Biomass...

148

Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels This factsheet describes a project that developed...

149

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

150

State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research...

151

Air-blown gasification of woody biomass in a bubbling fluidized bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Air-blown gasification of woody biomass was investigated in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidized bed gasifier. Air was used as the gasifying agent as well as a fluidizing gas. Fuel was fed into the top of the gasifier and air was introduced from the bottom through a distributor. In order to control the composition of the product gas, the amounts of feedstock and gasifying agent being fed into the gasifier were varied, and the temperature distribution in the gasifier and the composition of the syngas were monitored. It was shown that the distribution of the reaction zones in the gasifier could be controlled by the air injection rate, and the composition of the syngas by the equivalence ratio of the reactants. Although the obtained syngas had a low caloric value, its heating value is adequate for power generation using a syngas engine.

Young Doo Kim; Chang Won Yang; Beom Jong Kim; Kwang Su Kim; Jeung Woo Lee; Ji Hong Moon; Won Yang; Tae U Yu; Uen Do Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Westinghouse gasification technology development and projects status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint program between Westinghouse, the Department of Energy, and the Gas Research Institute has shown, through the use of a 35 ton-per-day coal feed process development unit (PDU), that the fluidized bed gasifier is technically feasible and economically attractive. The process has been shown to be simple, controllable, and safe in converting many types of coals, including reactive western coals, caking eastern coals, high ash coals, and run-of-mine coals. The process is efficient because it utilizes many coals at high conversion efficiency with relatively low use of oxidant and steam. Because of its simplicity, its use of available hardware technology, and the absence of tars in the product gas, the system has low capital and operating costs. It can be employed with little adverse environmental impact because of its efficiency, low pollutant output, low water usage, and disposal ash product. Process advantages have been confirmed by independent conceptual designs and cost estimates for commercial-scale applications, including substitute natural gas (SNG), industrial fuel gas, liquid synfuels, and combined cycle power generation. The development program includes unique cost-effective integration of hot and cold small-scale experimental models, a commercial-scale cold flow model, and analytical modeling, together with the PDU, to provide commercial design procedures. Westinghouse commercial designs are utilizing these design tools and the process is now being scaled-up for a commercial-scale demonstration facility.

Daugherty, D. P.; Schmidt, D. K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gasification improvement of a poor quality solid recovered fuel (SRF). Effect of using natural minerals and biomass wastes blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The need to produce energy from poor quality carbonaceous materials has increased, in order to reduce European dependency on imported fuels, diversify the use of new and alternative fuels and to guarantee secure energy production routes. The valorisation of a poor quality solid residual fuel (SRF), with high content of ash and volatile matter, through its conversion into fuel gas was studied. The rise of gasification temperature and equivalent ratio (ER) led to higher gas yields and to lower undesirable gaseous components, though higher ER values led to a gas with lower energetic content. To reduce the negative effect of SRF unfavourable characteristics and to diversify the feedstocks used, SRF blended with three different types of biomass wastes: forestry pine, almond shells and olive bagasse was co-gasified. The use of biomass wastes tested was valuable for SRF gasification, as there was an increase in the overall reactivity and in H2 production and a reduction of about 55% in tar released, without great changes in gas yield and in its HHV. The use of natural minerals mixed with silica sand was also studied with the aim of improving SRF gasification performance and fuel gas quality. The best results were obtained in presence of dolomite, as the lowest tar and H2S contents were obtained, while an increase in gas yield was observed. Co-gasification of this poor quality SRF blended with biomass wastes in presence of dolomite increased gas yield by 25% while tar contents decreased by 55%.

Filomena Pinto; Rui Neto André; Carlos Carolino; Miguel Miranda; Pedro Abelha; Daniel Direito; Nikos Perdikaris; Ioannis Boukis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biomass Technology Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Technology Analysis Biomass Technology Analysis Conducting full life-cycle assessments for biomass products, including electricity, biodiesel, and ethanol, is important for determining environmental benefits. NREL analysts use a life-cycle inventory modeling package and supporting databases to conduct life-cycle assessments. These tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Integrated system analyses, technoeconomic analyses, life-cycle assessments (LCAs), and other analysis tools are essential to our research and development efforts. They provide an understanding of the economic, technical, and even global impacts of renewable technologies. These analyses also provide direction, focus, and support to the development and commercialization of various biomass conversion technologies. The economic

155

Imperium/Lanzatech Syngas Fermentation Project - Biomass Gasification and Syngas Conditioning for Fermentation Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LanzaTech and NREL will investigate the integration between biomass gasification and LanzaTech's proprietary gas fermentation process to produce ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. Using three feed materials (woody biomass, agricultural residue and herbaceous grass) NREL will produce syngas via steam indirect gasification and syngas conditioning over a range of process relevant operating conditions. The gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio of the biomass feed into the gasifier, and several levels of syngas conditioning (based on temperature) will be varied to produce multiple syngas streams that will be fed directly to 10 liter seed fermenters operating with the Lanzatech organism. The NREL gasification system will then be integrated with LanzaTech's laboratory pilot unit to produce large-scale samples of ethanol and 2,3-butanediol for conversion to fuels and chemicals.

Wilcox, E.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Biomass Gasification with Steam and Oxygen Mixtures at Pilot Scale and with Catalytic Gas Upgrading. Part I: Performance of the Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass gasification with steam + O2...mixtures is studied at small pilot plant (10–20 kg/h) scale. The gasifier used is a turbulent fluidized bed of ... tested till date. Product distribution from the gasifier, ...

M. P. Aznar; J. Corella; J. Gil…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Experimental and computational investigations of sulfur-resistant bimetallic catalysts for reforming of biomass gasification products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experimental studies of supported catalysts was used to identify H{sub 2}S-resistant biomass gasification product reforming catalysts. DFT calculations were used to search for bimetallic, nickel-based (1 1 1) surfaces with lower sulfur adsorption energies and enhanced ethylene adsorption energies. These metrics were used as predictors for H{sub 2}S resistance and activity toward steam reforming of ethylene, respectively. Relative to Ni, DFT studies found that the Ni/Sn surface alloy exhibited enhanced sulfur resistance and the Ni/Ru system exhibited an improved ethylene binding energy with a small increase in sulfur binding energy. A series of supported bimetallic nickel catalysts was prepared and screened under model ethylene reforming conditions and simulated biomass tar reforming conditions. The observed experimental trends in activity were consistent with theoretical predictions, with observed reforming activities in the order Ni/Ru > Ni > Ni/Sn. Interestingly, Ni/Ru showed a high level of resistance to sulfur poisoning compared with Ni. This sulfur resistance can be partly explained by trends in sulfur versus ethylene binding energy at different types of sites across the bimetallic surface.

Rangan, Meghana; Yung, Matthew M.; Medlin, J. William (NREL); (Colorado)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: an interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The analyses were performed in order to provide more detailed data concerning these condensates for the different process research groups and to allow a determination of the differences in properties of the condensates as a function of reactor environment. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases, aqueous phases and, in some cases, both phases depending on the output of the particular reactor system. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay). The analytical data demonstrate the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

160

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Challenges for Gasification The widespread market penetration of gasification continues to face some challenges. Over the years, gasification challenges related to gasifier and supporting unit availability, operability, and maintainability have been addressed with substantial success, and new implementations of gasification will continue to improve in this area. At present, perhaps the most significant remaining challenge is the relatively high capital costs of gasification plants, particularly given the low capital investment required for NGCC-based power production combined with low natural gas prices currently being experienced in the domestic market. Accordingly, technology that can decrease capital costs of gasification systems and plant supporting systems will be most important towards further deployment of gasification.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals andEnergy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. CO ? Solution01GO10621. Industrial Technologies Progarm (ITP). 2006e.

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

163

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Gasification Systems Program Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products more easily with gasification-based technologies compared to conventional combustion of solid feedstocks. Gasification can generate clean power, and by adding steam to the syngas and performing water-gas-shift to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2), additional hydrogen can be produced. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for enhanced oil recovery (see Gasification Systems Program Research and Development Areas figure). In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Furthermore, polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies.

164

The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

French, R.J.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrothermal gasification of biomass and organic wastes. Thewaste, and organic waste from anaerobic wastewater digester and black liquid from paper pulping process have been investigated in the supercritical water gasificationgasification normally exceeds 22MPa [131]. Flowable feedstocks, such as woody waste,

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Examination of Kinetics of Non-catalytic Steam Gasification of Biomass/Lignite Chars and Its Relationship with the Variation of the Pore Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Examination of Kinetics of Non-catalytic Steam Gasification of Biomass/Lignite Chars and Its Relationship with the Variation of the Pore Structure ... Biomass and lignite are attractive as feedstocks in light of the renewable nature and large reserves, respectively. ...

Shinji Kudo; Yasuyo Hachiyama; Hyun-Seok Kim; Koyo Norinaga; Jun-ichiro Hayashi

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

Commercialization of biomass ethanol technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the recent commissioning of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) process development unit, through the support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Biofuels Program, the technology to convert...

Jonathan R. Mielenz; Dianne Koepping…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Commercialization of Biomass Ethanol Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the recent commissioning of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) process development unit, through the support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Biofuels Program, the technology to convert...

Jonathan R. Mielenz; Dianne Koepping…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 gasification reactivity of biomass char, Biotechnologyand economic feasibility of biomass gasification for powerLi, X.T. , et al. , Biomass gasification in a circulating

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE Pens New Agreement with Southern Company to Test Advanced Carbon-Capture & Gasification Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a new 5-year cooperative agreement with Southern Company to evaluate advanced carbon-capture and gasification technologies at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, Ala.

172

Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: International Biomass Energy Technology Review Report, January 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontractor report giving an overview of the biomass power generation technologies used in China, the U.S., and Europe.

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coal Gasification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

174

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressure on the Steam Gasification of Biomass," Departmentof Energy, Catalytic Steam Gasification of Biomass, 11 AprilII. DISCUSSION III. GASIFICATION/LIQUEFACTION DESIGN BASIS

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Instrumentation and Evaluation of a Pilot Scale Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasification System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature and pressure profile .................................. 24 Figure 14 Woodchips temperature and pressure profile .................................... 24 Figure 15 Gasification efficiency and reaction temperature, Tr vs the oxygen... Page Table 1 Modules used for CompactDAQ. ...................................................... 11 Table 2 Bulk density and loading factor ........................................................ 18 Table 3 Sample gasification data readings...

Maglinao, Amado L

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

176

State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre Place Beijing Municipality, China Sector Biomass Product The centre focuses on biomass technology research and provides integrated technologic and service support for biomass utilisation and industrialisation. References State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. State Grid and Shenzhen Energy Group Biomass Engineering Technology Research Centre is a company located in Beijing Municipality, China .

177

Integrated Biomass Gasification - Gas Turbine - Fuel Cell Systems for Small-Scale, Distributed Generation of Electricity and Heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system design for application on commercial scale based on present day technology will be considered. At Delft University of Technology, a biomass gasifier has been set up...th process development unit, will be...

B. J. P. Buhre; J. Andries

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Co-gasification of Plastics and Biomass in a Dual Fluidized-Bed Steam Gasifier: Possible Interactions of Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of Plastics and Biomass in a Dual Fluidized-Bed Steam Gasifier: Possible Interactions of Fuels ... Temperatures of up to 1000 °C were measured with high-temperature thermocouples, while high-quality flow meters (Krohne) were employed for the adjustment of process media inputs, such as the fluidization agents, steam and air. ... A GC–MS device (gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer) was used to measure the content of 50 different tar species of medium molecular weight in the product gas. ...

Veronika Wilk; Hermann Hofbauer

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:25am Addthis Photo of two hands cupping wood chips pouring from a green dispenser. Biomass uses agriculture and forest residues to create energy. This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector. Overview Biomass energy is fuel, heat, or electricity produced from organic materials such as plants, residues, and waste. These organic materials span several sources, including agriculture, forestry, primary and secondary mill residues, urban waste, landfill gases, wastewater treatment plants, and dedicated energy crops. Biomass energy takes many forms and can have a wide variety of applications

180

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification ... The steam–carbon reaction, which is the essential reaction of the gasification processes of carbon-based feed stocks (e.g., coal and biomass), produces synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a synthetically flexible, environmentally benign energy source. ... Coal Gasification in CO2 and Steam:? Development of a Steam Injection Facility for High-Pressure Wire-Mesh Reactors ...

C. W. Zielke; Everett. Gorin

1957-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Symposium on Energy from Biomass and Wastes, August 14,Gasification of Biomass," Department of Energy Contract No.of Biomass Gasification," Department of Energy Contract No.

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Plasmatron gasification of biomass lignocellulosic waste materials derived from municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this work is to study the feasibility and operational performance of plasmatron (plasma torch) gasification of municipal solid waste mixed with raw wood (MSW/RW) derived from the pretreatment of Steam Mechanical Heat Treatment (SMHT), as the target material (MRM). A 10 kW plasmatron reactor is used for gasification of the MRM. The production of syngas (CO and H2) is the major component, and almost 90% of the gaseous products appear in 2 min of reaction time, with relatively high reaction rates. The syngas yield is between 88.59 and 91.84 vol%, and the recovery mass ratio of syngas from MRM is 45.19 down to 27.18 wt% with and without steam with the energy yields of 59.07–111.89%. The concentrations of gaseous products from the continuous feeding of 200 g/h are stable and higher than the average concentrations of the batch feeding of 10 g. The residue from the plasmatron gasification with steam is between 0 and 4.52 wt%, with the inorganic components converted into non-leachable vitrified lava, which is non-hazardous. The steam methane reforming reaction, hydrogasification reaction and Boudouard reaction all contribute to the increase in the syngas yield. It is proved that MSW can be completely converted into bioenergy using SMHT, followed by plasmatron gasification.

Je-Lueng Shie; Li-Xun Chen; Kae-Long Lin; Ching-Yuan Chang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX™ Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy Feedstocks—From Field to Fuel Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX™ Technology Allen Julian, Chief Business Officer, MBI

184

A study on ultra heavy oil gasification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raising the thermal efficiency of a thermal power plant is an important issue from viewpoints of effective energy utilization and environmental protection. In view of raising the thermal efficiency, a gas turbine combined cycle power generation is considered to be very effective. The thermal efficiency of the latest LNG combined cycle power plant has been raised by more than 50%. On the other hand, the diversification of fuels to ensure supply stability is also an important issue, particularly in Japan where natural resources are scarce. Because of excellent handling characteristics petroleum and LNG which produces clean combustion are used in many sectors, and so the demand for such fuels is expected to grow. However, the availability of such fuels is limited, and supplies will be exhausted in the near future. The development of a highly efficient and environment-friendly gas turbine combined cycle using ultra heavy oil such as Orimulsion{trademark} (trademark of BITOR) is thus a significant step towards resolving these two issues. Chubu Electric Power Co, Inc., the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) conducted a collaboration from 1994 to 1998 with the objective of developing an ultra heavy oil integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Construction of the ultra heavy oil gasification testing facility (fuel capacity:2.4t/d) was completed in 1995, and Orimulsion{trademark} gasification tests were carried out in 1995 and 1996. In 1997, the hot dedusting facility with ceramic filter and the water scrubber used as a preprocessor of a wet desulfurization process were installed. Gasification and clean up the syngs tests were carried out on Orimulsion{trademark}, Asmulsion{trademark} (trademark of Nisseki Mitsubishi K.K.), and residue oil in 1997 and 1998. The results of the collaboration effort are described below.

Kidoguchi, Kazuhiro; Ashizawa, Masami; Taki, Masato; Ishimura, Masato; Takeno, Keiji

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

October 2005 Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 2005 Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass, without......................................................................... 9 3.1.1 Biomass Gasification, and production cost estimates for gasification-based thermochemical conversion of switchgrass into Fischer

186

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal catalysts on CO 2 gasification reactivity of biomassfeasibility of biomass gasification for power generation,et al. , Biomass gasification in a circulating fluidized

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ash melting behavior and slag infiltration into alumina refractory simulating co-gasification of coal and biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present study melting behavior of ashes from German brown coal and biomass (wheat straw) as well as from two artificial mixtures of both has been investigated. The four fuel samples were ashed at 450 °C over a period of 26 h. Ash fusion tests and all other measurements have been executed under reducing atmosphere, simulating gasification conditions. The ash melting and wetting properties have been studied for ash cylinders placed onto an alumina refractory at temperatures up to 1600 °C. Optical microscopy and SEM/EDX studies have been performed to analyze the infiltration of slag into the refractory and related progression. For the ash fusion behavior and surface wetting of the refractory clear distinctions from pure ashes have been detected for the blend with 50 wt.% biomass addition due to the formation of eutectics. From optical microscopy and SEM/EDX images of the sections different infiltration properties and mechanisms have been identified. The qualitative infiltration depth and deceleration of slag infiltration by a formation of solid phases have been provided by FactSage™ calculations. In these calculations the contact zone between the two materials has been reconstructed by a stepwise change in the amounts of ash and refractory. The experimental results are very well reflected in this model. Finally, the obtained results suggest low corrosive biomass amounts for co-use in the present gasifier types designed for pure coal.

Guanjun Zhang; Markus Reinmöller; Mathias Klinger; Bernd Meyer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion of Lignocellulosic Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis A. Dutta, M. Talmadge, and J. Hensley National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado M. Worley and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Atlanta, Georgia and Seattle, Washington D. Barton, P. Groenendijk, D. Ferrari, and B. Stears The Dow Chemical Company Midland, Michigan E.M. Searcy, C.T. Wright, and J.R. Hess Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-51400 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

190

Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This process design and technoeconomic evaluation addresses the conversion of biomass to ethanol via thermochemical pathways that are expected to be demonstrated at the pilot level by 2012.

191

Co-gasification of biomass with coal and oil sands coke in a drop tube furnace.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chars were obtained from individual fuels and blends with different blend ratios of coal, coke and biomass in Drop Tube Furnace at different temperatures. Based… (more)

Gao, Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Application of Gasification to the Conversion of Wood, Urban and Industrial Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification is widely accepted as a technological option for the production of synthesis gas (SG) via partial oxidation of heterogeneous organic matter such as, residual biomass, classified urban wastes (RDF)...

N. Abatzoglou; J.-C. Fernandez; L. Laramée…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Effect of Superficial Velocity on Tar from Downdraft Gasification of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many studies, most of which used indirectly heated gasifiers and fluidized bed gasifiers, have been conducted on operational parameters such as temperature, residence time, equivalence ratio, oxygen partial pressure, and gasification medium. ... 18 Superficial velocity (SV), which increases with airflow rate, is independent of gasifier size and permits comparison of gasifiers of different dimensions. ... The majority (85%) of the total particulate matter (TPM) mass was identified, using SEM, as mono-sized spherical primary soot particles with diams. of 70 nm. ...

Takashi Yamazaki; Hirokazu Kozu; Sadamu Yamagata; Naoto Murao; Sachio Ohta; Satoru Shiya; Tatsuo Ohba

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kinetics and Mathematical Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends Background Significant progress has been made in recent years in controlling emissions resulting from coal-fired electricity generation in the United States through the research, development, and deployment of innovative technologies such as gasification. Gasification is a process that converts solid feedstocks such as coal, biomass, or blends

195

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Derived Biomass and U.S. Northeast Forest Residuals Gasification for Electricity Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Derived Biomass and U.S. Northeast Forest Residuals Gasification for Electricity Production ... Various types of organic waste including (a) agriculture and forestry residues and (b) municipal and industrial wastes (i.e., biodegradable municipal solid waste, plastic waste, construction and demolition (C&D) waste, and sewage sludge) are considered as potential feedstock for bioenergy and chemicals production. ...

Philip Nuss; Kevin H. Gardner; Jenna R. Jambeck

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis ... This paper, which is the first part of a series of papers, introduces a hybrid coal, biomass, and natural gas to liquids (CBGTL) process that can produce transportation fuels in ratios consistent with current U.S. transportation fuel demands. ... Steady-state process simulation results based on Aspen Plus are presented for the seven process alternatives with a detailed economic analysis performed using the Aspen Process Economic Analyzer and unit cost functions obtained from literature. ...

Richard C. Baliban; Josephine A. Elia; Christodoulos A. Floudas

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic analysis of a system with biomass gasification, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic investigations of a small-scale integrated gasification solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine for combined heat and power (CHP) with a net electric capacity of 120 kWe have been performed. Woodchips are used as gasification feedstock to produce syngas, which is then utilized to feed the anode side of the SOFC stacks. A thermal efficiency of 0.424 LHV (lower heating value) for the plant is found to use 89.4 kg/h of feedstock to produce the above mentioned electricity. Thermoeconomic analysis shows that the production price of electricity is 0.1204 $/kWh. Furthermore, hot water is considered as a by-product, and the cost of hot water is found to be 0.0214 $/kWh. When compared to other renewable systems of similar scales, this result shows that if both SOFC and Stirling engine technology enter the commercialization phase, then they can deliver electricity at a cost that is competitive with the corresponding renewable systems of the same size.

Masoud Rokni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifiers and Impact of Coal Rank and Coal Properties The available commercial gasification technologies are often optimized for a particular rank of coal or coal properties, and in some cases, certain ranks of coal might be unsuitable for utilization in a given gasification technology. On the other hand, there is considerable flexibility in most of the common gasifiers; this is highlighted by the following table, which provides an overview of the level of experience for the various commercially available gasifiers by manufacturer for each coal type. This experience will only continue to expand as more gasification facilities come online and more demonstrations are completed. SOLID FUEL GASIFICATION EXPERIENCE1 High Ash Coals

199

Biomass Gasification:? Produced Gas Upgrading by In-Bed Use of Dolomite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When some calcined dolomite (OCa·OMg) is used in the bed of a biomass gasifier of fluidized bed type the raw gas produced is cleaner than when only silica sand is used in it as fluidizing medium. In-bed dolomite changes the product distribution at the ...

Ana Olivares; María P. Aznar; Miguel A. Caballero; Javier Gil; Eva Francés; José Corella

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Instrumentation and tar measurement systems for a downdraft biomass gasifier.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass gasification is a promising route utilizing biomass materials to produce fuels and chemicals. Gas product from the gasification process is so called synthesis gas… (more)

Hu, Ming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Characterization and Cleanup of Wastewater from Pressurized Entrained Flow Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The European Commission’s strategy on clean and efficient vehicles(2) includes the notion that the internal combustion engine is likely to remain dominant in road vehicles in the short- and medium-term perspective. ... In 2011, a pilot-scale gasifier (maximum 1 MWth fuel capacity, 10 bar(a) pressure) was commissioned to demonstrate the concept for large-scale production of liquid biofuel from solid biomass. ... Above the gravel was a bed of sand 200 mm in height (used as filtration media) with a particle size of 0.5–1.0 ...

Roger Molinder; Olov G. W. Öhrman

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Gasification | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gasification Gasification Gasification The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant Gasification Technology R&D Coal gasification offers one of the most versatile and clean ways to convert coal into electricity, hydrogen, and other valuable energy products. Coal gasification electric power plants are now operating commercially in the United States and in other nations, and many experts predict that coal gasification will be at the heart of future generations of clean coal technology plants. Rather than burning coal directly, gasification (a thermo-chemical process) breaks down coal - or virtually any carbon-based feedstock - into its basic chemical constituents. In a modern gasifier, coal is typically exposed to steam and carefully controlled amounts of air or oxygen under high

204

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Commercial Technologies for Oxygen Production Gasification processes require an oxidant, most commonly oxygen; less frequently air or just steam may suffice as the gasification agent depending on the process. Oxygen-blown systems have the advantage of minimizing the size of the gasification reactor and its auxiliary process systems. However, the oxygen for the process must be separated from the atmosphere. Commercial large-scale air separation plants are based on cryogenic distillation technology, capable of supplying oxygen at high purity1 and pressure. This technology is well understood, having been in practice for over 75 years. Cryogenic air separation is recognized for its reliability, and it can be designed for high capacity (up to 5,000 tons per day).

205

Coal gasification development intensifies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification development intensifies ... Three almost simultaneous developments in coal gasification, although widely divergent in purpose and geography, rapidly are accelerating the technology's movement into an era of commercial exploitation. ... A plant to be built in the California desert will be the first commercialsize coal gasification power plant in the U.S. In West Germany, synthesis gas from a coal gasification demonstration plant is now being used as a chemical feedstock, preliminary to scaleup of the process to commercial size. ...

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low-Rank Coals Project Number: DE-FE0007759 Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX. Air Products, in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), is testing its Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (Sour PSA) process that separates syngas into an hydrogen-rich stream and second stream comprising of sulfur compounds(primarily hydrogen sulfide)carbon dioxide (CO2), and other impurities. The adsorbent technology testing that has been performed to date utilized syngas streams derived from higher rank coals and petcoke. Using data from experiments based on petcoke-derived syngas, replacing the

207

Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Gas Technology Institute  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Gas Technology Institute will conduct research and development on hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion processes to make gasoline and diesel.

208

Production of Middle Caloric Fuel Gas from Coal by Dual-Bed Gasification Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work demonstrated the dual-bed gasification technology on a pilot plant (1000 tons of coal/a) mainly consisting of a fluidized-bed gasifier and a pneumatic combustor using the coal with a particle size of less than 20 mm. ... It can be seen in Table 1 that the mass fraction of the coal with sizes less than 2.0 mm was about 45 wt %. ... Coal was continuously fed in the gasifier, and meanwhile, air or gas mixture (air and steam) as the fluidizing medium and gasifying reagent was introduced from the bottom of the gasifier. ...

Yin Wang; Wen Dong; Li Dong; Junrong Yue; Shiqiu Gao; Toshiyuki Suda; Guangwen Xu

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

Biomass Gasification with Steam in Fluidized Bed:? Effectiveness of CaO, MgO, and CaO?MgO for Hot Raw Gas Cleaning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upgrading of the raw hot gas from a bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasifier is studied using cheap calcined minerals or rocks downstream from the gasifier. ... Gasification with steam (with or without O2 added) is another process which produces a medium heating (10?16 MJ/m3n) value gas with a 30?60 vol % H2 content. ... The effect of the particle diameter has been studied at 794 ± 9 °C (T2) with sizes between 1.0 and 4.0 mm (dp,mean = 1.30?3.25 mm). ...

Jesús Delgado; María P. Aznar; José Corella

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels, LLC  UCSD Biomass to Power  Economic Feasibility Figure 1: West Biofuels Biomass Gasification to Power rates..……………………. ……31  UCSD Biomass to Power ? Feasibility 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Autothermal oxidative pyrolysis of biomass feedstocks over noble metal catalysts to liquid products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Two thermal processing technologies have emerged for processing biomass into renewable liquid products: pyrolysis and gasification/Fischer-Tropsch processing. The work presented here will demonstrate oxidative pyrolysis… (more)

Balonek, Christine Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

NETL: Gasification Systems Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shelf Shelf Gasification Systems Reference Shelf TABLE OF CONTENTS Brochures Conferences and Workshops Gasification Systems Projects National Map Gasification Systems Projects and Performers Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifipedia Multi-phase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX) Patents Program Presentations Project Information Projects Summary Table by State Solicitations Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technical Presentations & Papers Technology Readiness Assessment (Comprehensive Report | Overview Report) Video, Images & Photos Gasification Plant Databases CD Icon Request Gasification Technologies Information on a CD. Gasification RSS Feed Subscribe to the Gasification RSS Feed to follow website updates. LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program Group Subscribe to the LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program group for more information and discussion.

213

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided more than $36 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE) to accelerate work on existing projects, undertake new and transformative research, and deploy clean energy technologies across the nation. Of this funding, $1029 million is supporting innovative work to advance biomass research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

214

Thermochemical Conversion Research and Development: Gasification and Pyrolysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass gasification and pyrolysis research and development activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies January 22, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis...

216

Gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review. [US DOE supported  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review was held June 24 to 26, 1981, at Germantown, Maryland. Forty-eight papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Generation of a Gaseous Fuel by Pyrolysis or Gasification of Biomass for Use as Reburn Gas in Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biofliels attract increasing interest in power plant technology as sources of carbon dioxide neutral fuels. Besides using solid pulverised biomass as an additional fuel in coal-fired boilers a further possibil...

C. Storm; H. Spliethoff; K. R. G. Hein

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Coal Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Recommendations and Strategies Produced for the Department of Energy (DOE)/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Gasification Technologies Council (GTC) September 2004 Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Strategies and Recommendations Final Report Study Performed by:

219

Fixed Bed Countercurrent Low Temperature Gasification of Dairy Biomass and Coal-Dairy Biomass Blends Using Air-Steam as Oxidizer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not properly managed. However, the concentrated production of low quality CB at these feeding operations serves as a good feedstock for in situ gasification for syngas (CO and H2) production and subsequent use in power generation. A small scale (10 k...

Gordillo Ariza, Gerardo

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Status of Coal Gasification: 1977  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-pressure technology is important to coal gasification for several reasons. When the end product ... of high pressures in all types of coal gasification reduces the pressure drop throughout the equipment,...

F. C. Schora; W. G. Bair

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs CO2: CO2 Capture: Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs Specific Impacts on IGCC Plant Designs from CO2 Capture In foregoing discussion, results of NETL's comprehensive study comparing the performance and cost of various fossil fuel-based power generation technologies with and without CO2 capture were reviewed. Of particular interest in that study was the companion set of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) designs, using GE's gasification technology, which can be used to illustrate the design changes needed for CO2 capture. Current Technology - IGCC Plant Design Figure 1 shows a simplified block flow diagram (BFD) of a market-ready IGCC design without CO2 capture. As shown, the IGCC plant consists of the following processing islands, of which a more detailed description of each can be found in the cited NETL referenced report: 1

222

Incentives boost coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher energy prices are making technologies to gasify the USA's vast coal reserves attractive again. The article traces the development of coal gasification technology in the USA. IGCC and industrial gasification projects are now both eligible for a 20% investment tax credit and federal loan guarantees can cover up to 80% of construction costs. 4 photos.

Hess, G.

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

NETL: 2010 World Gasification Database Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > 2010 World Gasification Database Gasification Systems 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Archive DOE/NETL 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database Worldwide Gasification Database Analysis The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

224

In situ catalytic conversion of tar using rice husk char/ash supported nickel–iron catalysts for biomass pyrolytic gasification combined with the mixing-simulation in fluidized-bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A catalytic gasification technology has been proposed for tar in situ conversion using the rice husk char (RHC) or rice husk ash (RHA) supported nickel–iron catalysts. Biomass tar could be converted effectively by co-pyrolysis with the RHC/RHA supported nickel–iron catalysts at 800 °C, simplifying the follow-up tar removal process. Under the optimized conditions, the tar conversion efficiency could reach about 92.3% by the RHC Ni–Fe, which exhibited more advantages of easy preparation and energy-saving. In addition, the tar conversion efficiency could reach about 93% by the RHA Ni. Significantly, partial metal oxides (e.g., NiO, Fe2O3) in the carbon matrix of RHC could be in-situ carbothermally reduced into the metallic state (e.g., Ni0) by reducing gases (e.g., CO) or carbon atom, thereby enhancing the catalytic performance of tar conversion. Furthermore, mixing with other solid particles such as sand and RHA Ni, can also improve biomass (e.g., RH) fluidization behavior by optimizing the operation parameters (e.g., particle size, mass fraction) in the mode of fluidized bed gasifier (FBG). After the solid–solid mixing simulation, the RH mass fraction of 0.5 and the particle diameter of 0.5 mm can be employed in the binary mixture of RH and RHA.

Yafei Shen; Peitao Zhao; Qinfu Shao; Fumitake Takahashi; Kunio Yoshikawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridgwater, A. , Thermal biomass conversion and utilization:and bed materials. Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery, 2011.in Thermochemical Biomass Conversion . 2008, Blackwell

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactor for the Study of Biomass Pyrolysis Chemistry at Highmineral matter on biomass pyrolysis characteristics. Fuel,Puigjaner, Kinetics of Biomass Pyrolysis: ? a Reformulated

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The handbook of biomass combustion and co-firing . 2008:a lower heat of combustion for biomass [164]. Consequently,Miles, Combustion properties of biomass. Fuel Processing

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

230

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

231

17 - Fluidized bed gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter describes the state-of-the-art of fluidized bed gasification of solid fuels, starting from the key role played by hydrodynamics, and its strong correlation with physical and chemical phenomena of the process and operating performance parameters of the reactor. The possible configurations of fluidized bed gasification plants are also assessed, and an analysis of the main methods for syngas cleaning is reported. Finally, the chapter describes some of the most interesting commercial experiences. The analysis indicates that the gasification of biomass and also of municipal and industrial solid wastes appear to be the most interesting sectors for the industrial development and utilization of fluidized bed gasifiers.

U. Arena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Multi-stage biomass gasification in Internally Circulating Fluidized-bed Gasifier (ICFG): Test operation of animal-waste-derived biomass and parametric investigation at low temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the design, construction and operation of an Internally Circulating Fluidized-bed Gasifier (ICFG) are introduced in detail. ICFG design provides a multi-stage gasification process, with bed material acting as the medium for char combustion and heat exchange by its internal circulation. And it is used for the steam gasification of animal waste at low temperature in view of producing fuel gas. The effects of pressure balance, pyrolysis temperature, catalytic temperature and steam/feedstock ratio on the gasifier performance (e.g. product gas yield, gas composition, tar content) are also discussed. Hydrogen-rich and low-tar product gas can be produced from the low-calorific feedstock, in the properly designed process together with high-performance catalyst.

Xianbin Xiao; Duc Dung Le; Kayoko Morishita; Shouyu Zhang; Liuyun Li; Takayuki Takarada

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tech. Carrier Torrefaction Biomass energy 200°C -300°C, a)ability to boost biomass energy density thru hydrothermalcomponents of biomass and stored energy of biomass [8-10].

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

Zhen Fan

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one-tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 2.16 MM Scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per Scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $26,680,000 - September 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood prices represent the cost of unchipped wood delivered to the plant site. For utility financing, the gas production costs are, respectively, $14.34, $14.83, $15.86, and $17.84 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $18.76, $19.26, $20.28, and $22.31 per MM Btu for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for char is 57.4%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix A. Feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to SNG. Plant production is 21.6 MM scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $95,115,000 - September, 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. For utility financing, the gas production costs are respectively $5.09, $5.56, $6.50, and $8.34 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton delivered to the plant at a moisture content of 49.50 wt %. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $6.62, $7.11, $8.10, and $10.06 per MM Btu. The cost calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for by-product char is 58.3%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

238

Catalytic conversion of methane over a biomass char for hydrogen production: deactivation and regeneration by steam gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract CH4 decomposition over a wood char was investigated as an alternative green catalyst to produce hydrogen from hydrocarbons. Pyrolytic carbon (pyrocarbon) deposition leads to apparent deactivation of the catalyst by pore-mouth plugging. The activity of the carbon bed and its available surface area is easily restored by H2O gasification. The used char with pyrocarbon deposition was even found to be more reactive to gasification than the fresh char used in our conditions. This finding was highlighted by: (i) determination of gasification reaction extents by steam, (ii) temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) of the fresh, used and reactivated chars, (iii) TPO under Differential Scanning Calorimetry of these chars and demineralised chars. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) analysis of the chars showed different multiscale organisation of the carbon materials (disordered and graphitic mesoporous nanostructures). The fast regeneration of the used char could be attributed to the catalytic effect of the minerals present in the char that are reduced under our conditions of CH4 conversion. The predominant oxidation of the pyrocarbon compared to the char during its regeneration is evidenced through differential annealing (at 1800 °C) followed by XRD analysis. The oxidation of pyrocarbon is faster than the oxidation of the weakly reactive mesoporous carbon in char as shown by the HRTEM analysis. Consequently, wood char is an effective, easy to regenerate, and cheap catalyst for converting hydrocarbons (CH4 or tar) into syngas.

A. Dufour; A. Celzard; V. Fierro; F. Broust; C. Courson; A. Zoulalian; J.N. Rouzaud

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass." Departmentand Celik, Fuat (2005). "Gasification-Based Fuels andon a study of slagging gasification for MSW that reported

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass." Departmentand Celik, Fuat (2005). "Gasification-Based Fuels andon a study of slagging gasification for MSW that reported

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.

Unknown

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

243

Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

244

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications Usage in Coal to Electrical Applications The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) application of gasification offers some water-saving advantages over other technologies for producing electricity from coal. Regions with limited water resources, typical of many parts of the western United States, could conserve resources by meeting increasing electricity demand with IGCC generation. Many of these areas have good coal resources and a need for new generating capacity. Water use in a thermoelectric power plant is described by two separate terms: water withdrawal and water consumption. Water withdrawal is the amount of water taken into the plant from an outside source. Water consumption refers to the portion of the withdrawn water that is not returned directly to the outside source - for example, water lost to evaporative cooling.

245

EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS...

246

Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification Biomass Pyrolysis Electrolysis Hydrogen Storage Compressed Gas Liquefied Gas Metal Hydride Carbon Hydrogen Production Steam Methane Reforming Noncatalytic Partial Oxidation Coal Gasification Biomass

247

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Gasification Systems Technologies - Major Partner Test Sites Major Partner Test Sites Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding provided for any one project. It then becomes critical to test the technology at a pre-existing facility willing to test experimental technologies. Not surprisingly, most commercial facilities are hesitant to interfere with their operations to experiment, but others, with a view towards the future, welcome promising technologies. Below is a list of major partner test sites that actively host DOE supported research activities. Many of the test sites were built with DOE support, but many were not. Some are commercial, and were designed to perform experimental work. All play an important role in developing technologies with minimal expense to the project, and to the U.S. taxpayer.

248

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for energy. Biomass and Bioenergy, 2003. 25 (2): p. 119-133.resources. Biomass and Bioenergy, 2004. 27 (6): p. 613-620.the U.S.A. Biomass and Bioenergy, 2009. 33 (4): p. 628-634.

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: A Case Study for Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production technologies including biomass gasification,coal gasification, natural gas reforming, and waterby biomass central gasification and then coal gasification

Lin, Zhenhong; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M; Chen, Chien-Wei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production technologies including biomass gasification,coal gasification, natural gas reforming, and waterby biomass central gasification and then coal gasification

Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

252

Experimental Study on Gasification of Jatropha Shells in a Downdraft Open Top Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few major attractions of gasification are that it can convert waste or low-priced fuels, such as biomass, coal, and petcoke, into high-value chemicals. Utilization of...4]. Biomass gasification is the latest ge...

Lalta Prasad

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture R&D Capture R&D DOE/NETL's pre-combustion CO2 control technology portfolio of R&D projects is examining various CO2 capture technologies, and supports identification of developmental pathways linking advanced fossil fuel conversion and CO2 capture. The Program's CO2 capture activity is being conducted in close coordination with that of advanced, higher-efficiency power generation and fossil fuel conversion technologies such as gasification. Links to the projects can be found here. Finally, an exhaustive and periodically updated report on CO2 capture R&D sponsored by NETL is available: DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (also referred to as the CO2 Handbook). Carbon Dioxide CO2 Capture Commercial CO2 Uses & Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery

254

NREL: Biomass Research - Richard L. Bain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Richard L. Bain Richard L. Bain Photo of Richard Bain Richard Bain is a Principal Engineer in the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. He has worked at NREL since 1990 and has extensive experience in the thermal conversion of biomass, municipal wastes, coal, and petroleum. He is a lead researcher in the area of production of transportation fuels and hydrogen via thermochemical conversion of biomass; technical advisor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on biofuels demonstrations; and Task Leader for the International Energy Agency Bioenergy Annex Biomass Gasification Task. Dr. Bain manages biomass gasification research activities for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program at NREL and coordinates support to the USDA for

255

Co-Gasification of Biomass Wastes and Coal?Coke Blends in an Entrained Flow Gasifier: An Experimental Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study of entrained flow, air-blown cogasification of biomass and a coal?coke mixture has been performed in order to evaluate the effect of the relative fuel/air ratio (ranging between 2.5 and 7.5), the reaction temperature (ranging between ...

Juan J. Hernández; Guadalupe Aranda-Almansa; Clara Serrano

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Attached cultivation technology of microalgae for efficient biomass feedstock production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential of microalgae biofuel has not been realized because of low productivity and high costs associated with the current cultivation systems. In this paper, an attached cultivation method was introduced, in which microalgae cells grew on the surface of vertical artificial supporting material to form algal film. Multiple of the algal films were assembled in an array fashion to dilute solar irradiation to facilitate high photosynthetic efficiency. Results showed that a broad range of microalgae species can grow with this attached method. A biomass productivity of 50–80 g m?2 d?1 was obtained outdoors for Scenedesmus obliquus, corresponding to the photosynthetic efficiency of 5.2–8.3% (total solar radiation). This attached method also offers lots of possible advantages over traditional open ponds, such as on water saving, harvesting, contamination controlling and scale-up. The attached cultivation represents a promising technology for economically viable production of microalgae biofuels.

Tianzhong Liu; Junfeng Wang; Qiang Hu; Pengfei Cheng; Bei Ji; Jinli Liu; Yu Chen; Wei Zhang; Xiaoling Chen; Lin Chen; Lili Gao; Chunli Ji; Hui Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analysis of energy recovery potential using innovative technologies of waste gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy recovery from waste by gasification was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two processes: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of feeding waste: Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and pulper residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different configurations for the energy cycles were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with performances from conventional Waste-to-Energy process. - Abstract: In this paper, two alternative thermo-chemical processes for waste treatment were analysed: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma process. The two processes were analysed from the thermodynamic point of view, trying to reconstruct two simplified models, using appropriate simulation tools and some support data from existing/planned plants, able to predict the energy recovery performances by process application. In order to carry out a comparative analysis, the same waste stream input was considered as input to the two models and the generated results were compared. The performances were compared with those that can be obtained from conventional combustion with energy recovery process by means of steam turbine cycle. Results are reported in terms of energy recovery performance indicators as overall energy efficiency, specific energy production per unit of mass of entering waste, primary energy source savings, specific carbon dioxide production.

Lombardi, Lidia, E-mail: lidia.lombardi@unifit.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Carnevale, Ennio [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Corti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 56100 Siena (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

JV Task 46 - Development and Testing of a Thermally Integrated SOFC-Gasification System for Biomass Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center has designed a biomass power system using a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermally integrated with a downdraft gasifier. In this system, the high-temperature effluent from the SOFC enables the operation of a substoichiometric air downdraft gasifier at an elevated temperature (1000 C). At this temperature, moisture in the biomass acts as an essential carbon-gasifying medium, reducing the equivalence ratio at which the gasifier can operate with complete carbon conversion. Calculations show gross conversion efficiencies up to 45% (higher heating value) for biomass moisture levels up to 40% (wt basis). Experimental work on a bench-scale gasifier demonstrated increased tar cracking within the gasifier and increased energy density of the resultant syngas. A series of experiments on wood chips demonstrated tar output in the range of 9.9 and 234 mg/m{sup 3}. Both button cells and a 100-watt stack was tested on syngas from the gasifier. Both achieved steady-state operation with a 22% and 15% drop in performance, respectively, relative to pure hydrogen. In addition, tar tolerance testing on button cells demonstrated an upper limit of tar tolerance of approximately 1%, well above the tar output of the gasifier. The predicted system efficiency was revised down to 33% gross and 27% net system efficiency because of the results of the gasifier and fuel cell experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of thermally integrating a gasifier and a high-temperature fuel cell in small distributed power systems.

Phillip Hutton; Nikhil Patel; Kyle Martin; Devinder Singh

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Complex analysis of energy production technologies from solid biomass in the Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of the energetic, economic, and environmental analyses of technologies of energy production from solid biomass are considered. Examples of the introduction of the technology of the direct combustion o...

T. A. Zheliezna; O. I. Drozdova

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Gasification Technologie: Opportunities & Challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This course has been put together to provide a single source document that not only reviews the historical development of gasification but also compares the process to combustion. It also provides a short discussion on integrated gasification and combined cycle processes. The major focus of the course is to describe the twelve major gasifiers being developed today. The hydrodynamics and kinetics of each are reviewed along with the most likely gas composition from each of the technologies when using a variety of fuels under different conditions from air blown to oxygen blown and atmospheric pressure to several atmospheres. If time permits, a more detailed discussion of low temperature gasification will be included.

Breault, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Process and technological aspects of municipal solid waste gasification. A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical assessment of the main commercially available MSW gasifiers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed discussion of the basic features of gasification process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of configurations of gasification-based waste-to-energy units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance analysis, on the basis of independent sources data. - Abstract: The paper proposes a critical assessment of municipal solid waste gasification today, starting from basic aspects of the process (process types and steps, operating and performance parameters) and arriving to a comparative analysis of the reactors (fixed bed, fluidized bed, entrained bed, vertical shaft, moving grate furnace, rotary kiln, plasma reactor) as well as of the possible plant configurations (heat gasifier and power gasifier) and the environmental performances of the main commercially available gasifiers for municipal solid wastes. The analysis indicates that gasification is a technically viable option for the solid waste conversion, including residual waste from separate collection of municipal solid waste. It is able to meet existing emission limits and can have a remarkable effect on reduction of landfill disposal option.

Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Gasification Â… Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Gasification Technologies Advances for Future Energy Plants Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 Oxygen Membrane - APCI - 25% capital cost reduction - 5.0% COE reduction Warm Gas Cleaning - RTI in combination with H 2 /CO 2 Membrane - Eltron - 2.9 % pt efficiency increase - 12% COE decrease Oxygen CO 2 H 2 rich stream Water Gas Shift*

263

Detailed kinetic study of anisole pyrolysis and oxidation to understand tar formation during biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass combustion and gasification Milena Nowakowska, Olivier Herbinet, Anthony Dufour, Pierre. Methoxyphenols are one of the main precursors of PAH and soot in biomass combustion and gasification. Keywords: Anisole; Pyrolysis; Oxidation; Tars; Biomass; Kinetic modeling Corresponding author

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G. , An overview of biomass pyrolysis, Energy Sources, 2002,Spliethoff, H. , Biomass pyrolysis/gasification for productreactor for the study of biomass pyrolysis chemistry at high

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic...

266

Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX? Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

biorefinery locations * Collection area may not be practical * Potential for spoilage Logistics Challenge Visualized AFEX Depot Biorefinery * 100-200 tonsday of biomass * Draw...

267

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Power: Typical IGCC Configuration Major Commercial Examples of IGCC Plants While there are many coal gasification plants in the world co-producing electricity, chemicals and/or steam, the following are four notable, commercial-size IGCC plants currently in operation solely for producing electricity from coal and/or coke. Tampa Electric, Polk County 250 MW GE Gasifier Wabash, West Terre Haute 265 MW CoP E-Gas(tm) Gasifier Nuon, Buggenum 250 MW Shell Gasifier Elcogas, Puertollano 300 MW Prenflo Gasifier All of the plants began operation prior to 2000 and employ high temperature entrained-flow gasification technology. GE (formerly Texaco-Chevron) and ConocoPhillips (CoP) are slurry feed gasifiers, while Shell and Prenflo are dry feed gasifiers. None of these plants currently capture carbon dioxide (CO2). A simplified process flow diagram of the 250-MW Tampa Electric IGCC plant is shown in Figure 1 to illustrate the overall arrangement of an operating commercial scale IGCC plant. The Tampa Electric plant is equipped with both radiant and convective coolers for heat recovery, generating high pressure (HP) steam.

268

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to Design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

Unknown

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Investigation on syngas production via biomass conversion through the integration of pyrolysis and air–steam gasification processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fuel production from agro-waste has become an interesting alternative for energy generation due to energy policies and greater understanding of the importance of green energy. This research was carried out in a lab-scale gasifier and coconut shell was used as feedstock in the integrated process. In order to acquire the optimum condition of syngas production, the effect of the reaction temperature, equivalence ratio (ER) and steam/biomass (S/B) ratio was investigated. Under the optimized condition, H2 and syngas yield achieved to 83.3 g/kg feedstock and 485.9 g/kg feedstock respectively, while LHV of produced gases achieved to 12.54 MJ/N m3.

Reza Alipour Moghadam; Suzana Yusup; Wan Azlina; Shahab Nehzati; Ahmad Tavasoli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - adiabatic fixed-bed gasification Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University ABSTRACT Gasification is a globally emerging technology in commercial markets... of the most developed and versatile gasification technologies is based upon...

271

Pyrolytic Gasification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyrolytic Gasification Pyrolytic Gasification Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyrolytic Gasification Sector Biomass References Balboa Pacific Corp[1] Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

272

Gasification Â… Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

th th Annual International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation, Costa Mesa, CA, February 7, 2012 An Overview of U.S. DOE's Gasification Systems Program Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 U.S. Coal Resources Low rank: lignite and sub-bituminous coal - About 50% of the U.S. coal reserves - Nearly 50% of U.S. coal production - Lower sulfur Bituminous coal

273

Coal gasification 2006: roadmap to commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surging oil and gas prices, combined with supply security and environmental concerns, are prompting power generators and industrial firms to further develop coal gasification technologies. Coal gasification, the process of breaking down coal into its constituent chemical components prior to combustion, will permit the US to more effectively utilize its enormous, low cost coal reserves. The process facilitates lower environmental impact power generation and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional generation techniques. The study is designed to inform the reader as to this rapidly evolving technology, its market penetration prospects and likely development. Contents include: Clear explanations of different coal gasification technologies; Emissions and efficiency comparisons with other fuels and technologies; Examples of US and global gasification projects - successes and failures; Commercial development and forecast data; Gasification projects by syngas output; Recommendations for greater market penetration and commercialization; Current and projected gasification technology market shares; and Recent developments including proposals for underground gasification process. 1 app.

NONE

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Gasification of Ponderosa Pine Charcoal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of wood chars with CO2 and steam is an important process step in the conversion of biomass to fuel and synthesis gases. Wood fuels can be gasified in a wide variety of sizes, shapes and densities...

Richard Edrich; Timothy Bradley…

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, an agricultural processing facility was constructed in southern New Mexico for spice and herb dehydration. Annual operational costs are dominated by energy costs, due primarily to the energy intensity of dehydration. A feasibility study was performed to determine whether the use of biomass resources as a feedstock for a cogeneration system would be an economical option. The project location allowed access to unusual biomass feedstocks including cotton gin trash, pecan shells and in-house residues. A resource assessment of the immediate project area determined that approximately 120,000 bone dry tons of biomass feedstocks are available annually. Technology characterization for the plant energy requirements indicated gasification systems offer fuel flexibility advantages over combustion systems although vendor support and commercial experience are limited. Regulatory siting considerations introduce a level of uncertainty because of a lack of a precedent in New Mexico for gasification technology and because vendors of commercial gasifiers have little experience operating such a facility nor gathering emission data. A public opinion survey indicated considerable support for renewable energy use and biomass energy utilization. However, the public opinion survey also revealed limited knowledge of biomass technologies and concerns regarding siting of a biomass facility within the geographic area. The economic analysis conducted for the study is based on equipment vendor quotations, and indicates there will be difficulty competing with current prices of natural gas.

Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chapter 5 - Environmental Impact of Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental impact of black liquor gasification (BLG) is discussed. Biofuels from a BLG process excel in terms of well-to-wheel carbon dioxide emission reduction and energy efficiency. Forest biorefinery utilizing gasification (in a black liquor gasification combined cycle (BLGCC) configuration) rather than a Tomlinson boiler is predicted to produce significantly fewer pollutant emissions due to the intrinsic characteristics of the BLGCC technology. Syngas cleanup conditioning removes a considerable amount of contaminants and gas turbine combustion is more efficient and complete than boiler combustion. Also, there could be reductions in pollutant emissions and hazardous wastes resulting from cleaner production of chemicals and fuels that are now manufactured using fossil energy resources. Production of power, fuels, chemicals, and other products from biomass resources creates a net zero generation of carbon dioxide as plants are renewable carbon sinks. BLG whether conducted at high or low temperatures is still superior to the current recovery boiler combustion technology. Implementation of IGCC power plants will cause net savings in cooling water requirements and net reductions in wastewater discharges. The most significant environmental impact caused by BLG will occur in air emissions. The overall reduction of Total reduced sulphur (TRS) gases using gasification technology will also reduce odor, which will improve public acceptance of pulp and paper mills, particularly in populated areas.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Chapter 15 - Catalytic Thermochemical Processes for Biomass Conversion to Biofuels and Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass is the most abundant and biorenewable resource with great potential for sustainable production of chemicals and fuels. Thermochemical conversion technologies (pyrolysis, gasification and hydrothermal liquefaction) are a promising option for transforming biomass feedstocks into liquid oils and chemicals. In the article, for the thermal process of biomass for biofuels and chemicals, the effect of reaction conditions, reactors, solvents and catalysts on the yield and distribution of the products are reviewed. Fast pyrolysis of cellulose is primarily conducted over catalysts with proper acidity/basicity and has undergone many pilot tests. Gasification is typically conducted over supported noble metal catalysts and has been profiled as being CO2-neutral, having a high potential to provide power, chemicals and fuels. Catalytically hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass produces a very complex mixture of liquid products; therefore, novel technology for separation and extraction of downstream products from hydrothermal liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass need to be developed.

Lin Mei Wu; Chun Hui Zhou; Dong Shen Tong; Wei Hua Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NETL: Gasification - Request Gasification Systems Information on a CD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Request Gasification Systems Information on a CD Please fill in the form below to receive the CDs of your choice. * Denotes required field Requestor Contact Information Requested By (Agency/Company): First Name: * Last Name: * Address: * PO Box: City: * State: * Zip: * Country: Email: * Phone: CD Request Select CD(s):* Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasification Technologies Training Course Special Instructions: Submit Request Reset Contacts Program Contact: Jenny Tennant (304) 285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Close Contacts Disclaimer Disclaimer of Liability: This system is made available by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, the Department of Energy, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, nor any of

280

Producer Gas Composition and NOx Emissions from a Pilot-Scale Biomass Gasification and Combustion System Using Feedstock with Controlled Nitrogen Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) Additionally, the biomass prices are generally high, as the biomass feedstocks are seasonal and there is lack of a large feed storage capability to control the price. ... Five different biomass feedstocks with varying nitrogen contents were tested. ... Five different biomass feedstocks were used in this study. ...

Sharan Sethuraman; Cuong Van Huynh; Song-Charng Kong

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GE Global Research is developing an innovative energy technology for coal gasification with high efficiency and near-zero pollution. This Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology simultaneously converts coal, steam and air into three separate streams of hydrogen-rich gas, sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and high-temperature, high-pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in gas turbines. This is the draft final report for the first stage of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program. The UFP technology development program encompassed lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP concept. Modeling and economic assessments were also key parts of this program. The chemical and mechanical feasibility were established via lab and bench-scale testing, and a pilot plant was designed, constructed and operated, demonstrating the major UFP features. Experimental and preliminary modeling results showed that 80% H{sub 2} purity could be achieved, and that a UFP-based energy plant is projected to meet DOE efficiency targets. Future work will include additional pilot plant testing to optimize performance and reduce environmental, operability and combined cycle integration risks. Results obtained to date have confirmed that this technology has the potential to economically meet future efficiency and environmental performance goals.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Raul Subia; Arnaldo Frydman; Parag Kulkarni; Jennifer Schwerman; Valadimir Zamansky; John Reinker; Kanchan Mondal; Lubor Stonawski; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Szymanski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - allothermal gasification gas- Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the gasifer, could cause... 2002. 13. Hansen, Martin, Gas Cleaning and Gas Engines for Small-Scale Biomass Gasification... , Orlando, Florida, USA NAWTEC18-3521 STATUS OF...

283

Current Gasification Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gasification » Current Gasification » Current Gasification Research Current Gasification Research Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Carbon Capture Center provides first-class facilities to test carbon capture technologies. With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer significant improvements in efficiency, fuel flexibility, economics and environmental sustainability. Fuel flexibility is especially important. Tomorrow's gasification plants conceivably could process a wide variety of low-cost feedstocks, handling

284

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel synthesis reactor. NREL investigates thermochemical processes for converting biomass and its residues to fuels and intermediates using gasification and pyrolysis...

285

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NETL: Gasification Systems Video, Images & Photos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Video, Images, Photos Video, Images, Photos Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Video, Images & Photos The following was established to show a variety of Gasification Technologies: Gasfication powerplant photo Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology (Mar 2008) Movie Icon Windows Media Video (WMV-26MB) [ view | download ] NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants. Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process* TRDU and Hot-Gas Vessel in the EERC Gasification Tower Transport reactor development unit

287

Chapter 2 - Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black liquor gasification (BLG) is being considered primarily as an option for production of biofuels in recent years due to the focus on the transport sector’s high oil dependence and climate impact. BLG may be performed either at low temperatures or at high temperatures, based on whether the process is conducted above or below the melting temperature range of the spent pulping chemicals. The development of various BLG technologies—SCA-Billerud process, the Copeland recovery process, Weyerhaeuser’s process, the St. Regis hydropyrolysis process, the Texaco process, VTT’s circulating fluidized bed BLG process, Babcock and Wilcox’s bubbling fluidized bed gasification process, NSP process (Ny Sodahus Process), DARS (Direct Alkali Recovery System) process, BLG with direct causticization, Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International fluidized bed gasification, Chemrec gasification, catalytic hydrothermal gasification of black liquor—is discussed in this chapter. The two main technologies under development are pressurized gasification and atmospheric gasification, being commercialized by Chemrec AB and ThermoChem Recovery International, respectively.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Gasification Plant Databases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coal gasification projects throughout the world. These databases track proposed gasification projects with approximate outputs greater than 100 megawatts electricity...

289

Gasification Plant Databases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Plant Databases News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

290

NETL: Coal Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification Systems News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

291

Gasification Systems Project Portfolio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International...

292

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

293

NETL: Gasification Systems Program Contacts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Program Contacts Gasification Systems Program Contacts Jenny Tennant Gasification Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Phone: (304) 285-4830 Email: Jenny.Tennant@netl.doe.gov Pete Rozelle Division of Advanced Energy System - Program Manager, Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy FE-221/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-1209 Phone: (301) 903-2338 Email: Peter.Rozelle@hq.doe.gov Heather Quedenfeld Gasification Division Director U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Phone: (412) 386-5781 Email: Heather.Quedenfeld@netl.doe.gov Kristin Gerdes Performance Division

294

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE-EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE-EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R and D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the 1st quarterly progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2000 and ending December 31, 2000. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, objectives of this program, and provides a summary of initial program activities covering program management and preliminary progress in first year tasks including lab- and bench-scale design, facilities preparation, and process/kinetic modeling. More over, the report presents and discusses preliminary results particularly form the bench-scale design and process modeling efforts including a process flow diagram that incorporates the AGC module with other vision-21 plant components with the objective of maximizing H{sub 2} production and process efficiency.

George Rizeq; Ravi Kumar; Janice West; Vitali Lissianski; Neil Widmer; Vladimir Zamansky

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the second annual technical progress report for the Vision 21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending September 30, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the fifth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending December 31, 2001. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design, and economic studies.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Tomasz Wiltowski; Tom Miles; Bruce Springsteen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agricultural waste based-hydrogen; biomass gasification toWaste Conversion Efficiency 60% biogas Comment A conservative estimate from the gasification

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agricultural waste based-hydrogen; biomass gasification toWaste Conversion Efficiency 60% biogas Comment A conservative estimate from the gasification

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas-phase chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas: Coal gasification Carbon gasification Detailed chemistry Heterogeneous surface reactions Radiation Multi-physics numerical modeling a b s t r a c t Fuel synthesis through coal and biomass gasification

Qiao, Li

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge biomass Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, Orlando, Florida, USA NAWTEC18-3521 STATUS OF EXISTING BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND PYROLYSIS FACILITIES... , the companies' existing installations focus on processing biomass...

303

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overview of fast pyrolysis of biomass, Organic Geochemistry,presented a Pyrolysis and Gasification of Biomass and waste,

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Power generation plants with carbon capture and storage: A techno-economic comparison between coal combustion and gasification technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide energy production requirements could not be fully satisfied by nuclear and renewables sources. Therefore a sustainable use of fossil fuels (coal in particular) will be required for several decades. In this scenario, carbon capture and storage (CCS) represents a key solution to control the global warming reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The integration between CCS technologies and power generation plants currently needs a demonstration at commercial scale to reduce both technological risks and high capital and operating cost. This paper compares, from the technical and economic points of view, the performance of three coal-fired power generation technologies: (i) ultra-supercritical (USC) plant equipped with a conventional flue gas treatment (CGT) process, (ii) USC plant equipped with SNOX technology for a combined removal of sulphur and nitrogen oxides and (iii) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant based on a slurry-feed entrained-flow gasifier. Each technology was analysed in its configurations without and with CO2 capture, referring to a commercial-scale of 1000 MWth. Technical assessment was carried out by using simulation models implemented through Aspen Plus and Gate-Cycle tools, whereas economic assessment was performed through a properly developed simulation model. USC equipped with CGT systems shows an overall efficiency (43.7%) comparable to IGCC (43.9%), whereas introduction of SNOX technology increases USC efficiency up to 44.8%. Being the CCS energy penalties significantly higher for USC (about 10.5% points vs. about 8.5 for IGCC), the IGCC with CCS is more efficient (35.3%) than the corresponding CO2-free USC (34.2% for the SNOX-based configuration). Whereas, for the case study, USC is most profitable than IGCC (with a net present value, NPV, of 190 M€ vs. 54 M€) for a conventional configuration, CO2-free IGCC shows a higher NPV (?673 M€) than USC (?711 M€). In any cases, the NPV of all the CO2-free configurations is strongly negative: this means that, with the current market conditions, the introduction of a CCS system cannot be economically justified without a significant incentive.

Vittorio Tola; Alberto Pettinau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

306

NETL: Gasification Project Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Information Project Information Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Project Information Active Projects | Archived Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads [SC0010151] Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications [FE0012065] Dry Solids Pump Coal Feed Technology [FE0012062] Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers [FE0012500] National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility [FE0000749] Modification of the Developmental Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) Feeder [NT0000749] Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems [DE-FC26-98FT40343]

307

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia > Feedstock Flexibility > Refinery Streams Gasifipedia Coal: Feedstock Flexibility Refinery Streams Gasification is a known method for converting petroleum coke (petcoke) and other refinery waste streams and residuals (vacuum residual, visbreaker tar, and deasphalter pitch) into power, steam and hydrogen for use in the production of cleaner transportation fuels. The main requirement for a gasification feedstock is that it contains both hydrogen and carbon. Below is a table that shows the specifications for a typical refinery feedstock. Specifications for a typical refinery feedstock A number of factors have increased the interest in gasification applications in petroleum refinery operations: Coking capacity has increased with the shift to heavier, more sour crude oils being supplied to the refiners.

308

Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXTILE DRYING VIA WOOD GASIFICATION Thomas F. ;McGowan, Anthony D. Jape Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement... for dryers. In addition to the experimental program described above, the DOE grant covered two other major areas. A survey of the textile industry was made to assess the market for gasification equip ment. The major findings were that a large amount...

McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Comparison of concepts for thermal biomass utilization, with the example of the Netherlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass and waste, which are the focus of the activities at the Thermal Power Engineering section of the TU Delft, are the most important renewable energies today. They will maintain their role in the future. There are different ways to convert biomass and waste to power and heat. The combustion of biomass can be considered state-of-the-art technology and plants ranging in capacity from a few kW up to several MW are available on the market. The selection of the combustion technology is dependent on the scale and the kind of biomass. Power can be produced by means of a steam turbine, which is attractive in units above 1 MW. Gasification, in contrast, is a technology that has yet to find a wide use. But, in combination with gas engines, gas turbines or fuel cells, gasification has the advantage of a high electrical efficiency. Direct co-combustion of biomass in coal-fired steam power plants is the most economic choice and it is widely applied in the Netherlands. By an additional pyrolysis or gasification step, it is possible to separately remove and utilize the ashes of coal and biomass, and expected operational problems, such as corrosion, can possibly be avoided. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Spliethoff, H. [Technical University, Delft (Netherlands). Thermal Power Engineering Section

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products is carrying out a scope of work under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications.” The Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) includes a Task 4f in which a Decision Point shall be reached, necessitating a review of Tasks 2-5 with an emphasis on Task 4f. This Topical Report constitutes the Decision Point Application pertaining to Task 4f. The SOPO under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 is aimed at furthering the development of the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen production process toward a demonstration scale facility known as the Oxygen Development Facility (ODF). It is anticipated that the completion of the current SOPO will advance the technology significantly along a pathway towards enabling the design and construction of the ODF. Development progress on several fronts is critical before an ODF project can commence; this Topical Report serves as an early update on the progress in critical development areas. Progress was made under all tasks, including Materials Development, Ceramic Processing Development, Engineering Development, and Performance Testing. Under Task 4f, Air Products carried out a cost and performance study in which several process design and cost parameters were varied and assessed with a process model and budgetary costing exercise. The results show that the major variables include ceramic module reliability, ITM operating temperature, module production yield, and heat addition strategy. High-temperature compact heat exchangers are shown to contribute significant cost benefits, while directly firing into the feed stream to an ITM are even a mild improvement on the high-temperature recuperation approach. Based on the findings to-date, Air Products recommends no changes to the content or emphasis in the current SOPO and recommends its completion prior to another formal assessment of these factors.

Armstrong, Phillip

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - allothermal steam gasification Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Utilization 79 Reproducedwith pennissionfrom ElsevierPergamon Biomass and Bioenerg..' Vol: 10, :os 2-3, pp..149-l66, 1996 Summary: with gasification have been...

312

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER (prime contractor) was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the tenth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting January 1, 2003 and ending March 31, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending December 31, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research (GEGR) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GEGR (prime contractor) was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GEGR, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling with best-case scenario assumptions, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2003 and ending June 30, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NETL: Gasifipedia - What is Gasification?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Background Gasification Background Drivers for Gasification Technology The need for low-cost power produced in an environmentally sound way is certain, even if the future of regulations limiting the emission and/or encouraging the capture of CO2, and the price and availability of natural gas and oil are not. Gasification is not only capable of efficiently producing electric power, but a wide range of liquids and/or high-value chemicals (including diesel and gasoline for transportation) can be produced from cleaned syngas, providing the flexibility to capitalize on a range of dynamic changes to either domestic energy markets or global economic conditions. Polygeneration-plants that produce multiple products-is uniquely possible with gasification technologies. Continued advances in gasification-based technology will enable the conversion of our nation's abundant coal reserves into energy resources (power and liquid fuels), chemicals, and fertilizers needed to displace the use of imported oil and, thereby, help mitigate its high price and security supply concerns and to support U.S. economic competitiveness with unprecedented environmental performance.

316

Effects of Feed Composition and Gasification Parameters on Product Gas from a Pilot Scale Fluidized Bed Gasifier.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass gasification is an integral part of a holistic project where low-value feedstocks are converted into ethanol via a gasification-fermentation process. Because microbial catalysts are… (more)

Cateni, Bruno Ghislain

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advancing Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Increased Biomass Productivity and Technology Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellana is a leading developer of algae-based bioproducts, and its pre-commercial production of marine microalgae takes place at Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF) in Hawaii. KDF is housing more than 70 high-performing algal strains for different bioproducts, of which over 30 have been grown outside at scale. So far, Cellana has produced more than 10 metric tons of algal biomass for the development of biofuels, animal feed, and high-value nutraceuticals. Cellana?s ALDUO algal cultivation technology allows Cellana to grow non-extremophile algal strains at large scale with no contamination disruptions. Cellana?s research and production at KDF have addressed three major areas that are crucial for the commercialization of algal biofuels: yield improvement, cost reduction, and the overall economics. Commercially acceptable solutions have been developed and tested for major factors limiting areal productivity of algal biomass and lipids based on years of R&D work conducted at KDF. Improved biomass and lipid productivity were achieved through strain improvement, culture management strategies (e.g., alleviation of self-shading, de-oxygenation, and efficient CO2 delivery), and technical advancement in downstream harvesting technology. Cost reduction was achieved through optimized CO2 delivery system, flue gas utilization technology, and energy-efficient harvesting technology. Improved overall economics was achieved through a holistic approach by integration of high-value co-products in the process, in addition to yield improvements and cost reductions.

Bai, Xuemei [Cellana LLC; Sabarsky, Martin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Entrainment Coal Gasification Modeling ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ... Equivalent Reactor Network Model for Simulating the Air Gasification of Polyethylene in a Conical Spouted Bed Gasifier ...

C. Y. Wen; T. Z. Chaung

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Pyrolysis, combustion and gasification characteristics of miscanthus and sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energetic conversion of biomass into syngas is considered as reliable energy source. In this context, biomass (miscanthus) and sewage sludge have been investigated. A simultaneous thermal analyzer and mass spectrometer was used for the characterization of samples and identified the volatiles evolved during the heating of the sample up to 1100 °C under combustion and gasification conditions. The TG and DTA results were discussed in argon, oxygen, steam and steam blended gas atmospheres. Different stages of pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples have been examined. It was shown that the combustion and gasification of char were occurred in two different temperature zones. The DTA–MS profile of the sample gives information on combustion and gasification process of the samples (ignition, peak combustion and burnout temperatures) and gases released (H2, O2, CO and CO2). The results showed that the different processes were mainly dependent on temperature. The evolution of the gas species was consistent with the weight loss of the samples during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification process. The effect of the ambiences during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples were reported. The appropriate temperature range to the sludge and miscanthus gasification was evaluated. The kinetic parameters of the biomass and sewage sludge were estimated for TGA using two models based on first-order reactions with distributed activation energies. The presence of ash in the biomass char was more influential during the gasification process.

Kandasamy Jayaraman; Iskender Gökalp

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Project Summary Full Title: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass, without and with Carbon Capture and Storage Project ID: 226 Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Keywords: Biomass; Fischer Tropsch; hydrogen Purpose Develop and analyze process designs for gasification-based thermochemical conversion of switchgrass into Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, dimethyl ether (DME), and hydrogen. All process designs will have some level of co-production of electricity, and some will include capture of byproduct CO2 for underground storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Organization: Princeton University Telephone: 609-258-4966 Email: elarson@princeton.edu

322

Materials Challenges for Advanced Combustion and Gasification Fossil Energy Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through gasification, carbonaceous feedstock such as coal, petroleum coke (petcoke), and biomass is converted into synthesis...12–18] through, e.g., combustion or electrochemical conversion in fuel cells. Syngas ...

S. Sridhar; P. Rozzelle; B. Morreale…

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Wood Gasification: Where It's At, Where It's Going  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the principles and practice of various designs of biomass/wood gasifiers. In general, the basic principle of gasification is reviewed. A look at existing gasifier schemes, including packed bed updraft, downdraft, and fluidized...

Murphy, M. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce hydrogen, and biomass combustion to produceCommercial status for biomass combustion, biogas production;gasification over biomass combustion is that the power

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Gasification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Gasification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Slang characterization and removal using pulse detonation technology during coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boiler slagging and fouling as a result of inorganic impurities in combustion gases being deposited on heat transfer tubes have caused severe problems in coal-fired power plant operation. These problems are fuel, system design, and operating condition dependent. Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. The detonation wave technique based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. These detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results show that the single shot detonation wave is capable of removing the entire slag (types of slag deposited on economizer) even at a distance of 8 in. from the exit of a detonation engine tube. Wave strength and slag orientation also have different effects on the chipping off of the slag. This paper discusses about the results obtained in effectively removing the economizer slag.

Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.

1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

328

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conditioning Conditioning Sulfur Recovery and Tail Gas Treating Sulfur is a component of coal and other gasification feed stocks. Sulfur compounds need to be removed in most gasification applications due to environmental regulations or to avoid catalyst poisoning. Whether it is electricity, liquid fuels, or some other product being output, sulfur emissions are regulated, and sulfur removal is important for this reason, along with the prevention of downstream component fouling. In addition to these constraints, recovering saleable sulfur is an important economic benefit for a gasification plant. To illustrate the previous point, in 2011 8.1 million tons of elemental sulfur was produced, with the majority of this coming from petroleum refining, natural gas processing and coking plants. Total shipments were valued at $1.6 billion, with the average mine or plant price of $200 per ton, up from $70.48 in 2010. The United States currently imports sulfur (36% of consumption, mostly from Canada), meaning the market can support more domestic sulfur production.

329

Biomass Gasification with Air in an Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed. Effect of Six Operational Variables on the Quality of the Produced Raw Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variables analyzed are equivalence ratio (from 0.20 to 0.45), temperatures of the gasifier bed (750?850 °C) and of its freeboard (500?600 °C), H/C ratio in the feed, use of secondary air (10% of the overall) in the freeboard, and addition (2?5 wt %) of a calcined dolomite mixed with the biomass used as the feedstock. ... Biomass has a density 2?5 times lower than silica sand, used as the fluidizing medium in the bed. ... The particle size for the silica sand in the bed is important. ...

Ian Narváez; Alberto Orío; Maria P. Aznar; José Corella

1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

330

The effect of biomass, operating conditions, and gasifier design on the performance of an updraft biomass gasifier.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gasification is an efficient way to produce energy from biomass, which has significant positive impacts on the environment, domestic economy, national energy security, and the… (more)

James Rivas, Arthur Mc Carty

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A summary of the status of biomass conversion technologies and opportunities for their use in developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass plays a significant role in energy use in developing countries: however, these resources are often used very inefficiently. Recent technology developments have made possible improved conversion efficiencies for utility scale technologies. These developments may be of interest in the wake of recent policy changes occurring in several developing countries, with respect to independent power production. Efforts are also being directed at developing biomass conversion technologies that can interface and/or compete with internal combustion engines for small, isolated loads. This paper reviews the technological status of biomass conversion technologies appropriate for commercial, industrial, and small utility applications in developing countries. Market opportunities, constraints, and technology developments are also discussed. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Waddle, D.B.; Perlack, R.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Wimberly, J. (Winrock International, Arlington, VA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessment of biomass energy resources and related technologies practice in Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Bangladesh is energy starve country facing a severe power crisis for the last few decades because of inadequate power generation capacity compared with demand. The power generation of the country largely depends on the non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy sources, mainly on the natural gas as accounts 64.5% of recent installed capacity. This trend causes rapid depletion of non-renewable energy sources. Thus, it is necessary to trim down the dependency on non-renewable energy sources and utilize the available renewable resources to meet the huge energy demand facing the country. Most of the people living in rural, remote, coastal and isolated areas in Bangladesh have no electricity access yet. However, renewable energy resources, especially biomass can play a pivotal role to electrify those rural, remote, coastal and isolated areas in the country. Humankind has been using biomass as an energy source for thousands of years. This study assesses the bio-energy potential, utilization and related Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) practice in Bangladesh. Improved cooking stove, biogas plant and biomass briquetting are the major \\{RETs\\} commonly practiced in Bangladesh. The assessment includes the potential of agricultural residue, forest residue, animal manure and municipal solid waste. The estimated total amount of biomass resource available for energy in Bangladesh in 2012–2013 is 90.21 million tons with the annual energy potential of 45.91 million tons of coal equivalent. The recoverable amount of biomass (90.21 million tons) in 2012–2013 has an energy potential of 1344.99 PJ which is equivalent to 373.71 TWh of electricity.

P.K. Halder; N. Paul; M.R.A. Beg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE November 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions. The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database, a comprehensive collection of gasification plant data, describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas

334

Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 °C.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Multiscale molecular modeling can be an effective tool to aid the development of biomass conversion technology: A perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignocellulosic biomass is an alternate and renewable source of carbon. However, due to high oxygen content and diverse functionality, its conversion to fuels and chemicals is technologically challenging. Since physico-chemical characteristics of biomass and its derived components are very different from petroleum, fundamental understanding of their interactions with catalysts and solvents and of their behavior during thermochemical processing needs to be developed. In the present paper, we provide a perspective on how multiscale molecular modeling can assist in developing the science of biomass processing. The scope of this paper is limited to liquid phase catalytic and pyrolytic conversion of biomass. Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD), a multiscale method that combines quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics and is an excellent choice to simulate biomass interactions in the condensed phase, is discussed. An overview of metadynamics, a method to accelerate CPMD dynamics, is also given. Revealing the chemistry of biomass pyrolysis, identifying liquid phase catalytic reaction mechanisms and developing a fundamental understanding of the role of solvents in biomass processing are the three main areas highlighted in this paper. Molecular modeling based investigations in these areas are reviewed and key findings are summarized. Limitations of the current approaches are discussed and the relevance of multiscale methods like CPMD and metadynamics is discussed. Potential studies that could implement multiscale molecular modeling methods to solve some of the challenging problems in developing biomass conversion technology are elaborated and an outlook is provided.

Samir H. Mushrif; Vallabh Vasudevan; Chethana B. Krishnamurthy; Boddu Venkatesh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Biomass Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basics and biomass organizations. Technology Basics The following resources explain the fundamentals of biomass energy technologies: Biomass Energy Basics: NREL publishes this...

337

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA 7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA SUMMARY DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood-to-energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities

338

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Acid Gas Removal (AGR) Acid gases produced in gasification processes mainly consist of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Syngas exiting the particulate removal and gas conditioning systems, typically near ambient temperature at 100°F, needs to be cleaned of the sulfur-bearing acid gases to meet either environmental emissions regulations, or to protect downstream catalysts for chemical processing applications. For integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) applications, environmental regulations require that the sulfur content of the product syngas be reduced to less than 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in order to meet the stack gas emission target of less than 4 ppmv sulfur dioxide (SO2)1. In IGCC applications, where selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is required to lower NOx emissions to less than 10 ppmv, syngas sulfur content may have to be lowered to 10 to 20 ppmv in order to prevent ammonium bisulfate fouling of the heat recovery steam generator's (HRSG) cold end tubes. For fuels production or chemical production, the downstream synthesis catalyst sulfur tolerance dictates the sulfur removal level, which can be less than 0.1 ppmv.

339

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification with combined cycles biological oxygen demandsintegrated gasification combined cycle Intergovernmentalbe integrated with combined-cycle (CC) technology (BLGCC),

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22. 5. X. Sha, Coal gasification. Coal, oil shale, natural7. C. Higman, M. Burgt, Gasification. 2003. Elsevier/Gulfbiomass ( part 3): gasification technologies. Bioresource

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Biomass Becoming More Important in U.S. Energy Mix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Becoming More Important in U.S. Energy Mix ... Projects aimed at developing biomass as an energy source are making good progress in tree culture, gasification, digestion, and liquefaction ...

JOSEPH HAGGIN

1983-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

342

Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Partner: International Trade Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.biomassthermal.org Cost: Free The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) website is focused on biomass for heating and other thermal energy applications, and includes links to numerous reports from various agencies around the world. Overview The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) website is focused on biomass for

343

Techno-economic Analysis for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Gasoline via the Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). With gasification technology, biomass can be converted to gasoline via methanol synthesis and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies. Producing a gasoline product that is infrastructure ready has much potential. Although the MTG technology has been commercially demonstrated with natural gas conversion, combining MTG with biomass gasification has not been shown. Therefore, a techno-economic evaluation for a biomass MTG process based on currently available technology was developed to provide information about benefits and risks of this technology. The economic assumptions used in this report are consistent with previous U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biomass Programs techno-economic assessments. The feedstock is assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two kinds of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. The gasoline selling prices (2008 USD) excluding taxes were estimated to be $3.20/gallon and $3.68/gallon for indirectly-heated gasified and directly-heated. This suggests that a process based on existing technology is economic only when crude prices are above $100/bbl. However, improvements in syngas cleanup combined with consolidated gasoline synthesis can potentially reduce the capital cost. In addition, improved synthesis catalysts and reactor design may allow increased yield.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

345

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well-Stirred Reactor: Effects of Devolatilization and Moisture Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well- Stirred Reactor: Effects in coal and biomass play an important role on the gasification performance of these fuels to simulate the gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor. This model is a first

Qiao, Li

346

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

347

Gasification: redefining clean energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet gives a comprehensive overview of how gasification is redefining clean energy, now and in the future. It informs the general public about gasification in a straight-forward, non-technical manner.

NONE

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Current Gasification Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With coal gasification now in modern commercial-scale applications, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has turned its attention to future gasification concepts that offer...

349

Materials of Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Gasification Systems Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project Portfolio Project...

351

Gasification Systems Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project...

352

2010 Worldwide Gasification Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

353

Analyzing Biomass Conversion into Liquid Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variants of the Fischer–Tropsch producer-gas conversion into liquid hydrocarbons are analyzed under the ... is attained in the reactions occurring in the biomass gasification. When the raw material is wood ... th...

V. D. Meshcheryakov; V. A. Kirillov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pilot-Scale Gasification of Corn Stover, Switchgrass, Wheat Straw, and Wood: 1. Parametric Study and Comparison with Literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pilot-Scale Gasification of Corn Stover, Switchgrass, Wheat Straw, and Wood: 1. Parametric Study and Comparison with Literature ... Chemical Reviews (Washington, DC, United States) (2006), 106 (9), 4044-4098 CODEN: CHREAY; ISSN:0009-2665. ... A review of the primary measures for tar elimination in biomass gasification processes Biomass Bioenergy 2003, 24, 125– 140 ...

Daniel L. Carpenter; Richard L. Bain; Ryan E. Davis; Abhijit Dutta; Calvin J. Feik; Katherine R. Gaston; Whitney Jablonski; Steven D. Phillips; Mark R. Nimlos

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

The development of Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carried-Heat Partial Gasification Combined cycle is a novel combined cycle which was proposed by Thermal Engineering Department ... technology, Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle, as the imp...

Li Zhao; Xiangdong Xu

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Syngas Production from Coal Gasification with CO2 Rich Gas Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification with CO2 rich gas mixture is one of several promising new technologies associated with CO2 reduction in the atmosphere. Coal gasification with high CO2 concentration is suitable for producing la...

M. S. Alam; A. T. Wijayanta; K. Nakaso…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Preparation for commercial demonstration of biomass-to-ethanol conversion technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to complete the development of a commercially viable process to produce fuel ethanol from renewable cellulosic biomass. The program focused on pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation technologies where Amoco has a unique proprietary position. Assured access to low-cost feedstock is a cornerstone of attractive economics for cellulose to ethanol conversion in the 1990s. Most of Amoco`s efforts in converting cellulosic feedstocks to ethanol before 1994 focused on using paper from municipal solid waste as the feed. However, while many municipalities and MSW haulers expressed interest in Amoco`s technology, none were willing to commit funding to process development. In May, 1994 several large agricultural products companies showed interest in Amoco`s technology, particularly for application to corn fiber. Amoco`s initial work with corn fiber was encouraging. The project work plan was designed to provide sufficient data on corn fiber conversion to convince a major agriculture products company to participate in the construction of a commercial demonstration facility.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Overview of Thermochemical Conversion Technology of Biomass and Wastes in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compared with the research activity of biochemical conversion, that of thermochemical conversion of biomass and organic wastes in Japan is still ... Trade and Industry(MITI). Thermochemical processing of biomass ...

Shin-ya Yokoyama

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Hydrogen: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization Weyburn Project The Great Plains Synfuels Plant (GPSP) has had the ability to capture CO2 through the Rectisol process for sequestration or sale as a byproduct. However, no viable market was found for the CO2 in the early years of operation, and the captured CO2 was simply discharged to the atmosphere. This changed in 2000, when the GPSP began selling CO2 emissions, becoming one of the first commercial coal facilities to have its CO2 sequestered. The program had begun in 1997, when EnCana (formerly PanCanadian Resources) sought a solution to declining production in their Weyburn Oil Fields. Dakota Gasification Company, owners of the GPSP, and EnCana made an agreement to sell CO2 for use in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). DGC installed two large CO2 compressors and began shipping 105 million standard cubic feet per day of compressed CO2 (60% of the total CO2 produced at the plant) through a 205 mile pipeline from Beulah, North Dakota, to the Weyburn Oil Fields, located in Saskatchewan, Canada, for EOR. The pipeline was constructed and operated by a BEPC subsidiary. The CO2, about 95.5% pure and very dry, is injected into the mature fields where it has doubled the oil recovery rate of the field. In 2006, a third compressor was installed and an additional agreement was reached with Apache Canada Ltd. to supply CO2 for EOR to their nearby oilfields. The three compressors increased CO2 delivery to 160 million standard cubic feet (MMSCF; or 8,000 tonnes) per day. Through 2007, over 12 million tons of CO2 had been sold, and over the current expected lifetime of the program, an anticipated 20 million tons of CO2 will be stored.

360

Mobile Gasification Units for Sustainable Electricity Production in Rural Areas: The SMARt-CHP Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile Gasification Units for Sustainable Electricity Production in Rural Areas: The SMARt-CHP Project ... In this project, called SMARt-CHP, the biomass gasifier coupled to an internal combustion engine will be extensively used under real world conditions for combined heat and power production, using different types of residues (wine prunings, corn stalks, etc.) characteristic of agriculture in Northern Greece. ... The main aims of SMARt-CHP are to attempt to demonstrate how logistics and biomass availability problems can be addressed, to inform the general public about the particular environmental issues, concerns, and opportunities in decentralized bioenergy production from agricultural residues, and to promote the applicability of a mature technology, bridging the gap between technology development and application. ...

Anastasia A. Zabaniotou; Vasiliki K. Skoulou; Dimitris P. Mertzis; George S. Koufodimos; Zissis C. Samaras

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 64 2012 Effect of Biomass Feedstocks on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and selectivity in hydrogenated biodiesel. In this work, the effect of biomass feedstocks (i.e. beef

Hydrogenated Biodiesel; Panatcha Bovornseripatai; Siriporn Jongpatiwut; Somchai Osuwan; Suchada Butnark

362

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne stergrd, Ris National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark DTU, Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy and emerging biomass conversion technologies Hanne �stergård, Risø National Laboratory in Denmark 8th May 2007 Background Bioenergy is an important topic to include in a foresight analysis of the world agricultural markets and Europe. In the recent Agricultural Outlook report from OECD-FAO1

363

The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Cleaning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cleaning Cleaning Chemicals from Coal Complex Chemicals from Coal Complex (Eastman Company) Novel gas cleaning and conditioning are crucial technologies for achieving near-zero emissions, while meeting gasification system performance and cost targets. DOE's Gasification Systems program supports technology development in the area of gas cleaning and conditioning, including advanced sorbents and solvents, particulate filters, and other novel gas-cleaning approaches that remove and convert gas contaminants into benign and marketable by-products. To avoid the cost and efficiency penalties associated with cooling the gas stream to temperatures at which conventional gas clean-up systems operate, novel processes are being developed that operate at mild to high temperatures and incorporate multi-contaminant control to

365

NETL: Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C&CBTL C&CBTL Coal and Power Systems Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids The Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids program effort is focused on technologies to foster the commercial adoption of coal and coal/biomass gasification and the production of affordable liquid fuels and hydrogen with excellent environmental performance. U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness Advanced Fuels Synthesis U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits

366

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Placer County, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood?to?energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities. NOTE: After review of a final California Environmental Quality Act Environmental Impact Report, DOE has determined that preparation of an EA is not necessary. The propsed action fits within DOE's categorical exclusion B5.20. Therefore, this EA is cancelled.

367

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Catalytic steam gasification of coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic steam gasification of coals ... Steam–Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ... Steam–Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ...

P. Pereira; G. A. Somorjai; H. Heinemann

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control With Monolith Traps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Technologies Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Jenny Tennant Technology/Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Michael Swanson Principal Investigator University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 15 North 23rd Street Grand Forks, ND 58202 701-777-5239 MSwanson@undeerc.org PARTNERS Corning, Inc. PROJECT DURATION

370

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion Capabilities Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost-effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. Gasification-heating biomass with about one-third of the oxygen necessary for complete combustion-produces a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis-heating biomass in the absence of oxygen-produces a liquid bio-oil. Both syngas and bio-oil can be used directly or can be converted to clean fuels and other valuable chemicals. Areas of emphasis in NREL's thermochemical conversion R&D are: Gasification and fuel synthesis R&D Pyrolysis R&D Thermochemical process integration. Gasification and Fuel Synthesis R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video.

371

Enzymatically based cellulosic ethanol production technology was selected as a key area for biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan and lignin) released in pretreatment, and their effects

California at Riverside, University of

372

Gasification of Coffee Grounds in Dual Fluidized Bed:? Performance Evaluation and Parametric Investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of Coffee Grounds in Dual Fluidized Bed:? Performance Evaluation and Parametric Investigation ... Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. ... With a national technical program, we recently worked on converting this biomass waste into middle-caloric product gas. ...

Guangwen Xu; Takahiro Murakami; Toshiyuki Suda; Yoshiaki Matsuzawa; Hidehisa Tani

2006-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Catalytic Conversion of Biomass-derived Feedstock (HMF) into...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Catalytic Conversion of Biomass-derived Feedstock...

374

1 - Gasification and synthetic liquid fuel production: an overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter discusses general considerations on gasification processes and synthetic liquid fuel production. It provides an overview of state-of-the-art gasification technologies, feedstocks and applications in power generation, and synthetic fuels production, together with some recent future trends in the field.

R. Luque; J.G. Speight

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Coal Gasification Systems Solicitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas; FE0023577 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation; FE0023497 OTM-Enhanced...

377

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Gasifiers Commercial Gasifiers Types of Gasifiers Although there are various types of gasifers (gasification reactors), different in design and operational characteristics, there are three main gasifier classifications into which most of the commercially available gasifiers fall. These categories are as follows: Fixed-bed gasifiers (also referred as moving-bed gasifiers) Entrained-flow gasifiers Fluidized-bed gasifiers Commercial gasifiers of GE Energy, ConocoPhillips E-Gas(tm) and Shell SCGP are examples of entrained-flow types. Fixed-or moving-bed gasifiers include that of Lurgi and British Gas Lurgi (BGL). Fluidized-bed gasifiers include the catalytic gasifier technology being commercialized by Great Point Energy, the Winkler gasifier, and the KBR transport gasifiers. For more specific information on these gasifiers, follow the links for the bulleted gasifier types above. NOTE: Although specific gasifiers named above are described in detail throughout this website, it is realized that other gasification technologies exist. The gasifiers discussed herein were not preferentially chosen by NETL.

378

Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with much progress. However, the current state of biological technology is not deemed to be ready commercially. A preliminary estimate of capital and operating costs of a 12000 gallon per day gasification/biological facility was developed for comparison purposes. In addition, during the biological organism screening and testing, some possible alternative products were identified. One such possibility is the biological production of bio-diesel. Additional research is necessary for further evaluation of all of the biological concepts.

Pearson, Larry, E.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Department Announces $10 Million for Technologies to Produce Advanced Biofuel Products from Biomass  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced up to $10 million in funding to advance the production of advanced biofuels, substitutes for petroleum-based feedstocks, and bioproducts made from renewable, non-food-based biomass, such as agricultural residues and woody biomass.

380

Coal Gasification in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... P. S. Andrews gave a full account of the Federal project for the pressure gasification of non-coking coals for the combined purpose of town's gas ' and the ... of town's gas ' and the production of synthetic liquid fuel. Work on the gasification of brown coal in. Victoria was commenced in 1931 by the technical staff of ...

1955-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Optimization of the performance ofdown-draft biomass gasifier installedat National Engineering Research &Development (NERD) Centre ofSri Lanka.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Using biomass gasification to produce combustible gas is one of the promising sustainable energy optionsavailable for many countries. At present, a few small scale… (more)

Gunarathne, Duleeka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

NETL: Gasification - Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Presentations, Papers, and Publications Presentations, Papers, and Publications ITM Oxygen Development for Advanced Oxygen Supply (Oct 2011) Ted Foster, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. presented at the Gasification Technologies Conference, San Francisco, CA Oct 9-12, 2011. ASU/IGCC Integration Strategies (Oct 2009), David McCarthy, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Taking the Next Step (Oct 2009), VanEric Stein, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2009 Gasification Technologies Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. ITM Oxygen: Scaling Up a Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Technology (Oct 2006) Philip Armstrong, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., 2006 Gasification Technologies Conference, Washington, D.C. ITM Oxygen: The New Oxygen Supply for the New IGCC Market (Oct 2005)

383

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy Department Announces $12 Million for Technologies to Produce Renewable Carbon Fiber from Biomass  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced up to $12 million in funding to advance the production of cost-competitive, high-performance carbon fiber material from renewable non-food-based feedstocks such as agricultural residues and woody biomass.

385

Progress in the technology of energy conversion from woody biomass in Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainable and renewable natural resources as biomass that contains carbon and hydrogen elements can ... conversion. In Indonesia, they comprise variable-sized wood from forests (i.e. natural forests, plantations

Tjutju Nurhayati; Yani Waridi; Han Roliadi

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

NETL: Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning: Acid Gas Removal (AGR) Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning: Acid Gas Removal (AGR) Rectisol Rectisol®, independently developed by Linde and Lurgi, is a physical acid gas removal process using an organic solvent (typically methanol) at subzero temperatures, and characteristic of physical AGR processes, it can purify synthesis gas down to 0.1 ppm total sulfur (including COS), and CO2 in the ppm range. It is also able to remove impurities such as hydrocarbons, ammonia, and hydrogen cyanide, consistent with its origin as a treatment for syngas from the Lurgi gasifier which contains these kinds of impurities. The Rectisol process uses a cheap and easily available, non-proprietary solvent, and is flexible in process configuration. On the other hand, refrigeration is required, associated with significant capital and operating costs, and high vapor pressure of methanol causes solvent losses. A simplified flow scheme of the Rectisol® process provided by technology vendor Linde is displayed in Figure 1. This is a configuration intended for dual removal of sulfur gases and CO2 in separate fractions, resulting in a pure CO2 product and an H2S/COS enriched Claus gas fraction.

387

Staged Catalytic Gasification/Steam Reforming of Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While the slag can be used in the current industry infrastructure as a construction material, up-scaling of biomass utilization will lead to land depletion because the mineral and metal balances are not closed. ... Table 4 shows gasification results at similar temperatures for two different types of pyrolysis oil (pine and beech) and of another liquid biomass stream, a “light” and a “heavy” sugar waste stream. ... The sugar waste streams that were gasified are a side product from lactic acid production. ...

Guus van Rossum; Sascha R. A. Kersten; Wim P. M. van Swaaij

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Stoichiometric Analysis of Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Stoichiometric Analysis of Coal Gasification ... Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study ... Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study ...

James Wei

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

390

World Gasification Database Now Available from DOE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A database just released by the U.S. Department of Energy documents the worldwide growth of gasification, the expected technology of choice for future coal-based plants that produce power, fuels, and/or chemicals with near-zero emissions.

391

Economic development through biomass system integration. Volumes 2--4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners.

DeLong, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Combustion of Low-Calorific Waste Biomass Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The industrial combustion chamber designed for burning low-calorific syngas from gasification of waste biomass is presented. ... chips and turkey feathers the non-premixed turbulent combustion in the chamber is s...

Kamil Kwiatkowski; Marek Dudy?ski; Konrad Bajer

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Wabash River Coal Gasification Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report August 2000 Work Performed Under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-92MC29310 For: The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia Prepared by: The Men and Women of Wabash River Energy Ltd. For Further Information Contact: Roy A. Dowd, CHMM Environmental Supervisor Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project 444 West Sandford Avenue West Terre Haute, IN 47885 LEGAL NOTICE/DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture pursuant to a Cooperative Agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, and neither the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering

394

Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in near-zero hazardous air or water pollution. This technology would also be conducive to the efficient coproduction of methane and hydrogen while also generating a relatively pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or sequestration. Specific results of bench-scale testing in the 4- to 38-lb/hr range in the EERC pilot system demonstrated high methane yields approaching 15 mol%, with high hydrogen yields approaching 50%. This was compared to an existing catalytic gasification model developed by GPE for its process. Long-term operation was demonstrated on both Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and on petcoke feedstocks utilizing oxygen injection without creating significant bed agglomeration. Carbon conversion was greater than 80% while operating at temperatures less than 1400°F, even with the shorter-than-desired reactor height. Initial designs for the GPE gasification concept called for a height that could not be accommodated by the EERC pilot facility. More gas-phase residence time should allow the syngas to be converted even more to methane. Another goal of producing significant quantities of highly concentrated catalyzed char for catalyst recovery and material handling studies was also successful. A Pd–Cu membrane was also successfully tested and demonstrated to produce 2.54 lb/day of hydrogen permeate, exceeding the desired hydrogen permeate production rate of 2.0 lb/day while being tested on actual coal-derived syngas that had been cleaned with advanced warm-gas cleanup systems. The membranes did not appear to suffer any performance degradation after exposure to the cleaned, warm syngas over a nominal 100-hour test.

Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NETL: Gasification Systems - Solicitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shelf > Solicitations Shelf > Solicitations Gasification Systems Solicitations All NETL Solicitations / Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOA) Gasification RSS Feed NETL RSS Feeds: List of available NETL RSS feeds. Business & Solicitations RSS: Subscribe to this to be notified of all NETL solicitations or FOA postings. Gasification RSS: Subscribe to this to be notified of Gasification news, solicitations and FOA postings. Business Alert Notification System Official notification is available through the Business Alert Notification System. *These notifications are provided as a courtesy and there may be a delay between the opportunity announcement and the arrival of the alert. SOLICITATION TITLE / AWARDS ANNOUNCEMENT PROJECT PAGE(S) 12.11.13: Fossil Energy's Request for Information DE-FOA-0001054; titled "Novel Crosscutting Research and Development to Support Advanced Energy Systems." Application due date is January 15, 2014. Applications and/or instructions can be found with this Funding Opportunity Announcement on FedConnect.

396

Coal gasification: Belgian first  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... hope for Europe's coal production came with the announcement this month that the first gasification of coal at depths of nearly 1,000 metres would take place this May in ... of energy.

Jasper Becker

1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

Investigating and Using Biomass Gases  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Students will be introduced to biomass gasification and will generate their own biomass gases. Students generate these everyday on their own and find it quite amusing, but this time they’ll do it by heating wood pellets or wood splints in a test tube. They will collect the resulting gases and use the gas to roast a marshmallow. Students will also evaluate which biomass fuel is the best according to their own criteria or by examining the volume of gas produced by each type of fuel.

398

Biomass 2014 Attendee List  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bender Novozymes Bryna Berendzen DOE - Bioenergy Technologies Office Joshua Berg The Earth Partners Dilfia Bermudez Summerhill Biomass Systems Inc. Michael Bernstein BCS, Inc....

399

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To support research and development (R&D) planning efforts within the Thermochemical Conversion Program, the Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted the Biomass Indirect Liquefaction (IDL)...

400

NETL: Gasification Systems and Industry Analyses Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analyses Studies Analyses Studies Gasification Systems Reference Shelf – Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Table of Contents Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Gasification Systems Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants Studies The Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants studies establish up-to-date estimates for the cost and performance of combustion and gasification based power plants as well as options for co-generating synthetic natural gas and fuels, all with and without carbon dioxide capture and storage. Several ranks of coal are being assessed in process configurations that are based on technology that could be constructed today such that the plant could be operational in the 2010 - 2015 timeframe. The analyses were performed on a consistent technical and economic basis that accurately reflects current market conditions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Modern Technologies of Biomass Combustion and Pre-treatment for more Efficient Electricity Production: Review and Case Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass combustion and biomass–coal cofiring represents a near-term, low...2 emissions, reduction in SOx and NOx emissions. However, untreated, woody biomass has a relatively low energy density, low ... a matter ...

Wlodzimierz Blasiak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gasification of Canola Meal and Factors Affecting Gasification Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-catalytic gasification of canola meal for the production of ... in order to study the effects of different gasification parameters on gas composition, H2/CO ratio, gas yield, syngas yield, lower heating value...

Ashwini Tilay; Ramin Azargohar; Regan Gerspacher; Ajay Dalai…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Southern Research Institute Project Number: FE0010231 Project Description Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, called syngas, into liquid hydrocarbons. It is a leading technology for converting syngas derived from gasification of coal and coal-biomass mixtures to hydrocarbons in coal to liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes. However, conventional FTS catalysts produce undesirable waxes (C21+) that need to be upgraded to liquids (C5-C20) by hydrotreating. This adds significantly to the cost of FTS. The objectives of this project are (i) to demonstrate potential for CBTL cost reduction by maximizing the production of C5-C20 hydrocarbon liquids using a selective FTS catalyst and (ii) to evaluate the impacts of the addition of biomass to coal on product characteristics, carbon foot print, and economics.

404

Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, William R. (Livermore, CA); Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Kevin Galbreath

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Improved Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fac Fac ts Materials Science contact Bryan Morreale Focus Area Leader (Acting) Materials Science Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15326 412-386-5929 bryan.morreale@netl.doe.gov Partner Harbison-Walker Refractories Company Improved Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasification Systems Advances in technology are often directly linked to materials development. For

408

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal gasification/combined cycle power plant with Texaco gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the Texaco Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the Texaco IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Section 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operation and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group, Inc. assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuel, Inc. are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Appendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 17 figures, 15 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Design of advanced fossil-fuel systems (DAFFS): a study of three developing technologies for coal-fired, base-load electric power generation. Integrated coal-gasification/combined power plant with BGC/Lurgi gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to present the facility description, plant layouts and additional information which define the conceptual engineering design, and performance and cost estimates for the BGC/Lurgi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. Following the introductory comments, the results of the British Gas Corporation (BGC)/Lurgi IGCC power plant study are summarized in Section 2. In Secion 3, a description of plant systems and facilities is provided. Section 4 includes pertinent performance information and assessments of availability, natural resource requirements and environmental impact. Estimates of capital costs, operating and maintenance costs and cost of electricity are presented in Section 5. A Bechtel Group Inc. (BGI) assessment and comments on the designs provided by Burns and Roe-Humphreys and Glasgow Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (BRHG) are included in Section 6. The design and cost estimate reports which were prepared by BRHG for those items within their scope of responsibility are included as Appendices A and B, respectively. Apendix C is an equipment list for items within the BGI scope. The design and cost estimate classifications chart referenced in Section 5 is included as Appendix D. 8 references, 18 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Gasification of selected woody plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article contains laboratory data comparing the rate of gasification of five types of woody plants—beech, ... oak, willow, poplar and rose. The gasification rate was determined thermogravimetrically. Carbon di...

Buryan Petr

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Chapter 4 - Obstacles to Implementation of Black Liquor Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Obstacles hindering the commercialization of black liquor gasification are discussed. The most important of them include financial risks, protection of the gasifier, increase in the causticizing demand, tar condensation, hot gas cleanup, and steam deficit. Gasification system demands significant capital investment. The high temperature and pressure and the alkaline conditions create aggressive environment. Protection from an aggressive environment is very important in the operation of a gasifier because it determines the lifetime and hence the feasibility of gasification as a technology as a whole.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Analysis of syngas formation and ecological efficiency for the system of treating biomass waste and other solid fuels with CO2 recuperation based on integrated gasification combined cycle with diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass combustion is a more complex process and its model solving is difficult than combustion of traditional liquid fuels. At the same...2...] to obtain the data for operating regimes of ICE with syngas-based d...

A. Y. Pilatau; H. A. Viarshyna…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Partner: Farm Service Agency Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=ener&topic=bcap Cost: Free The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. Overview The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. The Biomass Crop

414

Chapter 5 - Gasification Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary There is a broad range of reactor types that are used in the practical realization of the gasification process. For most purposes, these reactor types can be grouped into one of three categories: moving-bed gasifiers, fluid-bed gasifiers, and entrained-flow gasifiers. Moving-bed processes are the oldest processes, and two processes in particular, the producer gas process and the water gas process, have played an important role in the production of synthesis gas from coal and coke. In moving bed processes, there are the sasol-lurgi dry bottom process, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) slagging gasifier, that are detailed in the chapter along with their applications. Following this, fluid-bed processes are discussed in which the blast has two functions: that of blast as a reactant and that of the fluidizing medium for the bed. The best known fluid-bed gasifiers that have no tar problem are regenerators of catalytic cracking units that often operate under reducing, that is, gasification conditions that can be found in many refineries. HRL process, BHEL gasifier, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) processes, the KBR transport gasifier, agglomerating fluid-bed processes, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) gasifier, the GEE gasification process, the Shell Gasification Process (SGP), Lurgi’ s Multi-Purpose Gasification process (MPG), etc. are the various processes discussed in the chapter.

Christopher Higman; Maarten van der Burgt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Conceptual design of a black liquor gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July 1985, Champion International completed a study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in a combined cycle cogeneration system based on gas turbines. That study indicated that gasification had high potential as an alternative to recovery boiler technology and offered many advantages. This paper describes the design of the plant, the construction of the pilot plant, and finally presents data from operation of the plant.

Kelleher, E. G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural gas-powered combined cycle power plants. The mostintegrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal plants,integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology for

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation TRI Technology Update & IDL R&D Needs burciagatri.pdf More Documents & Publications...

418

Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gasifier selected for development under this contract is an innovative and patented hybrid technology which combines the best features of both fixed-bed and fluidized-bed types. PyGas{trademark}, meaning Pyrolysis Gasification, is well suited for integration into advanced power cycles such as IGCC. It is also well matched to hot gas clean-up technologies currently in development. Unlike other gasification technologies, PyGas can be designed into both large and small scale systems. It is expected that partial repowering with PyGas could be done at a cost of electricity of only 2.78 cents/kWh, more economical than natural gas repowering. It is extremely unfortunate that Government funding for such a noble cause is becoming reduced to the point where current contracts must be canceled. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project was initiated to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology at a cost approaching $1,000 per kilowatt for electric power generation applications. The project was to include an innovative, advanced, air-blown, pressurized, fixed-bed, dry-bottom gasifier and a follow-on hot metal oxide gas desulfurization sub-system. To help defray the cost of testing materials, the facility was to be located at a nearby utility coal fired generating site. The patented PyGas{trademark} technology was selected via a competitive bidding process as the candidate which best fit overall DOE objectives. The paper describes the accomplishments to date.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Gasification characteristics of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is evaluating the gasification characteristics of Eastern oil shales as a part of a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and HYCRUDE Corporation to expand the data base on moving-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification of shale fines will improve the overall resource utilization by producing synthesis gas or hydrogen needed for the hydroretorting of oil shale and the upgrading of shale oil. Gasification characteristics of an Indiana New Albany oil shale have been determined over temperature and pressure ranges of 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Carbon conversion of over 95% was achieved within 30 minutes at gasification conditions of 1800/sup 0/F and 15 psig in a hydrogen/steam gas mixture for the Indiana New Albany oil shale. This paper presents the results of the tests conducted in a laboratory-scale batch reactor to obtain reaction rate data and in a continuous mini-bench-scale unit to obtain product yield data. 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Behavior of Inorganic Matter in a Dual Fluidized Steam Gasification Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principle of DFB steam gasification is based on the separation of the endothermic gasification process and the external heat supply from a separate combustion chamber. ... The precoat material described in Table 8 shows a typical composition of the natural mineral dolomite, whose main components are calcium and magnesium oxide, with a high ignition loss at 1050 °C, when the carbonates are released. ... On the basis of a dual fluidized bed system, steam gasification of biomass is coupled with in situ CO2 absorption to enhance the formation of hydrogen. ...

Friedrich Kirnbauer; Markus Koch; Reinhard Koch; Christian Aichernig; Hermann Hofbauer

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Coal–biomass co-combustion: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energy sector in the global scenario faces a major challenge of providing energy at an affordable cost and simultaneously protecting the environment. The energy mix globally is primarily dominated by fossil fuels, coal being the major contributor. Increasing concerns on the adverse effect of the emissions arising from coal conversion technologies on the environment and the gradual depletion of the fossil fuel reserves had led to global initiatives on using renewables and other opportunity resources to meet the future energy demands in a sustainable manner. Use of coal with biomass as a supplementary fuel in the combustion or gasification based processes is a viable technological option for reducing the harmful emissions. Co-combustion of coal with biomass for electricity generation is gradually gaining ground in spite of the fact that their combustion behavior differ widely due to wide variations in their physical and chemical properties. This article deals with the technical aspects of co-combustion with emphasis on the fundamentals of devolatilization, ignition, burnout and ash deposition behavior along with the constraints and uncertainties associated with the use of different types of biomass of diverse characteristics and the likely impact of partial replacement of coal by biomass on the emission of CO2, SOx, NOx. Other issues of no less importance like sustained availability of biomass, transportation and storage, effect on biodiversity, etc., are left out in the study. The investigations reported in the study reflect the potential of biomass as co-fuel, and the scope of maximizing its proportion in the blend in the coal based power plants and the derived benefits.

S.G. Sahu; N. Chakraborty; P. Sarkar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

423

Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The low net GHG mitigation obtained in the ethanol scenarios is mainly caused by the considerable amounts of steam and electricity consumed in the process of converting biomass into bioethanol, particularly for pretreatment, hydrolysis, extract concentration, distillation, and drying processes (12). ... Figure 3. Fossil fuel displacement in a life cycle perspective for alternative energy utilizations of 1 ha year agricultural land, shown as (a) net consumption/displacement of crude oil, hard coal, and natural gas, respectively, and as (b) net fossil fuel displacement (positive values represent fuel consumptions and negative values represent fuel displacements). ... However, the electric car and plug-in hybrid cars (electric motor and combustion engine) are still in a development stage and commercialization is not expected to occur until 10 to 15 years from now (37). ...

Karsten Hedegaard; Kathrine A. Thyø; Henrik Wenzel

2008-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

NETL: News Release - DOE Opens Competition for Black Liquor/Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 7, 2000 January 7, 2000 DOE Opens Competition for Black Liquor/Biomass Gasification Program Intended to Boost Efficiency, Reduce Greenhouse Gases from Pulp and Paper Mills A new competition begun this week by the Department of Energy could make the pulp and paper mills of the 21st century cleaner and more energy efficient by demonstrating improved technologies to convert their spent cooking liquor streams into new sources of energy. The advanced processes would also simultaneously recover and recycle pulping chemicals. MORE INFO Download the solicitation The department's National Energy Technology Laboratory has issued a call for projects to demonstrate advanced ways to gasify the black liquor or biomass of pulp and paper mills. The gases can be more easily cleaned of

425

Gasification of black liquor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediatley above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone.

Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Donnerstag, 24. Juli 2003 Biomasse Info-Zentrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centre Biogas - fuel cell Dust engine/-turbine ORC--process Hot Gasturbine Gasification - engine-engine Steamprocess Bioethanol - engine Methanol - engine* Methanol - fuel cell* Co- Combustion Biogas Methan - fuel 8 Biomasse Info-Zentrum Biomass Information Centre Internal Combustion Engine, Biogas #12;Donnerstag

427

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

428

Underground coal gasification: a brief review of current status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal gasification is a promising option for the future use of coal. Similarly to gasification in industrial reactors, underground coal gasification (UCG) produces syngas, which can be used for power generation or for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels and other valuable chemical products. As compared with conventional mining and surface gasification, UCG promises lower capital/operating costs and also has other advantages, such as no human labor underground. In addition, UCG has the potential to be linked with carbon capture and sequestration. The increasing demand for energy, depletion of oil and gas resources, and threat of global climate change lead to growing interest in UCG throughout the world. In this article, we review the current status of this technology, focusing on recent developments in various countries.

Shafirovich, E.; Varma, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

430

DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required.

431

Commercialization of IH2® Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and...

432

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Plant biomass represents a...

433

Gasification of Model Compounds and Wood in Hot Compressed Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Examples of wet waste streams include the following:? vegetable, fruit and garden waste; waste streams from agricultural, food and beverage industries; manure; sewage sludge; and some household wastes. ... Lignin itself is difficult to gasify and it has been observed that lignin blocks the conversion of wood's other constituents:? cellulose and hemi-cellulose. ... The raw biomass feedstock of sawdust with some CMC was also gasified in this system, the gasification efficiency in excess of 95% was reached. ...

Sascha R. A. Kersten; Biljana Potic; Wolter Prins; Wim P. M. Van Swaaij

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Based on Pressurized Fluidized Bed Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enviropower Inc. has developed a modern power plant concept based on an integrated pressurized fluidized bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC)....

Kari Salo; J. G. Patel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Chapter 1 - Reactor configurations and design parameters for thermochemical conversion of biomass into fuels, energy, and chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter describes reactors for thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuels, energy, and chemicals. The chapter covers basic definitions and concepts involved in biofuels and thermochemical conversion of biomass, and it also includes more advanced topics such as the main reactor configurations currently in use for thermochemical technologies, important parameters for reactor design, discussion of how parameters affect reactor performance, and several examples and case studies. The focus is on fast pyrolysis and gasification systems. The topics discussed include energy and carbon efficiencies, convenience of operation and scale-up, and several other parameters related to reactor design. After reading this chapter, the reader will understand the main characteristics of reactors for thermochemical conversion of biomass, their strengths, and their weaknesses for specific applications.

Fernando L.P. Resende

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamentals Fundamentals Gasification is a partial oxidation process. The term partial oxidation is a relative term which simply means that less oxygen is used in gasification than would be required for combustion (i.e., burning or complete oxidation) of the same amount of fuel. Gasification typically uses only 25 to 40 percent of the theoretical oxidant (either pure oxygen or air) to generate enough heat to gasify the remaining unoxidized fuel, producing syngas. The major combustible products of gasification are carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2), with only a minor amount of the carbon completely oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. The heat released by partial oxidation provides most of the energy needed to break up the chemical bonds in the feedstock, to drive the other endothermic gasification reactions, and to increase the temperature of the final gasification products.

437

Pioneering Gasification Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

lighting street lights fueled by "town gas," frequently the product of early forms of coal gasification. Gasification of fuel also provided fuel for steel mills, and toward the...

438

Case-study of a coal gasification-based energy supply system for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean fuels derived via coal gasification. Emissions of air pollutants in the SC scenario are compared polygeneration technologies to meet energy needs of coal-rich areas. Polygeneration systems, based on coalCase-study of a coal gasification-based energy supply system for China Zheng Hongtao Department

439

The Complete Gasification of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... plant designed by C. B. Tully, and operated at Bedford, for the complete gasification of coal. Altogether, since 1919, about two hundred such plants have been erected ...

J. S. G. THOMAS

1923-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility National Carbon Capture Center Participants The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. The PSDF now houses the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to address the nation's need for cost-effective, commercially viable CO2 capture options for flue gas from pulverized coal power plants and syngas from coal gasification power plants. The NCCC focuses national efforts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through technological innovation, and serve as a neutral test center for emerging carbon capture technologies. PSDF-NCCC Background

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency than conventional gasification technologies when1.2.3 Feedstock and gasification Coal, biomass and naturalin many different ways including gasification or natural gas

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is incorporated that recovers the waste heat proceeding biomass gasification. Under the ideal assumptions applied exercise to design a solar supercritical water gasification (SCWG) reactor. A formative reactor concept the waste heat (steam) of a downstream Fischer- Tropsch process. An intermediate heat exchange unit

443

Peculiarities of Rapid Pyrolysis of Biomass Covering Medium- and High-Temperature Ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peculiarities of Rapid Pyrolysis of Biomass Covering Medium- and High-Temperature Ranges ... It is considered that rapid pyrolysis is the first step in both gasification and combustion, which occurs at the same temperature of gasification or combustion in an industrial gasifier or boiler. ...

Yan Zhang; Shiro Kajitani; Masami Ashizawa; Kouichi Miura

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Update of Hydrogen from Biomass — Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil.

445

Biomass to Ethanol: Process Simulation, Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a Gasifier and a Bioreactor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Gasification-Fermentation process for the production of fuel-grade ethanol from agricultural biomass is being investigated at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater. Process simulation software, Aspen Plus… (more)

Rao, Sirigudi Rahul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Catalytic Reforming of Biomass Raw Fuel Gas to Syngas for FT Liquid Fuels Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of biomass to obtain a syngas provides a competitive means for clean FT (Fischer-Tropsch) liquid fuels from renewable resources. The feasibility of the process depends on the upgrading of raw ...

Tiejun Wang; Chenguang Wang; Qi Zhang…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach to community micro hydro in Kalahandi, Orissa. Santechnologies, such as micro-hydro, biomass gasification,grids, such as many micro-hydro grids, will mainly concern

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Selection and performance of Materials for Biomass Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of syngas through gasification or pyrolysis offers one of the more efficient routes for utilization of biomass resources; however, the containment structures used for many of these thermochemical processes are exposed to severe environments that limit their longevity and reliability. Studies have been conducted for three of these systems, and superior alternative materials have been identified. Improved materials will be of even greater importance in proposed gasification systems, many of which will generate even more extreme operating conditions.

Keiser, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Blau, Peter J [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Pint, Bruce A [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

450

Gasification of Coal and Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , said the Gas Council is spending £120,000 this year on research into coal gasification, and the National Coal Board and the Central Electricity Generating Board £680,000 and ... coal utilization. The Gas Council is spending about £230,000 on research into the gasification of oil under a programme intended to contribute also to the improvement of the economics ...

1960-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Annual Supply ( USDA and DOE , Washington, DC , 2005 ); www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/final_billionton_vision...hybridcars.com/. 12 Vehicle Technologies Program, DOE , www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2008_fotw514...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

454

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

455

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Agency/Company /Organization: CONEG Policy Research Center Inc. Partner: Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, Rick Handley and Associates, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, Economic Development Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.mass.gov/Eoeea/docs/doer/renewables/biomass/DOER%20Biomass%20Emiss Country: United States

456

Taylor Biomass Energy LLC TBE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy LLC TBE Biomass Energy LLC TBE Jump to: navigation, search Name Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) Place Montgomery, New York Zip 12549-9900 Sector Biomass Product Montgomery-based municipal-solid-waste (MSW) recovery and recycling firm providing biomass gasification units in addition to operating its own gasifier plants. References Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) is a company located in Montgomery, New York . References ↑ "Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Taylor_Biomass_Energy_LLC_TBE&oldid=352048" Categories:

457

Flow performance of ground biomass in a commercial auger Zewei Miao, Tony E. Grift , Alan C. Hansen, K.C. Ting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, gasification and combustion require a form of biomass that is flowable, to enable handling using provenFlow performance of ground biomass in a commercial auger Zewei Miao, Tony E. Grift , Alan C. Hansen friction The flow performance of preprocessed biomass plays an important role in biomass transportation

458

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-99FT40675; W(A)-03-001, CH-1127 The Petitioner, ChevronTexaco Worldwide Power & Gasification (ChevronTexaco) is a subcontractor to Research Triangle Institute (RTI) under the subject cost plus fixed fee agreement for the performance of work entitled, Novel Technologies for Gaseous Containment Control. The purpose of the agreement is to prove the feasibility of synthesis gas clean up techniques, including the warm synthesis gas process based on the RVS-1 sorbent developed by the Department of Energy and RTI and, for reverse selective membrane technology developed by Dupont and Air Liquide, Membrane Dupont Air Liquide (MEDAL) and RTI.

459

ECOWAS - GBEP REGIONAL BIOMASS RESOURCE ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Biomass Program Peer...

460

Modelling coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification processes in a slurry-feed-type entrained-flow gasifier are studied. Novel simulation methods as well as numerical results are presented. We use the vorticity-stream function method to study the characteristics of gas flow and a scalar potential function is introduced to model the mass source terms. The random trajectory model is employed to describe the behaviour of slurry-coal droplets. Very detailed results regarding the impact of the O2/coal ratio on the distribution of velocity, temperature and concentration are obtained. Simulation results show that the methods are feasible and can be used to study a two-phase reacting flow efficiently.

Xiang Jun Liu; Wu Rong Zhang; Tae Jun Park

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass gasification technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PNNL Coal Gasification Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the goals of PNNL in relation to coal gasification research. The long-term intent of this effort is to produce a syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in materials, catalysts, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, system modifications to increase operational flexibility and reliability or accommodate other fuel sources that can be used for syngas production could be useful.

Reid, Douglas J.; Cabe, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

462

NETL: Gasification - Systems and Industry Analyses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

E&P Technologies Gas Hydrates T&D and Refining Contacts E&P Technologies Gas Hydrates T&D and Refining Contacts Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification Turbines Fuel Cells FutureGen Advanced Research Contacts Industrial Capture & Storage Carbon Sequestration Program Overview Core R&D Infrastructure Global Collaborations FAQs Reference Shelf Contacts Hydrogen & Clean Fuels Hydrogen-from-Coal RD&D Contacts ENERGY ANALYSIS About Us Search Products Contacts SMART GRID ANALYSIS BASELINE STUDIES NETL-RUA About NETL-RUA Research Technology Transfer Business Development Education News & Events Contacts Members Only Access TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER Available Technologies How to Partner Outreach Contacts SOLICITATIONS & BUSINESS Solicitations & Funding Opps. Related Links & Forms CDP/Financial Asst. Resources Unsolicited Proposals Available NETL Property Business Alert Notification IRS Tax Credit Program NETL Business Contacts

463

Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research and development efforts produced low-emission burner technology capable of operating on natural gas as well as crude glycerin and/or fatty acids generated in biodiesel plants. The research was conducted in three stages (1) Concept definition leading to the design and development of a small laboratory scale burner, (2) Scale-up to prototype burner design and development, and (3) Technology demonstration with field vefiication. The burner design relies upon the Flow Blurring (FB) fuel injection based on aerodynamically creating two-phase flow near the injector exit. The fuel tube and discharge orifice both of inside diameter D are separated by gap H. For H < 0.25D, the atomizing air bubbles into liquid fuel to create a two-phase flow near the tip of the fuel tube. Pressurized two-phase fuel-air mixture exits through the discharge orifice, which results in expansion and breakup of air bubbles yielding a spray with fine droplets. First, low-emission combustion of diesel, biodiesel and straight VO (soybean oil) was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine sprays for these fuels with significantly different physical properties. Visual images for these baseline experiments conducted with heat release rate (HRR) of about 8 kW illustrate clean blue flames indicating premixed combustion for all three fuels. Radial profiles of the product gas temperature at the combustor exit overlap each other signifying that the combustion efficiency is independent of the fuel. At the combustor exit, the NOx emissions are within the measurement uncertainties, while CO emissions are slightly higher for straight VO as compared to diesel and biodiesel. Considering the large variations in physical and chemical properties of fuels considered, the small differences observed in CO and NOx emissions show promise for fuel-flexible, clean combustion systems. FB injector has proven to be very effective in atomizing fuels with very different physical properties, and it offers a path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 ?m, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

465

Co-Solvent Enhanced Production of Platform Fuel Precursors From Lignocellulosic Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies for Biomass Conversion into Chemicals andBioethanol Production." Biomass Conversion and Biorefineryin the field of biomass conversion, greater emphasis should

Cai, Charles Miao-Zi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Place Baroda, Gujarat, India Zip 390 008 Sector Biomass Product Baroda-based developer and manufacturer of a wide range of biomass gasification technologies. Coordinates 41.95624°, -86.485679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.95624,"lon":-86.485679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

467

Preliminary life-cycle assessment of biomass-derived refinery feedstocks for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US by ratification of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has pledged to emit no higher levels of greenhouse gases in the year 2000 than it did in 1990. Biomass-derived products have been touted as a possible solution to the potential problem of global warming. However, past studies related to the production of liquid fuels, chemicals, gaseous products, or electricity from biomass, have only considered the economics of producing these commodities. The environmental benefits have not been fully quantified and factored into these estimates until recently. Evaluating the environmental impact of various biomass systems has begun using life-cycle assessment. A refinery Linear Programming model previously developed has been modified to examine the effects of CO{sub 2}-capping on the US refining industry and the transportation sector as a whole. By incorporating the results of a CO{sub 2} emissions inventory into the model, the economic impact of emissions reduction strategies can be estimated. Thus, the degree to which global warming can be solved by supplementing fossil fuels with biomass-derived products can be measured, allowing research and development to be concentrated on the most environmentally and economically attractive technology mix. Biomass gasification to produce four different refinery feedstocks was considered in this analysis. These biomass-derived products include power, fuel gas, hydrogen for refinery processing, and Fischer-Tropsch liquids for upgrading and blending into finished transportation fuels.

Marano, J.J. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rogers, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Spath, P.L.; Mann, M.K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advance Technologies for the Co-Production Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks August 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The

469

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen is an energy carrier, not an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. EERE gas with carbon sequestration are preferred. Gasification Gasification is a process in which coal hydrogen through biomass gasification releases near-zero net greenhouse gases. Renewable Liquid Reforming

470

CFD simulation on the gasification of asphalt water slurry in an entrained flow gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification technology is suggested to utilize asphalt particles, which are produced in the heavy oil deep separation process of using coupled low temperature separation of solvent and post extraction residue. I...

Xingying Lan; Hanbin Zhong; Jinsen Gao

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Status of health and environmental research relative to coal gasification 1976 to the present  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health and environmental research relative to coal gasification conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under DOE sponsorship is summarized. The studies have focused on the chemical and toxicological characterization of materials from a range of process streams in five bench-scale, pilot-plant and industrial gasifiers. They also address ecological effects, industrial hygiene, environmental control technology performance, and risk assessment. Following an overview of coal gasification technology and related environmental concerns, integrated summaries of the studies and results in each area are presented and conclusions are drawn. Needed health and environmental research relative to coal gasification is identified.

Wilzbach, K.E.; Reilly, C.A. Jr. (comps.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z