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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Specialists' workshop on fast pyrolysis of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop brought together most of those who are currently working in or have published significant findings in the area of fast pyrolysis of biomass or biomass-derived materials, with the goal of attaining a better understanding of the dominant mechanisms which produce olefins, oxygenated liquids, char, and tars. In addition, background papers were given in hydrocarbon pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis of biomass, and techniques for powdered-feedstock preparation in order that the other papers did not need to introduce in depth these concepts in their presentations for continuity. In general, the authors were requested to present summaries of experimental data with as much interpretation of that data as possible with regard to mechanisms and process variables such as heat flux, temperatures, partial pressure, feedstock, particle size, heating rates, residence time, etc. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Understanding the product distribution from biomass fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fast pyrolysis of biomass is an attractive route to transform solid biomass into a liquid bio-oil, which has been envisioned as a renewable substitute for… (more)

Patwardhan, Pushkaraj Ramchandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Chemical analysis of biomass fast pyrolysis oils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the development of the field of chemical analysis of biomass fast pyrolysis oils. The techniques applied to pyrolysis oil analysis are reviewed including proximate and ultimate analysis, water (moisture) analysis, and chemical component analysis by various forms of chromatography, solvent separations, and spectrophotometric analyses, like infrared and ultraviolet. Advanced analytical techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular beam -- mass spectrometry are also discussed. This paper reviews and compares the methods and the results of the analyses. The advantages and shortcomings of the various methods applied are identified. Comparisons derived from the IEA Round Robin are incorporated.

Elliott, D.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Acidity of biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the TAN method for measuring the acidity of biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil was evaluated. Suggestions for carrying out the analysis have been made. The TAN method by ASTM D664 or D3339 can be used for measuring the acidity of fast pyrolysis bio-oils and their hydrotreating products. The main difference between the methods is that ASTM D664 is specified for higher TAN values than ASTM D3339. Special focus should be placed on the interpretation of the TAN curves because they differ significantly from those of mineral oils. The curve for bio-oils is so gentle that the automatic detection may not observe the end point properly and derivatization should be used. The acidity of fast pyrolysis bio-oils is mainly derived (60-70%) from volatile acids. Other groups of compounds in fast pyrolysis bio-oils that influence acidity include phenolics, fatty and resin acids, and hydroxy acids.

Oasmaa, Anja; Elliott, Douglas C.; Korhonen, Jaana

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Transportation fuels from biomass via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a renewable source of carbon, which could provide a means to reduce the greenhouse gas impact from fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Biomass is the only renewable source of liquid fuels, which could displace petroleum-derived products. Fast pyrolysis is a method of direct thermochemical conversion (non-bioconversion) of biomass to a liquid product. Although the direct conversion product, called bio-oil, is liquid; it is not compatible with the fuel handling systems currently used for transportation. Upgrading the product via catalytic processing with hydrogen gas, hydroprocessing, is a means that has been demonstrated in the laboratory. By this processing the bio-oil can be deoxygenated to hydrocarbons, which can be useful replacements of the hydrocarbon distillates in petroleum. While the fast pyrolysis of biomass is presently commercial, the upgrading of the liquid product by hydroprocessing remains in development, although it is moving out of the laboratory into scaled-up process demonstration systems.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Controlling biomass properties for optimizing fast pyrolysis products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy future of the United States is likely to include a large number of traditional and alternative energy sources and technologies. Fast pyrolysis has… (more)

Jeffrey, Brandon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Development of a lab-scale auger reactor for biomass fast pyrolysis and process optimization using response surface methodology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A lab-scale biomass fast pyrolysis system was designed and constructed based on an auger reactor concept. The design features two intermeshing augers that mix biomass… (more)

Brown, Jared Nathaniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University Daren E. Daugaard ConocoPhillips Company David D. Hsu National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-46586 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University

9

The effects of biomass pretreatments on the products of fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fast pyrolysis thermochemically degrades lignocellulosic material into solid char, organic liquids, and gaseous products. Using fast pyrolysis to produce renewable liquid bio-oil to replace crude… (more)

Kasparbauer, Randall Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Experimental Study of the Effect of Spray Medium on the Collection of Bio-Oil Produced from Biomass Fast Pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The yield and properties of bio-oil are influenced by the species of spray medium used in the biomass fast pyrolysis. In this study, the GC-MS analysis of the whole bio-oil and of the mixture with isoparaffin and ethanol respectively gave information ... Keywords: biomass, pyrolysis, bio-oil, spray medium, isoparaffin

Xinbao Li; Shurong Wang; Qi Wang; Kaige Wang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Product characterization of fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pyrolysis is an important step in the thermal conversion of biomass. During this study, the influence of temperature, heating rate and holding time on fast… (more)

Gout, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed prep, fast pyrolysis, and upgrading. Stabilized, upgraded pyrolysis oil is transferred to the refinery for separation and finishing into motor fuels. The off-gas from the hydrotreaters is also transferred to the refinery, and in return the refinery provides lower-cost hydrogen for the hydrotreaters. This reduces the capital investment. Production costs near $2/gal (in 2007 dollars) and petroleum industry infrastructure-ready products make the production and upgrading of pyrolysis oil to hydrocarbon fuels an economically attractive source of renewable fuels. The study also identifies technical areas where additional research can potentially lead to further cost improvements.

Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburg, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed prep, fast pyrolysis, and upgrading. Stabilized, upgraded pyrolysis oil is transferred to the refinery for separation and finishing into motor fuels. The off-gas from the hydrotreaters is also transferred to the refinery, and in return the refinery provides lower-cost hydrogen for the hydrotreaters. This reduces the capital investment. Production costs near $2/gal (in 2007 dollars) and petroleum industry infrastructure-ready products make the production and upgrading of pyrolysis oil to hydrocarbon fuels an economically attractive source of renewable fuels. The study also identifies technical areas where additional research can potentially lead to further cost improvements.

Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburg, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

14

BIOMASS PRETREATMENT FOR INCREASED ANHYDROSUGARS YIELD DURING FAST PYROLYSIS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production of liquid fuels is a high national priority to provide transporation fuels. Production of liquid bio-fuels from biomass has been idenfied as a viable… (more)

Li, Qi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Chapter 2: Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis oil using Heterogeneous Noble Metal Fast pyrolysis oils from lignocellulosic biomass are promising second generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass, such as peanut shells, for urban transportation. The process involves pyrolysis of the biomass minorities. #12;APPROACH · Develop process based on biomass pyrolysis and steam reforming of pyrolysis vaporsHYDROGEN FROM BIOMASS FOR URBAN TRANSPORTATION Collaborating Project Team Y. Yeboah (PI) and K

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

17

An investigation of the kinetics for the fast pyrolysis of loblolly pine woody biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the search for fossil fuel alternatives the production of bio-oil through the pyrolysis of biomass is one method which has shown evidence of scalability,… (more)

Williams, Alexander W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: 2011 State of Technology and Projections to 2017  

SciTech Connect

Review of the the status of DOE funded research for converting biomass to liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating for fiscal year 2011.

Jones, Susanne B.; Male, Jonathan L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, Helena L. (8448 Allison Ct., Arvada, CO 80005); Black, Stuart K. (4976 Raleigh St., Denver, CO 80212); Diebold, James P. (57 N. Yank Way, Lakewood, CO 80228); Kreibich, Roland E. (4201 S. 344th, Auburn, WA 98001)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Design, optimization and evaluation of a free-fall biomass fast pyrolysis reactor and its products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this work is a radiatively heated, free-fall, fast pyrolysis reactor. The reactor was designed and constructed for the production of bio-oil from… (more)

Ellens, Cody James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to biomass fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. The project was a cooperative research and development agreement among UOP LLC, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis undertaken at PNNL. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of catalyst formulations were tested over a range of operating parameters including temperature, pressure, and flow-rate with bio-oil derived from several different biomass feedstocks. Effects of liquid hourly space velocity and catalyst bed temperature were assessed. Details of the process results were presented including mass and elemental balances. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition, chemical functional type determined by mass spectrometry, and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to bio-oil.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This study develops techno-economic models for assessment of the conversion of biomass to valuable fuel products via fast pyrolysis and bio-oil upgrading. The upgrading process produces a mixture of naphtha-range (gasoline blend stock) and diesel-range (diesel blend stock) products. This study analyzes the economics of two scenarios: onsite hydrogen production by reforming bio-oil, and hydrogen purchase from an outside source. The study results for an nth plant indicate that petroleum fractions in the naphtha distillation range and in the diesel distillation range are produced from corn stover at a product value of $3.09/gal ($0.82/liter) with onsite hydrogen production or $2.11/gal ($0.56/liter) with hydrogen purchase. These values correspond to a $0.83/gal ($0.21/liter) cost to produce the bio-oil. Based on these nth plant numbers, product value for a pioneer hydrogen-producing plant is about $6.55/gal ($1.73/liter) and for a pioneer hydrogen-purchasing plant is about $3.41/gal ($0.92/liter). Sensitivity analysis identifies fuel yield as a key variable for the hydrogen-production scenario. Biomass cost is important for both scenarios. Changing feedstock cost from $50-$100 per short ton changes the price of fuel in the hydrogen production scenario from $2.57-$3.62/gal ($0.68-$0.96/liter).

Wright, M. M.; Satrio, J. A.; Brown, R. C.; Daugaard, D. E.; Hsu, D. D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Biomass to hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil or its fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and reforming of the pyroligneous oils are being studied as a strategy for producing hydrogen. A process of this nature has the potential to be cost competitive with conventional means of producing hydrogen. The authors propose a regionalized system of hydrogen production, where small- and medium-sized pyrolysis units (catalytic reforming of model compounds to hydrogen using Ni-based catalysts have achieved essentially complete conversion to H{sub 2}. Existing data on the catalytic reforming of oxygenates have been studied to guide catalyst selection. A process diagram for the pyrolysis and reforming operations is discussed, as are initial production cost estimates. A window of opportunity clearly exists if the bio-oil is first refined to yield valuable oxygenates so that only a residual fraction is used for hydrogen production.

Wang, D.; Czernik, S.; Montane, D.; Mann, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Chornet, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)]|[Univ. de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Entrained-Flow, Fast Ablative Pyrolysis of Biomass - Annual Report, 1 December 1984 - 31 December 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ablative, fast pyrolysis system was relocated to SERI's new, permanent Field Test Laboratory. Pyrolysis system modifications were made to increase the energy available to the vortex reactor and to enhance the collection efficiency of primary pyrolysis vapors. Mathematical modeling of the vapor cracker has resulted in the ability to accurately predict experimental results with respect to the thermal cracking of the primary vapors, the generation of noncondensible gases, and the gas composition. The computer algorithm of this model can be readily used to perform experimental simulation and/or reactor scale-up due to its fundamental nature. Preliminary screening tests with pure ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, supplied by Mobil Research and Development Corporation, have shown promise for the conversion of primary pyrolysis oil vapors to aromatic hydrocarbons; i.e., gasoline.

Diebold, J. P.; Scahill, J. W.; Evans, R. J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

27

Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Tan, Eric; Dutta, Abhijit; Jacobson, Jacob; Cafferty, Kara

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Production of phenols and biofuels by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-distance transportation advantages over raw biomass and wood pellets is BioOil from fast pyrolysis, or Pyrolysis Oil called fast pyrolysis, whereby biomass particles are heated in the absence of oxygen, vapourized to become manufacturing centers for Pyrolysis Oil, and those with extensive reserves of low-cost biomass can

Tang, Juming

29

Chapter 3: Insights in the Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil using a Ruthenium on Carbon Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pyrolysis oil and bio-liquids derived thereof. Fast pyrolysis oils can be obtained from biomass in yields up] Bridgwater, A.; Czernik, S.; Diebold, J.; Meier, D.; Oasmaa, A.; Peacocke, C,. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass, I.A. Production of a Bio-Gasoline by Ugrading Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Liquids via Hydrogen

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

30

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Furan Over Zsm-5 Catalysts: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to its low cost and availability, lignocellulosic biomass is receiving significant attention worldwide as a feedstock for renewable liquid bio-fuels. We have recently shown… (more)

Cheng, Yu-Ting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass for the Production of Fuels and Chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to its low cost and large availability lignocellulosic biomass is being studied worldwide as a feedstock for renewable liquid biofuels. Currently there are several… (more)

Carlson, Torren Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

Reed, T.B.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Ablative fast pyrolysis of biomass in the entrained-flow cyclonic reactor at SERI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress with the entrained flow cyclonic reactor at SERI is detailed. Feedstocks successfully used include wood flour and fairly large sawdust. Preliminary results show that relatively complete vaporization of the biomass is realized and that the yields of tar or gas can be varied over quite a range with trends following first order kinetic concepts.

Diebold, J.; Scahill, J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Experimental investigation into fast pyrolysis of biomass using an entrained-flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolysis experiments were performed using 30 and 90cm entrained-flow reactors, with steam as a carrier gas and two different feedstocks - wheat straw and powdered material drived from municipal solid waste (ECO-II TM). Reactor wall temperature was varied from 700/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/C. Gas composition data from the ECO-II tests were comparable to previously reported data but ethylene yield appeared to vary with reactor wall temperature and residence time. The important conclusion from the wheat straw tests is that olefin yields are about one half that obtained from ECO-II. Evidence was found that high olefin yields from ECO-II are due to the presence of plastics in the feedstock. Batch experiments were run on wheat straw using a Pyroprobe/sup TM/. The samples were heated at a high rate (20,000/sup 0/ C/sec) to 1000/sup 0/ and held at 1000/sup 0/C for a variable period of time from 0.05 to 4.95s. For times up to 0.15s volume fractions of ethylene, propylene, and methane increase while that of carbon dioxide decreases. Subsequently, only carbon monoxide and hydrogen are produced. The change may be related to poor thermal contact and suggests caution in using the Pyroprobe.

Bohn, M.; Benham, C.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Biomass pyrolysis oil properties and combustion meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These proceedings contain extended abstracts from the Biomass Pyrolysis Oil Properties and Combustion Meeting held September 26-28, 1994. This meeting is cosponsored by the DOE, NREL, NRCan, and VTT Energy (Finland) for the discussion of developments in the application of biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Status of Process Development for Pyrolysis of Biomass for Liquid Fuels and Chemicals Production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is one of several thermochemical conversion strategies to produce useful fuels from biomass material . The goal of fast pyrolysis is to maximize liquid product yield. Fast pyrolysis is accomplished by the thermal treatment of the biomass in an air-free environment. Very short heat up and cool-down is a requirement for fast pyrolysis. The typical residence time in the pyrolysis reactor is 1 second. In order to accomplish the fast heatup, grinding the biomass to a small particle size in the range of 1 mm is typical and pre-drying of the biomass to less than 10 weight percent moisture is considered the standard. Recovery of the product liquid, called bio-oil, is accomplished by a variety of methods all of which require a quick quench of the product vapor. A definition of fast pyrolysis bio-oil is provided for the CAS # RN 1207435-39-9 recently issued by ChemAbstracts Services.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hydrogen from Biomass Catalytic Reforming of Pyrolysis Vapors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surging, the use of biomass and www.elsevier.com/locate/jaap J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis xxx (2006) xxx of the virgin biomass and the development of the microstructure of the char. Structural changes during pyrolysis. Leppamaki, P. Koponen, J. Lavander, E. Tapola, Physical characterization of biomass-based pyrolysis liquids

38

Study on the Maize Straw Process of Fast Pyrolysis in the Rotating Cone Reactor and Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With maize straw as raw material and quartz sand as heat medium, the system of rapid pyrolysis of biology materials using a rotating cone reactor was established. seven main factors during the pyrolysis process including temperature, rotating rate, degree ... Keywords: biomass, maize straw, bio-oil, fast pyrolysis, rotating cone reactor

Li Junsheng

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: 2012 State of Technology and Projections to 2017  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the economic impact of the work performed at PNNL during FY12 to improve fast pyrolysis oil upgrading via hydrotreating. A comparison is made between the projected economic outcome and the actual results based on experimental data. Sustainability metrics are also included.

Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Energy Optimization of Biomass Pyrolysis and Liquefaction System in CFB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass pyrolysis and liquefaction technology needs inert carrier gas and high energy consumption. On the basis of analyzing its energy consumption and the using way of char and off-gas, energy in the pyrolysis and liquefaction system in CFB is optimized ... Keywords: FB biomass pyrolysis energy consumption optimize

Zhang Jun; Teng Wenrui; Wei Xinli

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Post Processing Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, assembled a comprehensive team for a two-year project to demonstrate innovative methods for the stabilization of pyrolysis oil in accordance with DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-PS36-08GO98018, Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Stabilization. In collaboration with NREL, PNNL, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pall Fuels and Chemicals, and Ensyn Corporation, UOP developed solutions to the key technical challenges outlined in the FOA. The UOP team proposed a multi-track technical approach for pyrolysis oil stabilization. Conceptually, methods for pyrolysis oil stabilization can be employed during one or both of two stages: (1) during the pyrolysis process (In Process); or (2) after condensation of the resulting vapor (Post-Process). Stabilization methods fall into two distinct classes: those that modify the chemical composition of the pyrolysis oil, making it less reactive; and those that remove destabilizing components from the pyrolysis oil. During the project, the team investigated methods from both classes that were suitable for application in each stage of the pyrolysis process. The post processing stabilization effort performed at PNNL is described in this report. The effort reported here was performed under a CRADA between PNNL and UOP, which was effective on March 13, 2009, for 2 years and was subsequently modified March 8, 2011, to extend the term to December 31, 2011.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Hart, Todd R.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fast Pyrolysis of Poplar Using a Captive Sample Reactor: Effects of Inorganic Salts on Primary Pyrolysis Products  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed a captive sample reactor (CSR) to study fast pyrolysis of biomass. The reactor uses a stainless steel wire mesh to surround biomass materials with an isothermal environment by independent controlling of heating rates and pyrolysis temperatures. The vapors produced during pyrolysis are immediately entrained and transported in He carrier gas to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Formation of secondary products is minimized by rapidly quenching the sample support with liquid nitrogen. A range of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) and transition metal salts were tested to study their effect on composition of primary pyrolysis products. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the MBMS data shows that transition metal salts enhance pyrolysis of carbohydrates and AAEM salts enhances pyrolysis of lignin. This was supported by performing similar separate studies on cellulose, hemicellulose and extracted lignin. The effect of salts on char formation is also discussed.

Mukarakate, C.; Robichaud, D.; Donohoe, B.; Jarvis, M.; Mino, K.; Bahng, M. K.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Application of CHL model for estimating biomass pyrolysis yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pyrolysis of wood biomass represents a valid technique for recovering "green" fuel from residues of forestry and other activities, in agriculture as in industry, where wood and other plant residues are available. Wood biomass is essentially a composite ... Keywords: CHL model, biogas yield, biomass, numerical analysis, pyrolysis, rate estimation

Francesco Marra

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Catalytic Esterification of Model Compounds of Biomass Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass pyrolysis oil is a complex mixture containing a wide variety of oxygenated compounds, which results in difficulties in bio-oil upgrading. To gain a clearer understanding of the reaction pathways, seven compounds were chosen to represent biomass ... Keywords: pyrolysis oil, model compounds, catalytic esterification

Zuo-gang Guo; Shu-rong Wang; Ying-ying Zhu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Evaluation of Catalysts from Different Origin for Vapor Phase Upgrading in Biomass Pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Liquid fuels and chemicals from biomass resources arouse much interests in research and development. Fast pyrolysis of biomass has the potential to effectively change solid biomass materials into liquid products. However, bio-oil from traditional pyrolysis processes is difficult to apply in industry, because of its complicated composition, high oxygen content, low stability, etc. Upgrading or refining of the bio-oil should be performed for industrial application of biomass pyrolysis. Often, the process would be done in a separate reactor downstream of the pyrolysis process. In this paper, a laboratory scale micro test facility was constructed, wherein the pyrolysis of pine and catalytic upgrading of the resulting vapors were closely coupled in one reactor. The composition of vapor effluent was monitored with a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) for the online evaluation of the catalyst performance. Catalysts from different origin were tested and compared for the effectiveness of pyrolysis vapor upgrading, namely commercial zeolites, Ni based steam reforming catalyst, CaO, MgO, and several laboratory-made catalysts. The reaction temperature for catalytic upgrading varied between 400 and 600 centigrade, and the gaseous residence time ranged from 0.1 second to above 2 second, to simulate the conditions in industrial application. It is revealed that some catalysts are active in transform most of primary biomass pyrolysis vapors into hydrocarbons, resulting in nonoxygenated products, which is beneficial for downstream utilization. Others are not as effective, results in minor improvement compared with blank test results.

Zhang, X.; Mukarakate, C.; Zheng, Z.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Design and commissioning of a continuous isothermal fast pyrolysis reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In order to meet growing demands for alternatives to fossil fuels, biomass pyrolysis is a method that has been explored in depth as a method… (more)

Glauber, Samuel Melville

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Study of the mechanism of pyrolysis and gasification of Mallee biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mechanisms of pyrolysis/gasification (steam and carbon dioxide) of mallee biomass were investigated. Wood biochar obtained under slow pyrolysis kept botanical structure but lost its original… (more)

Yang, Yanwu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Combustion Properties of Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Oils: Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

Thermochemical pyrolysis of solid biomass feedstocks, with subsequent condensation of the pyrolysis vapors, has been investigated in the U.S. and internationally as a means of producing a liquid fuel for power production from biomass. This process produces a fuel with significantly different physical and chemical properties from traditional petroleum-based fuel oils. In addition to storage and handling difficulties with pyrolysis oils, concern exists over the ability to use this fuel effectively in different combustors. The report endeavors to place the results and conclusions from Sandia's research into the context of international efforts to utilize pyrolysis oils. As a special supplement to this report, Dr. Steven Gust, of Finland's Neste Oy, has provided a brief assessment of pyrolysis oil combustion research efforts and commercialization prospects in Europe.

C. R. Shaddix; D. R. Hardesty

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Combustion Properties of Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Oils: Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical pyrolysis of solid biomass feedstocks, with subsequent condensation of the pyrolysis vapors, has been investigated in the U.S. and internationally as a means of producing a liquid fuel for power production from biomass. This process produces a fuel with significantly different physical and chemical properties from traditional petroleum-based fuel oils. In addition to storage and handling difficulties with pyrolysis oils, concern exists over the ability to use this fuel effectively in different combustors. The report endeavors to place the results and conclusions from Sandia's research into the context of international efforts to utilize pyrolysis oils. As a special supplement to this report, Dr. Steven Gust, of Finland's Neste Oy, has provided a brief assessment of pyrolysis oil combustion research efforts and commercialization prospects in Europe.

C. R. Shaddix; D. R. Hardesty

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Impact of thermal pretreatment on the fast pyrolysis conversion of Southern Pine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Thermal pretreatment of biomass ranges from simple (nondestructive) drying to more severe treatments that cause devolatization, depolymerization and carbonization. These pretreatments have demonstrated promise for transforming raw biomass into feedstock material that has improved milling, handling, storage and conversion properties. In this work, southern pine material was pretreated at 120, 180, 230 and 270 degrees C, and then subjected to pyrolysis tests in a continuous-feed bubbling-fluid bed pyrolysis system. Results: High pretreatment temperatures were associated with lower specific grinding energies, higher grinding rates and lower hydrogen and oxygen contents. Higher pretreatment temperatures were also correlated with increased char production, decreased total acid number and slight decrease in the oxygen content of the pyrolysis liquid fraction. Conclusion: Thermal pretreatment has both beneficial and detrimental impacts on fast pyrolysis conversion of pine material to bio-oil, and the effect of thermal pretreatment on upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oil requires further attention.

Tyler L. Westover; Manunya Phanphanich; Micael L. Clark; Sharna R. Rowe; Steven E. Egan; Christopher T Wright; Richard D. Boardman; Alan H. Zacher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading to Transportation Fuels by Catalytic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as fast- pyrolysis and catalytic fast-pyrolysis for producing liquid fuels from biomass feedstocks biomass to a fast-pyrolysis reactor (Table 3.4), the greatest mass yield of bio-oil can be attributed............................................................................................- 70 - TABLE 2.18. BIOMASS PYROLYSIS TECHNOLOGIES, REACTION CONDITIONS AND PRODUCTS................- 70

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

56

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

Diebold, J.P. [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Liquid-phase Processing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil using Pt/HZSM-5 Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent developments in converting biomass to bio-chemicals and liquid fuels provide a promising sight to an emerging biofuels industry. Biomass can be converted to energy via thermochemical and biochemical pathways. Thermal degradation processes include liquefaction, gasification, and pyrolysis. Among these biomass technologies, pyrolysis (i.e. a thermochemical conversion process of any organic material in the absence of oxygen) has gained more attention because of its simplicity in design, construction and operation. This research study focuses on comparative assessment of two types of pyrolysis processes and catalytic upgrading of bio-oil for production of transportation fuel intermediates. Slow and fast pyrolysis processes were compared for their respective product yields and properties. Slow pyrolysis bio-oil displayed fossil fuel-like properties, although low yields limit the process making it uneconomically feasible. Fast pyrolysis, on the other hand, show high yields but produces relatively less quality bio-oil. Catalytic transformation of the high-boiling fraction (HBF) of the crude bio-oil from fast pyrolysis was therefore evaluated by performing liquid-phase reactions at moderate temperatures using Pt/HZSM-5 catalyst. High yields of upgraded bio-oils along with improved heating values and reduced oxygen contents were obtained at a reaction temperature of 200°C and ethanol/HBF ratio of 3:1. Better quality, however, was observed at 240 °C even though reaction temperature has no significant effect on coke deposition. The addition of ethanol in the feed has greatly attenuated coke deposition in the catalyst. Major reactions observed are esterification, catalytic cracking, and reforming. Overall mass and energy balances in the conversion of energy sorghum biomass to produce a liquid fuel intermediate obtained sixteen percent (16 wt.%) of the biomass ending up as liquid fuel intermediate, while containing 26% of its initial energy.

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing the same  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing them from carbonaceous biomass feedstock are provided. The carbonaceous biomass feedstock is pyrolyzed in the presence of a catalyst comprising base metal-based catalysts, noble metal-based catalysts, treated zeolitic catalysts, or combinations thereof to produce pyrolysis gases. During pyrolysis, the catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction whereby at least a portion of the oxygenated hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis gases are converted into hydrocarbons. The oxygen is removed as carbon oxides and water. A condensable portion (the vapors) of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Marinangeli, Richard; Brandvold, Timothy A; Kocal, Joseph A

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Total Acid Value Titration of Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Determination of Carboxylic Acids and Phenolics with Multiple End-Point Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total acid value titration has long been used to estimate corrosive potential of petroleum crude oil and fuel oil products. The method commonly used for this measurement, ASTM D664, utilizes KOH in isopropanol as the titrant with potentiometric end point determination by pH sensing electrode and Ag/AgCl reference electrode with LiCl electrolyte. A natural application of the D664 method is titration of pyrolysis-derived bio-oil, which is a candidate for refinery upgrading to produce drop in fuels. Determining the total acid value of pyrolysis derived bio-oil has proven challenging and not necessarily amenable to the methodology employed for petroleum products due to the different nature of acids present. We presented an acid value titration for bio-oil products in our previous publication which also utilizes potentiometry using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide in place of KOH as the titrant and tetraethylammonium bromide in place of LiCl as the reference electrolyte to improve the detection of these types of acids. This method was shown to detect numerous end points in samples of bio-oil that were not detected by D664. These end points were attributed to carboxylic acids and phenolics based on the results of HPLC and GC-MS studies. Additional work has led to refinement of the method and it has been established that both carboxylic acids and phenolics can be determined accurately. Use of pH buffer calibration to determine half-neutralization potentials of acids in conjunction with the analysis of model compounds has allowed us to conclude that this titration method is suitable for the determination of total acid value of pyrolysis oil and can be used to differentiate and quantify weak acid species. The measurement of phenolics in bio-oil is subject to a relatively high limit of detection, which may limit the utility of titrimetric methodology for characterizing the acidic potential of pyrolysis oil and products.

Christensen, E.; Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading to Transportation Fuels by Catalytic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or methanol. ! While pyrolysis/gasification of coal and woody biomass are in commercial use, pyrolysis reforming of the aqueous phase derived from fast-pyrolysis of biomass. Renewable Energy 2009, 34, (12), 2872.; Lee, W.-J.; Wu, H.; Li, C.-Z., Fast pyrolysis of oil mallee woody biomass: Effect of temperature

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

63

Gasification of woody biomass Tessa Jansen (s0140600)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on biomass fast pyrolysis followed by #12;-3- hydroprocessing.11-14 A number of pre-conversion technologies;-9- Fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing Fast pyrolysis is a process of heating biomass without include biomass pretreatment, fast pyrolysis, solids removal, oil recovery, char combustion

Luding, Stefan

64

Problems and opportunities fr solar energy in biomass, pyrolysis, and gasification  

SciTech Connect

Passive solar input for drying crops and wood already make a significant input to the US energy budget, and active solar drying, requiring temperatures below 200/sup 0/C, can easily make an important substitution for fossil fuels in drying. Pyrolysis of biomass typically requires less than 1.6 MBtu/dry ton at a temperature of 500/sup 0/C, and this could potentially be supplied by direct solar heating. The heat input is likely to be by indirect heating of a solid, liquid or gas heat-transfer agent. Fast pyrolysis requires modest heat inputs with high heat-transfer rates at temperatures over 900/sup 0/C and thus may be particularly suited to focusing collectors as energy sources. Char gasification, using steam or CO/sub 2/, requires large energy inputs at temperatures over 900/sup 0/C and thus is the least likely field of application of solar energy. Ultimately, the large scale application of solar energy to biomass pyrolysis and gasification will depend on the relative cost of direct solar versus biomass inputs. Biomass energy inputs now typically cost 1 to 3 $/MBtu; when direct solar heat costs begin to approach this level, we may begin to use direct solar process heat for biomass conversion.

Reed, T.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) for analytical pyrolysis. Biomass Analysis. All biomass samples were Technol 42: 649­661. 44. Evans RJ, Milne TA (1987) Molecular characterization of the pyrolysis of biomass fuels from lignocel- lulosic biomass is a plant's recalcitrance to releasing sugars bound in the cell

66

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis for the Production of the Hydrocarbon Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising technique for conversion of biomass into hydrocarbons for use as transportation fuels. For over 30 years this process has been studied and it has been demonstrated that oils can be produced with high concentrations of hydrocarbons and low levels of oxygen. However, the yields from this type of conversion are typically low and the catalysts, which are often zeolites, are quickly deactivated through coking. In addition, the hydrocarbons produced are primarily aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, xylene) that not desirable for petroleum refineries and are not well suited for diesel or jet engines. The goals of our research are to develop new multifunction catalysts for the production of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel range molecules and to improve process conditions for higher yields and low coking rates. We are investigating filtration and the use of hydrogen donor molecules to improve catalyst performance.

Nimlos, M. R.; Robichaud, D. J.; Mukaratate, C.; Donohoe, B. S.; Iisa, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Research on Common Biomass Pyrolysis Production of Biomass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Textural parameters analysis revealed the caloric value of biomass carbons between 32 MJ/kg and 34 MJ/kg. It also indicated that the surface of biomass carbon ...

68

Optimization of Pyrolysis of Biomass Using Differential Evolution Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differential Evolution (DE) is an evolutionary optimization technique, which is exceptionally simple, significantly faster & robust at numerical optimization and is more likely to find a function’s true global optimum. Pyrolysis of biomass is an important and promising chemical process in the area of renewable energy sources. In the present study, the modeling and simulation of the above process is coupled with the optimization of a non-linear function using Differential Evolution. The objective in this problem is to estimate optimal time of pyrolysis and heating rate under the restriction on concentration of biomass. It serves as the input to the coupled ordinary differential equations to find the optimum values of volatiles and char using Runge-Kutta fourth order method. 1.

B. V. Babu; A. S. Chaurasia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Phenol and phenolics from lignocellulosic biomass by catalytic microwave pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic microwave pyrolysis of biomass using activated carbon was investigated to determine the effects of pyrolytic conditions on the yields of phenol and phenolics. The high concentrations of phenol (38.9%) and phenolics (66.9%) were obtained at the temperature of 589 K, catalyst-to-biomass ratio of 3:1 and retention time of 8 min. The increase of phenol and its derivatives compared to pyrolysis without catalysts has a close relationship with the decomposition of lignin under the performance of activated carbon. The concentration of esters was also increased using activated carbon as a catalyst. The high content of phenols obtained in this study can be used either directly as fuel after upgrading or as feedstock of biobased phenols for chemical industry.

Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Wang, Lu; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Zhang, Qin; Tang, Juming; Ruan, Roger

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Chapter 1: An Introduction to the Hydroprocessing of Biomass Derived Pyrolysis An introduction to the hydrotreatment of pyrolysis oil is given and the outline of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

replacements for petroleum based fuels (Tang et al., 2009). Currently, bio-oil derived from biomass pyrolysis microwaves as heating re- source to prepare biomass pyrolysis oil (Huang et al., 2008; Lei et al., 2009 by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of biomass under distinct reaction conditions, including the reaction

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

71

A Study of Pyrolysis of Charring Materials and its Application to Fire Safety and Biomass Utilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A theoretical and experimental study of pyrolysis of charring material applicable to fire safety and biomass utilization is presented in this thesis. This work is… (more)

Park, Won Chan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Biomass pyrolysis processes: performance parameters and their influence on biochar system benefits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on performance of biomass pyrolysis processes for use in biochar systems. Objectives are to understand the range of control of such processes… (more)

Brownsort, Peter A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pyrolysis of biomass and biorefinery residual materials for production of advanced biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work carried out throughout this project has helped to further advance the area of biomass pyrolysis for the production of bio-oil. During the early… (more)

Melligan, Fergus J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Transforming Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) into Fuel via the Gasification/Pyrolysis Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pyrolysis oil and bio-liquids derived thereof. Fast pyrolysis oils can be obtained from biomass in yields up] Bridgwater, A.; Czernik, S.; Diebold, J.; Meier, D.; Oasmaa, A.; Peacocke, C,. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass, I.A. Production of a Bio-Gasoline by Ugrading Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Liquids via Hydrogen

Columbia University

75

Summary of Fast Pyrolysis and Upgrading GHG Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 established new renewable fuel categories and eligibility requirements (EPA 2010). A significant aspect of the National Renewable Fuel Standard 2 (RFS2) program is the requirement that the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a qualifying renewable fuel be less than the life cycle GHG emissions of the 2005 baseline average gasoline or diesel fuel that it replaces. Four levels of reduction are required for the four renewable fuel standards. Table 1 lists these life cycle performance improvement thresholds. Table 1. Life Cycle GHG Thresholds Specified in EISA Fuel Type Percent Reduction from 2005 Baseline Renewable fuel 20% Advanced biofuel 50% Biomass-based diesel 50% Cellulosic biofuel 60% Notably, there is a specialized subset of advanced biofuels that are the cellulosic biofuels. The cellulosic biofuels are incentivized by the Cellulosic Biofuel Producer Tax Credit (26 USC 40) to stimulate market adoption of these fuels. EISA defines a cellulosic biofuel as follows (42 USC 7545(o)(1)(E)): The term “cellulosic biofuel” means renewable fuel derived from any cellulose, hemicellulose, or lignin that is derived from renewable biomass and that has lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, as determined by the Administrator, that are at least 60 percent less than the baseline lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. As indicated, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has sole responsibility for conducting the life cycle analysis (LCA) and making the final determination of whether a given fuel qualifies under these biofuel definitions. However, there appears to be a need within the LCA community to discuss and eventually reach consensus on discerning a 50–59 % GHG reduction from a ? 60% GHG reduction for policy, market, and technology development. The level of specificity and agreement will require additional development of capabilities and time for the sustainability and analysis community, as illustrated by the rich dialogue and convergence around the energy content and GHG reduction of cellulosic ethanol (an example of these discussions can be found in Wang 2011). GHG analyses of fast pyrolysis technology routes are being developed and will require significant work to reach the levels of development and maturity of cellulosic ethanol models. This summary provides some of the first fast pyrolysis analyses and clarifies some of the reasons for differing results in an effort to begin the convergence on assumptions, discussion of quality of models, and harmonization.

Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Male, Jonathan L.

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

Hsu, D. D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

"Optimization of Zero Length Chromatographic System and Measuring Properties of Model Compounds from Biomass Pyrolysis"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on alternatives for fossil derived liquid transportation fuels. Biomass is considered a promising alternative due to its abundance and renewability. Various products from different biomass sources have been proposed interesting, second generation transportation fuel is pyrolysis oil, obtained by flash pyrolysis

Mountziaris, T. J.

78

Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Characteristics of Porosity in Biomass Chars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of pyrolysis temperature (T) in the range of 200-900oC on the characteristics of porosity in biomass chars was investigated. The samples were characterized by N2 isothermal adsorption/desorption method and scanning electron ... Keywords: biomass, pyrolysis, porosity

Peng Fu; Song Hu; Jun Xinag; Lushi Sun; Tao Yang; Anchao Zhang; Yi Wang; Gang Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pyrolysis and ignition behavior of coal, cattle biomass, and coal/cattle biomass blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in demand, lower emission standards, and reduced fuel supplies have fueled the recent effort to find new and better fuels to power the necessary equipment for society’s needs. Often, the fuels chosen for research are renewable fuels derived from biomass. Current research at Texas A&M University is focused on the effectiveness of using cattle manure biomass as a fuel source in conjunction with coal burning utilities. The scope of this project includes fuel property analysis, pyrolysis and ignition behavior characteristics, combustion modeling, emissions modeling, small scale combustion experiments, pilot scale commercial combustion experiments, and cost analysis of the fuel usage for both feedlot biomass and dairy biomass. This paper focuses on fuel property analysis and pyrolysis and ignition characteristics of feedlot biomass. Deliverables include a proximate and ultimate analysis, pyrolysis kinetics values, and ignition temperatures of four types of feedlot biomass (low ash raw manure [LARM], low ash partially composted manure [LAPC], high ash raw manure [HARM], and high ash partially composted manure [HAPC]) as well as blends of each biomass with Texas lignite coal (TXL). Activation energy results for pure samples of each fuel using the single reaction model rigorous solution were as follows: 45 kJ/mol (LARM), 43 kJ/mol (LAPC), 38 kJ/mol (HARM), 36 kJ/mol (HAPC), and 22 kJ/mol (TXL). Using the distributed activation energy model the activation energies were 169 kJ/mol (LARM), 175 kJ/mol (LAPC), 172 kJ/mol (HARM), 173 kJ/mol (HAPC), and 225 kJ/mol (TXL). Ignition temperature results for pure samples of each of the fuels were as follows: 734 K (LARM), 745 K (LAPC), 727 (HARM), 744 K (HAPC), and 592 K (TXL). There was little difference observed between the ignition temperatures of the 50% blends of coal with biomass and the pure samples of coal as observed by the following results: 606 K (LARM), 571 K (LAPC), 595 K (HARM), and 582 K (HAPC).

Martin, Brandon Ray

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Working Group Meeting Presentation Guidance at a Glance Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to the large quantity of biomass that would be required. Even with several remote pyrolysis plantsDecember 2003 · NREL/MP-510-33112 Update of Hydrogen from Biomass -- Determination of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A component based model for the prediction of the product yields of the pyrolysis of a biomass particle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pyrolysis of biomass can produce several useful, renewable products: biochar for soil amendment and long-term carbon sequestration; tars for chemicals and biofuels; and syngas as… (more)

Eberly, Brian C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy Policy 33 (2005) 705716 UK biomass energy since 1990: the mismatch between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-oil from fast pyrolysis, producing hydrogen from biomass for use in fuel cells). Consequently, biomass the scale of `medium' plant and the potential role of biomass pyrolysis or gasification technologies,11 technologies but references to biomass pyrolysis or biomass gasifica- tion are noticeably absent. The glossary

Heinke, Dietmar

83

Modelling and experimental studies of biomass and organic pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xii, 132 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CBME 2012 Lam Pyrolysis is a thermal conversion process that decomposes… (more)

Lam, Ka Leung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Preparation of brightness stabilization agent for lignin containing pulp from biomass pyrolysis oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a brightness stabilization mixture of water-soluble organic compounds from biomass pyrolysis oils comprising: a) size-reducing biomass material and pyrolyzing the size-reduced biomass material in a fluidized bed reactor; b) separating a char/ash component while maintaining char-pot temperatures to avoid condensation of pyrolysis vapors; c) condensing pyrolysis gases and vapors, and recovering pyrolysis oils by mixing the oils with acetone to obtain an oil-acetone mixture; d) evaporating acetone and recovering pyrolysis oils; e) extracting the pyrolysis oils with water to obtain a water extract; f) slurrying the water extract with carbon while stirring, and filtering the slurry to obtain a colorless filtrate; g) cooling the solution and stabilizing the solution against thermally-induced gelling and solidification by extraction with ethyl acetate to form an aqueous phase lower layer and an organic phase upper layer; h) discarding the upper organic layer and extracting the aqueous layer with ethyl acetate, and discarding the ethyl acetate fraction to obtain a brown-colored solution not susceptible to gelling or solidification upon heating; i) heating the solution to distill off water and other light components and concentrating a bottoms fraction comprising hydroxyacetaldehyde and other non-volatile components having high boiling points; and j) decolorizing the stabilized brown solution with activated carbon to obtain a colorless solution.

Agblevor, Foster A. (Blacksburg, VA); Besler-Guran, Serpil (Flemington, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A model for the vacuum pyrolysis of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass is a significant renewable energy source and much research is currently being done to enable the production of biofuels and chemicals from biomass. This… (more)

Rabe, Richardt Coenraad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

AlternativeAlternative FeedstocksFeedstocks for the Petrochemical Industryfor the Petrochemical Industry from Biomassfrom Biomass LigninsLignins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-oil from fast pyrolysis, producing hydrogen from biomass for use in fuel cells). Consequently, biomass the scale of `medium' plant and the potential role of biomass pyrolysis or gasification technologies,11 technologies but references to biomass pyrolysis or biomass gasifica- tion are noticeably absent. The glossary

87

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes of wood and biomass pyrolysis,” to appear ineffect during biomass pyrolysis,” Industrial & Engineeringprocesses during pyrolysis of a large biomass particle,”

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Corrosion Studies Of Raw And Treated Biomass-Derived Pyrolysis Oils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid pyrolysis of biomass generates a liquid with properties that are particularly attractive for production of hydrocarbons that could be substituted for liquid fuels derived from petroleum. However, the high oxygen content of the biomass derived liquids presents a number of problems because of the high water content and the considerable concentration of carboxylic acids. Measurements of total acid number (TAN) of pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) samples show that values in the 90-100 range are fairly common. This level of acidity has been shown to cause corrosion problems that have to be addressed in the selection of structural materials that are used in the production, subsequent processing, storage and transport of the pyrolysis oils. Chemical analyses have been performed and laboratory corrosion studies have been conducted in order to assess the aggressiveness of the raw pyrolysis oil from several sources as well as the corrosion caused by a bio-oil that has been treated to reduce the acid and oxygen content. Components of biomass pyrolyzers have also been fabricated from various candidate alloys, and these components have been exposed for extended periods during operation of the pyrolyzers. This paper will report on results of these analyses and corrosion studies.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Howell, Michael [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Connatser, Raynella M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Molecular Analysis of Primary Vapor and Char Products during Stepwise Pyrolysis of Poplar Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of biomass produces both pyrolysis oil and solid char. In this study, poplar has been pyrolyzed in a stepwise fashion over a series of temperatures from 200 to 500°C, and both the primary products contributing to pyrolysis oil and the changes in the pyrolyzing poplar surface leading toward char have been characterized at each step. The primary products were identified by direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry, and the changes in the poplar surface were monitored using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) photoacoustic spectroscopy, with a sampling depth of a few micrometers. The primary products from pyrolyzing cellulose, xylan, and lignin under similar conditions were also characterized to identify the sources of the poplar products.

Jones, Roger W.; Reinot, Tonu; McClelland, John F.

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Molecular Analysis of Primary Vapor and Char Products during Stepwise Pyrolysis of Poplar Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of biomass produces both pyrolysis oil and solid char. In this study, poplar has been pyrolyzed in a stepwise fashion over a series of temperatures from 200 to 500 C, and both the primary products contributing to pyrolysis oil and the changes in the pyrolyzing poplar surface leading toward char have been characterized at each step. The primary products were identified by direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry, and the changes in the poplar surface were monitored using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) photoacoustic spectroscopy, with a sampling depth of a few micrometers. The primary products from pyrolyzing cellulose, xylan, and lignin under similar conditions were also characterized to identify the sources of the poplar products.

Jones, Roger W.; Reinot, Tonu; McClelland, John F.

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

MINIMIZING NET CO2 EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL / BIOMASS BLENDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents a set of thermodynamic calculations on the optimal mode of solid fuel utilization considering a wide range of fuel types and processing technologies. The technologies include stand-alone combustion, biomass/coal cofiring, oxidative pyrolysis, and straight carbonization with no energy recovery but with elemental carbon storage. The results show that the thermodynamically optimal way to process solid fuels depends strongly on the specific fuels and technologies available, the local demand for heat or for electricity, and the local baseline energy-production method. Burning renewable fuels reduces anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions as widely recognized. In certain cases, however, other processing methods are equally or more effective, including the simple carbonization or oxidative pyrolysis of biomass fuels.

Todd Lang; Robert Hurt

2001-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

93

MAKING BIOELECTRICITY ECONOMIC IN THE UK BIOMASS CONFERENCE HAMBURG 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- economic comparison of power production by biomass fast pyrolysis with gasification and combustion, Comparisons of alternative routes for biomass fuel biomass pellets, pyrolysis oil and tall oil pitch paperMAKING BIOELECTRICITY ECONOMIC IN THE UK 17TH BIOMASS CONFERENCE ­ HAMBURG 2009 Thornley, P1

94

Well-to-wheels analysis of fast pyrolysis pathways with the GREET model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pyrolysis of biomass can help produce liquid transportation fuels with properties similar to those of petroleum gasoline and diesel fuel. Argonne National Laboratory conducted a life-cycle (i.e., well-to-wheels [WTW]) analysis of various pyrolysis pathways by expanding and employing the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The WTW energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the pyrolysis pathways were compared with those from the baseline petroleum gasoline and diesel pathways. Various pyrolysis pathway scenarios with a wide variety of possible hydrogen sources, liquid fuel yields, and co-product application and treatment methods were considered. At one extreme, when hydrogen is produced from natural gas and when bio-char is used for process energy needs, the pyrolysis-based liquid fuel yield is high (32% of the dry mass of biomass input). The reductions in WTW fossil energy use and GHG emissions relative to those that occur when baseline petroleum fuels are used, however, is modest, at 50% and 51%, respectively, on a per unit of fuel energy basis. At the other extreme, when hydrogen is produced internally via reforming of pyrolysis oil and when bio-char is sequestered in soil applications, the pyrolysis-based liquid fuel yield is low (15% of the dry mass of biomass input), but the reductions in WTW fossil energy use and GHG emissions are large, at 79% and 96%, respectively, relative to those that occur when baseline petroleum fuels are used. The petroleum energy use in all scenarios was restricted to biomass collection and transportation activities, which resulted in a reduction in WTW petroleum energy use of 92-95% relative to that found when baseline petroleum fuels are used. Internal hydrogen production (i.e., via reforming of pyrolysis oil) significantly reduces fossil fuel use and GHG emissions because the hydrogen from fuel gas or pyrolysis oil (renewable sources) displaces that from fossil fuel natural gas and the amount of fossil natural gas used for hydrogen production is reduced; however, internal hydrogen production also reduces the potential petroleum energy savings (per unit of biomass input basis) because the fuel yield declines dramatically. Typically, a process that has a greater liquid fuel yield results in larger petroleum savings per unit of biomass input but a smaller reduction in life-cycle GHG emissions. Sequestration of the large amount of bio-char co-product (e.g., in soil applications) provides a significant carbon dioxide credit, while electricity generation from bio-char combustion provides a large energy credit. The WTW energy and GHG emissions benefits observed when a pyrolysis oil refinery was integrated with a pyrolysis reactor were small when compared with those that occur when pyrolysis oil is distributed to a distant refinery, since the activities associated with transporting the oil between the pyrolysis reactors and refineries have a smaller energy and emissions footprint than do other activities in the pyrolysis pathway.

Han, J.; Elgowainy, A.; Palou-Rivera, I.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M.Q. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Real-Time and Post-Reaction Microscopic Structural Analysis of Biomass Undergoing Pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural complexity of unprocessed plant tissues used for thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and energy impedes heat and mass transfer and may increase the occurrence of tar-forming secondary chemical reactions. At industrial scales, gas and liquid products trapped within large biomass particles may reduce net fuel yields and increase tars, impacting industrial operations and increasing overall costs. Real-time microscopic analysis of poplar (Populus sp.) wood samples undergoing anoxic, pyrolytic heat treatment has revealed a pattern of tissue and macropore expansion and collapse. Post-reaction structural analyses of biomass char (biochar) by light and transmission electron microscopy have provided direct structural evidence of pyrolysis product mass-transfer issues, including trapped pyrolysis products and cell wall compression, and have demonstrated the impact of heat-transfer problems on biomass particles. Finally, microscopic imaging has revealed that pyrolyzed/gasified biochars recovered from a fluidized bed reactor retain a similar pre-reaction basic plant tissue structure as the samples used in this study, suggesting that the phenomena observed here are representative of those that occur in larger scale reactors.

Haas, T. J.; Nimlos, M. R.; Donohoe, B. S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases and aqueous phases. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay and mouse skin tumorigenicity tests). These results are the first step of a longer term program to determine the properties, handling requirements, and utility of the condensates recovered from biomass gasification and pyrolysis. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures. 56 refs., 25 figs., 21 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Pine Sawdust  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to the fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) from softwood biomass in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of operating parameters including temperature, and flow-rate were tested with bio-oil derived from pine wood as recovered and pyrolyzed in the pilot pyrolyzer of Metso Power in Tampere, Finland. Effects of time on stream and catalyst activity were assessed. Details of the process results were presented included product yields and hydrogen consumption. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an initial understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to the Finnish pine bio-oil.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Solantausta, Yrjo

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Biomass in Fluidized Bed Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is currently rising concern about securing sustainable, environmentally friendly and affordable sources of energy. The supply of liquid fuels from petroleum is of particular… (more)

Mukkamala, Saikrishna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Guidelines for Transportation, Handling, and Use of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil. Part 1. Flammability and Toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative sustainable fuel, biomass-derived fast pyrolysis oil or 'bio-oil', is coming into the market. Fast pyrolysis pilot and demonstration plants for fuel applications producing tonnes of bio-oil are in operation, and commercial plants are under design. There will be increasingly larger amounts of bio-oil transportation on water and by land, leading to a need for specifications and supporting documentation. Bio-oil is different from conventional liquid fuels, and therefore must overcome both technical and marketing hurdles for its acceptability in the fuels market. A comprehensive Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is required, backed with independent testing and certification. In order to standardise bio-oil quality specifications are needed. The first bio-oil burner fuel standard in ASTM (D7544) was approved in 2009. CEN standardisation has been initiated in Europe. In the EU a new chemical regulation system, REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) is being applied. Registration under REACH has to be made if bio-oil is produced or imported to the EU. In the USA and Canada, bio-oil has to be filed under TOSCA (US Toxic Substances Control Act). In this paper the state of the art on standardisation is discussed, and new data for the transportation guidelines is presented. The focus is on flammability and toxicity.

Oasmaa, Anja; Kalli, Anssi; Lindfors, Christian; Elliott, Douglas C.; Springer, David L.; Peacocke, Cordner; Chiaramonti, David

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Generalized Biomass Pyrolysis Model Based on Superimposed Cellulose, IIemi-CCIIU1OSC and Lignin Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to present a model for the numerical simulation of macro-particle of general of the is to predict pyrolysis yields associated with "typical" biomass samples. Potential alterations necessary to account for mineral and moisture content pressure arc postponed for future work. A ncw based on superimposed CC1IU1OSC,

R. S. Miller; J. Bellan; I. Ignin Kinetics; J. Bj. An; Jd Iyqmlsion; Greek Syqbols

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: an interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The analyses were performed in order to provide more detailed data concerning these condensates for the different process research groups and to allow a determination of the differences in properties of the condensates as a function of reactor environment. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases, aqueous phases and, in some cases, both phases depending on the output of the particular reactor system. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay). The analytical data demonstrate the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

MINIMIZING NET CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL/BIOMASS BLENDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid fuels vary significantly with respect to the amount of CO{sub 2} directly produced per unit heating value. Elemental carbon is notably worse than other solid fuels in this regard, and since carbon (char) is an intermediate product of the combustion of almost all solid fuels, there is an opportunity to reduce specific CO{sub 2} emissions by reconfiguring processes to avoid char combustion wholly or in part. The primary goal of this one-year Innovative Concepts project is to make a fundamental thermodynamic assessment of three modes of solid fuel use: (1) combustion, (2) carbonization, and (3) oxidative pyrolysis, for a wide range of coal and alternative solid fuels. This period a large set of thermodynamic calculations were carried out to assess the potential of the three processes. The results show that the net carbon dioxide emissions and the relative ranking of the different processes depends greatly on the particular baseline fossil fuel being displaced by the new technology. As an example, in a baseline natural gas environment, it is thermodynamically more advantageous to carbonize biomass than to combust it, and even more advantageous to oxidatively pyrolyze the biomass.

Robert Hurt; Todd Lang

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different stages of combustion,” Biomass and Bioenergy 23:biomass pyrolysis,” to appear in Progress in Energy and Combustion

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Life cycle analysis is carried out for 11 predicted configurations of pyrolysis biochar systems to determine greenhouse gas balance, using an original spreadsheet model. System… (more)

Hammond, James A R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Pyrolysis of Biomass. 1. Fundamentals. Energy Fuelsof the Pyrolysis of Biomass. 1. Fundamentals. Energy Fuelsand Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry. Biomass

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The flash pyrolysis and methanolysis of biomass (wood) for production of ethylene, benzene and methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} and with the non-reactive gases He and N{sub 2} is being determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000{degrees}C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000{degrees}C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 25% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH{sub 4} and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates a potentially economical competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 10 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

PEER-REVIEW Scrap tire pyrolysis: experiment and modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shell (biomass) cellulosa type of reaction flash pyrolysis pyrolysis flash pyrolysis slow pyrolysis. Scott, J. Piskorz, D. Radlein; Liquid Products from the Continuous Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass, Ind. Eng; The Continous Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, 1984, 62, 404-412 #12

Columbia University

109

Modeling Simulation Of Pyrolysis Of Biomass: Effect Of Thermal Conductivity, Reactor Temperature And Particle Size On Product Concentrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simultaneous chemical kinetics and heat transfer model is used to predict the effects of the most important physical and thermal properties (thermal conductivity, reactor temperature and particle size) of the feedstock on the convective-radiant pyrolysis of biomass fuels. The effects of these parameters have been analyzed for different geometries such as slab, cylinder and sphere. Finite difference method is employed for solving heat transfer model equation while Runge-Kutta 4 th order method is used for solving chemical kinetics model equations. Simulations are carried out for equivalent radius ranging from 0.0000125 m to 0.02 m, and temperature ranging from 303 K to 2100 K.

Chaurasia And Babu; A. S. Chaurasia; B. V. Babu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Oil production by entrained pyrolysis of biomass and processing of oil and char  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Entrained pyrolysis of lignocellulosic material proceeds from a controlled pyrolysis-initiating temperature to completion of an oxygen free environment at atmospheric pressure and controlled residence time to provide a high yield recovery of pyrolysis oil together with char and non-condensable, combustible gases. The residence time is a function of gas flow rate and the initiating temperature is likewise a function of the gas flow rate, varying therewith. A controlled initiating temperature range of about 400.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. with corresponding gas flow rates to maximize oil yield is disclosed.

Knight, James A. (Atlanta, GA); Gorton, Charles W. (Atlanta, GA)

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

Short Communication Phenol and phenolics from lignocellulosic biomass by catalytic microwave pyrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Chemicals in the U.S. Bob Wallace, Director Penn State BioEnergy BridgeTM Associate Director: Biomass Energy and Infrastructure Development Biomass Conversion Processes End Uses Systems Analyses Biomass Feedstocks Life Cycle and Economic Development Research Education Extension Facilities Testing ·Plant Production ·Biomass Harvest

Tang, Juming

112

"UPGRADING PYROLYSIS PRODUCTS" Donald K. Walter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption rate (kg/s) mv volatile matter in biomass (kg) t time (s) tpyr pyrolysis time (s) B transfer on the burner temperature prescribes the maximum allowable percentage of biomass in the blend. 3.1. Pyrolysis Pyrolysis of biomass is thermal decomposition of the fuel. As with coal, pyrolysis is a relatively slow

Columbia University

113

Acetylene from the co-pyrolysis of biomass and waste tires or coal in the H{sub 2}/Ar plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acetylene from carbon-containing materials via plasma pyrolysis is not only simple but also environmentally friendly. In this article, the acetylene produced from co-pyrolyzing biomass with waste tire or coal under the conditions of H{sub 2}/Ar DC arc plasma jet was investigated. The experimental results showed that the co-pyrolysis of mixture with biomass and waste tire or coal can improve largely the acetylene relative volume fraction (RVF) in gaseous products and the corresponding yield of acetylene. The change trends for the acetylene yield of plasma pyrolysis from mixture with raw sample properties were the same as relevant RVF. But the yield change trend with feeding rate is different from its RVF. The effects of the feeding rate of raw materials and the electric current of plasmatron on acetylene formation are also discussed.

Bao, W.; Cao, Q.; Lv, Y.; Chang, L. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Biomass Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shell (biomass) cellulosa type of reaction flash pyrolysis pyrolysis flash pyrolysis slow pyrolysis. Scott, J. Piskorz, D. Radlein; Liquid Products from the Continuous Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass, Ind. Eng; The Continous Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, 1984, 62, 404-412 #12

Paulsson, Johan

115

Feedstock Logistics of a Mobile Pyrolysis System and Assessment of Soil Loss Due to Biomass Removal for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess feedstock logistics for a mobile pyrolysis system and to quantify the amount of soil loss caused by harvesting agricultural feedstocks for bioenergy production. The analysis of feedstock logistics was conducted using ArcGIS with the Network Analyst extension and model builder. A square grid methodology was used to determine biomass availability of corn stover and bioenergy sorghum in Texas. The SWAT model was used to quantify soil erosion losses in surface runoff caused by sorghum residue removal for bioenergy production in the Oso Creek Watershed in Nueces County. The model simulated the removal of 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent residue removal. The WEPS model was used to quantify wind erosion soil loss caused by corn stover removal in Dallam County. Nine simulations were run estimating soil loss for corn stover removal rates of 0 percent to 50 percent. The results of the SWAT and WEPS analyses were compared to the NRCS tolerable soil loss limit of 5 tons/acre/year for both study areas. The GIS analysis determined the optimum route distances between mobile unit sites were 2.07 to 58.02 km for corn and 1.95 to 60.36 km for sorghum. The optimum routes from the mobile pyrolysis sites and the closest refineries were 49.50 to 187.18 km for corn and 7.00 to 220.11 km for sorghum. These results were used as input to a separate bioenergy economic model. The SWAT analysis found that maximum soil loss (1.24 tons/acre) occurred during the final year of the simulation where 100 percent of the sorghum residue was removed. The WEPS analysis determined that at 30 percent removal the amount of soil loss starts to increase exponentially with increasing residue removal and exceeds the tolerable soil loss limit. Limited harvesting of biomass for bioenergy production will be required to protect crop and soil productivity ensuring a sustainable biomass source.

Bumguardner, Marisa

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ris har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slr fast, at biomasse er en  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slår fast, at biomasse er en ligeså værdifuld skal til for at udnytte hele dens potentiale. Der er ikke noget nyt i at bruge biomasse til energi' er et spørgsmål om at udnytte ny teknologi til at gøre energi fra biomasse endnu mere rentabel og

117

Biocrude oils from the fast pyrolysis of poultry litter and hardwood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safe and economical disposal of poultry litter is becoming a major problem for the USA poultry industry. Current disposal methods such as land application and feeding to cattle are now under pressure because of pollution of water resources due to leaching, runoffs and concern for mad cow disease contamination of the food chain. Incineration or combustion is potentially applicable to large scale operations, but for small scale growers and EPA non-attainment areas, this is not a suitable option because of the high cost of operation. Thus, there is a need for developing appropriate technologies to dispose poultry litter. Poultry litters from broiler chicken and turkey houses, as well as bedding material were converted into biocrude oil in a fast pyrolysis fluidized bed reactor. The biocrude oil yields were relatively low ranging from 36 wt% to 50 wt% depending on the age and bedding material content of the litter. The bedding material (which was mostly hardwood shavings) biocrude oil yield was 63 wt%. The higher heating value (HHV) of the poultry litter biocrude oils ranged from 26 MJ/kg to 29 MJ/kg while that of the bedding material was 24 MJ/kg. The oils had relatively high nitrogen content ranging from 4 wt% to 8 wt%, very low sulfur (biochar yield ranged from 27 wt% to 40 wt% depending on the source, age and composition of the poultry litter. The biochar ash content ranged from 24 wt% to 54 wt% and was very rich in inorganic components such as potassium and phosphorous.

Agblevor, F.A., E-mail: Fagblevo@vt.ed [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Beis, S.; Kim, S.S.; Tarrant, R.; Mante, N.O. [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8 ���µm were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125���°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90���ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the bio-oils. The

George W. Huber, Aniruddha A Upadhye, David M. Ford, Surita R. Bhatia, Phillip C. Badger

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils  

SciTech Connect

This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8 ���µm were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125���°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90���ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the bio-oils. The

George W. Huber, Aniruddha A Upadhye, David M. Ford, Surita R. Bhatia, Phillip C. Badger

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

Influence of Pyrolysis Parameters and CaCl2 Catalyzer on Pyrolysis of Elephant Grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elephant grass is a fast growing and low nutrient demand plant with significant potential as a renewable energy source. In this work, the influence of heating temperatures, N2sweeping gas flow rates and CaCl2 catalyzer weights on the yields of products ... Keywords: biomass, pyrolysis, catalytic, elephant grass, calcium chloride

Li Bosong; Jiang Enchen; Xu Xiwei; Zhang Qiang; Liu Min; Wang Mingfeng

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil  

SciTech Connect

Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In an embodiment, a method of preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil includes providing a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is hydrodeoxygenated under catalysis in the presence of hydrogen to form a hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream comprising a cyclic paraffin component. At least a portion of the hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream is dehydrogenated under catalysis to form the upgraded pyrolysis oil.

Brandvold, Timothy A; Baird, Lance Awender; Frey, Stanley Joseph

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

PYROLYSIS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE M. IGARASHI Y. HAYAFUNE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modern biomass can produce a bio-char by-product through pyrolysis which results in 30.6 kg C, pyrolysis and gasification of biomass. In the context of bio-char sequestration, only pyrolysis yields in bio-char was the type of biomass used for pyrolysis. Greater concentrations of lignin increased

Columbia University

123

European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by liquid-phase processing.3 Thermal depolymerization of biomass can be ach- ieved by pyrolysis. Pyrolysis hydrolysis and pyrolysis can be combined to decompose the maximum amount of biomass to reactive intermediates to pyrolysis alone, suggesting that the choice of technology for biomass deconstruction will likely depend

124

Direct Detection of Products from the Pyrolysis of 2-Phenethyl Phenyl Ether Mark W. Jarvis,*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Pyrolysis." In Biomass Handbook; C. W. Hall, ed. Gordon and Breach: New York, 1989; pp. 379-385. (with Pyrolysis of Biomass Derived Volatile Matter." In Fundamentals of Thermochemical Biomass Conversion; R. P. "Biomass Pyrolysis. A Review of the Literature - Part 1: Carbohydrate Pyrolysis." In Advances in Solar

Dean, Anthony M.

125

Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

HYDROGEN FROM BIOMASS FOR URBAN TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-energy Pyrolysis is one of many technologies to produce energy from biomass (Bridgwater 2003). What distinguishes pyrolysis from alternative ways of converting biomass to energy is that pyrolysis produces a carbon-temperature pyrolysis"), using a variety of different reactor configurations. At these tem- peratures, biomass undergoes

127

Thermochemical Conversion Research and Development: Gasification and Pyrolysis (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass gasification and pyrolysis research and development activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.

Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

1999-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

Chemical analysis and reactivity of biomass pyrolysis products. Application to the development of carbon-neutral biofuels and chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this dissertation the pyrolytic conversion of biomass into chemicals and fuels was investigated from the analytical point of view. The study was focused on… (more)

Torri, Cristian and#60;1982and#62

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Use of pyrolysis char as an amendment in soils of the Southeastern United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pyrolysis is an energy production process involving the thermal decomposition of biomass in the absence of oxygen. Char, a byproduct of the pyrolysis process, has… (more)

Speir, Robert Adam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

133

Process for fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils, and products derived therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for fractionating lignocellulosic materials fast-prolysis oils to produce phenol-containing compositions suitable for the manufacture of phenol-formaldehyde resins. The process includes admixing the oils with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen The United States Government has rights in this invention under Contract No. DE-AC02-83CH10093 between the United States Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute, a Division of the Midwest Research Institute.

Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Chemical Sub-models in biomass Jenny Jones, Alan Williams,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by liquid-phase processing.3 Thermal depolymerization of biomass can be ach- ieved by pyrolysis. Pyrolysis hydrolysis and pyrolysis can be combined to decompose the maximum amount of biomass to reactive intermediates to pyrolysis alone, suggesting that the choice of technology for biomass deconstruction will likely depend

135

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels Technology Marketing Summaries Here ... The methods of the invention use solar thermal energy as the energy source for the biomass pyrolysis or ...

136

Modelling of Particle Pyrolysis in a Packed Bed Combustor A.R.C. Tuck and W.L.H. Hallett ,1 2*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Pyrolysis." In Biomass Handbook; C. W. Hall, ed. Gordon and Breach: New York, 1989; pp. 379-385. (with Pyrolysis of Biomass Derived Volatile Matter." In Fundamentals of Thermochemical Biomass Conversion; R. P. "Biomass Pyrolysis. A Review of the Literature - Part 1: Carbohydrate Pyrolysis." In Advances in Solar

Hallett, William L.H.

137

Pyrolysis of hull-enriched byproducts from the scarification of hulled barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Orlando, Florida, USA NAWTEC18-3521 STATUS OF EXISTING BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND PYROLYSIS FACILITIES trucking. The preferred development scenario for a biomass gasification or pyrolysis facility to serve for commercial applications [10]. A biomass pyrolysis system has tested firing syn-oil in a gas turbine [11

138

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the atmosphere from biomass burning.  Climatic Change Introduction to pyrolysis of biomass.  J.  Anal.  Appl.  Molecular Structure of Plant Biomass-derived Black Carbon (

Keiluweit, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Rapid Solar-Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Syngas  

perform biomass gasification or pyrolysis for production of hydrogen, synthesis gas, liquid fuels, or other hydrocarbon based chemicals. The methods of the invention use solar thermal energy as the energy source for the biomass pyrolysis or ...

140

Secretary Chu Checks In on Biomass Pilot-Scale Facility | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

project leverages two commercially proven core technologies into an integrated platform: pyrolysis of biomass from Ensyn Corporation and hydroconversion from UOP. The pyrolysis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrated solar receiver/biomass gasifier research  

SciTech Connect

Processes for producing liquid fuels from olefin-rich pyrolysis gases obtained from fast pyrolysis of biomass are being developed by J. Kuester at Arizona State University and J. Diebold at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, Calif. In the Diebold process the biomass, carried by steam, is blown through an entrained bed gasifier. The olefins are then separated from the rest of the reaction products and polymerized thermally to gasoline; the other gases are used as fuel for the process. The Kuester process uses a fluidized bed gasifier and a catalytic Fischer-Tropsch reactor which converts the olefins, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide into n-propanol and paraffinic hydrocarbons. The advantages over the Diebold process are shorter residence time and elimination of the gas separation requirement. One disadvantage is the low octane rating of the fuel. As part of the solar thermal program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), an entrained bed reactor/receiver for fast pyrolysis of biomass is being developed for use with either the Diebold or Kuester process. This system is discussed.

Benham, C.; Bergeron, P.; Bessler, G.; Bohn, M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Optimal of Pyrolysis Process in the Rotating Cone Reactor and Pyrolysis Product Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With wood shatters as raw material and quartz sand as heat medium, the process of rapid pyrolysis of biology materials with a self-made rotating cone reactor was investigated. The optimal conditions by orthogonal test indicated the pyrolysis of biology ... Keywords: Bio-oil, Fast pyrolysis, Rotating Cone Reactor

Li Junsheng

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Production of Green Aromatics and Olefins from Lignocellulosic Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Chemistry, Catalysis, and Process Development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diminishing petroleum resources combined with concerns about global warming and dependence on fossil fuels are leading our society to search for renewable sources of energy.… (more)

Jae, Jungho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Reactor with Gallium Promoted ZSM-5 Catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The huge energy demand of our society is causing fossil fuel resources to diminish rapidly. Therefore, it is critical to search for alternative energy resources.… (more)

Shi, Jian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel synthesis reactor. NREL investigates thermochemical processes for converting biomass and its residues to fuels and intermediates using gasification and pyrolysis...

147

CORROSIVITY AND COMPOSITION OF RAW AND TREATED PYROLYSIS OILS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis offers a relatively low cost method of processing biomass to produce a liquid product that has the potential for conversion to several types of liquid fuels. The liquid product of fast pyrolysis, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, contains a high oxygen content primarily in the form of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. These oils are typically very acidic with a Total Acid Number that is often in the range of 50 to 100, and previous studies have shown this material to be quite corrosive to common structural materials. Removal of at least some of the oxygen and conversion of this oil to a more useful product that is considerably less corrosive can be accomplished through a hydrogenation process. The product of such a treatment is considered to have the potential for blending with crude oil for processing in petroleum refineries. Corrosion studies and chemical analyses have been conducted using as produced bio-oil samples as well as samples that have been subjected to different levels of oxygen removal. Chemical analyses show treatment affected the concentrations of carboxylic acids contained in the oil, and corrosion studies showed a positive benefit of the oxygen removal. Results of these studies will be presented in this paper.

Keiser, Jim; Howell, Michael; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Sam; Elliott, Douglas C.

2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

148

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

149

Results of the IEA Round Robin on Viscosity and Aging of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils: Long-Term Tests and Repeatability  

SciTech Connect

An international round robin study of the viscosity and aging of fast pyrolysis bio-oil has been undertaken recently and this work is an outgrowth from that effort. Two bio-oil samples were distributed to the laboratories for aging tests and extended viscosity studies. The accelerated aging test was defined as the change in viscosity of a sealed sample of bio-oil held for 24 h at 80 °C. The test was repeated 10 times over consecutive days to determine the repeatability of the method. Other bio-oil samples were placed in storage at three temperatures, 21 °C, 4 °C and -17 °C for a period up to a year to evaluate the change in viscosity. The variation in the results of the aging test was shown to be low within a given laboratory. Storage of bio-oil under refrigeration can minimize the amount of change in viscosity. The accelerated aging test gives a measure of change similar to that of 6-12 months of storage at room temperature. These results can be helpful in setting standards for use of bio-oil, which is just coming into the marketplace.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Oasmaa, Anja; Meier, Dietrich; Preto, Fernando; Bridgwater, Anthony V.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pyrolysis oils) Producer gas Synthesis gas (syngas) Substitute natural gas (SNG) Hydrogen Biochemical Biosolids Physiochemical Densified biomass

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effect of Using Inert and Non-Inert Gases on the Thermal Degradation and Fuel Properties of Biomass in the Torrefaction and Pyrolysis Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research presented focuses on the use of Carbon-dioxide (CO?), Nitrogen (N?) and Argon (Ar) as purge gases for torrefaction. Torrefaction using CO? as a purge gas may further improve the fuel characteristics of the torrefied fuel when compared to N? and Ar (which are entirely inert), making it better suited for use as a fuel for co-firing with coal or gasification. Three different biomasses were investigated: Juniper wood chips, Mesquite wood chips, and forage Sorghum. Experiments were conducted using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA, TA Instruments Model Q-600) to determine the effect of the purge gas over a wide range of torrefaction temperatures (200-300°C). TGA weight traces (thermograms) showed an increased mass loss when using CO2 as a purge gas when compared to N?. The increased mass loss when CO? was used is attributed to a hypothesized reaction between the CO? and fixed Carbon contained within the biomass. Torrefaction of biomass, using Ar as the purge gas, produced results similar to torrefaction using N?. Derivative Thermo-Gravimetric analysis (DTG) was done to determine the temperature ranges over which the three main components of biomass (hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin) decomposed. The DTG results are in agreement with previously published research. From TGA thermograms and DTG analysis it was determined that torrefaction at higher temperatures (>260°C) likely result in the breakdown of cellulose during torrefaction, an undesired outcome. Proximate, ultimate, and heat value analysis was done on all three biomasses. All three contain a relatively high Oxygen content, which serves to decrease the higher heating value (HHV) of the biomass. The HHV of Juniper, Mesquite, and Sorghum on a dry ash-free (DAF) basis were 20,584 kJ/kg, 20,128 kJ/kg, and 19,389 kJ/kg respectively. The HHV of the three biomasses were relatively constant as expected for agricultural biomass. From TGA analysis (thermograms and DTG), an optimal torrefaction temperature was determined (240°C) based upon the amount of mass lost during torrefaction and estimates of energy retained. Batch torrefaction of all three biomasses at the optimal torrefaction temperature was completed using a laboratory oven. All three biomasses were torrefied using CO?, N?, and Ar as a purge gas. Proximate, ultimate, and heat value analysis was done for each of the torrefied fuels and compared. Results of the fuel property analysis showed torrefaction reduced the moisture content and oxygen percentage of the fuel resulting in the torrefied biomass having a larger HHV when compared to raw biomass. Due to inherent mass lost during torrefaction, the amount of energy retained in the torrefied biomass was calculated to determine the percentage of the virgin biomass energy content that remained. Torrefaction using CO2 resulted in the lowest amount of energy retention of all three purge gases tested (78.86% for Juniper); conversely, Nitrogen resulted in the highest amount of energy retention (91.81% for Sorghum.) Torrefaction of the biomass also increased the fixed carbon (FC) content of the fuel. The grindability of the torrefied biomass was investigated via size distribution analysis of the raw and ground biomass. Initial size distribution analysis showed that torrefaction of Mesquite and Juniper resulted in smaller particle sizes; with a greater fraction of the torrefied biomass passing through smaller meshes. Analysis of the ground biomass samples showed that torrefaction improved the grindability of the fuel. The percent of torrefied biomass that passed through an 840 micrometer mesh increased by over 20% for both Mesquite and Juniper when ground. Sorghum exhibited similar increases; however, the amount of increase is less apparent due to the smaller particle size distribution of the raw Sorghum.

Eseltine, Dustin E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Biomass Gasification using Solar Thermal Energy M. Munzinger and K. Lovegrove  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 30, 2009. Accepted November 17, 2009. Biomass pyrolysis with biochar returned to soil dependent on the costs of feedstock production, pyrolysis, and the value of C offsets. Biomass sources-3). Biochar is the stable, carbon- rich charcoal that results from pyrolysis of biomass materials. Used

153

Development and Applications of a Novel Intermittent Solids Feeder for Pyrolysis Reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This PhD research addresses the challenge of feeding biomass residues into fluidized bed reactors for pyrolysis, through the development of a novel intermittent solid slug… (more)

Berruti, Federico M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

FAST  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002363MLTPL00 FAST - A Framework for Agile Software Testing v. 2.0  https://software.sandia.gov/trac/fast 

155

Recent advances in hydrotreating of pyrolysis bio-oil and its oxygen-containing model compounds  

SciTech Connect

There is considerable world-wide interest in discovering renewable sources of energy that can substitute for fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic biomass, which is the most abundant and inexpensive renewable feedstock on the planet, has a great potential for sustainable production of fuels, chemicals, and carbon-based materials. Fast pyrolysis integrated with hydrotreating is one of the simplest, most cost-effective and most efficient processes to convert lignocellulosic biomass to liquid hydrocarbon fuels for transportation, which has attracted significant attention in recent decades. However, effective hydrotreating of pyrolysis bio-oil presents a daunting challenge to the commercialization of biomass conversion via pyrolysis-hydrotreating. Specifically, development of active, selective, and stable hydrotreating catalysts is the bottleneck due to the poor quality of pyrolysis bio-oil feedstock (high oxygen content, molecular complexity, coking propensity, and corrosiveness). Significant research has been conducted to address the practical issues and provide the fundamental understanding of the hydrotreating/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of bio-oils and their oxygen-containing model compounds, including phenolics, furans, and carboxylic acids. A wide range of catalysts have been studied, including conventional Mo-based sulfide catalysts and noble metal catalysts, with the latter being the primary focus of the recent research because of their excellent catalytic performances and no requirement of environmentally unfriendly sulfur. The reaction mechanisms of HDO of model compounds on noble metal catalysts as well as their efficacy for hydrotreating or stabilization of bio-oil have been recently reported. This review provides a survey of the relevant literatures of recent 10 years about the advances in the understanding of the HDO chemistry of bio-oils and their model compounds mainly on noble metal catalysts.

Wang, Huamin; Male, Jonathan L.; Wang, Yong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

TG-FTIR Analysis on Sawdust Catalytic Pyrolysis with CaO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the global warming and energy crisis, the utilization of biomass in zero emission system has aroused more attention. In this study, the effect of catalyst CaO on sawdust pyrolysis was investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with ... Keywords: CaO, biomass, pyrolysis, TG-FTIR, zero emission

Qiang Ma; Qinhui Wang; Long Han; Chunjiang Yu; Zhongyang Luo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hydropyrolysis of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of biomass was investigated. Experimental runs using the biomass (Poplar wood sawdust) were performed using a tubular reactor of dimensions 1 inch inside diameter and 8 feet long heated at a temperature of 800 C and pressures between 450 and 750 psig. At low heat-up rate the reaction precedes in two steps. First pyrolysis takes place at temperatures of 300 to 400 c and subsequent hydropyrolysis takes place at 700 C and above. This is also confirmed by pressurized thermogravimetric analysis (PTGA). Under conditions of rapid heat-up at higher temperatures and higher hydrogen pressure gasification and hydrogasification of biomass is especially effective in producing carbon monoxide and methane. An overall conversion of 88 to 90 wt % of biomass was obtained. This value is in agreement with the previous work of flash pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of biomass for rapid heat-up and short residence time. Initial rates of biomass conversion indicate that the rate increases significantly with increase in hydrogen pressure. At 800 C and 755 psig the initial rate of biomass conversion to gases is 0.92 1/min.

Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Pyrolysis of Wood and Bark in an Auger Reactor: Physical Properties and Chemical Analysis of the Produced Bio-oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-oil was produced at 450C by fast pyrolysis in a continuous auger reactor. Four feed stocks were used: pine wood, pine bark, oak wood, and oak bark. After extensive characterization of the whole bio-oils and their pyrolytic lignin-rich ethyl acetate fractions by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), calorific values, viscosity dependences on shear rates and temperatures, elemental analyses, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, water analyses, and ash content, these bio-oils were shown to be comparable to bio-oils produced by fast pyrolysis in fluidized bed and vacuum pyrolysis processes. This finding suggests that portable auger reactors might be used to produce bio-oil at locations in forests to generate bio-oil on-site for transport of the less bulky bio-oil (versus raw biomass) to biorefineries or power generation units. The pyrolysis reported herein had lower heat transfer rates than those achieved in fluidized bed reactors, suggesting significant further improvements are possible.

Ingram, L.; Mohan, D.; Bricka, M.; Steele, P.; Strobel, D.; Crocker, D.; Mitchell, B.; Mohammed, J.; Cantrell, K.; Pittman, C. U. Jr.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

163

Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Partner: International Trade Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.biomassthermal.org Cost: Free The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) website is focused on biomass for heating and other thermal energy applications, and includes links to numerous reports from various agencies around the world. Overview The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) website is focused on biomass for

164

1 Copyright 2008 by ASME Proceedings of NAWTEC16  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;iii Executive Summary Pyrolysis of biomass followed pyrolysis followed by hydrotreating and hydrocracking. In fast pyrolysis, biomass is rapidly heated primary unit processes. Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing The pyrolysis of biomass to bio

Columbia University

165

2003 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;iii Executive Summary Pyrolysis of biomass followed pyrolysis followed by hydrotreating and hydrocracking. In fast pyrolysis, biomass is rapidly heated primary unit processes. Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing The pyrolysis of biomass to bio

Columbia University

166

Update of Hydrogen from Biomass -- Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil. Hydrogen has the potential to be a clean alternative to the fossil fuels currently used in the transportation sector. This is especially true if the hydrogen is manufactured from renewable resources, primarily sunlight, wind, and biomass. Analyses have been conducted to assess the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via two thermochemical processes: (1) gasification followed by reforming of the syngas, and (2) fast pyrolysis followed by reforming of the carbohydrate fraction of the bio-oil. This study was conducted to update previous analyses of these processes in order to include recent experimental advances and any changes in direction from previous analyses. The systems examined were gasification in the Battelle/FERCO low pressure indirectly-heated gasifier followed by steam reforming, gasification in the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) high pressure direct-fired gasifier followed by steam reforming, and pyrolysis followed by coproduct separation and steam reforming. In each process, water-gas shift is used to convert the reformed gas into hydrogen, and pressure swing adsorption is used to purify the product. The delivered cost of hydrogen, as well as the plant gate hydrogen selling price, were determined. All analyses included Latin Hypercube sampling to obtain a detailed sensitivity analysis.

Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.; Amos, W. A.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy from Waste November 4, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cracking Plastics ETS (UK) Thermal Cracking Plastics Ensyn Thermal Fast Pyrolysis (Cracking) Biomass KiOR Catalytic Pyrolysis Biomass Kurata Catalytic Pyrolysis Biomass Plastics GTI Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Biomass Anellotech Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Biomass Pastic2Oil Catalytic Pyrolysis Plastics Bio-Fuels Technologies

Columbia University

168

Biofuels from Pyrolysis: Catalytic Biocrude Production in a Novel, Short-Contact Time Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: RTI is developing a new pyrolysis process to convert second-generation biomass into biofuels in one simple step. Pyrolysis is the decomposition of substances by heating—the same process used to render wood into charcoal, caramelize sugar, and dry roast coffee and beans. RTI’s catalytic biomass pyrolysis differs from conventional flash pyrolysis in that its end product contains less oxygen, metals, and nitrogen—all of which contribute to corrosion, instability, and inefficiency in the fuel-production process. This technology is expected to easily integrate into the existing domestic petroleum refining infrastructure, making it an economically attractive option for biofuels production.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Preparation and characterization of nanostructured metal oxides for application to biomass upgrading.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pyrolysis oil, or bio-oil, is one of the most promising methods to upgrade a variety of biomass to transportation fuels. Moving toward a more "green"… (more)

Finch, Kenneth B. H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils (Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas (0.5% H 2 ) System Definition (1500 kgday station used for H2A analysis) Capital Costs Bio-Oil Reforming H2A Analysis Bio-Oil Case (Ethanol Case) Bio-oil Storage Tank...

171

Fundamental Pyrolysis Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress on the direct mass spectrometric sampling of pyrolysis products from wood and its constituents is described for the period from June 1982 to February 1983. A brief summary and references to detailed reports, of the qualitative demonstration of our approach to the study of the separated processes of primary and secondary pyrolysis is presented. Improvements and additions to the pyrolysis and data acquisition systems are discussed and typical results shown. Chief of these are a heated-grid pyrolysis system for controlled primary pyrolysis and a sheathed flame arrangement for secondary cracking studies. Qualitative results of the secondary cracking of cellulose, lignin, and wood are shown as are comparisons with the literature for the pyrolysis spectra of cellulose, lignin, and levoglucosan. 'Fingerprints' for a number of materials are shown, with spectra taken under carefully controlled conditions so that sensitivity calibrations for different compounds, now being determined, can be applied.

Milne, T. A.; Evans, R. J.; Soltys, M. N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

DOE Announces Awards for up to $16.5 million for Biomass Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or jet fuel from biomass. Each selectee will utilize a thermochemical process known as pyrolysis, which breaks down biomass using heat in the absence of oxygen to produce a...

173

Biomass thermal conversion research at SERI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SERI's involvement in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals is reviewed. The scope and activities of the Biomass Thermal Conversion and Exploratory Branch are reviewed. The current status and future plans for three tasks are presented: (1) Pyrolysis Mechanisms; (2) High Pressure O/sub 2/ Gasifier; and (3) Gasification Test Facility.

Milne, T. A.; Desrosiers, R. E.; Reed, T. B.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Rejai, Bahman (Lakewood, CO); Bain, Richard L. (Golden, CO); Overend, Ralph P. (Lakewood, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols. 35 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.; Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.; Rejai, B.; Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Assessment of Feasibility of Biomass Fuel Conversion in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Feasibility of Biomass Fuel Conversion in Interior Villages #12;Is it feasible to convert diesel electrical systems in Interior Alaska villages to wood biomass systems? How would this type;Biomass Investment and Technology Boilers, wood gasification, or pyrolysis Existing combined heat

Ruess, Roger W.

177

IEA/H2/TR-02/001 Hydrogen from Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advanced low cost technologies for producing hydrogen from biomass (gasification/pyrolysis, fermentation/NEAR ZERO EMISSIONSEMISSIONS Why Hydrogen? Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Sequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Sequestration #12

178

Dual Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dual fluidized bed reactor is a recirculating system in which one half of the unit operates as a steam pyrolysis device for biomass. The pyrolysis occurs by introducing biomass and steam to a hot fluidized bed of inert material such as coarse sand. Syngas is produced during the pyrolysis and exits the top of the reactor with the steam. A crossover arm, fed by gravity, moves sand and char from the pyrolyzer to the second fluidized bed. This sand bed uses blown air to combust the char. The exit stream from this side of the reactor is carbon dioxide, water and ash. There is a second gravity fed crossover arm to return sand to the pyrolysis side. The recirculating action of the sand and the char is the key to the operation of the dual fluidized bed reactor. The objective of the project was to design and construct a dual fluidized bed prototype reactor from literature information and in discussion with established experts in the field. That would be appropriate in scale and operation to measure the relative performance of the gasification of biomass and low ranked coals to produce a high quality synthesis gas with no dilution from nitrogen or combustion products.

None

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Capabilities Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost-effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. Gasification-heating biomass with about one-third of the oxygen necessary for complete combustion-produces a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis-heating biomass in the absence of oxygen-produces a liquid bio-oil. Both syngas and bio-oil can be used directly or can be converted to clean fuels and other valuable chemicals. Areas of emphasis in NREL's thermochemical conversion R&D are: Gasification and fuel synthesis R&D Pyrolysis R&D Thermochemical process integration. Gasification and Fuel Synthesis R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video.

180

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Partner: Farm Service Agency Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=ener&topic=bcap Cost: Free The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. Overview The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. The Biomass Crop

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mineral Nutrient Recovery from Pyrolysis Co-Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is the thermo-chemical degradation of biomass in an oxygen-free environment to product liquid, gaseous, and solid co-products. The liquid co-product, known as bio-oil, can be used as a transportation fuel. The gaseous co-product, known as synthesis gas, can be used to power the pyrolysis reactor or other machinery. The solid co-product, known as bio-char, has been studied as an amendment to enhance soil physical and chemical properties and nutrient status. Although previous publications have described the beneficial effects of pyrolysis bio-char on soil physical and chemical properties, relatively little has been published on the recovery of mineral nutrients from pyrolysis co-products. This work quantified the recovery of feedstock nutrients (P, K, Ca, and Mg) and micronutrients (Na, Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn) from pyrolysis co-products from various feedstocks using three distinct pyrolysis reactor designs. The reactors comprised a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor and two fluidized-bed reactors located in College Station, TX and Wyndmoor, PA. Nutrient recoveries, on a feedstock basis, were calculated for a comparison of reactor efficiencies. In addition to nutrient recoveries, physical and chemical properties of input biomass and of bio-char generated by each reactor were characterized through ultimate and proximate analyses. For the fixed-bed reactor, results revealed variation among feedstocks for the recoveries of feedstock sources of macronutrients and Na, Fe, and Cu in pyrolysis co-products. Variation among species was also detected for the recoveries of feedstock sources of P, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe in pyrolysis co-products for samples pyrolyzed using the Wyndmoor reactor. For the College Station reactor, recoveries of feedstock sources of P, K, Ca, and Mg in pyrolysis co-products did not vary among species, but Zn did vary. Ultimate and proximate analyses of biomass and bio-chars generated by the three reactors revealed variation among species. Additionally, the results showed that the recovery of feedstock nutrients varied by reactor design. Statistical analysis revealed high correlations and linear relationships between the recovery of nutrients and reactor mass and energy efficiency and feedstock fiber properties.

Wise, Jatara Rob

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from these combinations; evaluation of briquettes made with a bio-oil binder and a biochar filler produced by fast pyrolysis; and an extensive characterization of the chemical...

183

Exploratory Studies on Fast Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Output Component Structure for Catalyst Regeneration Bed (Z­207 ...............................................................42 2.1.5 Solar Production of Carbon Nanotubes ............................................44 2 Balance Equations for Fluidized Bed Reactor (V­201

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

184

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town December 16, 2011 - 12:10pm Addthis Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? This ARPA-E awardee removes the oxygen and other contaminants in the biomass to be turned into fuel with a novel "catalytic biomass pyrolysis" approach. This substance is more carbon efficient, requires less hydrogen to

185

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town December 16, 2011 - 12:10pm Addthis Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? This ARPA-E awardee removes the oxygen and other contaminants in the biomass to be turned into fuel with a novel "catalytic biomass pyrolysis" approach. This substance is more carbon efficient, requires less hydrogen to

186

Pyrolysis of the tetra pak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study deals with pyrolysis of tetra pak which is widely used as an aseptic beverage packaging material. Pyrolysis experiments were carried out under inert atmosphere in a batch reactor at different temperatures and by different pyrolysis modes (one- and two-step). The yields of char, liquid and gas were quantified. Pyrolysis liquids produced were collected as three separate phases; aqueous phase, tar and polyethylene wax. Characterization of wax and the determination of the total amount of phenols in aqueous phase were performed. Chemical compositions of gas and char products relevant to fuel applications were determined. Pure aluminum can be also recovered by pyrolysis.

Korkmaz, Ahmet [Ege University, Faculty of Science, Chemistry Department, 35100 Izmir (Turkey); Yanik, Jale [Ege University, Faculty of Science, Chemistry Department, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: jale.yanik@ege.edu.tr; Brebu, Mihai; Vasile, Cornelia ['Petru Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Physical Chemistry of Polymers Laboratory, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

188

Update of Hydrogen from Biomass-Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Operated for the U.S. Dep. of Energy by Midwest Research Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis was to assess the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via two thermochemical processes: 1) gasification followed by reforming of the syngas, and 2) fast pyrolysis followed by reforming of the carbohydrate fraction of the bio-oil. In each process, water-gas shift is used to convert the reformed gas into hydrogen, and pressure swing adsorption is used to purify the product. This study was conducted to incorporate recent experimental advances and any changes in direction from previous analyses. The systems examined are based on the Battelle/FERCO low pressure indirectly-heated biomass gasifier, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) high pressure direct-fired gasifier, and fluidized bed pyrolysis followed by coproduct separation. The pyrolysis case assumes a bio-oil feed which is shipped from remote locations to the hydrogen production plant. The delivered cost of hydrogen, as well as the plant gate hydrogen selling price, were determined using both a cash flow spreadsheet and Crystal Ball ® risk assessment software. This software is able to predict the sensitivity of the hydrogen selling price to changes in various analysis parameters, and determines which of the parameters contribute the greatest uncertainty to the results. All of the parameters are varied at once, giving a combined uncertainty of hydrogen selling price. Several cases were run for each of the biomass conversion technologies at varying plant sizes and internal

Pamela L. Spath; Janice M. Lane; Margaret K. Mann; Wade A. Amos

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, William R. (Livermore, CA); Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NO reduction in decoupling combustion of biomass and biomass-coal blend  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a form of energy that is CO{sub 2}-neutral. However, NOx emissions in biomass combustion are often more than that of coal on equal heating-value basis. In this study, a technology called decoupling combustion was investigated to demonstrate how it reduces NO emissions in biomass and biomass-coal blend combustion. The decoupling combustion refers to a two-step combustion method, in which fuel pyrolysis and the burning of char and pyrolysis gas are separated and the gas burns out during its passage through the burning-char bed. Tests in a quartz dual-bed reactor demonstrated that, in decoupling combustion, NO emissions from biomass and biomass-coal blends were both less than those in traditional combustion and that NO emission from combustion of blends of biomass and coal decreased with increasing biomass percentage in the blend. Co-firing rice husk and coal in a 10 kW stove manufactured according to the decoupling combustion technology further confirmed that the decoupling combustion technology allows for truly low NO emission as well as high efficiency for burning biomass and biomass-coal blends, even in small-scale stoves and boilers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Li Dong; Shiqiu Gao; Wenli Song; Jinghai Li; Guangwen Xu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Multi-Phase Complex Systems

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste comprising polyethyleneterephthalate and polyethylene to sequentially recover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pyrolysis process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention discloses a process and apparatus for pyrolyzing particulate coal by heating with a particulate solid heating media in a transport reactor. The invention tends to dampen fluctuations in the flow of heating media upstream of the pyrolysis zone, and by so doing forms a substantially continuous and substantially uniform annular column of heating media flowing downwardly along the inside diameter of the reactor. The invention is particularly useful for bituminous or agglomerative type coals.

Lee, Chang-Kuei (Sewell, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Catalysis in biomass gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of these studies is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products by catalytic gasification of biomass. Catalyst performance is a key factor in the feasibility of catalytic gasification processes. The results of studies designed to gain a fundamental understanding of catalytic mechanisms and causes of deactivation, and discussion of the state-of-the-art of related catalytic processes are presented. Experiments with primary and secondary catalysts were conducted in a 5-cm-diameter, continuous-wood-feed, fixed-catalyst-bed reactor. The primary catalysts used in the experiments were alkali carbonates mixed with the biomass feed; the secondary catalysts included nickel or other transition metals on supports such as alumina, silica, or silica-alumina. The primary catalysts were found to influence wood pyrolysis as well as the char/steam reaction. Secondary catalysts were used in a fixed-bed configuration to direct gas phase reactions. Results of the performance of these catalysts are presented. Secondary catalysts were found to be highly effective for conversion of biomass to specific gas products: synthesis gases and methane-rich gas. With an active catalyst, equilibrium gas composition are obtained, and all liquid pyrolysis products are converted to gases. The major cause of catalyst deactivation was carbon deposition, or coking. Loss of surface area by sintering was also inportant. Catalyst deactivation by sulfur poisoning was observed when bagasse was used as the feedstock for catalytic gasification. Mechanisms of catalyst activity and deactivation are discussed. Model compounds (methane, ethylene, and phenol) were used to determine coking behavior of catalysts. Carbon deposition is more prevalent with ethylene and phenol than with methane. Catalyst formulations that are resistant to carbon deposition are presented. 60 references, 10 figures, 21 tables.

Baker, E.G.; Mudge, L.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Agency/Company /Organization: CONEG Policy Research Center Inc. Partner: Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, Rick Handley and Associates, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, Economic Development Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.mass.gov/Eoeea/docs/doer/renewables/biomass/DOER%20Biomass%20Emiss Country: United States

195

Kinetic Model Development for Lignin Pyrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin pyrolysis poses a significant barrier to the formation of liquid fuel products from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at higher temperatures than other biomass components (e.g. cellulose and hemi-cellulose) and tends to form radicals species that lead to cross-linking and ultimately char formation. A first step in the advancement of biomass-to-fuel technology is to discover the underlying mechanisms that lead to the breakdown of lignin at lower temperatures into more stable and usable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin (B-O4, a-O4, B-B, B-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to bond homolysis reactions, a variety of concerted elimination pathways are under investigation that tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

Clark, J.; Robichaud, D.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes during wood pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal decomposition of 25.4 mm diameter dry wood spheres is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Wood spheres were pyrolyzed in a vertical tube furnace at temperatures ranging from 638 K to 879 K. Mass loss and temperatures of the sample were measured during pyrolysis. Center temperature measurements showed two distinct thermal events consisting of sequential endothermic and exothermic reactions. A numerical investigation of these endo/exothermic reactions using various pyrolysis kinetics models was conducted to determine the pyrolysis mechanism and the heats of the pyrolysis reactions. A comparison of the experimental and numerical results showed that (i) Contrary to the suggestions in the literature, the contributions of the secondary tar decomposition and lignin decomposition to the center temperature exothermic peak are small. (ii) Exothermic decomposition of the intermediate solid is responsible for the center temperature peak. (iii) The center temperature plateau is caused by the endothermic decomposition of cellulose. (iv) Internal pressure generation was found to be quite important because it controls the pyrolyzate mass transfer and thus affects both the heat transfer and the residence time of the pyrolysis gases for secondary decomposition. Based on the experimental and numerical results, a new wood pyrolysis model is proposed. The model consists of three endothermic parallel reactions producing tar, gas and intermediate solid and subsequent exothermic decomposition of the intermediate solid to char and exothermic decomposition of tar to char and gas. The proposed pyrolysis model shows good agreement with the experiments. Pressure calculations based on the new pyrolysis model revealed that high pressure is generated inside the biomass particle during pyrolysis and sample splitting was observed during the experiments. The splitting is due to both weakening of the structure and internal pressure generation during pyrolysis. At low heating rates, structural weakness is the primary factor, whereas at high heating rates, internal pressure is the determining factor. It is expected that moisture, while not considered in this work will have a similar effect, but at lower temperatures. (author)

Park, Won Chan; Atreya, Arvind [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2158 GGBL 2350 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Baum, Howard R. [Department of Fire Protection Engineering, University of Maryland, 3106-D J.M. Patterson Building, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biomass Rapid Analysis Network (BRAN)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Helping the emerging biotechnology industry develop new tools and methods for real-time analysis of biomass feedstocks, process intermediates and The Biomass Rapid Analysis Network is designed to fast track the development of modern tools and methods for biomass analysis to accelerate the development of the emerging industry. The network will be led by industry and organized and coordinated through the National Renewable Energy Lab. The network will provide training and other activities of interest to BRAN members. BRAN members will share the cost and work of rapid analysis method development, validate the new methods, and work together to develop the training for the future biomass conversion workforce.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels from Coal and Biomass Thomas G. Kreutz, Eric D. Larson, Guangjian Liu, Robert H. Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Processes. Developments in Thermochemical Biomass Conversion", Eds. Bridgwater, A.V. and BoocockHydrogen from Biomass for Urban Transportation Y. D. Yeboah (PI), K. B. Bota and Z. Wang Clark amounts of fossil-derived CO2 are released to the atmosphere. Renewable biomass is an attractive

199

Analysis of Integrated Tropical Biorefineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as fast- pyrolysis and catalytic fast-pyrolysis for producing liquid fuels from biomass feedstocks biomass to a fast-pyrolysis reactor (Table 3.4), the greatest mass yield of bio-oil can be attributed............................................................................................- 70 - TABLE 2.18. BIOMASS PYROLYSIS TECHNOLOGIES, REACTION CONDITIONS AND PRODUCTS................- 70

200

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 6175  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as fast- pyrolysis and catalytic fast-pyrolysis for producing liquid fuels from biomass feedstocks biomass to a fast-pyrolysis reactor (Table 3.4), the greatest mass yield of bio-oil can be attributed............................................................................................- 70 - TABLE 2.18. BIOMASS PYROLYSIS TECHNOLOGIES, REACTION CONDITIONS AND PRODUCTS................- 70

Mailhes, Corinne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

NREL: Biomass Research - Josh Schaidle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Josh Schaidle Josh Schaidle Photo of Josh Schaidle Josh Schaidle works in the Thermochemical Catalysis Research and Development group, headed by Jesse Hensley. He manages a $500,000 per year task focused on developing catalysts, processes, and reactor systems for the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis products to produce fungible transportation fuels. Research Interests Biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals Environmentally-sustainable engineering practices Photochemical and electrochemical routes for fuel production Rational design of catalysts through the combination of experiment and theory Early transition metal carbide and nitride catalysts Process design and optimization Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) Catalysts for automotive exhaust treatment Education Ph.D., Chemical Engineering; Concentration in Environmental

204

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of phenolic resin containing waste streams to sequentially recover monomers and chemicals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a waste phenolic resin containing feedstreams in a manner such that pyrolysis of said resins and a given high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolyses of the resins in other monomeric components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said resin and a given high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other monomeric components; selecting, if desired, a catalyst and a support and treating said feedstreams with said catalyst to effect acid or basic catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said first temperature program range to utilize reactive gases such as oxygen and steam in the pyrolysis process to drive the production of specific products; differentially heating said feedstreams at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantity of said high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other monomeric components therein; separating said high value monomeric constituent; selecting a second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said phenolic resins waste and differentially heating said feedstreams at said higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said different high value monomeric constituent; and separating said different high value monomeric constituent. 11 figs.

Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

205

AN EVALUATION OF PYROLYSIS OIL PROPERTIES AND CHEMISTRY AS RELATED TO PROCESS AND UPGRADE CONDITIONS WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION TO PIPELINE SHIPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One factor limiting the development of commercial biomass pyrolysis is challenges related to the transportation of the produced pyrolysis oil. The oil has different chemical and physical properties than crude oil, including more water and oxygen and has lower H/C ratio, higher specific gravity and density, higher acidity, and lower energy content. These differences could limit its ability to be transported by existing petroleum pipelines. Pyrolysis oil can also be treated, normally by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, and approaches crude oil and petroleum condensates at higher severity levels. This improvement also results in lower liquid yield and high hydrogen consumption. Biomass resources for pyrolysis are expected to become plentiful and widely distributed in the future, mainly through the use of crop residuals and growing of energy crops such as perennial grasses, annual grasses, and woody crops. Crude oil pipelines are less well distributed and, when evaluated on a county level, could access about 18% of the total biomass supply. States with high potential include Texas, Oklahoma, California, and Louisiana. In this study, published data on pyrolysis oil was compiled into a data set along with bio-source source material, pyrolysis reactor conditions, and upgrading conditions for comparison to typical crude oils. Data of this type is expected to be useful in understanding the properties and chemistry and shipment of pyrolysis oil to refineries, where it can be further processed to fuel or used as a source of process heat.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Boyd, Alison C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Review of the pyrolysis platform for coproducing bio-oil and biochar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and robust thermochemical technology for transforming biomass into bio-oil, biochar, and syngas. The robust nature of the pyrolysis technology, which allows considerable flexibility in both the type and quality of the biomass feedstock, combined with a distributed network of small pyrolysis plants, would be compatible with existing agriculture and forestry infrastructure. Bio-oil can be used as a fuel in existing industrial boilers. Biochar can be used with existing infrastructure as a replacement for pulverized coal; however, use of biochar as a soil amendment results in significant environmental and agronomic benefits. Soil application of biochar is a means of sequestering large amounts of C and may have other greenhouse gas benefits. Preliminary reports of the impact of soil biochar applications on crop yields indicate that biochar quality is very important. Biochar is an effective adsorbent for both nutrients and organic contaminants, hence the presence of biochar in soils has been shown to improve water quality in column leaching and field lysimeter studies and it is anticipated to do the same for agricultural watersheds. The pyrolysis platform for producing bio-oil and biochar from biomass appears to be a practical, effective, and environmentally sustainable means of producing large quantities of renewable bioenergy while simultaneously reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. At the present time, the pyrolysis platform is economically marginal because markets for bio-oil and biochar are highly competitive. However, if the USA adopts a program for controlling greenhouse gases, the pyrolysis platform would be highly competitive.

Laird, David A.; Brown, Robert C.; Amonette, James E.; Lehmann, Johannes C.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ENGINEERING SCALE UP OF RENEWABLE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF PEANUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources [1-5]. Well know examples of second generation fuels derived from biomass are pyrolysis oil-ethanol from cellulosic biomass. Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass involves heating of the biomass] Bridgwater, A., editor, Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass: A Handbook Volume 3. CPL press: Newbury Berkshire, 2005

208

Feasibility of the electric energy production through gasification processes of biomass: technical and economic aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is one of the main sources for energy production, indeed, due to its chemical and physical peculiarities, it can be used very well in thermo chemical processes such as combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. Furthermore, the considerable variability ... Keywords: biomass production, economic aspect, gasification

Danilo Monarca; Massimo Cecchini; Andrea Colantoni; Alvaro Marucci

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Experiment Study on Adsorption Characteristics of SO2, NOx by Biomass Chars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different kinds of biomass chars of the wheat straws, rice straw, cotton straw collected at Nanjing, China, were pyrolysed in a fixed bed reactor at different temperatures and heating rates. The specific area and pore structure, micromorphology of different ... Keywords: Biomass char, Pyrolysis, Adsorption efficiency, SO2, NOx

Fei Lu; Ping Lu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Biomass Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many types of biomass—organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes—that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

212

Biomass Power: Program overview fiscal years 1993--1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biomass Power Program and industry are developing technologies to expand the use of biomass that include methods of feedstock production and the equipment to convert feedstocks into electric power or process heat. With the help of advanced biomass power technologies and new feedstock supply systems, as much as 50,000 megawatts (MW) of biomass power capacity will be in place by the year 2010. The Biomass Power Program supports the development of three technologies--gasification, pyrolysis, and direct combustion--from the laboratory bench scale to the prototype commercial scale. Gasification equipment produces biogas that is burned in high-efficiency turbine-generators developed for the electric power industry. Pyrolysis processes produce oils from renewable biomass that burn like petroleum to generate electricity. In direct combustion technology, power plants today burn bulk biomass directly to generate electricity. Improving the direct combustion technology of these plants increases efficiency and reduces emissions. In addition to developing these three technologies, the Biomass Power Program supports joint ventures to plan and construct facilities that demonstrate the benefits of biomass power. The Program is supporting joint ventures to conduct 10 case studies of dedicated feedstock supply systems.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Biomass Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks.

214

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

215

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood,” Transactions of the American Society of Heating andheating ways on pyrolysis and spontaneous ignition of some woods,”

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pyrolysis oil and bio-liquids derived thereof. Fast pyrolysis oils can be obtained from biomass in yields up] Bridgwater, A.; Czernik, S.; Diebold, J.; Meier, D.; Oasmaa, A.; Peacocke, C,. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass, I.A. Production of a Bio-Gasoline by Ugrading Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Liquids via Hydrogen

217

Leg 198 Preliminary Report Extreme Warmth in the Cretaceous and Paleogene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-distance transportation advantages over raw biomass and wood pellets is BioOil from fast pyrolysis, or Pyrolysis Oil called fast pyrolysis, whereby biomass particles are heated in the absence of oxygen, vapourized to become manufacturing centers for Pyrolysis Oil, and those with extensive reserves of low-cost biomass can

218

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or methanol. ! While pyrolysis/gasification of coal and woody biomass are in commercial use, pyrolysis reforming of the aqueous phase derived from fast-pyrolysis of biomass. Renewable Energy 2009, 34, (12), 2872.; Lee, W.-J.; Wu, H.; Li, C.-Z., Fast pyrolysis of oil mallee woody biomass: Effect of temperature

219

Published: December 28, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 724 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr2003272 |Chem. Rev. 2012, 112, 724781  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-distance transportation advantages over raw biomass and wood pellets is BioOil from fast pyrolysis, or Pyrolysis Oil called fast pyrolysis, whereby biomass particles are heated in the absence of oxygen, vapourized to become manufacturing centers for Pyrolysis Oil, and those with extensive reserves of low-cost biomass can

220

Fig. 1: Cross-section of experimental combustor and instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalysts Abstract Fast pyrolysis oils from lignocellulosic biomass are promising second generation biofuels-liquid is pyrolysis oil, obtainable from lignocellulosic biomass by flash pyrolysis in yields up to 70 %-wt. The oil.; Meier, D.;Oasmaa. A.; Peacocke, C. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass: A handbook. Vol. 1; CPL Press: Berkshire

Hallett, William L.H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Review on Biomass Torrefaction Process and Product Properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass Torrefaction is gaining attention as an important preprocessing step to improve the quality of biomass in terms of physical properties and chemical composition. Torrefaction is a slow heating of biomass in an inert or reduced environment to a maximum temperature of approximately 300 C. Torrefaction can also be defined as a group of products resulting from the partially controlled and isothermal pyrolysis of biomass occurring in a temperature range of 200-280 C. Thus, the process can be called a mild pyrolysis as it occurs at the lower temperature range of the pyrolysis process. At the end of the torrefaction process, a solid uniform product with lower moisture content and higher energy content than raw biomass is produced. Most of the smoke-producing compounds and other volatiles are removed during torrefaction, which produces a final product that will have a lower mass but a higher heating value. The present review work looks into (a) torrefaction process and different products produced during the process and (b) solid torrefied material properties which include: (i) physical properties like moisture content, density, grindability, particle size distribution and particle surface area and pelletability; (ii) chemical properties like proximate and ultimate composition; and (iii) storage properties like off-gassing and spontaneous combustion.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

224

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

225

Solar coal-gasification reactor with pyrolysis-gas recycle. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a product gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor, and solar energy is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front and a pyrolysis front. A gasification zone is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam, injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone, reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases flow from the gasification zone to the pyrolysis zone to generate hot char. Gases are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone. This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone and the pyrolysis zone. The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, W.R.; Gregg, D.W.

1981-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NETL: C&CBTL - Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Project Number: FE0005476 Project Description The objectives of the proposed study are to obtain experimental reactor data and develop kinetic rate expressions for pyrolysis and char gasification for the coal-biomass blends under conditions free from transport limitations, to develop a detailed understanding of the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the porous char structure, to build mathematical models that combine true kinetic rate expressions with transport models for predicting gasification behavior for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, and to investigate the physical and chemical parameters that might lead to synergistic effects in coal-biomass blends gasification.

228

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 87 figures.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

233

Russell Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Russell Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Russell Biomass Place Massachusetts Sector Biomass Product Russell Biomass, LLC is developing a 50MW biomass to energy project at...

234

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Biomass Place India Sector Biomass Product Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References Star Biomass1 LinkedIn...

235

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Technologies Photo of a pair of hands...

236

Desulfurized gas production from vertical kiln pyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas, formed as a product of a pyrolysis of oil shale, is passed through hot, retorted shale (containing at least partially decomposed calcium or magnesium carbonate) to essentially eliminate sulfur contaminants in the gas. Specifically, a single chambered pyrolysis vessel, having a pyrolysis zone and a retorted shale gas into the bottom of the retorted shale zone and cleaned product gas is withdrawn as hot product gas near the top of such zone.

Harris, Harry A. (Rifle, CO); Jones, Jr., John B. (Grand Junction, CO)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Vacuum pyrolysis of sodium stearate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vacuum pyrolysis of sodium stearate was studied to provide useful information for Green River oil shale pyrolysis. Sodium stearate is a typical compound of carboxylic acid salts amounting to 3.6% of total organic materials in the oil shale by methanol extraction. Sodium stearate contained in a stainless steel miniature reactor was heated at 450/sup 0/C in a fluidized sand bath. Pyrolysis times ranged from 15 to 120 minutes. The amounts of gas and liquid products were measured and composition determined by gas chromatography. Ethane, methane, propylene plus propane, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide are the major gaseous products, in order of decreasing concentration. The predominant liquid product is a C/sub 17/ alkene with C/sub 12/-C/sub 21/ alkene/alkane pairs present. The first order decomposition rate constant for sodium stearate at 450/sup 0/C was calculated to be 6.4 x 10/sup -3/ min./sup -1/. 18 refs., 7 figs.

Chong, S.L.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil ...  

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing ...

239

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decomposition fronts in wood,” Combustion and Flame 139: 16–dynamics modeling of wood combustion,” Fire Safety Journalduring the pyrolysis of wood,” Combustion and Flame 17: 79–

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RISÃ? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RISÃ?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Science Activities in Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

242

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro-cogeneration System based on a Modified Stirling Engine and Fuelled by a Wood Derived Fas Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A residential micro-cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine unit was modified to operate with wood derived fast pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil)-ethanol blend. A pilot stabilized… (more)

Khan, Umer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Environmental impacts of thermochemical biomass conversion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical conversion in this study is limited to fast pyrolysis, upgrading of fast pyrolysis oils, and gasification. Environmental impacts of all types were considered within the project, but primary emphasis was on discharges to the land, air, and water during and after the conversion processes. The project discussed here is divided into five task areas: (1) pyrolysis oil analysis; (2) hydrotreating of pyrolysis oil; (3) gas treatment systems for effluent minimization; (4) strategic analysis of regulatory requirements; and (5) support of the IEA Environmental Systems Activity. The pyrolysis oil task was aimed at understanding the oil contaminants and potential means for their removal. The hydrotreating task was undertaken to better define one potential means for both improving the quality of the oil but also removing contaminants from the oil. Within Task 3, analyses were done to evaluate the results of gasification product treatment systems. Task 4 was a review and collection of regulatory requirements which would be applicable to the subject processes. The IEA support task included input to and participation in the IEA Bioenergy activity which directly relates to the project subject. Each of these tasks is described along with the results. Conclusions and recommendations from the overall project are given.

Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; McKinney, M.D.; Norton, M.V.; Abrams, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

1982 annual report: Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program's activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1982. The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate scientific data and fundamental biomass converison process information that, in the long term, could lead to establishment of cost effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels and petrochemical substitutes. The goal of the program is to improve the data base for biomass conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and exploring those parameters which are critical to these conversion processes. To achieve this objective and goal, the Thermochemical Conversion Program is sponsoring high-risk, long-term research with high payoff potential which industry is not currently sponsoring, nor is likely to support. Thermochemical conversion processes employ elevated temperatures to convert biomass materials into energy. Process examples include: combustion to produce heat, steam, electricity, direct mechanical power; gasification to produce fuel gas or synthesis gases for the production of methanol and hydrocarbon fuels; direct liquefaction to produce heavy oils or distillates; and pyrolysis to produce a mixture of oils, fuel gases, and char. A bibliography of publications for 1982 is included.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1984 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the program is to generate scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective process for converting biomass resources into clean fuels. The goal of the program is to develop the data base for biomass thermal conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and by exploring those parameters that are critical to the conversion processes. The research activities can be divided into: (1) gasification technology; (2) liquid fuels technology; (3) direct combustion technology; and (4) program support activities. These activities are described in detail in this report. Outstanding accomplishments during fiscal year 1984 include: (1) successful operation of 3-MW combustor/gas turbine system; (2) successful extended term operation of an indirectly heated, dual bed gasifier for producing medium-Btu gas; (3) determination that oxygen requirements for medium-Btu gasification of biomass in a pressurized, fluidized bed gasifier are low; (4) established interdependence of temperature and residence times on biomass pyrolysis oil yields; and (5) determination of preliminary technical feasibility of thermally gasifying high moisture biomass feedstocks. A bibliography of 1984 publications is included. 26 figs., 1 tab.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

1982 annual report: Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a brief overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program's activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1982. The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate scientific data and fundamental biomass converison process information that, in the long term, could lead to establishment of cost effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels and petrochemical substitutes. The goal of the program is to improve the data base for biomass conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and exploring those parameters which are critical to these conversion processes. To achieve this objective and goal, the Thermochemical Conversion Program is sponsoring high-risk, long-term research with high payoff potential which industry is not currently sponsoring, nor is likely to support. Thermochemical conversion processes employ elevated temperatures to convert biomass materials into energy. Process examples include: combustion to produce heat, steam, electricity, direct mechanical power; gasification to produce fuel gas or synthesis gases for the production of methanol and hydrocarbon fuels; direct liquefaction to produce heavy oils or distillates; and pyrolysis to produce a mixture of oils, fuel gases, and char. A bibliography of publications for 1982 is included.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Valorisation of forestry waste by pyrolysis in an auger reactor  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis of forestry waste has been carried out in an auger reactor to study the influence of operational variables on the reactor performance and the properties of the related products. Pine woodchips were used for the first time as raw material and fed continuously into the reactor. Ten experiments were carried out under inert atmosphere at: (i) different reaction temperature (1073, 973, 873, 823 and 773 K); (ii) different solid residence time (5, 3, 2 and 1.5 min); and (iii) different biomass flow rate (3.9, 4.8 and 6.9 kg/h). Results show that the greatest yields for liquid production (59%) and optimum product characterisation were obtained at the lowest temperature studied (773 K) and applying solid residence times longer than 2 min. Regarding bio-oil properties, GC/MS qualitative identification show that the most abundant compounds are volatile polar compounds, phenols and benzenediols; and very few differences can be observed among the samples regardless of the pyrolysis operating conditions. On the whole, experimental results demonstrate that complete reaction of forest woodchips can be achieved in an auger reactor in most of the experimental conditions tested. Moreover, this study presents the initial steps for the future scaling up of the auger reactor with the aim of converting it into a mobile plant which will be able to remotely process biomass such as energy crops, forestry and agricultural wastes to obtain bio-oil that, in turn, can be used as energy vector to avoid high transport costs.

Puy, Neus, E-mail: neus.puy@uab.cat [Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn - Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Murillo, Ramon; Navarro, Maria V.; Lopez, Jose M. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, M Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Rieradevall, Joan [Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn - Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, ETSE, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Fowler, G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Aranguren, Ignacio; Garcia, Tomas [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, M Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartroli, Jordi [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn - Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Mastral, Ana M. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, M Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Selection and performance of Materials for Biomass Gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of syngas through gasification or pyrolysis offers one of the more efficient routes for utilization of biomass resources; however, the containment structures used for many of these thermochemical processes are exposed to severe environments that limit their longevity and reliability. Studies have been conducted for three of these systems, and superior alternative materials have been identified. Improved materials will be of even greater importance in proposed gasification systems, many of which will generate even more extreme operating conditions.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Blau, Peter J [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microwave pyrolysis of distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS) for biofuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave pyrolysis of distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS) was investigated to determine the effects of pyrolytic conditions on the yields of bio-oil, syngas, and biochar. Pyrolysis process variables included reaction temperature, time, and power input. Microwave pyrolysis of DDGS was analyzed using response surface methodology to ?nd out the effect of process variables on the biofuel (bio-oil and syn- gas) conversion yield and establish prediction models. Bio-oil recovery was in the range of 26.5–50.3 wt.% of the biomass. Biochar yields were 23.5–62.2% depending on the pyrolysis conditions. The energy con- tent of DDGS bio-oils was 28 MJ/kg obtained at the 650 oC and 8 min, which was about 66.7% of the heat- ing value of gasoline. GC/MS analysis indicated that the biooil contained a series of important and useful chemical compounds: aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. At least 13% of DDGS bio-oil was the same hydrocarbon compounds found in regular unleaded gasoline.

Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Wang, Lu; Bu, Quan; Julson, James; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Ruan, Roger

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Schiller Biomass Con Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Schiller Biomass Con Biomass...

251

Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ware Biomass Cogen Biomass...

252

Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reaction Mechanisms in Reaction Mechanisms in Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review. - - pacific N o r t h ~ ~ ~ , baboratwies I - - bCL-T-,,;, .,- , . . . I ' I . - " 1- jl,! # . .' , . - --h 1 , i b - . "I 1.- . . ., .. ' N O T - I C E , , If PACIF tC NORTHWLST U B O R A T ~ R Y .4peiild by B h m E far c h t ,EP4ERGY RESEARCH AN0 PEVELOPMEM ADMtNlSTRAnQN U m h Contract Z Y - ~ ~ - C ~ & I # D w n : m a , m & l 3 Q j l m OIdrfrn m y - !*? 1SI71Y9 1 - m-u3 2s-m .**-2?3 ,Sbca lcPa w m *a0 Iffy &a It- w-% w w @.a SlO.0 m u 6 REACTION MECHANISMS IN CELLULOSE PYROLYSIS A LITERATURE REVIEW by Peter M. Molton T.F. Demmitt Chemical Technology Department BATTELLE Pacific Northwest Laboratories Richland, Washington 99352 CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L I S T OF F I G U R E S iii L I S T O F T A B L E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i v . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . INTRODUCTION 1

253

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Projects Biomass Characterization Projects A photo of a magnified image on a computer screen. Many blue specks and lines in different sizes and shapes are visible on top of a white background. A microscopic image of biomass particles. Through biomass characterization projects, NREL researchers are exploring the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment and during processing. The characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. Among NREL's biomass characterization projects are: Feedstock/Process Interface NREL is working to understand the effects of feedstock and feedstock pre-processing on the conversion process and vice versa. The objective of the task is to understand the characteristics of biomass feedstocks

255

Hydrogen from Post-Consumer Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 19 Chapter 1: An Introduction to the Hydroprocessing of Biomass Derived Pyrolysis oil;An Introduction to the Hydroprocessing of Biomass Derived Pyrolysis oil 20 1. Introduction referred to in this introduction is the (fast) pyrolysis of biomass [2]. Here the biomass is converted

256

Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

Walchuk, George P. (Queens, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Biomass to Gasoline and DIesel Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosic and woody biomass can be directly converted to hydrocarbon gasoline and diesel blending components through the use of integrated hydropyrolysis plus hydroconversion (IH2). The IH2 gasoline and diesel blending components are fully compatible with petroleum based gasoline and diesel, contain less than 1% oxygen and have less than 1 total acid number (TAN). The IH2 gasoline is high quality and very close to a drop in fuel. The DOE funding enabled rapid development of the IH2 technology from initial proof-of-principle experiments through continuous testing in a 50 kg/day pilot plant. As part of this project, engineering work on IH2 has also been completed to design a 1 ton/day demonstration unit and a commercial-scale 2000 ton/day IH2 unit. These studies show when using IH2 technology, biomass can be converted directly to transportation quality fuel blending components for the same capital cost required for pyrolysis alone, and a fraction of the cost of pyrolysis plus upgrading of pyrolysis oil. Technoeconomic work for IH2 and lifecycle analysis (LCA) work has also been completed as part of this DOE study and shows IH2 technology can convert biomass to gasoline and diesel blending components for less than $2.00/gallon with greater than 90% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. As a result of the work completed in this DOE project, a joint development agreement was reached with CRI Catalyst Company to license the IH2 technology. Further larger-scale, continuous testing of IH2 will be required to fully demonstrate the technology, and funding for this is recommended. The IH2 biomass conversion technology would reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil, reduce the price of transportation fuels, and significantly lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is a breakthrough for the widespread conversion of biomass to transportation fuels.

Marker, Terry; Roberts, Michael; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Wangerow, Jim; Tan, Eric; Gephart, John; Shonnard, David

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

263

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Facility Tracy Biomass Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

Consider upgrading pyrolysis oils into renewable fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New research is identifying processing routes to convert cellulosic biomass into transportation fuels

Elliott, Douglas C.; Holmgren, Jennifer; Marinangelli, Richard; nair, Prabhakar; Bain, Richard

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemical engineering for purposes of optimizing energy conversion techniques, particularly from biomass.

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

267

Catalytic conversion of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Catalytic processes for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels have gained an increasing attention in sustainable energy production. The biomass can be converted to… (more)

Calleja Aguado, Raquel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polymer waste comprising nylon 6 and a polyolefin or mixtures of polyolefins to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase II. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wright-Malta gasification process is characterized by low-temperature, catalyzed steam gasification in a pressurized rotary kiln. Fresh biomass moves slowly and continuously through the kiln, where it is gradually heated to around 1200/sup 0/F in an atmosphere of 300 psi steam. During its traverse, pyrolysis and reaction of steam with the nascent char convert nearly all of the organic solids to the gaseous phase. The volatile pyrolysis products pass through the kiln co-currently with the solids and are similarly cracked and steam-reformed within the kiln to fixed gases. Heat for the gasification process is provided by sensible heat recovered from the product gas and the wood decomposition exotherm, making the process inherently very energy-efficient. This report summarizes the work done during the experimental, laboratory-scale phase of development of the W-M biomass gasification process. Two bench-scale experimental gasifiers were constructed and tested: the ''minikiln'', a batch-feed, rotating autoclave; and the ''biogasser'', a stationary, continuous-feed, tubular reactor with zone heating and auger transport. Studies were carried out in these reactors to determine the extent of conversion of biomass solids to gas, and the makeup of the product gas, over a wide range of process conditions. The process variables that were investigated included reactor pressure and temperature, catalyst type and concentration, moisture content and type of biomass feed.

Hooverman, R.H.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Biomass treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Lyons, Robert C. (Arvada, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

French, R.J.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Catalyst and feedstock effects in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermochemical conversion of biomass feedstocks to liquid transportation fuels can be accomplished by three processes, namely gasification, high-pressure liquefaction, and pyrolysis. In this study, the pyrolysis option is selected which is followed by the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors to aromatic and olefinic hydrocarbons (PYROCAT process). The aromatics constitute a high-octane gasoline blend, while the olefins can be utilized as feedstocks for various chemicals. The PYROCAT process has been studied in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed catalytic reactor. Consecutive biomass samples were pyrolyzed rapidly in steam at 550{degree}C and atmospheric pressure, and then the pyrolysis vapors were passed over a zeolite catalyst. The catalytic upgrading products were monitored in real-time using molecular-beam mass-spectrometry (MBMS). The yields of major products were estimated from mass-spectral data. Several zeolite catalysts were screened in the upgrading process and promising catalysts with high yields were identified. Feedstocks studied included: the woody biomass species aspen (Populus tremuloides), basswood (Tilia americana), and willow (Salix alba); the three isolated components of wood lignin, xylan and cellulose; and the herbaceous species bagasse (Saccharum spp. hybrid), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), and Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata). 17 refs.

Rejai, B.; Agblevor, F.A.; Evans, R.J.; Wang, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

Francis Lau

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

Francis Lau

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Woodland Biomass Power Ltd Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Biomass Power...

276

Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fibrominn Biomass Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fibrominn Biomass Power...

277

General model of oil shale pyrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mathematical model for pyrolysis of Green River oil shale is developed from previous experiments on oil, water, and gas evolution and oil cracking over a wide range of pyrolysis conditions. Reactions included are evolution of 5 gas species, oil, and water from kerogen, clay dehydration, oil coking and cracking, and evolution of H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ from char. Oil is treated in eleven boiling-point fractions in order to treat the competition between oil coking and evaporation, and to evaluate the effect of oil cracking on the boiling point distribution of the oil. The kinetics and product yields calculated by the model are compared to experimental results for pyrolysis conditions ranging from isothermal fluid-bed to high-pressure slow-heating-rate retorting.

Burnham, A.K.; Braun, R.L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

NREL: Biomass Research - Standard Biomass Analytical Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the pertinent LAPs. Workbooks are available for: Wood (hardwood or softwood) Corn stover (corn stover feedstock) Biomass hydrolyzate (liquid fraction produced from...

279

Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine  

SciTech Connect

The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report, (unpublished, 1979). Biomass Project Progress 31.Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Chapter 34: Catalysts and Sorbents for Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Renewable Biofuels-Material Development Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter contains sections titled: (1) Introduction, (2) Catalysts for Catalytic Pyrolysis and Bio-Oil Upgrading, (3) High Temperature Sorbents for Syngas Clean Up, (4) Conditioning Biomass Derived Syngas, (5) Catalysts for Synthesis of Ethanol and Higher Alcohols from Syngas, (6) Summary, and (7) Acknowledgments.

Cheah, S.; Czernik, S.; Baldwin, R. M.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Hensley, J. E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Dual Layer Monolith ATR of Pyrolysis Oil for Distributed Synthesis Gas Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have successfully demonstrated a novel reactor technology, based on BASF dual layer monolith catalyst, for miniaturizing the autothermal reforming of pyrolysis oil to syngas, the second and most critical of the three steps for thermochemically converting biomass waste to liquid transportation fuel. The technology was applied to aged as well as fresh samples of pyrolysis oil derived from five different biomass feedstocks, namely switch-grass, sawdust, hardwood/softwood, golden rod and maple. Optimization of process conditions in conjunction with innovative reactor system design enabled the minimization of carbon deposit and control of the H2/CO ratio of the product gas. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis of the integrated process using in part, experimental data from the project, indicates (1) net energy recovery of 49% accounting for all losses and external energy input, (2) weight of diesel oil produced as a percent of the biomass to be ~14%, and (3) for a �demonstration� size biomass to Fischer-Tropsch liquid plant of ~ 2000 daily barrels of diesel, the price of the diesel produced is ~$3.30 per gallon, ex. tax. However, the extension of catalyst life is critical to the realization of the projected economics. Catalyst deactivation was observed and the modes of deactivation, both reversible and irreversible were identified. An effective catalyst regeneration strategy was successfully demonstrated for reversible catalyst deactivation while a catalyst preservation strategy was proposed for preventing irreversible catalyst deactivation. Future work should therefore be focused on extending the catalyst life, and a successful demonstration of an extended (> 500 on-stream hours) catalyst life would affirm the commercial viability of the process.

Lawal, Adeniyi [Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point Hoboken NJ 07030

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

FAST LAB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo of the entrance to the FAST Lab building. FAST LAB Located on the campus of Aiken Technical College (see map 28k) in Aiken, South Carolina, the FAST Lab is a partnership of...

284

Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Theoretical Study of the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylic Acids at Pyrolysis Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carboxylic acids are important in the processing of biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. They are formed from the pretreatment and pyrolysis of hemicellulose biopolymers and are released from the decomposition of sugars. They result from the deconstruction of polyhydroxyalkanoates (bacterial carbon storage polymers) from fatty acids derived from algae, bacteria, and oil crops. The thermal deoxygenation of carboxylic acids is an important step in the conversion of biomass into aliphatic hydrocarbons suitable for use in renewable biofuels and as petrochemical replacements. Decarboxylation, a primary decomposition pathway under pyrolysis conditions, represents an ideal conversion process, because it eliminates two atoms of oxygen for every carbon atom removed. Problematically, additional deoxygenation processes exist (e.g. dehydration) that are in direct competition with decarboxylation and result in the formation of reactive and more fragmented end products. To better understand the competition between decarboxylation and other deoxygenation processes and to gain insight into possible catalysts that would favor decarboxylation, we have investigated the mechanisms and thermochemistry of the various unimolecular and bimolecular deoxygenation pathways for a family of C1-C4 organic acids using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(2df,p) level of theory.

Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Biomass Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on...

288

Small Modular Biomass Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet that provides an introduction to small modular biomass systems. These systems can help supply electricity to rural areas, businesses, and people without power. They use locally available biomass fuels such as wood, crop waste, and animal manures.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

TORREFACTION OF BIOMASS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical pre-treatment of biomass within a narrow temperature range from 200°C to 300°C, where mostly the hemicellulose components of a biomass depolymerise.… (more)

Dhungana, Alok

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biomass One Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One Sector Biomass Owner Biomass One LP Location White City, Oregon Coordinates 42.4333333°, -122.8338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4333333,"lon":-122.8338889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

291

Biomass Cofiring Update 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy source. When cofired with coal in a plant that would normally fire 100% coal as the fuel, biomass becomes a renewable source of electricity—for that fraction of electricity that is generated from the biomass fraction of the heat in the fuel mix to the power plant. For electric power generation organizations that have coal-fired generation, cofiring biomass with coal will often be the lowest-cost form of renewable power.

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

Recanati, Catherine

293

Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of liquid fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidative pyrolysis of n-heptane was investigated with metal oxides Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MnO/sub 2/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, NiO, Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, and CuO supported on alumina. Metallic content of the catalyst weight varied from 0.1 to 2.0% with catalytic activity reaching a maximum when the metal content was 1%. The most active catalysts were Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, MnO/sub 2/, and NiO. Pyrolysis of cyclohexane and toluene was also studied with Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as catalyst. Hydrocarbon stability and coke formation increase with increase of hydrocarbon condensation in the series paraffin < naphthalene < aromatic hydrocarbons. Pyrolysis of the various hydrocarbons at 800/sup 0/C yielded a gas that has an octane number of 90 to 93, and the process was shown to be adaptable to pyrolysis of various commercial fractions such as benzines A-72 and A-76, petroleum fractions, and liquid paraffins to produce gas of about the same octane. (BLM)

Antonova, V.M.; Gorlov, E.G.; Paushkin, Ya.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Pyrolysis mechanisms of lignin model compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds was studied under conditions optimized for the production of liquid products to provide mechanistic insight into the reaction pathways that lead to product formation. The major reaction products can be explained by cleavage of the C-O either linkage by a free radial or concerted 1,2-elimination.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Cooney, M.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Indirect heating pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hot, non-oxygenous gas at carefully controlled quantities and at predetermined depths in a bed of lump oil shale provides pyrolysis of the contained kerogen of the oil shale, and cool non-oxygenous gas is passed up through the bed to conserve the heat

Jones, Jr., John B. (Grand Junction, CO); Reeves, Adam A. (Grand Junction, CO)

1978-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding Guide 2010 The Forestry Commission and the Humber Rural Partnership (co-ordinated by East Riding of Yorkshire Council) have jointly produced a biomass funding guide fuel prices continue to rise, and the emerging biomass sector is well-placed to make a significant

297

NREL: Biomass Research - Alexandre Chapeaux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biofuels with industrial partners. Alex's research areas of interest are: Integrated biomass processing High solids biomass conversion Fermentation development Separation...

298

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

299

Comparison of Biological and Thermal (Pyrolysis) Pathways for Conversion of Lignocellulose to Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of the limited supply of imported crude oil and environmental degradation, renewable energy is becoming commercially feasible and environmentally desirable. In this research, biological and thermal (pyrolysis) conversion pathways for biofuel production from lignocellulosic feedstocks were compared. For biological conversions of sorghum, ethanol yield was improved using M81-E variety (0.072 g/g juice) over Umbrella (0.065 g/g juice) for first-generation biomass (sorghum juice), and 0.042 g/g sorghum was obtained from the cellulosic portion of second-generation biomass. When ultrasonication was combined with hot water pretreatment, yields increased by 15% and 7% for cellulose to glucose, and hemicellulose to pentose, respectively. Ethanol yield was 10% higher when this pretreatment was combined with Accellerase 1500+XC for saccharification. Biological conversion yielded 1,600?2,300 L ethanol/ha for first-generation biomass, and 4,300?4,500 L ethanol/ha from lignocellulosic biomass. For thermal (pyrolysis) conversion of lignocellulosic switchgrass at 600 degrees C, product yield was 37% bio-oil, 26% syngas, and 25% bio-char. At 400 degrees C, product yield was 22% bio-oil, 8% syngas, and 56% bio-char. Bio-oil from pyrolysis was highly oxygenated (37 wt%). It required chemical transformation to increase its volatility and thermal stability, and to reduce its viscosity by removing objectionable oxygen, so the product could be used as transportation fuel (gasoline). As a consequence of upgrading bio-oil by catalytic hydrogenation, bio-oil oxygen decreased from 37?2 wt%, carbon increased from 50?83 wt%, hydrogen increased from 9?15 wt% and heating value increased from 36?46 MJ/kg, resulting in a fuel that was comparable to gasoline. The upgraded product passed the thermal stability test when kept under an oxygen-rich environment. The upgraded product consisted of 14.8% parrafins, 21.7% iso-parrafins, 3% napthene, 42.6% aromatics, 4.7% olefin, 4.7% DMF, 8% alcohol, and 0.6% ketone on a mass basis. Comparing the two pathways, biological conversion had 11 wt% ethanol yield from sorghum, and thermal conversion had 13 wt% gasoline yield from switchgrass. For process efficiency, thermal conversion had 35% energy loss versus 45% energy loss for biological conversions. For the biological pathway, ethanol cost was $2.5/gallon ($4/gallon, gasoline equivalent), whereas for the thermal pathway, switchgrass gasoline cost was $3.7/gallon, both with 15% before tax profit.

Imam, Tahmina 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability  

SciTech Connect

If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass: Biomass: Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Traditional and Thermal Use of Biomass Traditional use of biomass, particularly burning wood, is one of the oldest manners in which biomass has been utilized for energy. Traditional use of biomass is 14% of world energy usage which is on the same level as worldwide electricity usage. Most of this consumption comes from developing countries where traditional use of biomass accounts for 35% of primary energy usage [1] and greater than 75% of primary energy use is in the residential sector. The general trend in developing countries has been a

302

Vapor Phase Catalytic Upgrading of Model Biomass-Derived Oxygenate Compounds  

SciTech Connect

When biomass is converted to a liquid bio-oil through pyrolysis, it has a significantly higher oxygen content compared to petroleum fractions. In order to convert the pyrolysis products into infrastructure-compatible fuels, oxygen removal is required. Oxygen removal can be achieved by both hydrotreating (which requires the addition of hydrogen) and decarboxylation or decarbonylation, whereby oxygen is rejected as CO2 and CO, respectively. In the present contribution, a number of catalysts were tested for their activity and selectivity in deoxygenation of model biomass-derived oxygenated compounds (e.g., acetic acid, phenol). Comparison of catalytic activity of materials for different compounds, as well as material characterization results will be discussed. Materials tested will include modified zeolites and supported transition metal catalysts.

Yung, M. M.; Gomez, E.; Kuhn, J. N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bibliographic review of 195 references is presented outlining the history of the research into the mechanisms of cellulose pyrolysis. Topics discussed are: initial product identification, mechanism of initial formation of levoglucosan, from cellulose and from related compounds, decomposition of cellulose to other compounds, formation of aromatics, pyrolysis of levoglucosan, crosslinking of cellulose, pyrolytic reactions of cellulose derivatives, and the effects of inorganic salts on the pyrolysis mechanism. (JSR)

Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Coal pyrolysis for utility use: Final report  

SciTech Connect

EPRI undertook an extensive research effort to evaluate the viability of coal pyrolysis products for utility use. The objectives of the studies were to evaluate the combustion and storage characteristics of pyrolysis char and to evaluate the upgrading potential of pyrolysis liquid products (tar). To achieve these objectives, it was necessary to produce sufficient quantities of the char and tar in a process unit large enough to produce commercially representative products. For both technical and availability reasons, EPRI selected the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (L-R) process for the production run (under subcontract to Bechtel Group, Inc. RP2505-2). Several contractors were to do the liquid upgrading. Two contractors were selected to use alternative processes for upgrading the L-R heavy tar: Lummus-Crest, Inc. (RP2505-5), using its LC-fining technology, and Veba Oel (RP2505-6), using its Combi-Cracking process. (The Combi-Cracking process also simultaneously hydrotreats the coal-tar-derived distillates.) Universal Oil Products, Inc. (UOP) was selected to hydrotreat the light and middle oils from the L-R process (RP2505-7), as well as the distillable material produced by Lummus. Unfortunately, none of these contractors received the anticipated products. The light oil was in the form of a light oil-water emulsion and the middle oil had been blended with the solids-laden heavy oil during L-R operation. Combustion Engineering, Inc. carried out a two-phase program to evaluate the combustion characteristics of pyrolysis char (RP2505-4).

McKinsey, R.; Luebke, C.P.; Thelen, H.J.; ya Nsakala, N.; Riegel, H.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

306

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Utilization of pyrolysis oil in industrial scale boilers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of pyrolysis oil in a large-scale combustion system is investigated to determine the feasibility of displacing fuel oil or natural gas in current… (more)

Redfern, Kyle D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Coke resistant coating technology for applications in ethylene pyrolysis heaters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation begins with a description of the history of the events leading to ethylene pyrolysis tube failure. During service, hydrocarbons pass through the… (more)

Chauhan, Alok Pratap Singh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 9. Biomass-Fired Electricity Generation ...

310

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 3. Biomass Resources by Price: Quantities ...

311

Biomass Cofiring Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook has been prepared as a 147how tomanual for those interested in biomass cofiring in cyclone- or pulverized-coal-fired boilers. It contains information regarding all aspects of biomass cofiring, including biomass materials and procurement, handling, storage, pulverizing, feeding, gaseous emissions, ash handling, and general economics. It relies on actual utility experience over the past many years from plants mainly in the United States, but some experience also in Europe and Australia. Many ...

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Engine fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

Methods discussed for the conversion of biomass to engine fuels include the production of producer gas, anaerobic fermentation to give biogas, fermentation of sugars and starches to give EtOH, and the production of synthesis gas for conversion to MeOH or hydrocarbons. Also discussed are the suitability of these fuels for particular engines, biomass availability, and the economics of biomass-derived engine fuels.

Parker, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Biomass Gasification Syngas Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published report 1023994, Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Gasification, prepared by CH2M HILL Engineers, Inc. (CH2M HILL). It provided a global overview of commercially available biomass gasification technologies that can be used for power production in the 25- to 50-MWe range. The report provided detailed descriptions of biomass gasification technologies, typical operational parameters, emissions information, and ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Biomass Cofiring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, primarily wood waste such as sawdust, has been cofired in over twenty utility coal-fired boilers in the United States at cofiring levels where the biomass provides from 1% to 10% of the heat input to the boiler. These guidelines present insights and conclusions from five years of EPRI assessment and testing of biomass cofiring and will enable utility engineers and power plant managers to evaluate their own options and plan their own tests.

1997-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

Advanced Biomass Gasification Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has a major initiative under way to demonstrate two high-efficiency gasification systems for converting biomass into electricity. As this fact sheet explains, the Biomass Power Program is cost-sharing two scale-up projects with industry in Hawaii and Vermont that, if successful, will provide substantial market pull for U.S. biomass technologies, and provide a significant market edge over competing foreign technologies.

Not Available

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Biomass Gasification Technology Commercialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable cost and performance data on biomass gasification technology is scarce because of limited experience with utility-scale gasification projects and the reluctance of vendors to share proprietary information. The lack of this information is a major obstacle to the implementation of biomass gasification-based power projects in the U.S. market. To address this problem, this report presents four case studies for bioenergy projects involving biomass gasification technologies: A utility-scale indirect c...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hydrogen production from biomass .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an… (more)

Hahn, John J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Co-firing biomass  

SciTech Connect

Concern about global warming has altered the landscape for fossil-fuel combustion. The advantages and challenges of co-firing biomass and coal are discussed. 2 photos.

Hunt, T.; Tennant, D. [Hunt, Guillot & Associates LLC (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Biomass Processing Photolibrary  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Research related to bioenergy is a major focus in the U.S. as science agencies, universities, and commercial labs seek to create new energy-efficient fuels. The Biomass Processing Project is one of the funded projects of the joint USDA-DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative. The Biomass Processing Photolibrary has numerous images, but there are no accompanying abstracts to explain what you are seeing. The project website, however, makes available the full text of presentations and publications and also includes an exhaustive biomass glossary that is being developed into an ASAE Standard.

320

Experimental investigation and systems modeling of fractional catalytic pyrolysis of pine .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The fractional catalytic pyrolysis of pine was studied both experimentally and through models. A preliminary stage economic analysis was conducted for a wood chip pyrolysis… (more)

Goteti, Anil Chaitanya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Pyrolysis behavior of coal and petroleum coke at high temperature and high pressure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??While pyrolysis of coal is a well-studied thermal process, little is known about pressurized pyrolysis of coal and petroleum coke. This study aims to interpret… (more)

Wagner, David Ray

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 1, Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed an initial investigation of the effects of physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstocks relative to their performance in biomass energy conversion systems. Both biochemical conversion routes (anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation) and thermochemical routes (combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification) were included in the study. Related processes including chemical and physical pretreatment to improve digestibility, and size and density modification processes such as milling and pelletizing were also examined. This overview report provides background and discussion of feedstock and conversion relationships, along with recommendations for future research. The recommendations include (1) coordinate production and conversion research programs; (2) quantify the relationship between feedstock properties and conversion priorities; (3) develop a common framework for evaluating and characterizing biomass feedstocks; (4) include conversion effects as part of the criteria for selecting feedstock breeding programs; and (5) continue emphasis on multiple feedstock/conversion options for biomass energy systems. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Florida Biomass Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Biomass Energy, LLC Place Florida Sector Biomass Product Florida-based biomass project developer. References Florida Biomass Energy, LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

324

Graphitized Conductive Carbon Coatings for Composite Electrodes ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... The fast plasma discharge and subsequent rapid pyrolysis of an organic precursor result in a uniform coating of ...

325

4th International Conference on Biofuels Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Overview of USDA Biomass Programs and Activities Harry Baumes, US Department of ... Development Related to Fuel Use of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil ...

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

NEUTRON SCATTERING STUDIES OF THE STRUCTURE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fast pyrolysis is one process that can be used to convert woody biomass into fuels and chemicals, however the liquid product created is an ...

327

Determining the Effect of Concerted Elimination Reactions in the Pyrolysis of Lignin Using Model Compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin pyrolysis is a significant impediment in forming liquid fuel from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at a higher temperature than other biomass components (ie cellulose, hemicellulose) and tends to form radicals which lead to cross linking and ultimately char formation. A primary step in advances biomass-to-fuel technology will be to discover mechanisms that can disassemble lignin at lower temperatures and depolymerize lignin into more stable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin ({beta}-O4, {alpha}-O4, {beta}-{beta}, {beta}-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to the usually-assumed bond homolysis reactions, we have investigated a variety of concerted elimination pathways that will tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

Robichaud, D.; Clark, J.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY) .......................................................................... 91 Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass) ......................................................................................................................... 111 Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members, and Project Advisors

329

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY to treatment prescriptions and anticipated outputs of sawlogs and biomass fuel? How many individual operations biomass fuel removed. Typically in plantations. 50% No harvest treatment

330

biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biomass biomass Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

331

Pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse and co-pyrolysis with an Argentinean subbituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

Physicochemical properties of the charcoal arising from pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse at 600{sup o}C and 800{sup o}C were determined to evaluate potentialities for specific end uses. The charcoals were found fairly adequate as solid bio-fuels. Their quality was comparable to charcoals obtained from some other agro-industrial by-products, reportedly proposed as substitutes of wood-based ones. Surface properties of the charcoal generated at the higher temperature indicated that it is reasonably suited for potential use as low-cost rough adsorbent, soil amender, and/or for further upgrading to activated carbon. Moreover, kinetic measurements for pyrolysis of the sugarcane bagasse individually and mixed with an Argentinean subbituminous coal in equal proportions were conducted by thermogravimetry for the range 25 -900{sup o}C. Data modeling accounting for variations in the activation energy with process evolution provided a proper description of pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis over the entire temperature range.

Bonelli, P.R.; Buonomo, E.L.; Cukierman, A.L. [University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Biomass Torrefaction Process Review and Moving Bed Torrefaction System Model Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Torrefaction is currently developing as an important preprocessing step to improve the quality of biomass in terms of physical properties, and proximate and ultimate composition. Torrefaction is a slow heating of biomass in an inert or reduced environment to a maximum temperature of 300 C. Torrefaction can also be defined as a group of products resulting from the partially controlled and isothermal pyrolysis of biomass occurring in a temperature range of 200-230 C and 270-280 C. Thus, the process can also be called a mild pyrolysis as it occurs at the lower temperature range of the pyrolysis process. At the end of the torrefaction process, a solid uniform product with lower moisture content and higher energy content than raw biomass is produced. Most of the smoke-producing compounds and other volatiles are removed during torrefaction, producing a final product that will have a lower mass but a higher heating value. An important aspect of research is to establish a degree of torrefaction where gains in heating value offset the loss of mass. There is a lack of literature on torrefaction reactor designs and a design sheet for estimating the dimensions of the torrefier based on capacity. This study includes (a) conducting a detailed review on the torrefaction of biomass in terms of understanding the process, product properties, off-gas compositions, and methods used, and (b) to design a moving bed torrefier, taking into account the basic fundamental heat and mass transfer calculations. Specific objectives include calculating the dimensions like diameter and height of the moving packed bed for different capacities, designing the heat loads and gas flow rates, and developing an interactive excel sheet where the user can define design specifications. In this report, 25-1000 kg/hr are used in equations for the design of the torrefier, examples of calculations, and specifications for the torrefier.

Jaya Shakar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Richard D. Boardman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Biomass Torrefaction Process Review and Moving Bed Torrefaction System Model Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Torrefaction is currently developing as an important preprocessing step to improve the quality of biomass in terms of physical properties, and proximate and ultimate composition. Torrefaction is a slow heating of biomass in an inert or reduced environment to a maximum temperature of 300°C. Torrefaction can also be defined as a group of products resulting from the partially controlled and isothermal pyrolysis of biomass occurring in a temperature range of 200–230ºC and 270–280ºC. Thus, the process can also be called a mild pyrolysis as it occurs at the lower temperature range of the pyrolysis process. At the end of the torrefaction process, a solid uniform product with lower moisture content and higher energy content than raw biomass is produced. Most of the smoke-producing compounds and other volatiles are removed during torrefaction, producing a final product that will have a lower mass but a higher heating value. An important aspect of research is to establish a degree of torrefaction where gains in heating value offset the loss of mass. There is a lack of literature on torrefaction reactor designs and a design sheet for estimating the dimensions of the torrefier based on capacity. This study includes a) conducting a detailed review on the torrefaction of biomass in terms of understanding the process, product properties, off-gas compositions, and methods used, and b) to design a moving bed torrefier, taking into account the basic fundamental heat and mass transfer calculations. Specific objectives include calculating the dimensions like diameter and height of the moving packed bed for different capacities, designing the heat loads and gas flow rates, and developing an interactive excel sheet where the user can define design specifications. In this report, 25–1000 kg/hr are used in equations for the design of the torrefier, examples of calculations, and specifications for the torrefier.

Jaya Shakar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a , Eric Blond1, b , Alain Gasser1 Forbach, France a damintode.kolani@univ-orleans.fr, b eric.blond@univ-orleans.fr Keywords: coal, drying: drying process and pyrolysis of coal. A heat and mass transfer model was developed to simulate the drying

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

335

Pyrolysis kinetics for western and eastern oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil yield and kinetic results are reviewed for Western (Colorado Mahogany zone) and Eastern (Sunbury and Ohio (Cleveland member)) oil shales for conditions ranging from those encountered in in-situ processing to those in fluidized-bed retorting. The authors briefly summarize kinetic models for the pyrolysis reactions. Oil yields from Eastern shale are much more sensitive to pyrolysis conditions than Western shale.

Burnham, A.K.; Coburn, T.T.; Richardson, J.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NREL: Biomass Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and green algae and gas bubbles can be seen floating in the liquid. Through biomass research, NREL is developing technologies to convert biomass-plant matter such as...

337

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY study. The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is exploring the ecological and economic consequences

338

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY Citation: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 2009. Biomass to Energy: Forest

339

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and continuously between the earth's biomass and atmosphere. From a greenhouse gas perspective, forest treatments

340

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY .................................................................................... 33 3.3 BIOMASS POWER PLANT OPERATION MODELS AND DATA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Multi-functional biomass systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass can play a role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions by substituting conventional materials and supplying biomass based fuels. Main reason for the low share… (more)

Dornburg, Veronika

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Baseline NO{sub x} emissions during combustion of wood-derived pyrolysis oils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NO{sub x} emissions from two pyrolysis oils of similar origin and overall composition but differing nitrogen contents (0.12 and 0.32% of dry fuel) are determined in a pilot-scale combustor. No NO{sub x} reduction technology is employed in these tests, establishing the baseline or uncontrolled levels of NO{sub x}. Measured effluent oxygen concentrations range from near 0% to near 21%, with stoichiometric ratios ranging from 0 to 1. NO and NO{sub x} are measured separately and found to differ by insignificant ({approx}10--25 ppmv) amounts. Other relevant gas species (CO{sub 2}, CO, total hydrocarbons, and O{sub 2}) are also reported. Peak NO{sub x} emissions from these fuels vary from about 300 to around 650 ppmv, with lower levels associated with low nitrogen content fuels. Trends with stoichiometric ratio and fuel nitrogen content agree qualitatively with behavior from other nitrogen containing fuels, including biomass, coal, and petroleum oils. Nitrogen conversion efficiencies as a function of stoichiometric and fuel nitrogen content are observed to decrease with increasing fuel nitrogen content and increase with increasing oxygen content. Measurements of thermal, prompt, and fuel NO{sub x} contributes indicate that fuel NO{sub x} is the dominant formation mechanism for these fuels. These data suggest that NO{sub x} formed during combustion of pyrolysis oil lends itself to many of the same control technologies as are used in other nitrogen-containing fuel.

Baxter, L.; Jenkins, B.; Winter, F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

Simoneit, B.R.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Coll. of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences; Abas, M.R. bin [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Cass, G.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Environmental Engineering Science Dept.; Rogge, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Florida International Univ., University Park, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Standley, L.J. [Academy of Natural Sciences, Avondale, PA (United States). Stroud Water Research Center; Hildemann, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Pyrolysis reactor and fluidized bed combustion chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid carbonaceous material is pyrolyzed in a descending flow pyrolysis reactor in the presence of a particulate source of heat to yield a particulate carbon containing solid residue. The particulate source of heat is obtained by educting with a gaseous source of oxygen the particulate carbon containing solid residue from a fluidized bed into a first combustion zone coupled to a second combustion zone. A source of oxygen is introduced into the second combustion zone to oxidize carbon monoxide formed in the first combustion zone to heat the solid residue to the temperature of the particulate source of heat.

Green, Norman W. (Upland, CA)

1981-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

OpenEI - biomass  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/827 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License: 

346

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

347

Computational Analysis of the Pyrolysis of ..beta..-O4 Lignin Model Compounds: Concerted vs. Homolytic Fragmentation  

SciTech Connect

The thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels is a very attractive technology for expanding the utilization of carbon neutral processes and reducing dependency on fossil fuel resources. As with all such emerging technologies, biomass conversion through gasification or pyrolysis has a number of obstacles that need to be overcome to make these processes cost competitive with the refining of fossil fuels. Our current efforts have focused on the investigation of the thermochemistry of the linkages between lignin units using ab initio calculations on dimeric lignin model compounds. All calculations were carried out using M062X density functional theory at the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The M062X method has been shown to be consistent with the CBS-QB3 method while being significantly less computationally expensive. To date we have only completed the study on the b-O4 compounds. The theoretical calculations performed in the study indicate that concerted elimination pathways dominate over bond homolysis reactions under typical pyrolysis conditions. However, this does not mean that concerted elimination will be the dominant loss process for lignin. Bimolecular radical chemistry could very well dwarf the unimolecular pathways investigated in this study. These concerted pathways tend to form stable, reasonably non-reactive products that would be more suited producing a fungible bio-oil for the production of liquid transportation fuels.

Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Copyrolysis of Seyitomer-lignite and safflower seed: influence of the blending ratio and pyrolysis temperature on product yields and oil characterization  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolytic behaviors of biomass/coal mixtures were investigated under a heating rate of 7{sup o}C min{sup -1}, over a range of pyrolysis temperatures between 400 and 700{sup o}C, and the blending ratio of coal in mixtures was varied between 0 and 100 wt %. The results indicated that considerable synergistic effects were observed during the copyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor leading to an increase in the oil yield at lower than coal blending ratios of 33%. At the lower blending coal ratio conditions, the oil yields are higher than the expected ones, calculated as the sum of oil fractions produced by pyrolysis of each separated component. The maximum pyrolysis oil yield of 39.5% was obtained with 5% of lignite mixed with safflower seed. The obtained oils are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis. These findings can potentially help to understand and predict the behavior of coal/biomass blends in practical liquefaction systems. 33 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Ozlem Onay; Evren Bayram; O. Mete Kockar [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Porsuk Vocational School

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

CLC of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developments on Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions Control Science & Technology Hangzhou, China May 28-30, 2008 Overview  Introduction  Technical approach  Experiments on chemical looping combustion of biomass  Conclusions Climate change is a result of burning too much coal, oil and gas.... We need to capture CO 2 in any way ! Introduction CCS is the world's best chance to have a major & immediate impact on CO 2 emission reduction Introduction Introduction  Biomass is renewable energy with zero CO 2 emission  A way to capture CO 2 from biomass ?  If so, a quick way to reduce CO 2 content in the atmosphere Normal combustion

350

Biomass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy » Energy » Biomass Biomass Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy. Featured Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel A behind-the-scenes video of how oil from algae is extracted and refined to create clean, renewable transportation fuel. Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain Hospital replaced one of its 1950s crude oil boilers with a wood-pellet boiler -- saving the hospital about $100,000 a year in heating costs. | Photo courtesy of the Oregon Department of Energy. Highlighting how a rural Oregon hospital was able to cut its heating bills while stimulating the local economy. Ceres: Making Biofuels Bigger and Better A Ceres researcher evaluates the performance of biofuel crops. | Photo courtesy of Ceres, Inc.

351

Energy Basics: Biomass Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from...

352

CLC of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions...

353

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

354

A Review on Biomass Torrefaction Process and Product Properties for Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Torrefaction of biomass can be described as a mild form of pyrolysis at temperatures typically ranging between 200 and 300 C in an inert and reduced environment. Common biomass reactions during torrefaction include devolatilization, depolymerization, and carbonization of hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose. Torrefaction process produces a brown to black solid uniform product and also condensable (water, organics, and lipids) and non condensable gases (CO2, CO, and CH4). Typically during torrefaction, 70% of the mass is retained as a solid product, containing 90% of the initial energy content, and 30% of the lost mass is converted into condensable and non-condensable products. The system's energy efficiency can be improved by reintroducing the material lost during torrefaction as a source of heat. Torrefaction of biomass improves its physical properties like grindability; particle shape, size, and distribution; pelletability; and proximate and ultimate composition like moisture, carbon and hydrogen content, and calorific value. Carbon and calorific value of torrefied biomass increases by 15-25%, and moisture content reduces to biomass has improved sphericity, particle surface area, and particle size distribution. Pelletization of torrefied biomass at temperatures of 225 C reduces specific energy consumption by two times and increases the capacity of the mill by two times. The loss of the OH group during torrefaction makes the material hydrophobic (loses the ability to attract water molecules) and more stable against chemical oxidation and microbial degradation. These improved properties make torrefied biomass particularly suitable for cofiring in power plants and as an upgraded feedstock for gasification.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Richard D. Boardman

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Flash hydrogenation of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to obtain process chemistry information on the rapid hydrogenation of biomass (wood and other agricultural products) to produce light liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and feedstocks. The process is referred to as Flash Hydropyrolysis. The information will be of use in the design and evaluation of processes for the conversion of biomass to synthetic fuels and petrochemical feedstocks. Results obtained in an initial experiment are discussed.

Steinberg, M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

Skelton, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

Zhang Xinghua [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 610540 (China); Wang Tiejun [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 610540 (China)], E-mail: wangtj@ms.giec.ac.cn; Ma Longlong; Chang Jie [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 610540 (China)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Method for preventing plugging in the pyrolysis of agglomerative coals  

SciTech Connect

To prevent plugging in a pyrolysis operation where an agglomerative coal in a nondeleteriously reactive carrier gas is injected as a turbulent jet from an opening into an elongate pyrolysis reactor, the coal is comminuted to a size where the particles under operating conditions will detackify prior to contact with internal reactor surfaces while a secondary flow of fluid is introduced along the peripheral inner surface of the reactor to prevent backflow of the coal particles. The pyrolysis operation is depicted by two equations which enable preselection of conditions which insure prevention of reactor plugging.

Green, Norman W. (Upland, CA)

1979-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Review on Biomass Torrefaction Process and Product Properties and Design of Moving Bed Torrefaction System Model Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Review on Torrefaction Process and Design of Moving Bed Torrefaction System for Biomass Processing Jaya Shankar Tumuluru1, Shahab Sokhansanj2 and Christopher T. Wright1 Idaho National Laboratory Biofuels and Renewable Energy Technologies Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Bioenergy Resource and Engineering Systems Group Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Abstract Torrefaction is currently developing as an important preprocessing step to improve the quality of biomass in terms of physical properties, and proximate and ultimate composition. Torrefaction is a slow heating of biomass in an inert or reduced environment to a maximum temperature of 300 C. Torrefaction can also be defined as a group of products resulting from the partially controlled and isothermal pyrolysis of biomass occurring in a temperature range of 200-230 C and 270-280 C. Thus, the process can also be called a mild pyrolysis as it occurs at the lower temperature range of the pyrolysis process. At the end of the torrefaction process, a solid uniform product with lower moisture content and higher energy content than raw biomass is produced. Most of the smoke-producing compounds and other volatiles are removed during torrefaction, which produces a final product that will have a lower mass but a higher heating value. There is a lack of literature on the design aspects of torrefaction reactor and a design sheet for estimating the dimensions of the torrefier based on capacity. This study includes (a) conducting a detailed review on the torrefaction of biomass in terms of understanding the process, product properties, off-gas compositions, and methods used, and (b) to design a moving bed torrefier, taking into account the basic fundamental heat and mass transfer calculations. Specific objectives include calculating the dimensions like diameter and height of the moving packed bed torrefier for different capacities ranging from 25-1000 kg/hr, designing the heat loads and gas flow rates, and developing an interactive excel sheet where the user can define design specifications.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright; Shahab Sokhansanj

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Indirectly heated fluidized bed biomass gasification using a latent heat ballast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to improve the heating value of gas produced during gasification of biomass fuels using an indirectly heated gasifier based on latent heat ballasting. The latent heat ballast consists of lithium fluoride salt encased in tubes suspended in the reactor. The lithium fluoride has a melting point that is near the desired gasification temperature. With the ballast a single reactor operating in a cyclic mode stores energy during a combustion phase and releases it during a pyrolysis phase. Tests were carried out in a fluidized bed reactor to evaluate the concept. The time to cool the reactor during the pyrolysis phase from 1,172 K (1,650 F) to 922 K (1,200 F) increased 102% by use of the ballast system. This extended pyrolysis time allowed 33% more biomass to be gasified during a cycle. Additionally, the total fuel fraction pyrolyzed to produce useful gas increased from 74--80%. Higher heating values of 14.2 to 16.6 MJ/Nm{sup 3} (382--445 Btu/scf) on a dry basis were obtained from the ballasted gasifier.

Pletka, R.; Brown, R.; Smeenk, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Center for Coal and the Environment

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dual bed reactor for the study of catalytic biomass tars conversion  

SciTech Connect

A dual fixed bed laboratory scale set up has been used to compare the activity of a novel Rh/LaCoO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst to that of dolomite, olivine and Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, typical catalysts used in fluidized bed biomass gasification, to convert tars produced during biomass devolatilization stage. The experimental apparatus allows the catalyst to be operated under controlled conditions of temperature and with a real gas mixture obtained by the pyrolysis of the biomass carried out in a separate fixed bed reactor operated under a selected and controlled heating up rate. The proposed catalyst exhibits much better performances than conventional catalysts tested. It is able to completely convert tars and also to strongly decrease coke formation due to its good redox properties. (author)

Ammendola, P.; Piriou, B.; Lisi, L.; Ruoppolo, G.; Chirone, R.; Russo, G. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyses the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step. 9 figs.

Shang, J.Y.; Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal  

SciTech Connect

The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyzes the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step.

Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA); Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

365

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reburn with animal waste yield NO{sub x} reduction of the order of 70-80%, which is much higher than those previously reported in the literature for natural gas, coal and agricultural biomass as reburn fuels. Further, the NO{sub x} reduction is almost independent of stoichiometry from stoichiometric to upto 10% deficient air in reburn zone. As a first step towards understanding the reburn process in a boiler burner, a simplified zero-dimensional model has been developed for estimating the NO{sub x} reduction in the reburn process using simulated animal waste based biomass volatiles. However the first model does not include the gradual heat up of reburn fuel particle, pyrolysis and char combustion. Hence there is a need for more rigorous treatment of the model with animal waste as reburn fuel. To address this issue, an improved zero-dimensional model is being developed which can handle any solid reburn fuel, along with more detailed heterogeneous char reactions and homogeneous global reactions. The model on ''NO{sub x} Reduction for Reburn Process using Feedlot Biomass,'' incorporates; (a) mixing between reburn fuel and main-burner gases, (b) gradual heat-up of reburn fuel accompanied by pyrolysis, oxidation of volatiles and char oxidation, (c) fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) pyrolysis, and FBN including both forward and backward reactions, (d) prediction of NO{sub x} as a function of time in the reburn zone, and (e) gas phase and solid phase temperature as a function of time. The fuel bound nitrogen is assumed to be released to the gas phase by two processes, (a) FBN evolution to N{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}, and (b) FBN oxidation to NO at the char surface. The formulation has been completed, code has been developed, and preliminary runs have been made to test the code. Note that, the current model does not incorporate the overfire air. The results of the simulation will be compared with the experimental results. During this quarter, three journal and four conference publications dealing with utilization of animal waste as fuel have been published. In addition a presentation was made to a utility company interested in the new reburn technology for NO{sub x} reduction.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Soyuz Priyadarsan (PhD)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Versatile and Biomass Synthesis of Iron-based Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Matrix with High Iron Content and Tunable Reactivity  

SciTech Connect

Iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon (FeNPs{at}C) have enormous potential for environmental applications. Reported is a biomass-based method for FeNP{at}C synthesis that involves pyrolysis of bleached wood fiber pre-mixed with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. This method allows synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles with tunable chemical reactivity by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The FeNP{at}C synthesized at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 C (FeNP{at}C-500) reacts violently (pyrophoric) when exposed to air, while FeNP{at}C prepared at 800 C (FeNP{at}C-800) remains stable in ambient condition for at least 3 months. The FeNPs in FeNP{at}C-800 are mostly below 50 nm in diameter and are surrounded by carbon. The immediate carbon layer (within 5-15 nm radius) on the FeNPs is graphitized. Proof-of-concept environmental applications of FeNPs{at}C-800 were demonstrated by Rhodamine 6G and arsenate (V) removal from water. This biomass-based method provides an effective way for iron-based nanoparticle fabrication and biomass utilization.

Zhang, Dongmao [ORNL; Shi, Sheldon Q [ORNL; Jiang, Dongping [Mississippi State University (MSU); Che, Wen [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gai, Zheng [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Arockiasamy, Antonyraj [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Two-stage dilute acid prehydrolysis of biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-stage dilute acid prehydrolysis process on xylan containing hemicellulose in biomass is effected by: treating feedstock of hemicellulosic material comprising xylan that is slow hydrolyzable and xylan that is fast hydrolyzable under predetermined low temperature conditions with a dilute acid for a residence time sufficient to hydrolyze the fast hydrolyzable xylan to xylose; removing said xylose from said fast hydrolyzable xylan and leaving a residue; and treating said residue having a slow hydrolyzable xylan with a dilute acid under predetermined high temperature conditions for a residence time required to hydrolyze said slow hydrolyzable xylan to xylose.

Grohmann, Karel (Winter Haven, FL); Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

Santini, Alessandro [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Passarini, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.passarini@unibo.it [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Vassura, Ivano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier [Department of Chemical and Energy Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Instituto IMDEA Energy, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Morselli, Luciano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

November 2011 Model documentation for biomass,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 November 2011 Model documentation for biomass, cellulosic biofuels, renewable of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;3 Contents Biomass.....................................................................................................................................................4 Variables in the biomass module

Noble, James S.

371

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in Estonia Biomass Utilisation of Local in Estonia in 1995 - 2002 Regional Energy Centres in Estonia http://www.managenergy.net/conference/biomass

372

Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name Florida Biomass Energy Consortium Place Florida Sector Biomass Product Association of biomass energy companies. References Florida...

373

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Haryana Biomass Power Ltd. Place Mumbai, Haryana, India Zip 400025 Sector Biomass Product This is a JV consortium between...

374

Algae Biomass Summit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biomass Summit Algae Biomass Summit September 30, 2013 12:00PM EDT to October 3, 2013 12:00PM EDT Algae Biomass Summit...

375

PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC-61 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.10093 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.hydrolytic pretreatment to biomass feedstocks, higher acid

Schaleger, Larry L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Category:Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass category. Pages in category "Biomass" This category contains only the following page. B Biomass Scenario Model Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCatego...

377

Tribal Renewable Energy Curriculum Foundational Course: Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Tribal Renewable Energy Curriculum Foundational Course: Biomass Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar on biomass renewable...

378

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels, LLC  UCSD Biomass to Power  Economic Feasibility Figure 1: West Biofuels Biomass Gasification to Power rates..……………………. ……31  UCSD Biomass to Power ? Feasibility 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiantou Biomass Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power Place Jinzhou, Hebei Province, China Zip 50000 Sector Biomass Product A company engages in...

380

Chowchilla Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chowchilla Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chowchilla Biomass Facility Facility Chowchilla Sector Biomass Owner London Economics Location Chowchilla, California...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Saugus Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid...

382

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

383

Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Structural and compositional transformations of biomass chars during combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an investigation of the physical and chemical transformations of biomass chars during combustion, we have subjected two chars, produced from the pyrolysis of pine and switchgrass, to combustion at 1600 K in a laminar flow reactor. In order to obtain time-resolved data on the structural and compositional transformations of the biomass chars, samples are extracted from the reactor at different residence times and subjected to a variety of analytical techniques: elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results point to several changes in both the organic and inorganic constitutents of the chars. The early stages of conversion are characterized by devolatilization, which leads to the removal of amorphous material and the release of oxygen- and hydrogen-rich gases. After devolatilization, combustion is accompanied by: vaporization of some metals (particularly Na and K), surface migration and coalescence of inorganic material, and the incorporation of metals (particularly Ca) into silicate structures. The latest stages of combustion reveal the transformation of inorganic constituents from amorphous phases to crystalline forms. Some short-range order appears in the carbon-rich portions of the chars as combustion proceeds, but the high levels of oxygen originally present in these chars foster cross-linking, which limits the extent of order ultimately attained. The transformations of the biomass chars are compared with those of coal chars, and the implications of these observations -- with respect to reactivity and ash behavior -- are discussed.

Wornat, M.J.; Hurt, R.H.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Headley, T.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A REVIEW ON BIOMASS DENSIFICATION TECHNOLOGIE FOR ENERGY APPLICATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world is currently facing challenges to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is finding more uses as it is considered carbon neutral since the carbondioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle (Arias et al., 2008). Increasing the utilization of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help to meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol (UN, 1998). Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes like thermochemical (combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation) or chemical (esterification) where direct combustion can provide a direct near-term energy solution (Arias et al., 2008). Some of the inherent problems with raw biomass materials, like low bulk density, high moisture content, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value, limit the ease of use of biomass for energy purposes (Arias et al., 2008). In fact, due to its low energy density compared to fossil fuels, high volumes of biomass will be needed; adding to problems associated with storage, transportation and feed handling at a cogeneration plant. Furthermore, grinding biomass pulverizes, can be very costly and in some cases impractical. All of these drawbacks have given rise to the development of new technologies in order to increase the quality of biomass fuels. The purpose of the work is mainly in four areas 1) Overview of the torrefaction process and to do a literature review on i) Physical properties of torrefied raw material and torrefaction gas composition. 2) Basic principles in design of packed bed i) Equations governing the flow of material in packed bed ii) Equations governing the flow of the gases in packed bed iii) Effect of physical properties of the raw materials on the packed bed design 3) Design of packed bed torrefier of different capacities. 4) Development of an excel sheet for calculation of length and diameter of the packed bed column based on the design considerations.

JAYA SHANKAR TUMULURU; CHRISTOPHER T. WRIGHT

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Facility APS Biomass I Sector Biomass Location Arizona Coordinates 34.0489281°, -111.0937311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0489281,"lon":-111.0937311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

387

Minimally refined biomass fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

Carl Bielenberg

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

390

Comparison of concepts for thermal biomass utilization, with the example of the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass and waste, which are the focus of the activities at the Thermal Power Engineering section of the TU Delft, are the most important renewable energies today. They will maintain their role in the future. There are different ways to convert biomass and waste to power and heat. The combustion of biomass can be considered state-of-the-art technology and plants ranging in capacity from a few kW up to several MW are available on the market. The selection of the combustion technology is dependent on the scale and the kind of biomass. Power can be produced by means of a steam turbine, which is attractive in units above 1 MW. Gasification, in contrast, is a technology that has yet to find a wide use. But, in combination with gas engines, gas turbines or fuel cells, gasification has the advantage of a high electrical efficiency. Direct co-combustion of biomass in coal-fired steam power plants is the most economic choice and it is widely applied in the Netherlands. By an additional pyrolysis or gasification step, it is possible to separately remove and utilize the ashes of coal and biomass, and expected operational problems, such as corrosion, can possibly be avoided. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Spliethoff, H. [Technical University, Delft (Netherlands). Thermal Power Engineering Section

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fast valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

Van Dyke, W.J.

1992-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fast valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

Van Dyke, William J. (Grafton, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Research into the pyrolysis of pure cellulose, lignin, and birch wood flour in the China Lake entrained-flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This experimental program used the China Lake entrained-flow pyrolysis reactor to briefly investigate the pyrolysis of pure cellulose, pure lignin, and birch wood flour. The study determined that the cellulose and wood flour do pyrolyze to produce primarily gaseous products containing significant amounts of ethylene and other useful hydrocarbons. During attempts to pyrolyze powdered lignin, the material melted and bubbled to block the reactor entrance. The pure cellulose and wood flour produced C/sub 2/ + yields of 12% to 14% by weight, which were less than yields from an organic feedstock derived from processed municipal trash. The char yields were 0.1% by weight from cellulose and 1.5% from birch wood flour - one to two orders of magnitude less than were produced from the trash-derived feedstock. In scanning electron microscope photographs, most of the wood flour char had a sintered and agglomerated appearance, although some particles retained the gross cell characteristics of the wood flour. The appearance of the char particles indicated that the material had once been molten and possibly vapor before it formed spheroidal particles about 1 ..mu..m diameter which agglomerated to form larger char particles. The ability to completely melt or vaporize lignocellulosic materials under conditions of high heating rates has now been demonstrated in a continuous flow reactor and promises new techniques for fast pyrolysis. This char was unexpectedly attracted by a magnet, presumably because of iron contamination from the pyrolysis reactor tube wall. The production of water-insoluble tars was negligible compared to the tars produced from trash-derived feedstock. The production of water-soluble organic materials was fairly low and qualitatively appeared to vary inversely with temperature. This study was of a preliminary nature and additional studies are necessary to optimize ethylene production from these feedstocks.

Diebold, J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Biomass Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technologies August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic...

395

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and dead vegetative material that have been removed from the landscape (either sent as biomass to the power

396

ENERGY FROM BIOMASS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated- gasifier steam-injected gasturbine (BIGISTIG) cogenerationsystemsis carried out here. A detailed!l!ledin a companionpaperprepared for this conference. 781 #12;BIOMASS-GASIFIER ~.INJECTED GAS TURBINE COGENERA110N FOR THE CANE). Biomassintegrated-gasifier/steam-injectedgas-turbine (BIG/STIG) cogenerationtechnologyand prospectsfor its use

397

3, 503539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OSD 3, 503­539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs G. Crispi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions for biomass assimilation G. Crispi, M. Pacciaroni, and D. Viezzoli Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Correspondence to: G. Crispi (gcrispi@ogs.trieste.it) 503 #12;OSD 3, 503­539, 2006 Biomass OSSEs G. Crispi et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

5, 21032130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 5, 2103­2130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal J. Sch¨ongart et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction dynamics in aboveground coarse wood biomass of wetland forests in the northern Pantanal, Brazil J. Sch of the European Geosciences Union. 2103 #12;BGD 5, 2103­2130, 2008 Biomass Pantanal J. Sch¨ongart et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

5, 27912831, 2005 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction measurements of trace gas and aerosol particle emissions from biomass burning in Amazonia P. Guyon1 , G. Frank1. 2791 #12;ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

400

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY not substantively affect the findings or recommendations of the study. 2. Introduction The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is developing a comprehensive forest biomass-to- electricity model to identify and analyze

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;5-2 #12;APPENDIX 5: BIOMASS TO ENERGY PROJECT:WILDLIFE HABITAT EVALUATION 1. Authors: Patricia Manley Ross management scenarios. We evaluated the potential effects of biomass removal scenarios on biological diversity

402

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY as a result of emerging biomass opportunities on private industrial and public multiple-use lands (tracked in the vegetation domain) and the quantity of biomass consumed by the wildfire (tracked

403

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;12-2 #12;Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members and Project Advisors Research Team. Nechodom's background is in biomass energy policy development and public policy research. Peter Stine

404

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;10-2 #12;Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass to Renewable Fuels and Electricity 1. Report to the Biomass to Energy Project (B2E) Principal Authors: Dennis Schuetzle, TSS

405

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;6-2 #12;APPENDIX 6: Cumulative Watershed Effects Analysis for the Biomass to Energy Project 1. Principal the findings or recommendations of the study. Cumulative watershed effects (CWE) of the Biomass to Energy (B2E

406

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY or recommendations of the study. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Domain Description The study area for the Biomass to Energy (B2 and environmental costs and benefits of using forest biomass to generate electrical power while changing fire

407

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

408

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

410

6, 60816124, 2006 Modeling biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 6081­6124, 2006 Modeling biomass smoke injection into the LS (part II) G. Luderer et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Modeling of biomass smoke injection into the lower stratosphere by a large Correspondence to: G. Luderer (gunnar@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 6081 #12;ACPD 6, 6081­6124, 2006 Modeling biomass smoke

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

Abundance,Biomass, and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abundance,Biomass, and Production Daniel B.Hayes,James R.Bence,Thomas J.Kwak, and Bradley E, the proportion of fish present that are #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 329 detected (i.e., sightability; available at http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/distance/). #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 331 Box 8

Kwak, Thomas J.

412

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels...

413

Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biofuels produced from biomass provide a promising alternative to fossil fuels. Biomass is an inexpensive, readily available and renewable resource.

414

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Biomass Guidelines (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned...

415

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests February 2012 #12;This Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests study was conducted by the Biomass Energy Resource Center Biomass Energy Resource Center Kamalesh Doshi Biomass Energy Resource Center Hillary Emick Biomass Energy

416

Analysis of photographic records of coal pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Bituminous coals upon heating undergo melting and pyrolytic decomposition with significant parts of the coal forming an unstable liquid that can escape from the coal by evaporation. The transient liquid within the pyrolyzing coal causes softening or plastic behavior that can influence the chemistry and physics of the process. Bubbles of volatiles can swell the softened coal mass in turn affecting the combustion behavior of the coal particles. The swelling behavior of individual coal particles has to be taken into account both as the layout as well as for the operation of pyrolysis, coking and performance of coal-fired boilers. Increased heating rates generally increase the amount of swelling although it is also known that in some cases, even highly swelling coals can be transformed into char with no swelling if they are heated slowly enough. The swelling characteristics of individual coal particles have been investigated by a number of workers employing various heating systems ranging from drop tube and shock tube furnaces, flow rate reactors and electrical heating coils. Different methods have also been employed to determine the swelling factors. The following sections summarize some of the published literature on the subject and outline the direction in which the method of analysis will be further extended in the study of the swelling characteristics of hvA bituminous coal particles that have been pyrolyzed with a laser beam.

Dodoo, J.N.D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

418

Flash pyrolysis of oil shale with various gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flash pyrolysis of Colorado Oil Shale with methane at a temperature of 800/sup 0/C and pressure of 500 psi appears to give the highest yield of hydrocarbon gas and liquid followed by hydrogen and lowest with helium. In the methane pyrolysis over 54.5% of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to ethylene and benzene. The flash pyrolysis with hydrogen (flash hydropyrolysis) of the oil shale at increasing temperatures showed a rapidly increasing amount of methane formed and a decrease in ethane formation, while the BTX (benzene mainly) yield remained at approximately 10%. At 950/sup 0/C and 500 psi almost all (97.0%) of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Experiments with a mixture of a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal and oil shale under flash hydropyrolysis and methane pyrolysis conditions indicated higher yields of methane and ethylene and slightly lower yields of benzene than predicted by partial additive calculations. These exploratory experiments appear to be of sufficient interest to warrant a fuller investigation of the interaction of the natural resources, oil shale, coal and natural gas under flash pyrolysis conditions.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENT WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~. ~. ~. ~. Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . Coal and Solventon Subbiturninous Coal Below Pyrolysis Temperatures, LBL-Treatment of Extract Solution Coal Residue Treatment. Yield

Lindsey, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Definition: Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Biomass Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. It most often refers to plants or plant-derived materials which are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass. As a renewable energy source, biomass can either be used directly via combustion to produce heat, or indirectly after converting it to various forms of biofuel. Conversion of biomass to biofuel can be achieved by different methods which are broadly classified into: thermal, chemical, and biochemical methods. Historically, humans have harnessed biomass-derived

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

422

Clean fractionation of biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process. This project is designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. Clean fractionation separates a single feedstock into individual components cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Catalyzed gasification of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalyzed biomass gasification studies are being conducted by Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Investigations are being carried out concurrently at the bench and process development unit scales. These studies are designed to test the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from biomass by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of specific catalysts. The program is directed at controlling the gasification reaction through the use of specific catalytic agents to produce desired products including synthetic natural gas, ammonia synthesis gas (H/sub 2//N/sub 2/), hydrogen, or syn gas (H/sub 2//CO). Such gaseous products are currently produced in tonnage quantities from non-renewable carbonaceous resources, e.g., natural gas and petroleum. The production of high yields of these specified gases from biomass is accomplished through optimization of gasification conditions and proper choice of catalytic agents. For instance, high yields of synthetic natural gas can be attained through gasification with steam in the presence of gasification catalyst such as trona (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ . NaHCO/sub 3/ . 2H/sub 2/O) and a nickel methanation catalyst. The gasification catalyst enhances the steam-biomass reaction while the methanation catalyst converts gaseous intermediates from this reaction to methane, the most thermodynamically stable hydrocarbon product. This direct conversion to synthetic natural gas represents a significant advancement in the classical approach of producing synthetic natural gas from carbonaceous substrates through several unit operations. A status report, which includes experimental data and results of the program is presented.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.; Mudge, L.K.; Mitchell, D.H.; Cox, J.L.

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

424

Waste tyre pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor under vacuum conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of scrap tires has been studied at 425 and 500°C and three pressure levels, atmospheric one 0.5 and 0.25 atm. The experimental runs have been carried out in a pilot plant conical spouted bed reactor provided with a system for continuous ... Keywords: carbon black, conical spouted bed reactor, tire pyrolysis, vacuum pyrolysis

Gartzen Lopez; Maider Amutio; Gorka Elordi; Maite Artetxe; Aitziber Erkiaga; Astrid Barona; Martin Olazar

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Biomass resource potential using energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

General model of oil shale pyrolysis. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mathematical model for pyrolysis of Green River oil shale is developed from previous experiments on oil, water, and gas evolution and oil cracking over a wide range of pyrolysis conditions. Reactions included are evolution of 5 gas species, oil, and water from kerogen, clay dehydration, oil coking and cracking, and evolution of H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ from char. Oil is treated in eleven boiling point fractions in order to treat the competition between oil coking and evaporation, and to evalute the effect of oil cracking on the boiling point distribution of the oil. The kinetics and product yields calculated by the model are compared to experimental results for pyrolysis conditions ranging from isothermal fluid-bed to high-pressure slow-heating-rate retorting.

Burnham, A.K.; Braun, R.L.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions  

SciTech Connect

The freezing point of JP-5, the Navy jet fuel, has been related to the n-alkane content, specifically n-hexadecane. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest n-alkanes. The formation of n-alkanes in the jet fuel distillation range can be explained if large n-alkanes are present in the crude oil source. Quantities of large n-alkanes are insufficient, however, to explain the amounts found - up to 37% n-alkanes in the jet fuel range. Other possible precursors to small straight chain molecules are substituted cyclic compounds. Attack in the side chain obviously afford a path to an n-alkane. Aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, acids, amines, and ethers also have the potential to form n-alkanes if an unbranched alkyl chain is present in the molecule. Investigations showed that the best yield of the JP-5 cut comes at different times for the various fractions, but a time in the 60 to 120 min range would appear to be the optimum time for good yield at 450/sup 0/C. The longer time would be preferred with respect to lower potential n-alkane yield. None of the fractions gave n-alkane yields approaching the 37% amount found in the Shale-I JP-5. A temperature different than the 450/sup 0/C used here might affect the conversion percentage. Further the combined saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions may interact under pyrolysis conditions to give higher potential n-alkane yields than the fractions stressed independently.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.; Vetter, T.; Sonntag, R.; Moniz, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility Facility Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Sector Biomass Location Lewis County, New York Coordinates 43.840112°, -75.4344727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.840112,"lon":-75.4344727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

Biomass One LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP Biomass Facility LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass One LP Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One LP Sector Biomass Location Jackson County, Oregon Coordinates 42.334535°, -122.7646577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.334535,"lon":-122.7646577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass & Biomass Model Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an innovative, modern, and effective destruction process for the treatment of organic compounds. Hydrogen production using SCWG of biomass or… (more)

Youssef, Emhemmed A.E.A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Potential of biomass conversion in meeting the energy needs of the rural populations of developing countries: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment is presented of the contribution that biomass conversion could make in the context of the rural areas of six developing countries: India, Indonesia, Peru, Sudan, Tanzania, and Thailand. The technologies selected for analysis are: anaerobic digestion of wet biomass to produce methane and pyrolysis of dry biomass to produce charcoal, liquid fuels, and low-Btu gases. Preliminary estimates are made of the amounts of fuels that could be produced in each of the selected countries by a combination of these technologies. It was found that, with the exception of India, implementation of these technologies could potentially meet the future energy needs of their rural populations for both subsistence and development. (MHR)

Mubayi, V.; Lee, J.; Chatterjee, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

State and Regional Biomass Partnerships  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Co-reforming Biomass Pyrolysis Liquids and Natural Gas,pathways, biomass gasification/pyrolysis, and fossil fuelsto be possible. Pyrolysis of biomass, another production

Lipman, Timothy; Kammen, Daniel; Ogden, Joan; Sperling, Dan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon by biasing biomass pyrolysis practices to yield highof liquefaction and pyrolysis reactions of biomass. Energ.soot ? aromatics PYROLYSIS biomass lignin ? ? ? ? ? guaiacyl

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactor for the Study of Biomass Pyrolysis Chemistry at Highmineral matter on biomass pyrolysis characteristics. Fuel,Puigjaner, Kinetics of Biomass Pyrolysis: ? a Reformulated

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Biomass power for rural development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a proven option for electricity generation. A diverse range of biopower producers includes electric utilities, independent power producers, and the pulp and paper industry. To help expand opportunities for biomass power production, the U.S. Department of Energy established the Biopower Program and is sponsoring efforts to increase the productivity of dedicated energy crops. The Program aims to double biomass conversion efficiencies, thus reducing biomass power generation costs. These efforts will promote industrial and agricultural growth, improve the environment, create jobs, increase U.S. energy security, and provide new export markets.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

438

Biomass Engineering Prize Competition Announced  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 7/30/2010 12:00:00 AM... The DownEast 2010 Biomass Engineering Prize Competition is seeking innovative solutions focused on revitalizing an ...

439

Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Steelmaking. Author(s), Shiju Thomas, Paul Cha, Steven J McKnight, Vincent A Bouma, Andrew L Petrik,

440

Biomass Databook ed4.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy Data Book Center for Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 For more information please contact: Stacy Davis (865) 946-1256...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NREL: Biomass Research - Daniel Inman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

us to examine the feasibility of alternative process configurations. Learn more about Biomass Technology Analysis at NREL. System Dynamics I am also interested in dynamic modeling...

442

Pyrolysis kinetics of scrap tire rubbers. 1: Using DTG and TGA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tire pyrolysis kinetics was investigated to explore an economically viable design for the pyrolysis process. Derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were found to provide valuable information on pyrolysis kinetics and mechanisms of a heterogeneous compound like scrap tire rubbers. Kinetic parameters of each compositional compound were obtained by analyzing DTG and TGA results with a series of mathematical methods proposed in this study. The pyrolysis kinetics of the scrap tire rubbers tested was well accounted for by the first-order irreversible independent reactions of three compositional compounds. The sidewall and tread rubber exhibited different thermal degradation patterns, suggesting a compositional difference between them. Isothermal pyrolysis results showed that the sidewall rubber would hardly be degraded at low temperature regions (=}746 K). Because of the shorter pyrolysis time, the higher isothermal pyrolysis temperature appeared to be more economically favorable.

Kim, S.; Park, J.K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Chun, H.D. [Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

System and process for biomass treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce biomass energy resource through estimations of future biomass use for liquid fuels and electricity. Title Biomass...

445

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for energy and materials Local technologies - in a global perspective Erik Steen Jensen Bioenergy and biomass Biosystems Department Risø National Laboratory Denmark #12;Biomass - a local resource, slaughterhouse waste. #12;Biomass characteristics · Biomass is a storable energy carrier, unlike electricity

446

PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arc pyrolysis of methane at supersonic conditions, representative of conditions in the reformer is then reformed or cracked to produce hydrogen. The hy- drocarbon of choice is methane because of its highest material instead of as a fuel. Amongst various hydrogen production technologies,7 steam reformation

Texas at Arlington, University of

447

Ultimate Disposal of Wastes by Pyrolysis and Incineration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fan into the stack to atmosphere. The system incorporates the latest available designs in combustion This paper describes a new disposal facility designed to reduce thermally, without causing pollution, liq authorized the design and construction of a facility to reduce liquid/fluid industrial wastes by pyrolysis

Columbia University

448

Catalytic pyrolysis of xylan-based hemicellulose over zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Xylan was selected as model compound of hemicellulose to investigate its thermal behavior over zeolites by using TG-FTIR. The chemical structure of xylan and characterization of catalysts were first studied. All the three catalysts, HZSM-5, H-? ... Keywords: TG-FTIR, acids, catalytic pyrolysis, furans, hemicellulose, xylan, zeolites

Xiujuan Guo; Shurong Wang; Yan Zhou; Zhongynag Luo

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Flash pyrolysis and gasification of coal through laser heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results obtained from the rapid pyrolysis of finely powdered coal are presented. The experiments are designed to provide basic information on gas yield, gas composition, optimum fluxes, and temperature history of coal samples under high intensity laser radiation. The information obtained from these experiments will be used to test concepts for the use of concentrated sunlight to produce fuel gases from coal. Heating the coal at rates of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ C/s in an inert atmosphere of argon results in pyrolysis at temperatures between 400 and 800/sup 0/C. The gases evolved are primarily CO, H/sub 2/, and CH/sub 4/ with lesser amounts of CO/sub 2/ and other light hydrocarbons. Mass spectrometry is used to determine the composition of the evolved gases. The optimum flux for laser pyrolysis of coal was found to be 250 W/cm/sup 2/. Results from experiments wherein the char created by pyrolysis is gasified to CO in an atmosphere of CO/sub 2/ are also presented.

Beattie, W.H.; Sullivan, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A Review on Biomass Torrefaction Process and Product Properties for Energy Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Torrefaction of biomass can be described as a mild form of pyrolysis at temperatures typically ranging between 200 and 300 C in an inert and reduced environment. Common biomass reactions during torrefaction include devolatilization, depolymerization, and carbonization of hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose. Torrefaction process produces a brown to black solid uniform product and also condensable (water, organics, and lipids) and non condensable gases (CO2, CO, and CH4). Typically during torrefaction, 70% of the mass is retained as a solid product, containing 90% of the initial energy content, and 30% of the lost mass is converted into condensable and non-condensable products. The system's energy efficiency can be improved by reintroducing the material lost during torrefaction as a source of heat. Torrefaction of biomass improves its physical properties like grindability; particle shape, size, and distribution; pelletability; and proximate and ultimate composition like moisture, carbon and hydrogen content, and calorific value. Carbon and calorific value of torrefied biomass increases by 15-25%, and moisture content reduces to <3% (w.b.). Torrefaction reduces grinding energy by about 70%, and the ground torrefied biomass has improved sphericity, particle surface area, and particle size distribution. Pelletization of torrefied biomass at temperatures of 225 C reduces specific energy consumption by two times and increases the capacity of the mill by two times. The loss of the OH group during torrefaction makes the material hydrophobic (loses the ability to attract water molecules) and more stable against chemical oxidation and microbial degradation. These improved properties make torrefied biomass particularly suitable for cofiring in power plants and as an upgraded feedstock for gasification.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Richard D. Boardman

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

452

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are proposed activities for quarter 3 (12/15/00-3/14/01): (1) Conduct TGA and fuel characterization studies - Task 1; (2) Continue to perform re-burn experiments. - Task 2; (3) Design fixed bed combustor. - Task 3; and (4) Modify the PCGC2 code to include moisture evaporation model - Task 4. The following were achieved During Quarter 3 (12/15/0-3/14/01): (1) Conducted TGA and Fuel Characterization studies (Appendix I). A comparison of -fuel properties, TGA traces etc is given in Appendix I. Litter has 3 and 6 times more N compared to coal on mass and heat basis. The P of litter is almost 2 % (Task 1). Both litter biomass (LB) and feedlot biomass (FB) have been pulverized. The size distributions are similar for both litter and FB in that 75 % pass through 150 {micro}m sieve while for coal 75 % pass through 60 {micro}m sieve. Rosin Rammler curve parameters are given. The TGA characteristics of FB and LB are similar and pyrolysis starts at 100 C below that of coal; (2) Reburn experiments with litter and with FB have been performed (Appendix II) -Task 2. Litter is almost twice effective (almost 70--90 % reduction) compared to coal in reducing the NOx possibly due to presence of N in the form of NH{sub 3}; (3) Designed fixed bed gasifier/combustor (Appendix III) - Task 3; and (4) Modified PCGC2 to include moisture evaporation model in coal and biomass particles. (Appendix IV) - Task 4.

Dr. Kalyan Annamalai; Dr. John Sweeten; Dr. Sayeed Mukhtar

2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

453

Process for concentrated biomass saccharification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

OUT Success Stories: Biomass Gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world's first demonstration of an efficient, low-pressure biomass gasifier capable of producing a high-quality fuel is now operating in Vermont. The gasifier converts 200 tons of solid biomass per day into a clean-burning gas with a high energy content for electricity generation.

Jones, J.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

456

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

457

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS APRIL BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES FORWASHINGTON corrpletsformalreview,editorialamtrd,ordetailedediting. APRIL 1990 BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES rockfish (S.jordani). A biomass-based delay- difference model with knife-edge recruitment appeared

458

BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

icat ion Preheat zone Biomass liquefaction Tubular reactor (design is shown in Figure 7, C I Biomass ua efaction Fic LBL Process BiOMASS t NON-REVERS lNG CYCLONE CONDENSER (

Ergun, Sabri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Biomass Electricity in California Elizabeth K. Stoltzfus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Electricity in California Elizabeth K. Stoltzfus Energy and Resources Group University would also like to thank Bryan Jenkins and other members of the California Biomass Collaborative............................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Biomass Electricity in California Today

Kammen, Daniel M.

460

Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, Melvin (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard (Evergreen, CO); Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "biomass fast pyrolysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Biomass Webinar Text Version | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Webinar Text Version Biomass Webinar Text Version Dowload the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on biomass. DOE Office of Indian Energy...

462

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

 The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass.  The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

463

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with  greater  supply  of  biomass,  such  as  northern areas of  higher supply will enable biomass to be secured supply of feedstock is  key component in developing a viable biomass 

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z